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Summary In John, the second volume in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series, Dr. Sproul deals with major themes in his easily understandable style. Readers will find invaluable insights into the goals John had in writing his Gospel, the background for Jesus' time, and the meanings of some of John's most difficult passages. This introduction to the Gospel of Jo Summary In John, the second volume in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series, Dr. Sproul deals with major themes in his easily understandable style. Readers will find invaluable insights into the goals John had in writing his Gospel, the background for Jesus' time, and the meanings of some of John's most difficult passages. This introduction to the Gospel of John is packed with insights and exhortations that will draw the reader closer to the Savior and encourage him or her to a greater depth of love and devotion to Him.John presents the fruits of Dr. R.C. Sproul's lifetime of biblical study as expressed in his most recent calling. After a long and distinguished ministry as a teacher in various settings, Dr. Sproul accepted a call in 1997 to preach at St. Andrew's in Sanford, Florida. There, he adopted the ancient practice of preaching through books of the Bible, eventually working his way through several of them. He has now begun to adapt those sermon series in book form, and the result is the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series.


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Summary In John, the second volume in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series, Dr. Sproul deals with major themes in his easily understandable style. Readers will find invaluable insights into the goals John had in writing his Gospel, the background for Jesus' time, and the meanings of some of John's most difficult passages. This introduction to the Gospel of Jo Summary In John, the second volume in the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series, Dr. Sproul deals with major themes in his easily understandable style. Readers will find invaluable insights into the goals John had in writing his Gospel, the background for Jesus' time, and the meanings of some of John's most difficult passages. This introduction to the Gospel of John is packed with insights and exhortations that will draw the reader closer to the Savior and encourage him or her to a greater depth of love and devotion to Him.John presents the fruits of Dr. R.C. Sproul's lifetime of biblical study as expressed in his most recent calling. After a long and distinguished ministry as a teacher in various settings, Dr. Sproul accepted a call in 1997 to preach at St. Andrew's in Sanford, Florida. There, he adopted the ancient practice of preaching through books of the Bible, eventually working his way through several of them. He has now begun to adapt those sermon series in book form, and the result is the St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary series.

30 review for John

  1. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Thorough Sproul! I found several interesting insights that I hadn't heard prior to reading this. Thorough Sproul! I found several interesting insights that I hadn't heard prior to reading this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mic

    Great commentary on the book of John. Very well grounded.

