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Drawing from his own pastoral experience as a priest and bishop before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla has produced a remarkably eloquent and resourceful defense of Catholic tradition in the sphere of family life and sexual morality. He writes in the conviction that science--biology, psychology, sociology--can provide valuable information on particular aspects o Drawing from his own pastoral experience as a priest and bishop before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla has produced a remarkably eloquent and resourceful defense of Catholic tradition in the sphere of family life and sexual morality. He writes in the conviction that science--biology, psychology, sociology--can provide valuable information on particular aspects of relations between the sexes, but that a full understanding can be obtained only by study of the human person as a whole. Central to his argument is the contrast between the personalistic and the utilitarian views of marriage and of sexual relations. The former views marriage as an interpersonal relationship, in which the well-being and self-realization of each partner are of overriding importance to the other. It is only within this framework that the full purpose of marriage can be realized. The alternative, utilitarian view, according to which a sexual partner is an object for use, holds no possibility of fulfillment and happiness. Wojtyla argues that divorce, artificial methods of birth control, adultery (pre-marital sex), and sexual perversions are all in various ways incompatible with the personalistic view of the sexual self-realization of the human person. Perhaps the most striking feature of the book is that Wojtyla appeals throughout to ordinary, human experience, logically examined. He draws support for his views on the proper gratification of sexual needs, on birth control, and on other matters, from the findings of physiologists and psychologists. His conclusions coincide with the traditional teachings of the Church, which invoke scriptural authority. His approach ensures that non-Christians also can consider his arguments on their own merits.


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Drawing from his own pastoral experience as a priest and bishop before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla has produced a remarkably eloquent and resourceful defense of Catholic tradition in the sphere of family life and sexual morality. He writes in the conviction that science--biology, psychology, sociology--can provide valuable information on particular aspects o Drawing from his own pastoral experience as a priest and bishop before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla has produced a remarkably eloquent and resourceful defense of Catholic tradition in the sphere of family life and sexual morality. He writes in the conviction that science--biology, psychology, sociology--can provide valuable information on particular aspects of relations between the sexes, but that a full understanding can be obtained only by study of the human person as a whole. Central to his argument is the contrast between the personalistic and the utilitarian views of marriage and of sexual relations. The former views marriage as an interpersonal relationship, in which the well-being and self-realization of each partner are of overriding importance to the other. It is only within this framework that the full purpose of marriage can be realized. The alternative, utilitarian view, according to which a sexual partner is an object for use, holds no possibility of fulfillment and happiness. Wojtyla argues that divorce, artificial methods of birth control, adultery (pre-marital sex), and sexual perversions are all in various ways incompatible with the personalistic view of the sexual self-realization of the human person. Perhaps the most striking feature of the book is that Wojtyla appeals throughout to ordinary, human experience, logically examined. He draws support for his views on the proper gratification of sexual needs, on birth control, and on other matters, from the findings of physiologists and psychologists. His conclusions coincide with the traditional teachings of the Church, which invoke scriptural authority. His approach ensures that non-Christians also can consider his arguments on their own merits.

30 review for Love and Responsibility

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    This lays the all important groundwork for the Pope's later masterwork: the Theology of the Body. This is a challenging read. The language is dense and overflowing with ideas. Normally when an author introduces a complex idea, he follows it up with an "in other words.." followed by some real life examples to help ground the idea in the reader's mind. The Pope skips those things in this book, so you just get the pure complex ideas. The book is broken up in 5-8 page chapters, which took me about 1 This lays the all important groundwork for the Pope's later masterwork: the Theology of the Body. This is a challenging read. The language is dense and overflowing with ideas. Normally when an author introduces a complex idea, he follows it up with an "in other words.." followed by some real life examples to help ground the idea in the reader's mind. The Pope skips those things in this book, so you just get the pure complex ideas. The book is broken up in 5-8 page chapters, which took me about 15~20 minutes to get through and unpack. I ended up reading about a chapter a day, which took me a very long time to complete. But, man, it was worth it. This is the raw material of the greatest answer to the problems of our age. When these ideas get distilled into more readable books by future writers and become more entertaining and digestable to the masses, I think these ideas are going to explode and provide and complete and rounded philosophy of love and life for many people. The Church has long been accused of provided nothing but a "thou shalt NOT..." list when it comes to love and sex. The Pope here finally gives the positive and loving explanation for responsible love that is so lacking today.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mita

