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Shaped by the Word: The Power of Scripture in Spiritual Formation

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Many people buy and read the Bible for the sake of gaining information, Robert Mulholland believes that people can read the Bible not only for information, but for formation. In this completely revised version of an Upper Room best-selling classic, Mulholland invites readers to embrace scripture in a new and more fulfilling way, letting the biblical text form our spiritual Many people buy and read the Bible for the sake of gaining information, Robert Mulholland believes that people can read the Bible not only for information, but for formation. In this completely revised version of an Upper Room best-selling classic, Mulholland invites readers to embrace scripture in a new and more fulfilling way, letting the biblical text form our spiritual life. Mulholland's biggest hope is that people will begin to open themselves so they may regularly encounter God in reading the Bible.Dr. Mulholland examines the obstacles often encountered in spiritual reading. These obstacles include the attitudes that we bring to reading the Bible -- our view of self, our view of the Bible, our relationships with others. As Mulholland writes about these obstacles, he offers a gentle pastoral voice that guides the reader to meet God anew. Readers will grow spiritually as they read and digest Mulholland's insights into the ways we meet God in scripture.


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Many people buy and read the Bible for the sake of gaining information, Robert Mulholland believes that people can read the Bible not only for information, but for formation. In this completely revised version of an Upper Room best-selling classic, Mulholland invites readers to embrace scripture in a new and more fulfilling way, letting the biblical text form our spiritual Many people buy and read the Bible for the sake of gaining information, Robert Mulholland believes that people can read the Bible not only for information, but for formation. In this completely revised version of an Upper Room best-selling classic, Mulholland invites readers to embrace scripture in a new and more fulfilling way, letting the biblical text form our spiritual life. Mulholland's biggest hope is that people will begin to open themselves so they may regularly encounter God in reading the Bible.Dr. Mulholland examines the obstacles often encountered in spiritual reading. These obstacles include the attitudes that we bring to reading the Bible -- our view of self, our view of the Bible, our relationships with others. As Mulholland writes about these obstacles, he offers a gentle pastoral voice that guides the reader to meet God anew. Readers will grow spiritually as they read and digest Mulholland's insights into the ways we meet God in scripture.

30 review for Shaped by the Word: The Power of Scripture in Spiritual Formation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    For a book about being formed by scripture, I found this book to be lacking in actual engagement with scripture. The power seemed to be on the reader and not God or the Bible itself. Also found his word pictures required a lot of unnecessary mental gymnastics and his overall diction bent was hard to connect with. This read like a series of seminary lectures to a very specific community and was not very accessible to someone outside that particular lane. In place of this book, I would recommend S For a book about being formed by scripture, I found this book to be lacking in actual engagement with scripture. The power seemed to be on the reader and not God or the Bible itself. Also found his word pictures required a lot of unnecessary mental gymnastics and his overall diction bent was hard to connect with. This read like a series of seminary lectures to a very specific community and was not very accessible to someone outside that particular lane. In place of this book, I would recommend Scripture And The Authority of God by NT Wright.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chance Faulkner

    Although there were helpful bits in his book, I cannot say that I would recommend it as a helpful resource Bible engagement. The author begins by warning the reader that there is going to be content will trouble, offend, and make the reader uncomfortable. He suggests that any un easiness, offence or trouble internally is a means of God's "knock upon one of the closed door of your life" (16). According to the author, God is willing to work in our lives and he often knocks at our "closed doors", a Although there were helpful bits in his book, I cannot say that I would recommend it as a helpful resource Bible engagement. The author begins by warning the reader that there is going to be content will trouble, offend, and make the reader uncomfortable. He suggests that any un easiness, offence or trouble internally is a means of God's "knock upon one of the closed door of your life" (16). According to the author, God is willing to work in our lives and he often knocks at our "closed doors", and we need to give him permission to come in. One must be open minded, yes. But one must be open minded to change only if they are corrected by means of the Biblical text. One must not be so open minded that they cease to think. Never does the author even submit to the reader to look at the Biblical text and be convinced by it, but rather concludes that any disagreement with the author, means being "closed off" to the working of God. On a book about Scripture, I find it troubling that he pushes aside the possibility that any disagreement or uncomfort could be a result of the authors own doing. Instead he leaves the only option to disagreement to be the result the readers own hard heart. Secondly, though minor when in context to the topic of Bible engagement but worth addressing, he consistently repeats is this idea that God needs our permission to let him in. Although man's responsibility is compatible with God's sovereignty, God does not need our permission to do anything. He is sovereign Lord and does all that he pleases. Although I appreciate his concern for one reading Scripture without being penetrated and formed by it, I do think he sets up a false dichotomy between what he calls "informational" and "formational" reading (using ones mind versus using ones heart and spirit). At points in the book he will say thing's like "it's not about the method but the motive" yet continue to pit these two things against each other. Scripture was written by specific people, in specific times and therefore must be read and understood in light of that. He suggests that reading "less" is better. Books were written to be read and heard in one sitting (the epistles for example). And must be understood in light of original readers and original audience. It seems that much of what he is saying is suggesting a subjectivism to hearing God's voice when God has communicated and continues to communicate through his Word in light of context and the original readers. The response of experiencing the Scriptures should not be a subjectivism but putting oneself in the shoes of the original readers, audiences, and author in a way that is faithful to history and the text. When we find ourselves here, we experience and feel the weight of the meaning of the sacred text and then apply it appropriately.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Take-aways: - Read the Bible formationally rather than informationally - Place yourself in the text and allow it to shape you - Focus on being and becoming rather than doing