  3. 4 out of 5

    B

    As I continue to read the modern-day commentaries, I become increasingly convinced that our contemporary theologians do more to undermine the Word the God than some of Christianity's worst critics. Christians should consider the warning of the Old Testament Prophet Jeremiah: "How do ye say, We are wise, and the law of the Lord is with us? Lo, certainly in vain made he it; the pen of the scribes is in vain. The wise men are ashamed, they are dismayed and taken: lo, they have rejected the word of As I continue to read the modern-day commentaries, I become increasingly convinced that our contemporary theologians do more to undermine the Word the God than some of Christianity's worst critics. Christians should consider the warning of the Old Testament Prophet Jeremiah: "How do ye say, We are wise, and the law of the Lord is with us? Lo, certainly in vain made he it; the pen of the scribes is in vain. The wise men are ashamed, they are dismayed and taken: lo, they have rejected the word of the Lord; and what wisdom is in them?" (Jer. 8:8-9). When doubt is cast on the validity of any portion of Scripture, then the whole Bible is subject to question. John 17:17 tells us that God's word is truth; it's all truth or it's not--there's no in between. From the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith (LBCF), Chapter 1 'Of the Holy Scriptures', paragraph 4: "The authority of the Holy Scripture, for which it ought to be believed, dependeth not upon the testimony of any man or church, but wholly upon God (who is truth itself), the author thereof; therefore it is to be received because it is the Word of God." In the same chapter, Christians are told "that [with] the Word of God dwelling plentifully in all, they may worship Him in an acceptable manner, and through patience and comfort of the Scriptures may have hope," (LBCF, Chapter 1, paragraph 8). Through the Scriptures Christians have hope. In 1 Tim. 1:1, Paul tells us that the Lord Jesus Christ is our hope. Jesus is the Truth, (John 14:6), and He is the Word, (John 1:1). Therefore, if Jesus is infallible, then the Word of God, or Scripture, must be infallible as well. It is foundational to Christianity that the Bible is true: "The Holy Scripture is the only sufficient, certain and infallible rule of all saving knowledge, faith, and obedience," (LBCF, Chapter 1, paragraph 1). Obviously, I'm belaboring the point of the Bible's infallibility for a reason. This core doctrine came up in reading St. Andrew's Expositional Commentary on John by R.C. Sproul. In Chapter 12, Dr. Sproul looks at John 5:4 which says: "For an angel went down at a certain season in the pool, and troubled the water: whosoever then first after the troubling of the water stepped in was made whole of whatsoever disease he had." He then goes on to explain this verse on page 77. I'm quoting him at length because this excerpt is the prime example of why I continue to push-back against the "science of textual criticism" (underlining and bold emphasis is mine): "This [the angel stirring the water] is the only instance in sacred Scripture where we find any indication that there was a pool in Jerusalem where an angel came periodically, stirred up the water, and gave miraculous healing to the first person who managed to get down into the water. How are we to understand this strange account? Let me preface what I'm about to say with some background about the manuscripts of the biblical books. We don't possess the original manuscripts; they have been lost. What the church possess are hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of copies that were made in the earliest days. Through the science of textual criticism, scholars try to reconstruct what was in the original documents. Thanks to the great number of copies and the precision of textual criticism, we have a high degree of confidence that the biblical manuscripts as we now have them are very close to the originals. However, occasionally we find manuscripts differing as to what was in the original text, and this is one of those instances--some of the best texts of the Gospel of John do not include verse 4. Therefore, it's very possible that this statement about an angel stirring up the water and healing the first person who stepped into the pool may have been a textual gloss that reflected more of the superstition of the people than the actual truth of God. But if the stirring of the water and the healings were not caused by an angel, what was happening? We know these pools in Jerusalem were occasionally fed by artesian wells. The wells would start to flow and the pools would be stirred with an influx of water with special characteristics--something like the hot springs people visit even today for therapeutic reasons. That may have been what was happening at Bethesda, and the people, not knowing the science of artesian wells, simply believed that the stirring of the water was due to the presence of an angel." First of all, why do we have to understand this account fully in order to accept it? Could this not be one of the "secret things that belong to unto the Lord our God," (Deut. 29:29)? Personally, I have no problem believing this account. The Lord worked miraculous healings all throughout the Old and New Testaments. It never occurred to me to question the validity of this account until Dr. Sproul decided that verse 4 should not be included in John 5 based on the science of textual criticism. The Apostle Peter tells us that God's Word abides and endures forever; it cannot be corrupted, (1 Peter 1:23-25). God is sovereign; if I can't trust Him to preserve His Word, how can I have assurance that He will preserve me until the Day of Judgment? Instead of believing that the Holy Spirit inspired these words and they are true even though we can't explain the miracle scientifically, Dr. Sproul hypothesizes that the healings were probably caused by artesian wells, but the angel "story" was included because the first century people were scientifically inept and too superstitious to understand the reality of the situation. This example of scholarly arrogance corrupts the Word of God by subverting its infallibility. Casting doubt and confusion through pragmatic and reasonable human logic at best keeps Christian "in need of milk, and not of strong meat," (Heb. 5:12), but at worst causes some to "stumble at the word, being disobedient," (1 Peter 2:8). Clearly, there's no application to disobey in this passage, but where do you draw the line once you start questioning and even dismissing God's Word? I also find it interesting to note that the Puritan commentators Matthew Poole and Matthew Henry never discount the miracle of the angels stirring the water for healing. In his commentary on John 5:1-4 Matthew Henry states: "Now this is all the account we have of this standing miracle; it is uncertain when it began and when it ceased," (Vol. 5, p. 742). He goes on to discuss some of the conjecture about its beginning and ending, but he does not question the validity of the miracle or its inclusion in Scripture. Christian scholars will never possess or recreate the original manuscripts of the Old and New Testaments. But the Bible has not been lost because God has promised that His Word will stand forever, (Isa. 40:8), and it will not pass away, (Matt. 24:35). The Word of God is quick and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, (Heb. 4:12). Liberal Christian theologians are known for questioning many orthodox views of Jesus--His deity, His virgin birth, His miracles, His resurrection, etc. Reformed Christian theologians criticize their liberal counterparts for rejecting the orthodox foundations of Christianity. But the devil is crafty; he has found a way to infiltrate both sides through the so-called science of textual criticism. This is a call for Christians to "put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil," (Eph. 6:12). God has preserved His Word throughout the ages in His church through the Textus Receptus or Received Text, which is available for all Christians to read in the King James Bible.