    Really great book - especially for a new Catholic. It is nice to see that his views are similar to what I thought before: how love involves the whole person, including all of the possibilities that the person holds (including parenthood) . . . and, thus not limit a marriage to a physical or utilitarian plane. Now I get the Catholic teachings against artificial birth control. Also interesting to note that he quotes Gandhi's autobiography. (p. 232) After I began reading this book, I realized that a Really great book - especially for a new Catholic. It is nice to see that his views are similar to what I thought before: how love involves the whole person, including all of the possibilities that the person holds (including parenthood) . . . and, thus not limit a marriage to a physical or utilitarian plane. Now I get the Catholic teachings against artificial birth control. Also interesting to note that he quotes Gandhi's autobiography. (p. 232) After I began reading this book, I realized that a Catholic man I met over 20 years ago had told me about it. He said that he wanted a marriage based on this book. It still makes sense . . . giving oneself as a gift to the other and God, and accepting the other person as a gift from God. The book is incredibly absorbing and involving - I highly recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Hughes

    In college I struggled with John Paul II's work The Theology of the Body and eventually gave up on it. It was too dense, too seemingly aimless, too full of tangents whose significance to wasn't clear enough, at least to me. I was very pleasantly surprised when I began Love and Responsibility. It was far more accesible and straighforward, at least compared to the Wednesday audiences that make up The Theology of the Body. For me, this text is the best way to approach the Pope's theology of human se In college I struggled with John Paul II's work The Theology of the Body and eventually gave up on it. It was too dense, too seemingly aimless, too full of tangents whose significance to wasn't clear enough, at least to me. I was very pleasantly surprised when I began Love and Responsibility. It was far more accesible and straighforward, at least compared to the Wednesday audiences that make up The Theology of the Body. For me, this text is the best way to approach the Pope's theology of human sexuality that has become so popular and even trendy in circles of young Catholics. It was written somewhat earlier and drew on his pastoral work with young married couples. (Not that it's full of annecdotes -- it's still a work of theology / philosophy.) I recommend it to one and all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

    Wojtyla writes beautifully philosophic prose on the topic of love, particularly as it is expressed in marriage. While the material is dense, the core ideas of love as commitment to the other person as a person, love as avoiding the mistaken notion that love involves using another person as an object, and marriage as the loving union of two persons designed to produce children has profound implications for how we think about marriage today. As a Protestant, much in the book flows quite nicely with Wojtyla writes beautifully philosophic prose on the topic of love, particularly as it is expressed in marriage. While the material is dense, the core ideas of love as commitment to the other person as a person, love as avoiding the mistaken notion that love involves using another person as an object, and marriage as the loving union of two persons designed to produce children has profound implications for how we think about marriage today. As a Protestant, much in the book flows quite nicely with my theological tradition, even if we rarely, if ever, express these ideas as well as they are here. The book also includes an excellent final chapter which illustrates the congruencies between modern medical findings and the more fundamental, personal and moral concerns expressed in the book. This book is a wonderful affirmation of how love can and should be expressed within the bounds of marriage and the beauty that flows from such an expression. I am very pleased to have read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Petersen

