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Wildlife Conservation in China: Preserving the Habitat of China's Wild West (East Gate Books): Preserving the Habitat of China's Wild West (East Gate Books)

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Very little is known about the issue of wildlife conservation within China. Even China specialists get a meager ration of stories about pandas giving birth in zoos, or poachers in some remote setting being apprehended. But what does the future hold for China's wildlife? In this thoughtful work the leading U.S. expert on wildlife projects in Western China presents a multi-f Very little is known about the issue of wildlife conservation within China. Even China specialists get a meager ration of stories about pandas giving birth in zoos, or poachers in some remote setting being apprehended. But what does the future hold for China's wildlife? In this thoughtful work the leading U.S. expert on wildlife projects in Western China presents a multi-faceted assessment of the topic. Richard B. Harris draws on twenty years of experience working in China, and incorporates perspectives ranging from biology through Chinese history and tradition, to interpret wildlife conservation issues in a cultural context. In non-technical language, Harris shows that, particularly in its vast western sections where most species of wildlife still have a chance to survive, China has adopted a strongly preservationist, "hands-off" approach to wildlife without confronting the larger and more difficult problem of habitat loss. This policy treats wildlife conservation as a strictly technical problem - and thus prioritizes captive breeding to meet the demand for animal products - while ignoring the manifold cultural, social, and economic dimensions that truly dictate how wild animals will fare in their interaction with the physical and human environments. The author concludes that any successes this policy achieves will be temporary.


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Very little is known about the issue of wildlife conservation within China. Even China specialists get a meager ration of stories about pandas giving birth in zoos, or poachers in some remote setting being apprehended. But what does the future hold for China's wildlife? In this thoughtful work the leading U.S. expert on wildlife projects in Western China presents a multi-f Very little is known about the issue of wildlife conservation within China. Even China specialists get a meager ration of stories about pandas giving birth in zoos, or poachers in some remote setting being apprehended. But what does the future hold for China's wildlife? In this thoughtful work the leading U.S. expert on wildlife projects in Western China presents a multi-faceted assessment of the topic. Richard B. Harris draws on twenty years of experience working in China, and incorporates perspectives ranging from biology through Chinese history and tradition, to interpret wildlife conservation issues in a cultural context. In non-technical language, Harris shows that, particularly in its vast western sections where most species of wildlife still have a chance to survive, China has adopted a strongly preservationist, "hands-off" approach to wildlife without confronting the larger and more difficult problem of habitat loss. This policy treats wildlife conservation as a strictly technical problem - and thus prioritizes captive breeding to meet the demand for animal products - while ignoring the manifold cultural, social, and economic dimensions that truly dictate how wild animals will fare in their interaction with the physical and human environments. The author concludes that any successes this policy achieves will be temporary.

15 review for Wildlife Conservation in China: Preserving the Habitat of China's Wild West (East Gate Books): Preserving the Habitat of China's Wild West (East Gate Books)

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    The only authoritative overview of the subject matter. It covers a lot of different issues--the situation of wildlife in a few reserves over three decades, management practices and the laws and policies governing them, and how people in China think about nature. Harris (following in the footsteps of Mark Elvin in The Retreat of the Elephants) makes a welcome challenge to the usual ways people almost automatically assume Chinese culture makes people love nature, forcing us to face directly the co The only authoritative overview of the subject matter. It covers a lot of different issues--the situation of wildlife in a few reserves over three decades, management practices and the laws and policies governing them, and how people in China think about nature. Harris (following in the footsteps of Mark Elvin in The Retreat of the Elephants) makes a welcome challenge to the usual ways people almost automatically assume Chinese culture makes people love nature, forcing us to face directly the complicated issues arising in a country that at once sees people and nature as connected but in which most people are alienated from nature and see resources in a very utilitarian manner. If you're interested in conservation in China, this is a must-read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jared

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leon Lee

  4. 5 out of 5

    Seam Ic

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Schmidt

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tingting

  8. 5 out of 5

    Seleno

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tom Broughton

  11. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  12. 4 out of 5

    N M

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicki Hazelett

  14. 4 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hereisfourpm

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