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    R.C. Sproul comes with high recommendation from almost everyone I know. Perhaps I came to this text with higher expectations than I should have. It was certainly a good book and I will definitely read Sproul again in the future. Here are my thoughts about his book on John. First I would like to say that Dr. Sproul's intention for this book seemed to be creating a commentary that would be accessible to people of various backgrounds. In this regard I would say that he accomplished that task well. T R.C. Sproul comes with high recommendation from almost everyone I know. Perhaps I came to this text with higher expectations than I should have. It was certainly a good book and I will definitely read Sproul again in the future. Here are my thoughts about his book on John. First I would like to say that Dr. Sproul's intention for this book seemed to be creating a commentary that would be accessible to people of various backgrounds. In this regard I would say that he accomplished that task well. This was helpful to me to see how a brilliant scholar like Sproul translates a text like John for a general audience. The book was very accessible and yet it was clear that the man writing it was no simpleton. He has certain eloquence and grace in his simplicity that implies that the author knows far more than he is sharing. He had some fantastic insights and a majority of the time I appreciate that the author is careful in his assessments. For example: he is very leary about speculating concerning the nature of Jesus' resurrected body and warns readers to exercise caution when the text of scripture is not exactly very clear. I love the fact that he is conservative and he honors the scripture as God's living Word. He truly lets the Word of God be the Word of God. His anecdotes are also very charming and helpful for the purpose of illustration. Nevertheless, I had some problems with this writing. First of all, I was very disappointed in the treatment he gave the prologue. Truly there was nothing there which sparked much thought and it was almost as if he was trying to gloss that over. After the prologue he does not spend hardly anytime writing about the first two chapters. It was as if he told the story and and then failed to offer insights. Any student of John's gospel knows that there is more material in first miracle of Jesus than indicating that it is "okay to drink" which he does not say explictly but seems to imply. Once he did get into the text it seemed that he was overall generic in his assessments. In other words this is the 20th book I have read in my research of John's Gospel and it was not necessarily helpful more any other book I have read. Dr. Sproul is a reformed theologian and although I would not consider myself Calvinist I do respect this position and I will in fact be reading Calvin's commentary on John very shortly. I understand that his translation of the Bible is through the lens of Calvinism but there were times that I felt he went overboard and became very dogmatic about his beliefs. A couple of times I was not sure whether I was reading the "Gospel according to John" or the "Gospel according to John Calvin." I realize that Dr. Sproul believes that the Gospel of John is more Calvinistic than the others but I think there were times this slant detracted from the work. Before I get labeled as anti-Calvinist I would have you know that most of the commentaries I have read were from a Calvinist viewpoint and I have loved many of them. Dr. Sproul seemed overly dogmatic about the five points of Calvinism and while he was generally respectful to other positions that was not always the case. Overall, I did enjoy the book for some of the insights that he gave and if this tells you anything I plan on reading his work on the epistles of Peter. If you are new to John this book is a great primer but if you are looking for more you should reference Bruce, Tenney or Kostenberger.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    The Gospel according to St. John is unique in the four Gospels in that it only shares about ten percent of its content with the other three and includes the Upper Room Discourse, Christ's High Priestly prayer, and the seven I AM sayings of Jesus. And R.C. Sproul, in this expositional series he preached to his own church, does a masterful job of patiently interpreting this book. There are many passages to be read over and over, and here are just two: On the church being made to be confessional - "t The Gospel according to St. John is unique in the four Gospels in that it only shares about ten percent of its content with the other three and includes the Upper Room Discourse, Christ's High Priestly prayer, and the seven I AM sayings of Jesus. And R.C. Sproul, in this expositional series he preached to his own church, does a masterful job of patiently interpreting this book. There are many passages to be read over and over, and here are just two: On the church being made to be confessional - "the church that Christ built and is building must always be a confessing church. When I speak of the church as a confessing church, I'm not simply speaking of the confession of sin that we utter before God, but rather the confession of our faith. Christ promises redemption to those who not only believe in His resurrection in their hearts but who confess Him with their mouths (Rom. 10:9)." (pg. 262) On love - "This was extravagant love. There are times for extravagance, and it is always time for an extravagant manifestation of adoration to Christ. What could you and I possibly do that would be too extravagant in giving Him glory? Anyone who has ever been in love at some point has made an extravagant gift for the one that he or she loved, and the only justification for it was the love that he or she felt. If we love Christ, it is appropriate to love Him extravagantly, for He is worthy of extravagant love." (pg. 218-9) The only detraction of this otherwise fine book is R.C.’s uncharacteristically imprecise descriptions in several places. For instance: "...the ministry of Christ and the significance of the cross were presented to her in a way that caused the scales to fall from her eyes, and she came to a saving knowledge of Christ." (pg. 268) Since when did the presentation of the Gospel play a role in its hearing? Earlier, he writes: “God doesn't force people into sin and then refuse to rescue them from it. However, He sometimes turns a a sinner over to his sin, which is the most ghastly judgment any person could ever receive from the hands of God. That is what happened to the people of Israel in Isaiah’s day. God did the same thing in Jesus’ day. Due to the rebelliousness of the people, God judged them with the inability to repent even though the message of salvation was being compellingly presented right before their eyes" [emphasis mine]. But, as I say, these are not characteristic of Dr. Sproul’s overall presentation. His preaching and teaching is both accessible and faithful and this is the best volume in the St. Andrew’s Expositional series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    E.M.

