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Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 - 1927), English author, known for his humorous essays."What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books, ' you may take this Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 - 1927), English author, known for his humorous essays."What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books, ' you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." (from the Preface to "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow by Jerome Jerome)


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Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 - 1927), English author, known for his humorous essays."What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books, ' you may take this Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 - 1927), English author, known for his humorous essays."What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books, ' you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." (from the Preface to "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow by Jerome Jerome)

30 review for The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow & Three Men in a Boat

  1. 4 out of 5

    Praj

    Monday afternoons are most favorable to practice the art of idling. The anxiety of a fresh work week prevails over the dormancy of deadlines and you are back on detoxification diet after a carb loaded Sunday. On one such afternoons amid my momentary sniffing of liquid black ink( the one that fills the belly of a fountain pen), I hear a deafening sound enough to crack the inner chords of my ears. As I look up from my sniffing activity, I observe a recognizable obnoxious face of a dear friend who Monday afternoons are most favorable to practice the art of idling. The anxiety of a fresh work week prevails over the dormancy of deadlines and you are back on detoxification diet after a carb loaded Sunday. On one such afternoons amid my momentary sniffing of liquid black ink( the one that fills the belly of a fountain pen), I hear a deafening sound enough to crack the inner chords of my ears. As I look up from my sniffing activity, I observe a recognizable obnoxious face of a dear friend who also acts as my local bookworm. “Have you heard of Jerome K Jerome “, she says overlooking my disdain. “Is he your fuck mate?” I ask, trying to outwit with my sarcasm. You lightheaded bitch!, she shows displeasure. “He is the one who wrote Three Men in a Boat”. Laughter overcomes me as I tell her my awareness of the author stating that he is one of the funniest men in English literature. As she takes a mouthful of my salad, “Read this book. It is quite interesting”, she urges while masticating on the lettuce. “Jerome writes that although this book might be a good change in between reading “the best 100 books ever”, it wouldn’t even elevate a cow. But, I think it might elevate you”. As she squanders away to my relief, I sit at my desk torn between the desire to resume ink inhalation or read a book by one of my favourite author. Idling can be a joy if it is masked in the aura of procrastination. Lethargy is an entirely different concept as it is accompanied by comatose temporal lobe. So, I concur with my dear friend Jerome, when he states that in the world of slow-coaches and indolent people, a true idler is a rarity. A lazy person can sit on a park bench for hours and would care the least even if his butt falls asleep while staring expressionlessly at the birds. On the other hand, an idler for a gem of a person that he is, counts the pigeons in the park, browses the newspaper and exhibits characteristic facial expressions indicating his choc-a bloc schedule. Jerome infers idleness is as sweet as stolen kisses. Idle thoughts on the other hand, can weave an intriguing web of frivolous words and rational sentences. An imposed idleness can relay a series of thoughts, wondering why isn’t the life-cycle of a mosquito applicable to certain neighbors when they share the same blood-sucking attributes of the insect. Your mind debates the legitimacy of Darwin’s claim of man being evolved from apes, when you can clearly see the physical similarities and behavioral patterns between a walrus and one of you elder uncles at a family reunion. If we could identify with the baby talk, would all the “goo-goo-ga-ga” spell out Stewie Griffin’s verbal diarrhea? As you idle away work responsibilities, flinging pebbles in the nearby pond, the simultaneous ripples in the water brings a plethora of dystopian phrases that you might scribble away. Pigeons are devilish birds and so are seagulls. They secretly hate me like my exes. They stare at me and then maul me for a bag of cookies. Cats are smarter than dogs. An individual is the most compassionate and cheerful when he is fed. It is funny how a hungry stomach lustfully adores a plate full of gastronomic delicacies. Hunger is a luxury for those well-fed, as myself. Melancholy is like a glob of butter on toasts. It is detrimental to health, but without it life would be as flavorless as a stale oat. Vanity is not an honorary title solely bestowed on Simon Cowell. Everyone is vain. Take pride in it, just like my aunt whose bedroom lifestyle can put a praying mantis to shame (so claims my uncle, marvel at him being still hale and hearty), flutters like a butterfly at a cosmetic counter even though she appears to be a victim of a reversed metamorphosis. Jerome inscribes that memory is a rare ghost-raiser. Like a haunted house, its walls are ever echoing to unseen feet. Through the broken casements we watch the flitting shadows of the dead, and the saddest shadows of them all are the shadows of our own dead selves. Self- imposed amnesia is the best cure. That is what my cousin prescribes to when she runs into one of her ex-husbands while on a shopping spree. Jerome is not at his sarcastic best. He is sick, you see. But, he does not disappoint at all. With the help of his dearest companion – the pipe, his drugged temporal lobe leisurely grabs every thought that runs through his mind contemplating from animal attitudes to love, furnishing apartments, babies, food and merriment of the time gone by. The text comprising of 14 varied essays, are rich with the humorous undertones on frolicsome anecdotes filtering into a theoretical finesse. I am alone and the road is very dark. I stumble on, I know not how nor care, for the way seems leading nowhere, and there is no light to guide. But at last the morning comes, and I find that I have grown into myself. As the alarm once again nearly ruptures my ear drums, it is 4’oclock in the evening and as I erase the defined whorls off my cheek printed by the ink stained thumb, a thought lingers asserting that my friend was precise of this book elevating me. Moo!!!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    MihaElla