    Very informative and moving book. Lots of food for thought. A definite must for all Catholics!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Before Karol Wojtyla was elected to pope and became John Paul II, he had already written what was arguably his greatest work. Let that sink in for a moment. The great saint who gave us fourteen encyclicals such as Ecclesia De Eucharistia, Fides et Ratio, and Evangelium Vitae had already written a work greater than perhaps all of his encyclicals put together. This book was entitled Love and Responsibility, and if you love reading (soon-to-be) Saint John Paul II's writings then you'll definitely w Before Karol Wojtyla was elected to pope and became John Paul II, he had already written what was arguably his greatest work. Let that sink in for a moment. The great saint who gave us fourteen encyclicals such as Ecclesia De Eucharistia, Fides et Ratio, and Evangelium Vitae had already written a work greater than perhaps all of his encyclicals put together. This book was entitled Love and Responsibility, and if you love reading (soon-to-be) Saint John Paul II's writings then you'll definitely want to check out this book. I must admit that I feel ill-equipped to review Love and Responsibility. In fact, I've been at this book for months trying to parse through it and understand it to the best of my ability. A work like this requires multiple readings to begin to even comprehend all of the topics covered, and unfortunately, I was not able to devote my time to multiple readings. However, I appreciate the new translation and notes the translator, Grzegorz Ignatik, provided, as I believe I would have had an even harder time reading this work before the new translation. As a point of introduction, there are five main topics in this book: The Person and the Drive The Person and Love The Person and Chastity Justice with Respect to the Creator Sociology and Ethics The text is highly philosophical and contains copious footnotes from the translator. One should try not to get bogged down though and realize that Blessed John Paul was writing about what real human love is. As far as I can surmise from the text, we best find love when we give love ourselves. Also covered in this book is the the dignity of each individual and the "responsibility" portion of the title. Our society today has warped love, and people are used and discarded by other people. That is not how God intended love when he created man and woman. Therefore, we must not only be responsible with the love we give but the love we receive as well. It's hard to pin down a section I could describe as my favorite, but I did have one that did stand out to me. Pope John Paul II states, "Although a second marriage after the death of a spouse is justified and permitted, it is nevertheless by all means praiseworthy to remain in a state of widowhood, for in this way the union with the person who passed away is, among other things, better expressed. After all, the very value of the person does not pass away and the spiritual union with him can and should continue, even when the bodily union has ceased." This is referred to in the book as absolute monogamy and something in which I firmly believe. Like this topic and many others in the book, I appreciate the fact that Pope John Paul II didn't shy away from truth. I would love to tell you that Love and Responsibility is a book you can pick up and read one weekend and walk away feeling wiser and spiritually richer. On the contrary, it is a VERY challenging read. That is not to discourage you from reading this 5-star book. Quite the contrary. Anything worth understanding will take effort on your part. You will have to pore over this book and struggle to understand some points of it. The fruit it will yield you, though, will be all the sweeter. Pick this book up along with Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body, and you will have the two essential texts for seeing into the mind of the brilliant Saint John Paul II.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gonzo

    One of the reviewers on Amazon noted that he wished St. John Paul's picture had been kept off the cover of this, as the presence of a Pope on the cover might dissuade people who would otherwise read this book from doing so. Having finished it, I tend to agree. One need not be Catholic (or particularly religious) to enjoy this book. In a better world, it would loom much larger as an antidote to the callousness and inhumanity which characterizes sexuality in our time. It's hard to believe that mos One of the reviewers on Amazon noted that he wished St. John Paul's picture had been kept off the cover of this, as the presence of a Pope on the cover might dissuade people who would otherwise read this book from doing so. Having finished it, I tend to agree. One need not be Catholic (or particularly religious) to enjoy this book. In a better world, it would loom much larger as an antidote to the callousness and inhumanity which characterizes sexuality in our time. It's hard to believe that most humanists could easily dismiss this book. As the author notes, the Biblical basis for the ideas put forth in this book is pretty spare--five segments from the Gospels and a couple more from the Epistles. The most important of these segments contains the Great Commandment--love God above all things, and love thy neighbor as thyself. From this simple beginning, the author comes to the same conclusion as Kant--that we must not use human beings as mere instrumentalities in our own pursuits. Really, most of the first part of this book falls in line after this insight. The sexual ethics of the Catholic Church are meant to help us protect ourselves from using (and being used by) each other as objects. We must see each other as something innately worthwhile and special, not merely a means of pleasure. Could a humanist really argue for anything otherwise? The second part of the book, and the rounding out of Catholic sexual ethics, is more focused on justice towards the Creator, i.e. it is the part of the book which requires theological and supernatural explanations. It's only here that I could imagine a humanist really objecting to the author's line of argument. Nonetheless, for believers, it offers a brilliant and clear explication of Catholic sexual mores. I wish I had had access to it when I was younger. While reading, I couldn't help but think how "sex positive" the entire work is. It reminded me of the quote from Chesterton--the Catholic Church hates sex so much that it placed it at the very center of one of her sacraments! The author clearly appreciates the value of sexual relations properly realized--I daresay that he has greater appreciation for sex than a vast majority of libertines who enjoy sex as an end in itself. The difference between the author's view on sex and the modern libertine approach is that the author is never so "sex positive" that he loses sight of the fact that sex cannot be put ahead of the good of the people engaged in it. Who could be against this? Who actually wants to live in a world where one's sexual capability is the only standard of valuation? What kind of person actually wants to be placed in a situation to use others so callously? Vanity Fair just ran an article about the "dating apocalypse" in which women (and some men) mourn the fact that the current hook-up dating culture is leaving them unfulfilled. But this is no surprise. As the author tells us, human beings don't exist for the purpose of other humans' pleasures, and using each other only for pleasures inevitably makes us feel degraded, just the same as it does to be used. As Christ tells us, we are here to love each other, and to do justice towards each other. Promiscuity and adultery deny us this love, and for this reason must be avoided. Who can fail to see the honor and beauty of this? This is why I do wish the publisher had kept John Paul's picture off the cover. I know very many good, caring people who are deeply dissatisfied with the current state of dating and sexual relations, and who nonetheless view the Church's teachings as puritanical and oppressive. I can't help but think that an encounter with the arguments in this book--based as they are on ration, reason, and love--would not win at least a couple converts to the proper mode of sexual morality. The author's arguments appeal to what is best in us--our ration and our love for one another--and even the most strident atheist could not scoff them off wholesale. Even if ideas of justice towards the Creator are a harder sell, it would be worthwhile as a half-measure to let our generation know that there is an alternate and better way. This is the first book I've read by Mr. Wojtyla. It is quite dry at times, as a philosophical tract should be, but it is always compelling and should be read by everybody. It is interesting to think that John Paul's greatest historical achievement will likely be his stalwart opposition to the Soviet Empire. The free West's own Bolshevist revolt has gone by the name of the Sexual Revolution; its fatalities, in the terms of wasted lives, diseases, and abortions, is not so distant from the depredations suffered under the Communists. Such reflections put into perspective how important and beautiful the Church's teachings on sexuality and humanity really are, and the fact that, long before beatification, Mr. Wojtyla could be described as "great."