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve Jaeger

    Unquestionably one of the best books I've read on the centrality of Scripture to the Christian life and, more specifically, to spiritual formation. As a pastor and the director of spiritual formation ministry at my church, I *highly* recommend this. On the basis of a negative review I saw here, I'd anticipate at least two places of possible concern or disagreement from evangelical Christians (of whom I count myself a part): 1) that this book on Scripture isn't grounded enough in Scripture itself Unquestionably one of the best books I've read on the centrality of Scripture to the Christian life and, more specifically, to spiritual formation. As a pastor and the director of spiritual formation ministry at my church, I *highly* recommend this. On the basis of a negative review I saw here, I'd anticipate at least two places of possible concern or disagreement from evangelical Christians (of whom I count myself a part): 1) that this book on Scripture isn't grounded enough in Scripture itself (i.e., it doesn't present Scriptural citations or references for some of its assertions); and 2) that his language of Christians being "a 'word' that God speaks us forth to be in the world" sounds a little weird at first (and the lack of direct Scripture citation to support it might set off alarm bells for some). However, I'd respond by saying: 1) Mulholland didn't intend this book as an exhaustive theology of God's Word (which would necessarily entail biblical references), but writes with that orthodox foundation underneath; and 2) the concept of each Christ-follower being a "word" spoken by God into the world is actually very biblical. For one, we're Christ's ambassadors, bringing his message to a world that needs it (2 Cor. 5:20). For another, we are those in whom the "word of Christ" is to "dwell richly" (Col. 3:16), thereby proclaiming & demonstrating his truth to the world. The analogies and metaphors could continue. All in all, this is an exceptionally helpful book for nurturing one's relationship with the Lord by encountering him in the Bible. My 5 stars are given enthusiastically.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Brooker

    If I never read "the word that God is speaking you forth to be" again it will be too soon. For a book about the power of Scripture, Mulholland does not seem to put a lot of weight on the word of God (something I'm sure he would argue with me were he still alive) but on the reader's revelations by engaging the word of God. And, for what it's worth, this was even made frighteningly obvious when, in one brief moment, the author indicated that Scripture can speak to us as much as any other book or e If I never read "the word that God is speaking you forth to be" again it will be too soon. For a book about the power of Scripture, Mulholland does not seem to put a lot of weight on the word of God (something I'm sure he would argue with me were he still alive) but on the reader's revelations by engaging the word of God. And, for what it's worth, this was even made frighteningly obvious when, in one brief moment, the author indicated that Scripture can speak to us as much as any other book or experience could. This very liberal and loose look at interpreting and understanding the Scriptures came to a head very early on in the book with the author's primary point: The believer is a "word" that God is speaking out and has been since before creation. Not only is that unbelievably irresponsible wording for a book that is meant to highlight the spiritually formational potential of the Holy Scriptures, but it's also an incredibly irresponsible way of taking the original language and stretching it beyond what was meant by it. In fact, Ephesians 1:4 is very clear that we were "chosen" by God in Christ before the foundation of the world, not "a word spoken forth by God." There's not even other supporting Scripture for such a misunderstanding. And what makes it worse is that the reader needs to hear a variation of that phrase used in almost every other paragraph. Truthfully, I began the book thinking it was quite intriguing as it would tackle less of the educational and more the transformational aspect of approaching God's Word, but I just did not find any profound revelations in here; only ended up finding poor writing and even poorer premises.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jay McCann