    Ah, this was such a lovely, entertaining, witty read. First about (my) sentiments. I felt a bit (strongly) envious of the friend to which JKJ dedicated this small collection of essays. Well, I assumed, on reasonable ground, that it’s a woman, a man, a pet. But no, alas! It is his most beloved smoking pipe! It has, as per below listed, got the best of the lively and trustful attributes to be worthy of this laudatory credit: “To the very dear and well-beloved friend of my prosperous and evil days- T Ah, this was such a lovely, entertaining, witty read. First about (my) sentiments. I felt a bit (strongly) envious of the friend to which JKJ dedicated this small collection of essays. Well, I assumed, on reasonable ground, that it’s a woman, a man, a pet. But no, alas! It is his most beloved smoking pipe! It has, as per below listed, got the best of the lively and trustful attributes to be worthy of this laudatory credit: “To the very dear and well-beloved friend of my prosperous and evil days- To the friend who, though in the early stages of our acquaintanceship did ofttimes disagree with me, has since become to be my very warmest comrade- To the friend who, however often I may put him out, never (now) upsets me in revenge- To the friend who, treated with marked coolness by all the female members of my household, and regarded with suspicion by my very dog, nevertheless seems day by day to be more drawn by me, and in return to more and more impregnate me with the odor of his friendship- To the friend who never tells me of my faults, never wants to borrow money, and never talks about himself- To the companion of my idle hours, the soother of my sorrows, the confidant of my joys and hopes- My oldest and strongest pipe, this little volume is gratefully and affectionately dedicated.” Indeed, so! I feel (again) a bit (strongly) jealous, what a tremendously charming way to pay a tribute to…something or someone! This collection of essays – by the way, there is a second volume, too- is a joy to read, while at the same time, it feels like you are hit by cold showers, from the moral lesson point of view. JKJ is again in his best element: humour, wit, a bit of satire, irony, here and there, and everything is wrapped up in a very simple, digestible and common description of the human life, of people or their actions, trying to reveal the weaknesses and idiosyncrasies as states of fact or common aspects of life. I loved the best his very amusing anecdotes. His humour is bright, and his satire can be easily accepted, without turning the knife deep into your wound, or trying to sink in some deep doubts or questions. He is not dwelling strongly on the human sentiments, but only give you a gentle glimpse and, most important, doesn't carry any meanness or wickedness. He wants you to have your wrinkles smoothened on your face. Well, it depends here on how much loosen skin one has. Sometimes, you can get yourself in big trouble, as by laughing out loud strongly, your eyes might be covered totally of that free skin... I like the way he treats some important subjects by proving that he knows a good deal about the man's and woman's psychology, which allows him to paint, in a very limited space, some very memorable characters, mostly as if talking about himself. His style is clear, straight, and the humorous-satirical shades give the best of the message in all his anecdotes, because in the end we are supposed to extract some lessons, or take-away points, which in most cases, are full of bitterness, grief, sadness, about the human nature... This little volume gathers 14 essays on: being idle; being in love; being in the blues; being hard up; vanity and vanities; getting on in the world; the weather; cats and dogs; being shy; babies; eating and drinking; furnished apartments; dress and deportment; memory. I loved the most the essays on themes such as: idleness, love, vanity and vanities, being shy, cats and dogs, memory. The others are good enough too, so don't think they should be skipped or skimmed. It is just my personal feel that was moved strongly on those themes. I am now heading into the second volume, which surprisingly was written much later, that is to say when he was in his late 30’, while the first volume saw the light of print in his late 20’. If you have a desire for something playful and light, but still thoughtful and inspiring, this is a happy choice. “Can you remember, reader, when you felt something of the same sort of thing? Can you remember those amazing days of fresh young manhood—how, when coming home along the moonlit road, we felt too full of life for sober walking, and had to spring and skip, and wave our arms, and shout till belated farmers' wives thought—and with good reason, too—that we were mad, and kept close to the hedge, while we stood and laughed aloud to see them scuttle off so fast and made their blood run cold with a wild parting whoop, and the tears came, we knew not why? Oh, that magnificent young LIFE! that crowned us kings of the earth; that rushed through every tingling vein till we seemed to walk on air; that thrilled through our throbbing brains and told us to go forth and conquer the whole world; that welled up in our young hearts till we longed to stretch out our arms and gather all the toiling men and women and the little children to our breast and love them all—all. Ah! they were grand days, those deep, full days, when our coming life, like an unseen organ, pealed strange, yearnful music in our ears, and our young blood cried out like a war-horse for the battle. Ah, our pulse beats slow and steady now, and our old joints are rheumatic, and we love our easy-chair and pipe and sneer at boys' enthusiasm. But, oh, for one brief moment of that god-like life again!”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vimal Thiagarajan

    Safest bet on the planet, as far as reading an essay collection goes. Just enough humour to keep you engaged, just enough philosophy to make you ponder and nod, and just enough imagery to thoroughly transport you into the charming realms of slow-paced old world existence - Jerome K Jerome is surely in a league of his own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shaz S

    This is one of the wittiest, most hilarious books I have read in quite a while. I was quite uncertain about picking up this book because the only humour or sarcasm that I really enjoy is written by Oscar Wilde. Previous experiences have taught me not to expect much LOL-inducing wittiness from other authors because they generally pale in comparison. But with The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, even before the book, the introduction caught me, hook, line and sinker. "One or two friends to whom I This is one of the wittiest, most hilarious books I have read in quite a while. I was quite uncertain about picking up this book because the only humour or sarcasm that I really enjoy is written by Oscar Wilde. Previous experiences have taught me not to expect much LOL-inducing wittiness from other authors because they generally pale in comparison. But with The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, even before the book, the introduction caught me, hook, line and sinker. "One or two friends to whom I showed these papers in MS having observed that they were not half bad, and some of my relations having promised to buy the book if it ever came out, I feel I have no right to longer delay its issue. But for this, as one may say, public demand, I perhaps should not have ventured to offer these mere 'idle thoughts' of mine as mental food for the English-speaking peoples of the earth. What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books', you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." It’s not every day that one comes across satire of such quality or honesty. The essays cover a wide range of topics; from pets to babies to blues and clothing. I deliberately restricted myself to reading just an essay a day and most of the time I couldn't read this book in public because every other sentence is ridiculously funny and I’d break into peals of laughter at regular intervals drawing weird looks from the strangers around me. I thoroughly enjoyed these idle thoughts and Jerome K. Jerome just became one of my favourite authors of all time. It’s amazing how most of his insights and observations are relevant even after more than a century of the first publication of the book. I guess great humour is classic. Rating: 4.5/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lubinka Dimitrova

    “What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this for half an hour. It will be a change." “What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this for half an hour. It will be a change."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    "I like idling when I ought not to be idling; not when it is the only thing I have to do." I enjoyed this collection of essays on a variety of topics such as Being Hard Up, Being In Love, Being Shy, Dogs and Cats, and The Weather. Jerome's prose meanders; he's lyrical, sentimental and melancholy; but he is sometimes poignant and frequently hilarious. One must either forgive the sexism of a man born in 1859 or suspect that he's joking when he assumes that the reader is male, or sympathizes with wom "I like idling when I ought not to be idling; not when it is the only thing I have to do." I enjoyed this collection of essays on a variety of topics such as Being Hard Up, Being In Love, Being Shy, Dogs and Cats, and The Weather. Jerome's prose meanders; he's lyrical, sentimental and melancholy; but he is sometimes poignant and frequently hilarious. One must either forgive the sexism of a man born in 1859 or suspect that he's joking when he assumes that the reader is male, or sympathizes with women who needn't go to political meetings, or claims that it is the duty of women to dress prettily.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sabareesh