  8. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Want to return to this; setting it aside with the greatest reluctance and only because I have started too many books at the same time. (sigh) Have read and reread Intro and first chapter three times. Dense text or I've got from summer sludge on the brain--probably both. However, it really seems to be one of those books which if I force myself to keep working on it will yield hundred or sixty or thirty fold. Want to return to this; setting it aside with the greatest reluctance and only because I have started too many books at the same time. (sigh) Have read and reread Intro and first chapter three times. Dense text or I've got from summer sludge on the brain--probably both. However, it really seems to be one of those books which if I force myself to keep working on it will yield hundred or sixty or thirty fold.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Edward C.

    One of the three most important books I have read. Within, Karol Cardinal Wojtyla (Bl. John Paul II) plays the philosopher, expertly employing phenomenology girded by Thomism to discuss sexuality, relationships, and the meaning of human love. Although often mentioned as a precursor to Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body, Love and Responsibility stands well enough on its own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fr. Ryan Humphries

    This is a philosophical master work in Christian Phenomenology. Beware, though. This is not a spiritual book or a papal encyclical. It's a complex work of philosophy which requires foreknowledge of phenomenology and metaphysics. John Paul is in his most intellectual and, therefore, least accessible in this work. This is a philosophical master work in Christian Phenomenology. Beware, though. This is not a spiritual book or a papal encyclical. It's a complex work of philosophy which requires foreknowledge of phenomenology and metaphysics. John Paul is in his most intellectual and, therefore, least accessible in this work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    If I were, say, the dictator of my own country, I would make this astounding book a required read for all people between the ages of 16 and 19. Then, for their 20th birthday, as a tradition, I would have the parents buy them another copy to read again. This book presents a necessary and vital understanding of love.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meg Jenista

    Think that the Roman Catholic prohibition of birth control is about being a spoil-sport and killjoy? Think again. Here is the moral theology upon which the Roman Catholic stance is based. It may actually be a beautiful thing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Swick

    This book is the best book I have ever read. This is a must read for all Catholics especially young people. I highly recommend this book. It has changed the way I view relationships and has helped me to grow in my relationship.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Life altering. Incredibly dense. Read it with several really smart people and you might get a hint at the amazing things JP2 was suggesting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessikah

    John Paul II did it again. He philosophically got me thinking and questioning. Great for studying.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Constanza

    A MUST READ.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chet

    Wanna know what real love is?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pham

    This book can save any marriage in trouble or strengthen the spousal relationship. Incredible concept about utility and about charity. Must read for any one who cares about love