    I love the basic philosophy behind the book. He does a great job to talk about how the Bible can be used to take a self-assessment of who we are. Unfortunately it reads like an article that became extended to a full book with far less interest. It spends quite a bit of time repeating itself, perhaps because it was initially a lecture series. Also, I found like some of the arguments were not well backed, for instance the idea of we being a word sent out into the word. It was a bit of a stretch th I love the basic philosophy behind the book. He does a great job to talk about how the Bible can be used to take a self-assessment of who we are. Unfortunately it reads like an article that became extended to a full book with far less interest. It spends quite a bit of time repeating itself, perhaps because it was initially a lecture series. Also, I found like some of the arguments were not well backed, for instance the idea of we being a word sent out into the word. It was a bit of a stretch that didn't seem to fit perfectly with the Ephesians passage surrounding that discussion. The problem is that he kept coming back and mentioning it as a way of backing other arguments, therefore it seemed to fall apart. I have been seeking to spend more time allowing Scripture to speak towards who I am which is why I have liked this book as it doesn't seek to be a ten step method or formulaic. The major themes are great reminders of how we bring our Western eyes into the process.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandi Ehman

    As a task-oriented INTJ who definitely leans toward reading Scripture informationally and with an end goal in mind, I really really liked this book. That’s not to say I disagree with the points brought up in the negative reviews - I really didn’t love the phrase “the word God is speaking you to be” and there’s one page where it shows up 3-4 times in a single paragraph, and there are definitely parts that seem overly wordy or repetitive. But for me, I was able to set aside annoyances in favor of As a task-oriented INTJ who definitely leans toward reading Scripture informationally and with an end goal in mind, I really really liked this book. That’s not to say I disagree with the points brought up in the negative reviews - I really didn’t love the phrase “the word God is speaking you to be” and there’s one page where it shows up 3-4 times in a single paragraph, and there are definitely parts that seem overly wordy or repetitive. But for me, I was able to set aside annoyances in favor of the heart of the message. I especially loved the section where he breaks down John Wesley’s guidelines for reading Scripture and talks in depth about what each means. The book itself isn’t highly anecdotal, but the few examples from his own life that he did share really resonated with me (and echoed experiences I’ve had as well). I also appreciated his encouragement to read completely through the Bible - not for speed but for thoroughness.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This is the second time I have read this powerful book. I find the strictures more inflexible this reading. I do agree the Bible is God-breathed, but I begin to question whether it's complete. I found this book very helpful as I re-established my faith and it provides a faith-filled approach to study the Word. Mulholland challenges you to think through the message and apply it. Very helpful earlier in my journey. Recommend it to anyone beginning and needing help in how to approach such a large a This is the second time I have read this powerful book. I find the strictures more inflexible this reading. I do agree the Bible is God-breathed, but I begin to question whether it's complete. I found this book very helpful as I re-established my faith and it provides a faith-filled approach to study the Word. Mulholland challenges you to think through the message and apply it. Very helpful earlier in my journey. Recommend it to anyone beginning and needing help in how to approach such a large and potentially intimidating Book. May this book open you to a deep understanding of God's Word. Amen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Pine

    A helpful book, although a bit dry. A central theme is how easy it is to manipulate the Word for our own purposes. Mulholland has some good insights and challenges about how to be more open to God accomplishing His purposes in us through His Word. "'Graspers' powerfully resist being grasped by God. Controllers are inherently incapable of yielding control to God. Manipulators strongly reject being shaped by God. Information gatherers are structurally closed to being addressed by God. Information t A helpful book, although a bit dry. A central theme is how easy it is to manipulate the Word for our own purposes. Mulholland has some good insights and challenges about how to be more open to God accomplishing His purposes in us through His Word. "'Graspers' powerfully resist being grasped by God. Controllers are inherently incapable of yielding control to God. Manipulators strongly reject being shaped by God. Information gatherers are structurally closed to being addressed by God. Information takers have extreme difficulty being receivers. Frenetically functional activists find it extremely difficult to 'be still and know' that God is God." (Psalm 46:10, RSV)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jacque Kelnhofer