    As I preached through the Gospel of John from Nov. 2009 to Aug. 2011 I found R.C. Sproul's commentary on the Gospel unequaled in its balance of deep theological teaching and practical application. This commentary was always in my study as I prepared sermons for the Church's edification. As useful and challenging as Dr. Sproul's writings are it is important to remember that they do come from a Covenant Theologian's bent. So it should not surprise one that when Dr. Sproul comments on the Apostle Jo As I preached through the Gospel of John from Nov. 2009 to Aug. 2011 I found R.C. Sproul's commentary on the Gospel unequaled in its balance of deep theological teaching and practical application. This commentary was always in my study as I prepared sermons for the Church's edification. As useful and challenging as Dr. Sproul's writings are it is important to remember that they do come from a Covenant Theologian's bent. So it should not surprise one that when Dr. Sproul comments on the Apostle John's account of the Lord's washing of his disciple's feet in Jn. 13 that he connects this event with Baptism, an observation which left me scratching my head (p.243). Nor should it surprise one that Dr. Sproul calls Dispensationalism a "novelty theology that arouse in the nineteenth century..." (p. 284), which isn't all that charitable. It would perhaps have been more accurate to say that Dispensationalism is a theology that arouse in the nineteenth century that a novel few take quite seriously. = ) May we Christians learn to get along before we meet our Father. That being said, it is important for the Christian to note that just about every bible teacher is teaching from some kind of bent. All and all, I highly recommend that R.C. Sproul's warm and engaging commentary on the Gospel of John, and I hope it makes its way into your theological library!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    R.C. Sproul’s commentary on the Gospel of John features the strong, frequent marks of a major popular Reformed theologian and gifted teacher. His insights here are always accessible and illuminating. Readers will not for the space of a single chapter, I think, forget that the book originated as an expository sermon series. That is, the commentary is filled with personal anecdotes (some of which are a bit less effective than others) and occasional references to pop culture. It goes without saying R.C. Sproul’s commentary on the Gospel of John features the strong, frequent marks of a major popular Reformed theologian and gifted teacher. His insights here are always accessible and illuminating. Readers will not for the space of a single chapter, I think, forget that the book originated as an expository sermon series. That is, the commentary is filled with personal anecdotes (some of which are a bit less effective than others) and occasional references to pop culture. It goes without saying, then, that this is not an academic text. Rather, it’s an excellent starting place for a study of this Gospel, and it is a book that many a layperson will find deeply memorable. As a side note, Sproul begins with a fairly light touch in incorporating Reformed theology with his study, and sometimes I felt that he missed an opportunity to expound on particular passages from his well-informed Calvinist perspective. However, about 3/4 of the way into the book, there are some very strong, very helpful Reformed observations. This was my first Sproul commentary, and I look forward to reading more of them.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laramie Gildon