    "This book wouldn't elevate a cow," reads the author's preface. I cannot presume to agree with or raise issue against it, but whatever be the case, elevation aside, I loved the book. The lovely satire and humorous insight (looks like I am using 5 adjectives per noun!) made it a great read. It is rather surprising how the societal aspects of one's individuality and the individual natures of the cross-cultural constants of society one encounters have not changed one bit in the 130+ years it has been "This book wouldn't elevate a cow," reads the author's preface. I cannot presume to agree with or raise issue against it, but whatever be the case, elevation aside, I loved the book. The lovely satire and humorous insight (looks like I am using 5 adjectives per noun!) made it a great read. It is rather surprising how the societal aspects of one's individuality and the individual natures of the cross-cultural constants of society one encounters have not changed one bit in the 130+ years it has been since the book was written.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    For someone thought of as terribly bluff and British, it's strange how Jerome's almost stand-up thoughts on everyday life always tend to veer towards mystical, melancholy and lyrical conclusions on the bittersweet pleasures of a world where all things must pass. For someone thought of as terribly bluff and British, it's strange how Jerome's almost stand-up thoughts on everyday life always tend to veer towards mystical, melancholy and lyrical conclusions on the bittersweet pleasures of a world where all things must pass.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    The book's sarcastic tone is very entertaining and his insights are wonderful. The book's sarcastic tone is very entertaining and his insights are wonderful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Al

    I’m going against the prevailing opinion on GR, and I had high hopes for this book, because I thoroughly enjoyed Three Men in a Boat when I first read it years ago. Jerome wrote 14 essays, and based on the fact that he dedicated the book to his pipe, I think it would be fair to assume that most, if not all, of the essays should have tongue firmly planted in cheek. Unfortunately, I didn’t perceive them that way. The ones that stood out for me were the first one, On Being Idle, On Being in Love, O I’m going against the prevailing opinion on GR, and I had high hopes for this book, because I thoroughly enjoyed Three Men in a Boat when I first read it years ago. Jerome wrote 14 essays, and based on the fact that he dedicated the book to his pipe, I think it would be fair to assume that most, if not all, of the essays should have tongue firmly planted in cheek. Unfortunately, I didn’t perceive them that way. The ones that stood out for me were the first one, On Being Idle, On Being in Love, On Being Shy and the last one, On Memory. Out of those, On Being Idle and On Being in Love were the best because they seemed the wittiest. The rest of the essays just meandered without being amusing and failed to appeal to me. It’s a short read, about 150 pages, so I may come back to it and find that I enjoy it more, if I can find an idle couple of hours.

  11. 4 out of 5

    CatherineMorland

    Jerome K. Jerome always makes me laugh. But among the funny, rambling stories, there's also some unexpected insight and depth. While Three Men in a Boat was much better, Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow was still entertaining and I enjoyed reading it. It was filled with random thoughts about life and all of its troubles and pleasures. I found some of his comments about women mildly offensive, but many books written in that time period were sexist (you can't expect old books to have modern views!) Jerome K. Jerome always makes me laugh. But among the funny, rambling stories, there's also some unexpected insight and depth. While Three Men in a Boat was much better, Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow was still entertaining and I enjoyed reading it. It was filled with random thoughts about life and all of its troubles and pleasures. I found some of his comments about women mildly offensive, but many books written in that time period were sexist (you can't expect old books to have modern views!). I was able to overlook it. If you're looking for a fun, easy read, give Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow a try! I'll just leave you with a few favorite quotes from the book. "Love is like the measles; we all have to go through it." "But we are so blind to our own shortcomings, so wide awake to those of others." (on pets) "And when we bury our face in our hands and wish we had never been born, they don't sit up very straight and observe that we have brought it all upon ourselves. They don't even hope it will be a warning to us. But they come up softly and shove their heads against us. If it is a cat, she stands on your shoulder, rumples your hair, and says, "I am sorry for you, old man," as plain as words can speak; and if it is a dog, he looks up at you with his big, true eyes and says with them, "Well, you've always got me, you know. We'll go through the world together and always stand by each other, won't we?" "It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being so."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tosh

    Ah the roots of Tom Hodgkinson! This is a British writer I know too little about - and that should change. Jerome K. Jerome wrote this work sometime in the early 20th Century -and in ways it reminds me of British Mark Twain, but also it is obvious that he's the spiritual father to Hodgkinson's thoughts on the life of an idle man. His essay on dogs and cats is hysterical. Ah the roots of Tom Hodgkinson! This is a British writer I know too little about - and that should change. Jerome K. Jerome wrote this work sometime in the early 20th Century -and in ways it reminds me of British Mark Twain, but also it is obvious that he's the spiritual father to Hodgkinson's thoughts on the life of an idle man. His essay on dogs and cats is hysterical.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phrodrick