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Serwach

    July 3, 2012 Nearly 20 years before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla wrote a compelling explanation of what destroys relationships and how to make them living, growing meaningful experiences that makes us better people. In short, when we treat another person as "an object,'' focusing on what they can give us (sex, money, etc.), we are starting a utilitarian relationship that is incredibly limited. When we make our partner's self-realization and well-being our overriding goal, then any July 3, 2012 Nearly 20 years before he became Pope John Paul II, Karol Wojtyla wrote a compelling explanation of what destroys relationships and how to make them living, growing meaningful experiences that makes us better people. In short, when we treat another person as "an object,'' focusing on what they can give us (sex, money, etc.), we are starting a utilitarian relationship that is incredibly limited. When we make our partner's self-realization and well-being our overriding goal, then anything is possible. In other words, transactional love, all too common, involves one partner focusing on what benefits they themselves will receive from the other while transformational love is the kind of love you feel when someone changes your life forever (for example, when your baby makes you a parent or when you meet someone who makes you want to become a better person simply because you love or loved them). John Paul argues that sexual instinct is our basic, reflexive animal instinct, as natural as can be. We go beyond that instinct and begin to love more like God loves when we love at a higher level. Some of John Paul's early wisdom: "The sexual instinct wants above all to give, to create a good, to bring happiness... From the desire for the 'unlimited' good of another 'I' springs the whole creative drive of true love - the drive to endow a beloved person with the good, to make them happy. This is, so to speak, the divine aspect of love. In point of fact, to desire unlimited good for another person is really to desire God for that person... True love compels me to believe in my own spiritual powers. Even when I am 'bad', if true love awakens in me it bids me seek the true good where the object of my love is concerned.'' The longer someone "objectifies'' another, the more the resentment and ultimately hostility builds leading to disasters. "We have defined love as an ambition to ensure the true good of another person and consequently as the antithesis of egoism... everyone knows that egoism may either blind a man and rob him of his pride or, on the contrary, result in a morbid hyper-trophy of pride, which causes him to lose sight of the other human being... The main objective of this education is to create the conviction that 'the other person is more important than I'.. Love should help one to understand and to feel for a human being for this makes it possible to educate him, and in married life for husband and wife to educate each other."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daniela CastaƱeda

    Man in his various activities makes use of the whole created universe, takes advantage of all its resources for ends which he sets himself, for he alone understands them. Such an attitude on the part of man towards inanimate nature whose riches are so important to economic life, or towards living nature, whose energies and riches man appropriates, does not in principle arouse any doubts. Intelligent human beings are only required not to destroy or squander these natural resources, but to use the Man in his various activities makes use of the whole created universe, takes advantage of all its resources for ends which he sets himself, for he alone understands them. Such an attitude on the part of man towards inanimate nature whose riches are so important to economic life, or towards living nature, whose energies and riches man appropriates, does not in principle arouse any doubts. Intelligent human beings are only required not to destroy or squander these natural resources, but to use them with restraint, so as not to impede the development of man himself, and so as to ensure the coexistence of human societies in justice and harmony. In his treatment of animals in particular, since they are beings endowed with feeling and sensitive to pain, man is required to ensure that the use of these creatures is never attended by suffering or physical torture.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Pope John Paul II gives the reasoning and foundation for the how men and women should see relate with each other, especially in marriage. Basically, we should never see each other as an object of use or enjoyment, because with true love, we focus on what is best for the other person. He breaks down the kinds of love ! It's more than I would have expected from the most holy of priests, and he is as always a very compassionate and loving father in his explanations. Edward Sri also has a short book Pope John Paul II gives the reasoning and foundation for the how men and women should see relate with each other, especially in marriage. Basically, we should never see each other as an object of use or enjoyment, because with true love, we focus on what is best for the other person. He breaks down the kinds of love ! It's more than I would have expected from the most holy of priests, and he is as always a very compassionate and loving father in his explanations. Edward Sri also has a short book with a conversational tone that can help as a study guide. I read this as part of a discussion group, and will probably have to re-read it again, but it's worth it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Henderson