    I really enjoyed this commentary. Sproul as always did a great job illustrating and really putting you in the midst of the events described in the gospel of John. He also makes great pastoral applications throughout. As we continue to preach through the gospel of the John, I will continue to refer back to this great resource. I believe any believer would greatly benefit from this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Greg Judy

    Sproul is an incredible author, teacher, and preacher. He is one of my favorites.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Chattaway

    Clear, concise and informative. Very readable.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Gardner

    I was excited to learn that Dr. Sproul was writing a series of new commentaries. He has long been one of my favorite theologians, and is one of the clearest teachers of Scripture that I have encountered. I was a bit concerned, however, that his commentaries might be somewhat more “intellectual” than many of his other books. Often in his lectures, he operates on a different mental plane than most mere mortals! So it was much to my relief to see that this commentary was very approachable and easy t I was excited to learn that Dr. Sproul was writing a series of new commentaries. He has long been one of my favorite theologians, and is one of the clearest teachers of Scripture that I have encountered. I was a bit concerned, however, that his commentaries might be somewhat more “intellectual” than many of his other books. Often in his lectures, he operates on a different mental plane than most mere mortals! So it was much to my relief to see that this commentary was very approachable and easy to read. In fact, it is possibly the most accessible book of its type that I’ve seen. I especially appreciated the format of this book. Rather than write a verse-by-verse exposition, as many commentators do, Sproul has broken John’s gospel into 57 chapters, focusing on individual events and encounters. He then writes his commentary in a very conversational style, often relaying personal stories and analogies to help teach the text. This writing style lends this commentary to reading just like one might read any other typical book, rather than requiring strenuous study like many other commentaries. It is highly recommended for students of Scripture at any level of spiritual maturity or theological experience!

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Gardner

    I was excited to learn that Dr. Sproul was writing a series of new commentaries. He has long been one of my favorite theologians, and is one of the clearest teachers of Scripture that I have encountered. I was a bit concerned, however, that his commentaries might be somewhat more “intellectual” than many of his other books. Often in his lectures, he operates on a different mental plane than most mere mortals! So it was much to my relief to see that this commentary was very approachable and easy t I was excited to learn that Dr. Sproul was writing a series of new commentaries. He has long been one of my favorite theologians, and is one of the clearest teachers of Scripture that I have encountered. I was a bit concerned, however, that his commentaries might be somewhat more “intellectual” than many of his other books. Often in his lectures, he operates on a different mental plane than most mere mortals! So it was much to my relief to see that this commentary was very approachable and easy to read. In fact, it is possibly the most accessible book of its type that I’ve seen. I especially appreciated the format of this book. Rather than write a verse-by-verse exposition, as many commentators do, Sproul has broken John’s gospel into 57 chapters, focusing on individual events and encounters. He then writes his commentary in a very conversational style, often relaying personal stories and analogies to help teach the text. This writing style lends this commentary to reading just like one might read any other typical book, rather than requiring strenuous study like many other commentaries. It is highly recommended for students of Scripture at any level of spiritual maturity or theological experience!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tyson

    John's Gospel has been one of my favorite New Testament books for some time and though I haven't read a large number of R. C. Sproul's books, many of my friends have a great deal of respect for him. I had always wanted to read through an in-depth commentary on John and I felt that Sproul would do an excellent job. Though his book isn't as detailed as other commentaries may be, it nevertheless provides a lot of insight into the main themes of John by looking at individual passages and showing how John's Gospel has been one of my favorite New Testament books for some time and though I haven't read a large number of R. C. Sproul's books, many of my friends have a great deal of respect for him. I had always wanted to read through an in-depth commentary on John and I felt that Sproul would do an excellent job. Though his book isn't as detailed as other commentaries may be, it nevertheless provides a lot of insight into the main themes of John by looking at individual passages and showing how they tie into the Gospel as a whole. Sproul writes in a fluid style that is often lacking in more technical, verse-by-verse commentaries that allows the reader to stay focused without being burdened by a collection of dry facts about each verse. He focuses on the spiritual applications of each passage and in doing so shows his concern for his reader's walk with Christ. I would highly recommend this to anyone waning to dive deeper into John's Gospel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emmanuel Boston