    Jerome K Jerome’s Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is little more than what the title suggests. A series of light extemporanea. Given his studied use of language it is not effortless so much as superficial. This was his intention; not to be philosophical rather to be pleasant. He rarely aims for sustained belly laughter but he is reliably humorous. As is the tradition in such things he is often the target of his barbs. He will from time to time comment on social conditions even on occasion he can Jerome K Jerome’s Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is little more than what the title suggests. A series of light extemporanea. Given his studied use of language it is not effortless so much as superficial. This was his intention; not to be philosophical rather to be pleasant. He rarely aims for sustained belly laughter but he is reliably humorous. As is the tradition in such things he is often the target of his barbs. He will from time to time comment on social conditions even on occasion he can give way to a dramatic appeal. His intent is never revolutionary, but rather to create contrast with, and perhaps a little reminder of ”There but for the grace of…”. Recommendation: Idle Thoughts of and Idle Fellow is a soothing balm read. It is enjoyable and the more as he is timeless in his observations. It may not be fair to compare the so labeled musings of a barely remembered British writer of the late 19th Century with the great Montaigne, the 16th century philosopher and inventor of the modern essay. Reading Jerome, made me think about (to quote Wiki) ” one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance” and wish he had included something of his sense of humor. The two men may never again be mentioned in the same review, but Jerome will never be listed among the stodgy and the heavy. Jerome’s opening title essay gained my sympathy immediately. His use of deliberately awkward phrasing works for me making word choice part of the humor: “The gentleman who, when I was young, bathed me at wisdom's font for nine guineas a term—no extras—used to say he never knew a boy who could do less work in more time; and I remember my poor grandmother once incidentally observing, in the course of an instruction upon the use of the Prayer-book, that it was highly improbable that I should ever do much that I ought not to do, but that she felt convinced beyond a doubt that I should leave undone pretty well everything that I ought to do. I am afraid I have somewhat belied half the dear old lady's prophecy. Heaven help me! I have done a good many things that I ought not to have done, in spite of my laziness. But I have fully confirmed the accuracy of her judgment so far as neglecting much that I ought not to have neglected is concerned.” A few paragraphs later he will detail for us that “There is more excitement about Bath-chairing—especially if you are not used to the exhilarating exercise—than might appear to the casual observer.” Who knew there was such a thing as Bath- chairing. Perhaps it can be made into a professional sport. Much later he will take on those who over-romance yesteryear observing that the elderly can get away with their claims for the good old days as the young have no firsthand knowledge to gainsay the speaker. The line I can only hope to remember when I next hear about how great the old days were: “ "Oh, give me back the good old days of fifty years ago," has been the cry ever since Adam's fifty-first birthday.” These days I tend to ask if the pleader wants to visit a dentist who operated as if it were the old days. In between he will amuse, rather than regal us with the awkwardness attendant with young love and the near universal law that you will collect the most mess while in your best (newest) suit. He compares dogs and cats in much the same language we use today and shares with us the never fun experience of hunting for an apartment. Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is not going to change your life. It is going to make it a little lighter and perhaps remind you that as for life’s smaller details; things have not changed that much.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shantanoo Desai

    If Jerome K. Jerome was this idle and wrote this book from an idle perspective then I think we should all be procrastinating at his pace. Some of the work in this book just merely questions the rudimentary form of our own existence. He writes this amazing section on love and if you come to think of it he makes you realize what us "busy" souls are really missing out on Love. He has the humor level of a subtle genius. Some banter is so lively that you might as well nod your head and say "take a bo If Jerome K. Jerome was this idle and wrote this book from an idle perspective then I think we should all be procrastinating at his pace. Some of the work in this book just merely questions the rudimentary form of our own existence. He writes this amazing section on love and if you come to think of it he makes you realize what us "busy" souls are really missing out on Love. He has the humor level of a subtle genius. Some banter is so lively that you might as well nod your head and say "take a bow, ye'old Lad" Now I realize why my school syllabus had works of Jerome Klapka Jerome included in it, because I think subtle thinking with a tinge of humor is what this hard world needs at the moment.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Wry wit. Some sentimentality.

  16. 4 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    This is hard to find, but available on Project Gutenburg if you absolutely cant get it anywhere else. Oh how I adore Mr. Jerome!! I came across this book first of all of his by complete accident and how very grateful I am to have discovered him! A turn of the last century humorist with a light heart and wry smile, he is an excellent choice when you want something completely different!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Corvinus Maximilus

    Oh my! How I have loved this book...an absolutely brilliant witty well written book. I wish everyone would read just to feel the words move you, with you, in you and all around you. Bravo Bravo Mr. Jerome, you are masterful. Thank you! This book, I will read it again and again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Violetta Yudina

    "All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books", you may take this up for half an hour" @Jerome K Jerome "All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books", you may take this up for half an hour" @Jerome K Jerome