    This is a short book that packs a powerful punch. Doesn't let the size fool you. This will not be a quick read, nor will it be a one-and-done read. The book itself exemplifies the lessons it is striving to impart. I suspect this will become a staple resource to refer to as I work to live into its guides, as well as a source of renewal when reading the Word threatens to become stale or return void. A must-read, and re-read, for anyone seeking to develop their personal relationship with Christ and This is a short book that packs a powerful punch. Doesn't let the size fool you. This will not be a quick read, nor will it be a one-and-done read. The book itself exemplifies the lessons it is striving to impart. I suspect this will become a staple resource to refer to as I work to live into its guides, as well as a source of renewal when reading the Word threatens to become stale or return void. A must-read, and re-read, for anyone seeking to develop their personal relationship with Christ and live into God's unique purpose for you, in service to others!

  11. 4 out of 5

    T.M.

    The main premise of this book was a good one, that our life should be governed by the will of God and not our own, and that we should read scripture and communicate with God with that attitude in mind in order to truly achieve spiritual formation. That said, it wasn't until the last third of the book that I felt like this truly came through in the reading. Up to that point, the book read more like something I would expect from a new age humanist point of view. Perhaps I was expecting more instru The main premise of this book was a good one, that our life should be governed by the will of God and not our own, and that we should read scripture and communicate with God with that attitude in mind in order to truly achieve spiritual formation. That said, it wasn't until the last third of the book that I felt like this truly came through in the reading. Up to that point, the book read more like something I would expect from a new age humanist point of view. Perhaps I was expecting more instruction from a practical standpoint?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Rogers

    I struggled reading this at first because he was saying things I did not understand. Also he is wordy and I felt like it made the reading more difficult than it needed to be. However, I realized that for the most part, he just uses different terms for some of these concepts than I do. I'm glad I hung in there because he has some great insights into the roadblocks that can keep us from being 'shaped by the Word.' Because I had so many aha moments, I rated it 5 stars. If you are willing to grapple I struggled reading this at first because he was saying things I did not understand. Also he is wordy and I felt like it made the reading more difficult than it needed to be. However, I realized that for the most part, he just uses different terms for some of these concepts than I do. I'm glad I hung in there because he has some great insights into the roadblocks that can keep us from being 'shaped by the Word.' Because I had so many aha moments, I rated it 5 stars. If you are willing to grapple with the ideas he presents, I hope you will have an eye-opening experience like I did.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is my 3rd Mulholland book. While it was less of a smooth read for some reason, it was equally convicting as his others. His aim of helping us truly letting the Bible shape us is his constant aim. He hits his 4 main ideas over and over again. This is actually helpful. It never feels like repetition but instead adding meat to the arguments his making. If you want to interact with the scripture deeply and allow it to truly shape you in a "word" for the world "God's word" is shaping, then read a This is my 3rd Mulholland book. While it was less of a smooth read for some reason, it was equally convicting as his others. His aim of helping us truly letting the Bible shape us is his constant aim. He hits his 4 main ideas over and over again. This is actually helpful. It never feels like repetition but instead adding meat to the arguments his making. If you want to interact with the scripture deeply and allow it to truly shape you in a "word" for the world "God's word" is shaping, then read and reflect on it slowly.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Good book on shaping your spiritual formation. Tips on how to read the Word of God to help you speak and act the Word of God in your life. Started a little slow and was hard to get into, but I think the more I read and understood, it began to make more sense. Will definitely try these ideas as they sound very good (as long as I keep them up).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This book does exactly what it says it does: you come to understand how to read Scripture for your personal spiritual formation. But the way it approaches the mindset people have about the Bible really makes it worth reading. The Bible isn’t just an informative read, but it should be read transformatively.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean Nemecek

    Excellent content gets lost in clunky language. The author's points get lost in words and phrases that are hard to understand. A good editor would make this book much more accessible. Still, for those who are willing to work through the jargon, this book will really help them read Scripture in a new way. Excellent content gets lost in clunky language. The author's points get lost in words and phrases that are hard to understand. A good editor would make this book much more accessible. Still, for those who are willing to work through the jargon, this book will really help them read Scripture in a new way.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Dishman