    *Some thoughts, not a full review: Moves too quickly from the text to application and misses prominent theological points/themes because of it. Occasionally inaccurate regarding cultural elements. Occasionally inaccurate regarding the thrust of a passage. Prone to overstatement (e.g. "I am convinced that the Ascension is the most important part" [of the work of Christ]. Yet, the Ascension only appears in Luke & Acts--it cannot be the most important part). Sproul writes within the Reformed tradition b *Some thoughts, not a full review: Moves too quickly from the text to application and misses prominent theological points/themes because of it. Occasionally inaccurate regarding cultural elements. Occasionally inaccurate regarding the thrust of a passage. Prone to overstatement (e.g. "I am convinced that the Ascension is the most important part" [of the work of Christ]. Yet, the Ascension only appears in Luke & Acts--it cannot be the most important part). Sproul writes within the Reformed tradition but neglects to consult Calvin on interpretive issues and contradicts Calvin's wise exegesis (see the healing of the man born blind where Sproul states that the blinding occurred so that the work of healing could be seen; Calvin shows how the text uses the plural and indicates that the blinding itself is the work of God for his glory).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zach McDonald

    I have enjoyed Dr. Sprouls writing, teachings, and sermons since high school but this is my first time reading one of his commentaries. One of the characteristics I first loved about him was he ability to teach the depth of biblical truths in a very concise, God honoring, and clear manner. This is precisely why he is enjoyed by folks from all spans of the Christian life, professors, pastors, laymen, and new believers alike. This commentary on the Gospel of John was no different. My only complain I have enjoyed Dr. Sprouls writing, teachings, and sermons since high school but this is my first time reading one of his commentaries. One of the characteristics I first loved about him was he ability to teach the depth of biblical truths in a very concise, God honoring, and clear manner. This is precisely why he is enjoyed by folks from all spans of the Christian life, professors, pastors, laymen, and new believers alike. This commentary on the Gospel of John was no different. My only complaint about this work is that, on many issues, he could have dug in deeper and spent more time on a number of different texts. But let's be honest, no one can fully exhaust the truths found in Scripture. This would be a great resource to read through with a new disciple.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    This exegetical survey of the gospel of John is a fine introduction for those new to the book, the Christian Faith, or to Sproul's style. However, if you have read John several times and listen to the Reasonable Faith podcast, there's probably little new here for you. Very roughly speaking, the book is about 1/3 direct long quotes of John (cumulatively, quoting the entire gospel at least once), 1/3 smaller "in-line" quotes and paraphrases of the biblical text, and 1/3 interpretation or explanati This exegetical survey of the gospel of John is a fine introduction for those new to the book, the Christian Faith, or to Sproul's style. However, if you have read John several times and listen to the Reasonable Faith podcast, there's probably little new here for you. Very roughly speaking, the book is about 1/3 direct long quotes of John (cumulatively, quoting the entire gospel at least once), 1/3 smaller "in-line" quotes and paraphrases of the biblical text, and 1/3 interpretation or explanation, and most of the latter is material already covered by Sproul in other media. For the small amount of new original material, the book is far too long, but everything in it is good.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pm

    This is an excellent review of the gospel of John that is insightful and personal. Rather than a technical commentary, this review is more like a conversation between friends discussing the book. It is highly enjoyable if approached in this way. There are many detailed commentaries on John but RC does not attempt to write another but rather presents a conversation with personal stories and thoughts. I especially enjoyed his brief story of his conversion to Christ which illustrates how every sing This is an excellent review of the gospel of John that is insightful and personal. Rather than a technical commentary, this review is more like a conversation between friends discussing the book. It is highly enjoyable if approached in this way. There are many detailed commentaries on John but RC does not attempt to write another but rather presents a conversation with personal stories and thoughts. I especially enjoyed his brief story of his conversion to Christ which illustrates how every single passage in God's word is powerful to pierce our hearts when illuminated by the Holy Spirit.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mandi

    This book gives a brief overview of each chapter in John's Gospel taken from R.C. Sproul's sermon series. In typical Sproul style the book is full of deep insights yet explained easily enough for anyone to take to heart. I really enjoyed how the chapters are written from a pastor's perspective and not only a theologian. This book makes a great devotion when reading through the book of John. The chapters are short enough to easily read in the morning during personal study time. This is the second This book gives a brief overview of each chapter in John's Gospel taken from R.C. Sproul's sermon series. In typical Sproul style the book is full of deep insights yet explained easily enough for anyone to take to heart. I really enjoyed how the chapters are written from a pastor's perspective and not only a theologian. This book makes a great devotion when reading through the book of John. The chapters are short enough to easily read in the morning during personal study time. This is the second time I have read this book and plan to read it more in the future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    台耀