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daria Todorova

    The King of english humor and selfirony. Such an amusement for the soul. Love him.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    "What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." ............ ON BEING IDLE. Author clarifies the difference between idle, lazy, and plain unoccupied - with much that's familiar to most people. "Idling always has been "What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." ............ ON BEING IDLE. Author clarifies the difference between idle, lazy, and plain unoccupied - with much that's familiar to most people. "Idling always has been my strong point. I take no credit to myself in the matter—it is a gift. Few possess it." "It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do. Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen." "Tobacco has been a blessing to us idlers. What the civil-service clerk before Sir Walter's time found to occupy their minds with it is hard to imagine. I attribute the quarrelsome nature of the Middle Ages young men entirely to the want of the soothing weed. They had no work to do and could not smoke, and the consequence was they were forever fighting and rowing. If, by any extraordinary chance, there was no war going, then they got up a deadly family feud with the next-door neighbor, and if, in spite of this, they still had a few spare moments on their hands, they occupied them with discussions as to whose sweetheart was the best looking, the arguments employed on both sides being battle-axes, clubs, etc. Questions of taste were soon decided in those days. When a twelfth-century youth fell in love he did not take three paces backward, gaze into her eyes, and tell her she was too beautiful to live. He said he would step outside and see about it. And if, when he got out, he met a man and broke his head—the other man's head, I mean—then that proved that his—the first fellow's—girl was a pretty girl. "Nowadays we light a pipe and let the girls fight it out among themselves." ............ ON BEING IN LOVE. "And oh, how beautiful she was, how wondrous beautiful! It was as some angel entering the room, and all else became plain and earthly. She was too sacred to be touched. It seemed almost presumption to gaze at her. You would as soon have thought of kissing her as of singing comic songs in a cathedral. It was desecration enough to kneel and timidly raise the gracious little hand to your lips. "Ah, those foolish days, those foolish days when we were unselfish and pure-minded; those foolish days when our simple hearts were full of truth, and faith, and reverence! Ah, those foolish days of noble longings and of noble strivings!" ............ ON BEING IN THE BLUES. "I can enjoy feeling melancholy, and there is a good deal of satisfaction about being thoroughly miserable; but nobody likes a fit of the blues." ............ ON BEING HARD UP. "There have been a good many funny things said and written about hardupishness, but the reality is not funny, for all that. It is not funny to have to haggle over pennies. It isn't funny to be thought mean and stingy." ............ ON VANITY AND VANITIES. "There she goes, now, gazing rapturously at her own toes and murmuring "pittie"—two-foot-ten of conceit and vanity, to say nothing of other wickednesses." "We wish to become rich men, not in order to enjoy ease and comfort—all that any one man can taste of those may be purchased anywhere for 200 pounds per annum—but that our houses may be bigger and more gaudily furnished than our neighbors'; that our horses and servants may be more numerous; that we may dress our wives and daughters in absurd but expensive clothes; and that we may give costly dinners of which we ourselves individually do not eat a shilling's worth." ............ ON GETTING ON IN THE WORLD. "Man is not given that godlike unselfishness that thinks only of others' good. But in working for themselves they are working for us all. We are so bound together that no man can labor for himself alone. Each blow he strikes in his own behalf helps to mold the universe. The stream in struggling onward turns the mill-wheel; the coral insect, fashioning its tiny cell, joins continents to one another; and the ambitious man, building a pedestal for himself, leaves a monument to posterity. .... " "Contented, unambitious people are all very well in their way. They form a neat, useful background for great portraits to be painted against, and they make a respectable, if not particularly intelligent, audience for the active spirits of the age to play before. I have not a word to say against contented people so long as they keep quiet. But do not, for goodness' sake, let them go strutting about, as they are so fond of doing, crying out that they are the true models for the whole species. Why, they are the deadheads, the drones in the great hive, the street crowds that lounge about, gaping at those who are working." ............ ON THE WEATHER. Amazing finale to a diatribe about weather being always unpleasant in cities, as he concludes about how it's the opposite when in country, communing with nature. "We see but dimly through the mists that roll around our time-girt isle of life, and only hear the distant surging of the great sea beyond." ............ ON CATS AND DOGS. "They are always glad to see us. They are with us in all our humors. They are merry when we are glad, sober when we feel solemn, and sad when we are sorrowful." ............ ON BEING SHY. "All great literary men are shy. I am myself, though I am told it is hardly noticeable. "I am glad it is not. It used to be extremely prominent at one time, and was the cause of much misery to myself and discomfort to every one about me—my lady friends especially complained most bitterly about it." "Conceit, indeed, is the quickest cure for it. When it once begins to dawn upon you that you are a good deal cleverer than any one else in this world, bashfulness becomes shocked and leaves you. When you can look round a roomful of people and think that each one is a mere child in intellect compared with yourself you feel no more shy of them than you would of a select company of magpies or orang-outangs." "Genuine conceit does not make a man objectionable. On the contrary, it tends to make him genial, kind-hearted, and simple. He has no need of affectation—he is far too well satisfied with his own character; and his pride is too deep-seated to appear at all on the outside. Careless alike of praise or blame, he can afford to be truthful. Too far, in fancy, above the rest of mankind to trouble about their petty distinctions, he is equally at home with duke or costermonger. And valuing no one's standard but his own, he is never tempted to practice that miserable pretense that less self-reliant people offer up as an hourly sacrifice to the god of their neighbor's opinion. "The shy man, on the other hand, is humble—modest of his own judgment and over-anxious concerning that of others. But this in the case of a young man is surely right enough. His character is unformed. It is slowly evolving itself out of a chaos of doubt and disbelief. Before the growing insight and experience the diffidence recedes. ... " ............ ON BABIES. "Oh, yes, I do—I know a lot about 'em. I was one myself once, though not long—not so long as my clothes. They were very long, I recollect, and always in my way when I wanted to kick." "It is only the first baby that takes up the whole of a woman's time. Five or six do not require nearly so much attention as one." "Poor little feet, just commencing the stony journey! We old travelers, far down the road, can only pause to wave a hand to you. You come out of the dark mist, and we, looking back, see you, so tiny in the distance, standing on the brow of the hill, your arms stretched out toward us. God speed you! We would stay and take your little hands in ours, but the murmur of the great sea is in our ears and we may not linger. We must hasten down, for the shadowy ships are waiting to spread their sable sails." ............ ON EATING AND DRINKING. "My poor, dear mother used to say she liked to see me eat, and it has always been a pleasant reflection to me since that I must have given her much gratification in that direction. A growing, healthy lad, taking plenty of exercise and careful to restrain himself from indulging in too much study, can generally satisfy the most exacting expectations as regards his feeding powers." "By the way, we never eat anybody's health, always drink it. Why should we not stand up now and then and eat a tart to somebody's success?" "Ah! we may talk sentiment as much as we like, but the stomach is the real seat of happiness in this world. The kitchen is the chief temple wherein we worship, its roaring fire is our vestal flame, and the cook is our great high-priest. He is a mighty magician and a kindly one. He soothes away all sorrow and care. He drives forth all enmity, gladdens all love. Our God is great and the cook is his prophet. Let us eat, drink, and be merry." ............ ON FURNISHED APARTMENTS. "Curious, that in lodgings the rule of life is reversed. The higher you get up in the world the lower you come down in your lodgings. On the lodging-house ladder the poor man is at the top, the rich man underneath. You start in the attic and work your way down to the first floor." "Haydn grew up in an attic and Chatterton starved in one. Addison and Goldsmith wrote in garrets. Faraday and De Quincey knew them well. Dr. Johnson camped cheerfully in them, sleeping soundly—too soundly sometimes—upon their trundle-beds, like the sturdy old soldier of fortune that he was, inured to hardship and all careless of himself. Dickens spent his youth among them, Morland his old age—alas! a drunken, premature old age. Hans Andersen, the fairy king, dreamed his sweet fancies beneath their sloping roofs. Poor, wayward-hearted Collins leaned his head upon their crazy tables; priggish Benjamin Franklin; Savage, the wrong-headed, much troubled when he could afford any softer bed than a doorstep; young Bloomfield, "Bobby" Burns, Hogarth, Watts the engineer—the roll is endless. Ever since the habitations of men were reared two stories high has the garret been the nursery of genius." " ... If all the wisdom of the world and all its art—all the spoils that it has won from nature, all the fire that it has snatched from heaven—were gathered together and divided into heaps, and we could point and say, for instance, these mighty truths were flashed forth in the brilliant salon amid the ripple of light laughter and the sparkle of bright eyes; and this deep knowledge was dug up in the quiet study, where the bust of Pallas looks serenely down on the leather-scented shelves; and this heap belongs to the crowded street; and that to the daisied field—the heap that would tower up high above the rest as a mountain above hills would be the one at which we should look up and say: this noblest pile of all—these glorious paintings and this wondrous music, these trumpet words, these solemn thoughts, these daring deeds, they were forged and fashioned amid misery and pain in the sordid squalor of the city garret. There, from their eyries, while the world heaved and throbbed below, the kings of men sent forth their eagle thoughts to wing their flight through the ages. There, where the sunlight streaming through the broken panes fell on rotting boards and crumbling walls; there, from their lofty thrones, those rag-clothed Joves have hurled their thunderbolts and shaken, before now, the earth to its foundations." ............ ON DRESS AND DEPORTMENT. Good. ............ ON MEMORY. "I am alone and the road is very dark. I stumble on, I know not how nor care, for the way seems leading nowhere, and there is no light to guide. "But at last the morning comes, and I find that I have grown into myself." Lovely. ............