    Mulholland writes about a way to approach the Bible in a way that’s personal, and life changing. I have appreciated his knowledge and ability to communicate in a way that is easy to understand and apply.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rayna

    Great content with a helpful examination of spiritual formation. 3 stars only because it was quite repetitive and read like a term paper (the thesis, organization and chapter summaries would have earned a straight A)!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I really appreciate the call here to move from informational to transformational hermeneutics.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gwen Heginbotham

    Highly recommend- this book played a huge role in shifting the way I approach Scripture in a more contemplative/meditative, conversational way.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amos Smith

    Mulholland has been shaped by the Word largely because of the intention he brings to the Bible. He approaches the Bible with the desire to hear what God is saying to him personally through the Word. And since he approaches the Bible with that intention he is not disappointed. For centuries people have come to the Bible for spiritual counsel. If that is our intention it will deliver. Mulholland says it well on page 42: "spiritual reading has more to do with approach than with content..." One of t Mulholland has been shaped by the Word largely because of the intention he brings to the Bible. He approaches the Bible with the desire to hear what God is saying to him personally through the Word. And since he approaches the Bible with that intention he is not disappointed. For centuries people have come to the Bible for spiritual counsel. If that is our intention it will deliver. Mulholland says it well on page 42: "spiritual reading has more to do with approach than with content..." One of the key quotations in the book for me is found on page 38: "In New Testament times (there was) a concept of logos or "word" as the shaping, organizing, forming principle of the universe that held everything together and directed its course..." This word shapes us in and through the words of the Bible. I like Mulholland's emphasis on letting the Biblical text master you, as opposed to trying to master and control the text. It is a very different kind of reading than that to which we are accustomed. I think Mulholland summarizes his approach to the Bible in the following line on page 104: "God's relationship with humanity is not structured by legal demands of a distant deity but by the intimacy of a personal relationship." -Amos Smith (author of Healing The Divide: Recovering Christianity's Mystic Roots)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Mulholland's discussion of formative reading (or as another reviewer put it, "How Not To Read The Bible Wrong") is a thoughtful theory of biblical reading. Mulholland spends most of his time describing significant concepts to formative reading, rather than giving an actual process. If you're looking for a process or magic key to spiritual and interpretive scripture reading, don't look here. This text is honestly quite antiprocess in a lot of ways--and I think that's a good thing, after having re Mulholland's discussion of formative reading (or as another reviewer put it, "How Not To Read The Bible Wrong") is a thoughtful theory of biblical reading. Mulholland spends most of his time describing significant concepts to formative reading, rather than giving an actual process. If you're looking for a process or magic key to spiritual and interpretive scripture reading, don't look here. This text is honestly quite antiprocess in a lot of ways--and I think that's a good thing, after having read this. The greatest limitation of this book is that it's sooo badly written in terms of prose style. Mulholland is often redundant and almost always uses a very passive voice--this obfuscates his meaning more than it emphasizes his passive, formative approach to reading. Word and word, formation and information, being and doing, all of these things are complex enough in their own right, and while the language used to describe them ought to be reflectively complex, that doesn't mean it has to be so passive.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I very much appreciated Shaped by the Word and found it challenged the way I often read the Bible. The call to move from informational to formational, and from functional to relational approach was particularly helpful. I found the book highly repetitive. A point made in the first chapter continued to be repeated in every chapter that followed. In some sense the whole book is neatly contained in the last chapter making one wonder if this shouldn't have been just an article rather than a book. Th I very much appreciated Shaped by the Word and found it challenged the way I often read the Bible. The call to move from informational to formational, and from functional to relational approach was particularly helpful. I found the book highly repetitive. A point made in the first chapter continued to be repeated in every chapter that followed. In some sense the whole book is neatly contained in the last chapter making one wonder if this shouldn't have been just an article rather than a book. This conclusion would be mistaken, since it would be looking at the book from an informational perspective. Rather, the reader should recognize that Mulholland is taking a formational approach with the reader, slowly drawing the reader in, and encouraging a heart change. I believe this book is intended to be read a chapter at a time, with a nice separation (maybe a week) between chapters. If read this way, the repetition can be a welcome reminder rather than an annoyance.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Susie