    Every time I read one of the Gospels, I can't help but feel like I have had a divine encounter with the One. To have had that chance to walk with Him and "hear" Him speak, and follow Him all the way to Jerusalem, Calvary and then witness His resurrection and Ascension. Each time I finish one of the Gospels, it feels like I always leave learning something new about Him. And it really helps, how Sproul breaks down complex theology into digestible form. It's amazing how God uses him to open the eye Every time I read one of the Gospels, I can't help but feel like I have had a divine encounter with the One. To have had that chance to walk with Him and "hear" Him speak, and follow Him all the way to Jerusalem, Calvary and then witness His resurrection and Ascension. Each time I finish one of the Gospels, it feels like I always leave learning something new about Him. And it really helps, how Sproul breaks down complex theology into digestible form. It's amazing how God uses him to open the eyes, minds and hearts of so many people who read his commentaries.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Greg Beauchamp

    An excellent commentary. This is an excellent commentary in that Mr Sproul includes both well researched information and his own personal testimony regarding the Gospel of John. I have several of his Bible commentaries and many of his other books and I have never been disappointed with any of them. Mr Sproul is a gift to the Christian community and am hoping that He writes a commentary on earth h of the books of the Bible.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    This added so much to my reading of the gospel of John. I was concurrently doing a study on John by Beth Moore and found this to be so much more useful in filling in the missing pieces and helping me to unpack the text for myself. I will definitely use Sproul's sermons again for other biblical books when available. This added so much to my reading of the gospel of John. I was concurrently doing a study on John by Beth Moore and found this to be so much more useful in filling in the missing pieces and helping me to unpack the text for myself. I will definitely use Sproul's sermons again for other biblical books when available.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Gould

    An excellent commentary through the book of John. Admittedly, I am biased. I don't think there's anything out by Dr. R.C. Sproul I have not liked for various reasons. Like the other books in the St. Andrew's Expositionary Commentary series, this is highly recommended - especially those sections dealing with the "difficult passages" in John chapter 6 regarding the Sovereignty of God in salvation. An excellent commentary through the book of John. Admittedly, I am biased. I don't think there's anything out by Dr. R.C. Sproul I have not liked for various reasons. Like the other books in the St. Andrew's Expositionary Commentary series, this is highly recommended - especially those sections dealing with the "difficult passages" in John chapter 6 regarding the Sovereignty of God in salvation.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jstrick

    I used this commentary as an aid in teaching through the Gospel of John with our Sr. High youth and found it to be immensely helpful - both for my mind and heart, as well as in communicating the truth to our students!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Loren

    It was a decent book. I used it as our church was doing a sermon series in John. It is definitely less academic and more conversational in a sermon-y kind of way. There were times I wish it would have gone into more depth.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    An excellent and easy to read commentary. Expository as if reading through a series of good sermons. Short enough that these could be done as a devotional. Good balance between teaching and application.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Sproul always has such good things to say and such helpful ways of looking at things. This book is no different. Many of the chapters were just perfect, but quite a few felt stretched out and needlessly long.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Young

    Eye opening I have read the Gospel of John before, but never with guidance. This book is intensive and time-consuming, but one of the most informative books I've ever read. I highly recommend, and will definitely be rereading it again in the near future. Eye opening I have read the Gospel of John before, but never with guidance. This book is intensive and time-consuming, but one of the most informative books I've ever read. I highly recommend, and will definitely be rereading it again in the near future.

  28. 5 out of 5

    C.B. Stone

    Loved this dive into the book of John. RC is great at breaking theology and doctrine down so it can be understood easily by someone without such a background. A lot of aha moments in this one. I feel like I came to know Jesus even better.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    Loved how the passages are dissected yet shown to be part of a whole narrative. There is something to highlight on every page! It is a resource that is invaluable to everyone from seminary to Sunday school

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    My review is at http://ericrowell.net/book-reviews/jo... My review is at http://ericrowell.net/book-reviews/jo...

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