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amrita

    This brilliant gentleman could take something as banal as the weather and write an essay with just the right balance of humor and sentimentality. I came across some of the most beautiful sentences in these essays. The humor made me laugh out loud, the poetic imagery made me sigh deeply, and the truth resonated with my very soul. This was a feast.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    IDLE THOUGHTS OF AN IDLE FELLOW "What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." ......... ON BEING IDLE. Author clarifies the difference between idle, lazy, and plain unoccupied - with much that's familiar to most pe IDLE THOUGHTS OF AN IDLE FELLOW "What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading "the best hundred books," you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." ......... ON BEING IDLE. Author clarifies the difference between idle, lazy, and plain unoccupied - with much that's familiar to most people. "Idling always has been my strong point. I take no credit to myself in the matter—it is a gift. Few possess it." "It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do. Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen." "Tobacco has been a blessing to us idlers. What the civil-service clerk before Sir Walter's time found to occupy their minds with it is hard to imagine. I attribute the quarrelsome nature of the Middle Ages young men entirely to the want of the soothing weed. They had no work to do and could not smoke, and the consequence was they were forever fighting and rowing. If, by any extraordinary chance, there was no war going, then they got up a deadly family feud with the next-door neighbor, and if, in spite of this, they still had a few spare moments on their hands, they occupied them with discussions as to whose sweetheart was the best looking, the arguments employed on both sides being battle-axes, clubs, etc. Questions of taste were soon decided in those days. When a twelfth-century youth fell in love he did not take three paces backward, gaze into her eyes, and tell her she was too beautiful to live. He said he would step outside and see about it. And if, when he got out, he met a man and broke his head—the other man's head, I mean—then that proved that his—the first fellow's—girl was a pretty girl. "Nowadays we light a pipe and let the girls fight it out among themselves." ......... ON BEING IN LOVE. "And oh, how beautiful she was, how wondrous beautiful! It was as some angel entering the room, and all else became plain and earthly. She was too sacred to be touched. It seemed almost presumption to gaze at her. You would as soon have thought of kissing her as of singing comic songs in a cathedral. It was desecration enough to kneel and timidly raise the gracious little hand to your lips. "Ah, those foolish days, those foolish days when we were unselfish and pure-minded; those foolish days when our simple hearts were full of truth, and faith, and reverence! Ah, those foolish days of noble longings and of noble strivings!" ......... ON BEING IN THE BLUES. "I can enjoy feeling melancholy, and there is a good deal of satisfaction about being thoroughly miserable; but nobody likes a fit of the blues." ......... ON BEING HARD UP. "There have been a good many funny things said and written about hardupishness, but the reality is not funny, for all that. It is not funny to have to haggle over pennies. It isn't funny to be thought mean and stingy." ......... ON VANITY AND VANITIES. "There she goes, now, gazing rapturously at her own toes and murmuring "pittie"—two-foot-ten of conceit and vanity, to say nothing of other wickednesses." "We wish to become rich men, not in order to enjoy ease and comfort—all that any one man can taste of those may be purchased anywhere for 200 pounds per annum—but that our houses may be bigger and more gaudily furnished than our neighbors'; that our horses and servants may be more numerous; that we may dress our wives and daughters in absurd but expensive clothes; and that we may give costly dinners of which we ourselves individually do not eat a shilling's worth." ......... ON GETTING ON IN THE WORLD. "Man is not given that godlike unselfishness that thinks only of others' good. But in working for themselves they are working for us all. We are so bound together that no man can labor for himself alone. Each blow he strikes in his own behalf helps to mold the universe. The stream in struggling onward turns the mill-wheel; the coral insect, fashioning its tiny cell, joins continents to one another; and the ambitious man, building a pedestal for himself, leaves a monument to posterity. .... " "Contented, unambitious people are all very well in their way. They form a neat, useful background for great portraits to be painted against, and they make a respectable, if not particularly intelligent, audience for the active spirits of the age to play before. I have not a word to say against contented people so long as they keep quiet. But do not, for goodness' sake, let them go strutting about, as they are so fond of doing, crying out that they are the true models for the whole species. Why, they are the deadheads, the drones in the great hive, the street crowds that lounge about, gaping at those who are working." ......... ON THE WEATHER. Amazing finale to a diatribe about weather being always unpleasant in cities, as he concludes about how it's the opposite when in country, communing with nature. "We see but dimly through the mists that roll around our time-girt isle of life, and only hear the distant surging of the great sea beyond." ......... ON CATS AND DOGS. "They are always glad to see us. They are with us in all our humors. They are merry when we are glad, sober when we feel solemn, and sad when we are sorrowful." ......... ON BEING SHY. "All great literary men are shy. I am myself, though I am told it is hardly noticeable. "I am glad it is not. It used to be extremely prominent at one time, and was the cause of much misery to myself and discomfort to every one about me—my lady friends especially complained most bitterly about it." "Conceit, indeed, is the quickest cure for it. When it once begins to dawn upon you that you are a good deal cleverer than any one else in this world, bashfulness becomes shocked and leaves you. When you can look round a roomful of people and think that each one is a mere child in intellect compared with yourself you feel no more shy of them than you would of a select company of magpies or orang-outangs." "Genuine conceit does not make a man objectionable. On the contrary, it tends to make him genial, kind-hearted, and simple. He has no need of affectation—he is far too well satisfied with his own character; and his pride is too deep-seated to appear at all on the outside. Careless alike of praise or blame, he can afford to be truthful. Too far, in fancy, above the rest of mankind to trouble about their petty distinctions, he is equally at home with duke or costermonger. And valuing no one's standard but his own, he is never tempted to practice that miserable pretense that less self-reliant people offer up as an hourly sacrifice to the god of their neighbor's opinion. "The shy man, on the other hand, is humble—modest of his own judgment and over-anxious concerning that of others. But this in the case of a young man is surely right enough. His character is unformed. It is slowly evolving itself out of a chaos of doubt and disbelief. Before the growing insight and experience the diffidence recedes. ... " ......... ON