    Would be better titled "How not to read the Bible the wrong way." A helpful discussion of how informational, transactional approaches to reading (which we use for most educational situations) do not allow Scripture reading as a spiritual discipline to shape the reader. Describes what it looks like to come to Scripture with a transformational stance toward letting God speak to you and change you by his grace. Somewhat repetitive in places, because he regularly reviews what he has gone through so Would be better titled "How not to read the Bible the wrong way." A helpful discussion of how informational, transactional approaches to reading (which we use for most educational situations) do not allow Scripture reading as a spiritual discipline to shape the reader. Describes what it looks like to come to Scripture with a transformational stance toward letting God speak to you and change you by his grace. Somewhat repetitive in places, because he regularly reviews what he has gone through so far. But it does have helpful insights into how Western culture has generally given us a handful of obstacles to overcome when we want to let God form us through his word and how we can begin to approach Scripture differently.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Mulholland constructs a framework and approach to reading Scripture that is a worthwhile counterbalance to the informational and propositional approach generally taught. His approach pushes the reader to open herself to God, to allow him to shape and transform as she practices the discipline of regular, intentional reading. The helpful contrasts of informational/formational, being/doing, and functional/relational are repeated more than necessary for an attentive reader. To the point that the red Mulholland constructs a framework and approach to reading Scripture that is a worthwhile counterbalance to the informational and propositional approach generally taught. His approach pushes the reader to open herself to God, to allow him to shape and transform as she practices the discipline of regular, intentional reading. The helpful contrasts of informational/formational, being/doing, and functional/relational are repeated more than necessary for an attentive reader. To the point that the redundancy is off-putting, but not a turn-off. The book is a worthwhile read. Open your mind to Mulholland's perspective, meander down his path, and prepare your heart, soul, mind and strength to hear God speaking through his Word.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lori Schwilling

    Much of this book addresses the importance of approaching scripture "formationally" rather than "informationally," as "relation" rather than "function." Some of the book is repetitive. After an extensive description of one's approach to scripture, Mulholland continually refers to his comments about "approach" as he goes on to describes how our approach influences our "encounter" and "response" to the Word. I found it helpful to digest the book very slowly as I integrated these concepts into my own Much of this book addresses the importance of approaching scripture "formationally" rather than "informationally," as "relation" rather than "function." Some of the book is repetitive. After an extensive description of one's approach to scripture, Mulholland continually refers to his comments about "approach" as he goes on to describes how our approach influences our "encounter" and "response" to the Word. I found it helpful to digest the book very slowly as I integrated these concepts into my own reading of scripture.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Dr. Mulholland says many thought provoking things in this short volume. He was one of my favor professors in seminary and many of the stories or examples from Scripture used in this book were told in the class room. That being said, I struggled to get into it. It could just be the wrong time for me to have read it, but it just didn't grab me in the way I expected. Dr. Mulholland says many thought provoking things in this short volume. He was one of my favor professors in seminary and many of the stories or examples from Scripture used in this book were told in the class room. That being said, I struggled to get into it. It could just be the wrong time for me to have read it, but it just didn't grab me in the way I expected.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Although I have no recollection of reading this book the first time, I found it refreshing but also a bit abstract. I didn't finish it this time. Only those elements of our being that are inconsistent with God's will for our wholeness will be disturbed, displaced, or destroyed. (p.40-41) (First read 9/01/06) Although I have no recollection of reading this book the first time, I found it refreshing but also a bit abstract. I didn't finish it this time. Only those elements of our being that are inconsistent with God's will for our wholeness will be disturbed, displaced, or destroyed. (p.40-41) (First read 9/01/06)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darcy Knight

    Good information on "formational" reading, a way of reading Scripture that requires a different mindset than reading for the sake of information. However, a major flaw is the constant repetition within the text. Recommended, but only if you have the time to take it in small chunks, with time to think about it between readings. Good information on "formational" reading, a way of reading Scripture that requires a different mindset than reading for the sake of information. However, a major flaw is the constant repetition within the text. Recommended, but only if you have the time to take it in small chunks, with time to think about it between readings.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    it was good. challenged me on certain aspects of my thinking, for sure. otherwise, basic devotional hermeneutics. but some parts on his spiritual disciplines and "being/doing" aspects of his writing... superb. it was good. challenged me on certain aspects of my thinking, for sure. otherwise, basic devotional hermeneutics. but some parts on his spiritual disciplines and "being/doing" aspects of his writing... superb.

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