    Pretty heavy stuff and kind of steamy in some places... I agree with and love the theology but am still having a very hard time with some of the material, just as most modern couples do. I love how JPII differentiates between animals (driven by instinct) and humans (free will) and why it's important to practice the virtues of love and temperance together. Also the in depth philosophy on fully mature, integrated love is what they should really emphasize in pre-cana. This is a deep, beautiful, phi Pretty heavy stuff and kind of steamy in some places... I agree with and love the theology but am still having a very hard time with some of the material, just as most modern couples do. I love how JPII differentiates between animals (driven by instinct) and humans (free will) and why it's important to practice the virtues of love and temperance together. Also the in depth philosophy on fully mature, integrated love is what they should really emphasize in pre-cana. This is a deep, beautiful, philosophical journey that will no doubt lead to self-examination and a new way of looking at love and sex.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    This book is a bit dense, but it captures amazingly well what Love (as a virtue) between a man and a woman is and what it isn't. When I first started this book, I thought I would gain an idealized understanding of Love. However, reading through it, what I am gaining is not an idealized understanding of Love, but rather a realistic understanding of Love. Help yourself and read this book. It'll revolutionize, purify, and complete your beliefs and ideas on Love. I like this book so much, I have to This book is a bit dense, but it captures amazingly well what Love (as a virtue) between a man and a woman is and what it isn't. When I first started this book, I thought I would gain an idealized understanding of Love. However, reading through it, what I am gaining is not an idealized understanding of Love, but rather a realistic understanding of Love. Help yourself and read this book. It'll revolutionize, purify, and complete your beliefs and ideas on Love. I like this book so much, I have to re-rate my other ratings to properly account for this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thadeus

    A challenging book, but well worth it. So many quotes full of wisdom. The challenge is that much of the book is spent defining and parsing terms (which is necessary) that unless you've read the book, the quotes won't be as meaningful. Very helpful in learning about the personalistic norm and about the foundation for the Theology of the Body. Highly recommended! A challenging book, but well worth it. So many quotes full of wisdom. The challenge is that much of the book is spent defining and parsing terms (which is necessary) that unless you've read the book, the quotes won't be as meaningful. Very helpful in learning about the personalistic norm and about the foundation for the Theology of the Body. Highly recommended!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tainara Campanini

    That is certainly incredible to see how Pope John Paul II is a wise man even he was still a young Bishop. He covers every single problem in the field of love along with the commandments of Jesus Christ. This book should certainly be in everyone's shelf as it is full of understandings about what is one of the biggest problems of the society's behaviors in terms of love and responsibility. That is certainly incredible to see how Pope John Paul II is a wise man even he was still a young Bishop. He covers every single problem in the field of love along with the commandments of Jesus Christ. This book should certainly be in everyone's shelf as it is full of understandings about what is one of the biggest problems of the society's behaviors in terms of love and responsibility.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Heavy... a lot to chew through but great stuff!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ale Jandro

    Vital to understand the personalistic view of the world and be aware of the dangers and bias from our utilitarian way of seeing the world and people around us.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grace Krilanovich

    A philosophy of the interrelatedness of love and responsibility -- however loaded both terms soon become -- here laid out in a surprisingly conversational, commonsense, even intuitive way. The dictates could be applied to any number of worldviews, but Love and Responsibility is, of course, a book about Catholic sexual morality. It seems pretty obvious that it was written by dictation, which is okay per se, but here each sentence stretches on and on in complex threads of small words. Unnecessarily A philosophy of the interrelatedness of love and responsibility -- however loaded both terms soon become -- here laid out in a surprisingly conversational, commonsense, even intuitive way. The dictates could be applied to any number of worldviews, but Love and Responsibility is, of course, a book about Catholic sexual morality. It seems pretty obvious that it was written by dictation, which is okay per se, but here each sentence stretches on and on in complex threads of small words. Unnecessarily labyrinthine, it can be a tough thicket to get through -- if it weren't for Wojtyla's constant reiteration of key points, hammering home the basic tenets again and again. Highly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cris

    Karol Wojtyla at his best. The foundational work that he would later expand into a Theology of The Body. Taking a phenomenological approach, he develops the topic of how marriage fulfills human love in giving people their entire dignity. A very romantic and frank book, written by a man whose specialty was marriage counseling he speaks frankly of the need for generosity in the sexual union.....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    I honestly don't remember much from this book. I had to read it for a class I took in college. I honestly don't remember much from this book. I had to read it for a class I took in college.

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