BABIES. "Oh, yes, I do—I know a lot about 'em. I was one myself once, though not long—not so long as my clothes. They were very long, I recollect, and always in my way when I wanted to kick." "It is only the first baby that takes up the whole of a woman's time. Five or six do not require nearly so much attention as one." "Poor little feet, just commencing the stony journey! We old travelers, far down the road, can only pause to wave a hand to you. You come out of the dark mist, and we, looking back, see you, so tiny in the distance, standing on the brow of the hill, your arms stretched out toward us. God speed you! We would stay and take your little hands in ours, but the murmur of the great sea is in our ears and we may not linger. We must hasten down, for the shadowy ships are waiting to spread their sable sails." ......... ON EATING AND DRINKING. "My poor, dear mother used to say she liked to see me eat, and it has always been a pleasant reflection to me since that I must have given her much gratification in that direction. A growing, healthy lad, taking plenty of exercise and careful to restrain himself from indulging in too much study, can generally satisfy the most exacting expectations as regards his feeding powers." "By the way, we never eat anybody's health, always drink it. Why should we not stand up now and then and eat a tart to somebody's success?" "Ah! we may talk sentiment as much as we like, but the stomach is the real seat of happiness in this world. The kitchen is the chief temple wherein we worship, its roaring fire is our vestal flame, and the cook is our great high-priest. He is a mighty magician and a kindly one. He soothes away all sorrow and care. He drives forth all enmity, gladdens all love. Our God is great and the cook is his prophet. Let us eat, drink, and be merry." ......... ON FURNISHED APARTMENTS. "Curious, that in lodgings the rule of life is reversed. The higher you get up in the world the lower you come down in your lodgings. On the lodging-house ladder the poor man is at the top, the rich man underneath. You start in the attic and work your way down to the first floor." "Haydn grew up in an attic and Chatterton starved in one. Addison and Goldsmith wrote in garrets. Faraday and De Quincey knew them well. Dr. Johnson camped cheerfully in them, sleeping soundly—too soundly sometimes—upon their trundle-beds, like the sturdy old soldier of fortune that he was, inured to hardship and all careless of himself. Dickens spent his youth among them, Morland his old age—alas! a drunken, premature old age. Hans Andersen, the fairy king, dreamed his sweet fancies beneath their sloping roofs. Poor, wayward-hearted Collins leaned his head upon their crazy tables; priggish Benjamin Franklin; Savage, the wrong-headed, much troubled when he could afford any softer bed than a doorstep; young Bloomfield, "Bobby" Burns, Hogarth, Watts the engineer—the roll is endless. Ever since the habitations of men were reared two stories high has the garret been the nursery of genius." " ... If all the wisdom of the world and all its art—all the spoils that it has won from nature, all the fire that it has snatched from heaven—were gathered together and divided into heaps, and we could point and say, for instance, these mighty truths were flashed forth in the brilliant salon amid the ripple of light laughter and the sparkle of bright eyes; and this deep knowledge was dug up in the quiet study, where the bust of Pallas looks serenely down on the leather-scented shelves; and this heap belongs to the crowded street; and that to the daisied field—the heap that would tower up high above the rest as a mountain above hills would be the one at which we should look up and say: this noblest pile of all—these glorious paintings and this wondrous music, these trumpet words, these solemn thoughts, these daring deeds, they were forged and fashioned amid misery and pain in the sordid squalor of the city garret. There, from their eyries, while the world heaved and throbbed below, the kings of men sent forth their eagle thoughts to wing their flight through the ages. There, where the sunlight streaming through the broken panes fell on rotting boards and crumbling walls; there, from their lofty thrones, those rag-clothed Joves have hurled their thunderbolts and shaken, before now, the earth to its foundations." ......... ON DRESS AND DEPORTMENT. Good. ......... ON MEMORY. "I am alone and the road is very dark. I stumble on, I know not how nor care, for the way seems leading nowhere, and there is no light to guide. "But at last the morning comes, and I find that I have grown into myself." July 27, 2020 - July 29, 2020. ......... ......... ......... ......... Stage-Land ......... ......... Jerome K. Jerome in his element, from the word go! ......... "TO THAT HIGHLY RESPECTABLE BUT UNNECESSARILY RETIRING INDIVIDUAL, OF WHOM WE HEAR SO MUCH BUT SEE SO LITTLE, “THE EARNEST STUDENT OF THE DRAMA,” THIS (COMPARATIVELY) TRUTHFUL LITTLE BOOK IS LOVINGLY DEDICATED." ......... THE HERO. "His name is George, generally speaking. “Call me George!” he says to the heroine. She calls him George (in a very low voice, because she is so young and timid). Then he is happy. "The stage hero never has any work to do. He is always hanging about and getting into trouble. His chief aim in life is to be accused of crimes he has never committed, and if he can muddle things up with a corpse in some complicated way so as to get himself reasonably mistaken for the murderer, he feels his day has not been wasted. "He has a wonderful gift of speech and a flow of language calculated to strike terror to the bravest heart. It is a grand thing to hear him bullyragging the villain. "The stage hero is always entitled to “estates,” chiefly remarkable for their high state of cultivation and for the eccentric ground plan of the “manor house” upon them. The house is never more than one story high, but it makes up in green stuff over the porch what it lacks in size and convenience. "The chief drawback in connection with it, to our eyes, is that all the inhabitants of the neighboring village appear to live in the front garden, but the hero evidently thinks it rather nice of them, as it enables him to make speeches to them from the front doorstep — his favorite recreation." ......... THE VILLAIN. "He wears a clean collar and smokes a cigarette; that is how we know he is a villain. In real life it is often difficult to tell a villain from an honest man, and this gives rise to mistakes; but on the stage, as we have said villains wear clean collars and smoke cigarettes, and thus all fear of blunder is avoided." ............ THE HEROINE. "She is always in trouble — and don’t she let you know it, too! Her life is undeniably a hard one. Nothing goes right with her. We all have our troubles, but the stage heroine never has anything else. If she only got one afternoon a week off from trouble or had her Sundays free it would be something. But no; misfortune stalks beside her from week’s beginning to week’s end." ............ THE COMIC MAN. ............ THE LAWYER. ............ THE ADVENTURESS. ............ THE SERVANT-GIRL. ............ THE CHILD. ............ THE COMIC LOVERS. ............ THE PEASANTS. ............ THE GOOD OLD MAN. ............ THE IRISHMAN. ............ THE DETECTIVE. ............ THE SAILOR. ............ ............................................... ............................................... October 06, 2020 - October 06, 2020. ............................................... ...............................................

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Some parts of this book are absolutely brilliant, others are just unremarkable, thats why I gave it three stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Here's a current email that I wrote to a special someone as a reactionary piece in order to prove to everyone around here that I am pretty idle indeed: From: [Removed] Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 2:44 PM To: [Removed] Subject: RE: What does this even mean?? It means that she and [Removed] are going to expense a long lunch somewhere and then forcibly schedule several meetings with pre-determined resources, up to and including all pre-determined resources, in order to underhandedly control the fl Here's a current email that I wrote to a special someone as a reactionary piece in order to prove to everyone around here that I am pretty idle indeed: From: [Removed] Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 2:44 PM To: [Removed] Subject: RE: What does this even mean?? It means that she and [Removed] are going to expense a long lunch somewhere and then forcibly schedule several meetings with pre-determined resources, up to and including all pre-determined resources, in order to underhandedly control the flow of everyone’s thought speak for the expected grand result of an ill-advised, horribly-written, poorly-scoped be-all, end-all running document that less-than-clearly attempts to define middling client objectives. Ironic, though, as important people seem to managerially jump in front of AMs with respect to client communications, client-promised deliverables, and the obvious interrelated arenas of forecasting/budget-related return result expectations whenever it so seems to suit them. Is English a second language for you? It’s all there in black and white. Read it again. Try to understand. Put forth effort. Et al... And personally I feel that you’d be better off embedding an image of a piece of bread that looks like Abraham Lincoln within said document and helped thyself to a week-long sojourn of expanded luncheon opportunities. Try the South Metro if you get a chance; for example, Inver Grove Heights offers some wondrous dining experiences if you’ve got the time and the money. From: [Removed] Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 2:01 PM To: [Removed] Subject: What does this even mean?? From: [Someone Apparently Quite Important] Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 12:42 PM To: [Removed] Cc: [Removed] Subject: Role Definitions/Expectations Etc. Hello, As a follow up to the information the AM team provided a few weeks back on expectations, roles etc., [Removed] and I are kicking off a short initiative. It is the objective to complete the definitions and role clarification and schedule implementation to roll this out in the next 4 to 6 weeks. Each of you have a unique set of clients and approach to your work with a shared passion to meet and exceed client expectations. Therefore, I would like you to participate in the initiative. Estimated time requirements is 8 hours or less for 2-3 meetings over the next 4 to 6 weeks. If we get this right with your input, our overall efficiency and effectiveness will improve, paying you back for the hours you invest. What do you think? Are you up for the challenge? [Removed] [Removed] SVP Client Operations [Removed] [Removed]

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Cleveland

    definitely a good break when reading something more in-depth and educational

  26. 5 out of 5

    Austen to Zafón

    I read and loved Jerome's "Three Men in a Boat," so I picked up this series of his essays on a variety of topics. Pub'd in 1886, before "Three Men in a Boat," it was the intro by the author that sold me: "One or two friends to whom I showed these papers in MS having observed that they were not half bad, and some of my relations having promised to buy the book if it ever came out, I feel I have no right to longer delay its issue. But for this, as one may say, public demand, I perhaps should not h I read and loved Jerome's "Three Men in a Boat," so I picked up this series of his essays on a variety of topics. Pub'd in 1886, before "Three Men in a Boat," it was the intro by the author that sold me: "One or two friends to whom I showed these papers in MS having observed that they were not half bad, and some of my relations having promised to buy the book if it ever came out, I feel I have no right to longer delay its issue. But for this, as one may say, public demand, I perhaps should not have ventured to offer these mere 'idle thoughts' of mine as mental food for the English-speaking peoples of the earth. What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books', you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." I thoroughly enjoyed his humor and his insights into such topics as "being hard up," "furnished apartments," "dress and deportment," and "memory." Several times I laughed aloud. As you might expect, given the publication date, some of his ideas about women are a bit dated and sexist, but for a man of his era, I thought he was fairer than most.

  27. 5 out of 5

    George

    BIT OF A STODGY READ. “Irreverence for the dreams of youth soon creeps like a killing frost upon our hearts.”—page 15 I expected more from ‘Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow,’ than Jerome K. Jerome seemed able to deliver. What, at fist, I took to be pithy phrases, worthy of quoting, on reread took on a patina of melancholy and maudlin. I expected a more humorous read. The first essay, ‘On Being Idle’ and the last, ‘On Memory’ were by far the best, but were also heavily steeped in melancholia. Recomme BIT OF A STODGY READ. “Irreverence for the dreams of youth soon creeps like a killing frost upon our hearts.”—page 15 I expected more from ‘Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow,’ than Jerome K. Jerome seemed able to deliver. What, at fist, I took to be pithy phrases, worthy of quoting, on reread took on a patina of melancholy and maudlin. I expected a more humorous read. The first essay, ‘On Being Idle’ and the last, ‘On Memory’ were by far the best, but were also heavily steeped in melancholia. Recommendation: Stay with Mencken and Twain if it’s pithy you want. “The frail bridge of time on which we tread sinks back into eternity at every step we take.”—page 114 ePub edition. Source: http://gutenberg.org, from www.feedbooks.com, 122 pages

  28. 4 out of 5

    M

    I read this expecting something lighthearted, entertaining and humorous like Jerome's Three Men in a Boat. Instead I found somewhat depressing musings and sexist commentary. There were a few good bits, but if you come into it expecting a sequel you will be disappointed. I read this expecting something lighthearted, entertaining and humorous like Jerome's Three Men in a Boat. Instead I found somewhat depressing musings and sexist commentary. There were a few good bits, but if you come into it expecting a sequel you will be disappointed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike Nallo

    A highly entertaining and insightful read. This book made me yearn for the days when people were able to use language in a beautiful way to communicate, with no fear of being thought of as prententious. I may take to wearing a billycock hat.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    You know how when you read 3 Men in a Boat for the umpteenth time, and you know which maudlin tedious bits to skip? Well if that's you, then give this whole book a miss, because that's pretty much all of it. You know how when you read 3 Men in a Boat for the umpteenth time, and you know which maudlin tedious bits to skip? Well if that's you, then give this whole book a miss, because that's pretty much all of it.

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