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Quiltmaker's Gift (Limited Edition)

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When a generous quiltmaker finally agrees to make a quilt for a greedy king but only under certain conditions, she causes him to undergo a change of heart.


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When a generous quiltmaker finally agrees to make a quilt for a greedy king but only under certain conditions, she causes him to undergo a change of heart.

30 review for Quiltmaker's Gift (Limited Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Best for ages 4 and up. This book is magnificent. Its message is incomparable. An illustrated treasure that every child should own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    A beautiful picture book. The story is sweet and meaningful, and the pictures are fantastic. The end papers feature different classic quilt blocks, and you can find them throughout the book. There are other puzzles and games that you can play with the detailed pictures.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aleksandra

    This is a story of the victory of selflessness over greed and the power of generosity in transforming people’s hearts. The quilt maker is an old woman who lives at the top of the mountain. She makes quilts unlike any the world has seen. At night she goes down to the city and gives away her quilts to poor or homeless people. There is also a powerful and greedy king in the story, who loves getting presents. He owns a lot of things, but he is never happy. He is still looking for that one thing that This is a story of the victory of selflessness over greed and the power of generosity in transforming people’s hearts. The quilt maker is an old woman who lives at the top of the mountain. She makes quilts unlike any the world has seen. At night she goes down to the city and gives away her quilts to poor or homeless people. There is also a powerful and greedy king in the story, who loves getting presents. He owns a lot of things, but he is never happy. He is still looking for that one thing that would make him happy. One day he hears about the quilt maker and wants her to make him a quilt. Her condition is for him to make presents of everything he owns. For each thing he gives away, she will add another piece to the quilt. After a lot of hesitation and angry outbursts, the king finally agrees. He ends up traveling around the world, giving away his possessions and making people happy. Finally, he is in rags himself from all the traveling. The quilt maker finds him already happy and content and gives him his beautiful new quilt. They remain lifelong friends. She continues making quilts, and the king distributes them at night to the poor and downhearted. He has finally discovered the one thing that makes him happy, which is giving something away. This book belongs to traditional literature genre of legends and folktales. It was written in 1999, but it reads like an old folktale. It has a story-telling pattern, rich language and elements of magic and fantasy. Its characters are evocative of old legends. The narrative also has a clear didactic purpose, with the moral of the story being that material things don’t make us happy – people do; also, that it is better to give than to receive. The book is appropriate as an interactive read-aloud for grades K-2. Every page has a visual clue in the form of a quilt square whose symbolism is related to the passage. The names and pictures of all the featured squares are on the inside covers of the book. Children can examine them and explore the connection between the design and meaning of the square and how it fits into the narrative. Educational concepts to teach with this book include retelling (ELA 0.1.7.7), story elements, characters, main events (ELA 1.1.3.3), predicting, summarizing and determining the moral of the story (ELA 2.1.2.2). Students can create charts and graphic organizers to compare and contrast the king’s character at the beginning and the end of the story. Possible topics for discussion (evaluation) include gift giving and receiving (suitable around the time of holidays), charity, generosity vs. greed, and whether material things alone can make us happy. A great way to integrate this book with arts is to make a class quilt. Students can draw their own quilt squares that tell a certain story (about themselves/their family.) Individual quilt squares can be glued to a big poster. This activity is suitable at the beginning of the school year as a way to build community in the classroom.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    This delectable book is a simple, old-fashioned fairy tale exploring themes of greed and joy and generosity. The illustrations are bursting with color, detail, whimsy and charm. It made me laugh; it made me cry; it made me want to be a better person. It's a rare children's book can make me do all of that.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Malinda Faber

    The Quiltmaker's Gift, an award-winning folklore picture book, tells a modern folktale about a generous quilt-maker and a greedy king. The quilt-maker lives on the outskirts of the kingdom and makes beautiful quilts that she refuses to sell. Instead, the quilt-maker will only give her quilts to the poor and homeless. The greedy king prioritizes acquiring the most beautiful things for himself from all over the world, decides he wants a quilt, and the quilt-maker insists that she will only give hi The Quiltmaker's Gift, an award-winning folklore picture book, tells a modern folktale about a generous quilt-maker and a greedy king. The quilt-maker lives on the outskirts of the kingdom and makes beautiful quilts that she refuses to sell. Instead, the quilt-maker will only give her quilts to the poor and homeless. The greedy king prioritizes acquiring the most beautiful things for himself from all over the world, decides he wants a quilt, and the quilt-maker insists that she will only give him a quilt if he gives away everything else he has. The tale ends with the king finding true happiness in giving, eventually receiving a quilt from the quilt-maker that he then gives away. Written at a 5th grade reading level, but with an interest level for students as young as kindergarten, The Quiltmaker’s Gift’s incredibly beautiful and intricate pictures and it’s engaging story make it a great read-aloud book for younger students and a great independent reading book for older students. The story provides a great life lesson about the joy that can be found in giving to others. It’s use of magical realism and fantasy will draw-in readers, as will its occasional silliness and fun – like when the soldiers marched to the quiltmaker’s house in their pajamas at the king’s order. The life lesson that is taught in the story, as well as the moral question raised about the rightness of one person having so many luxuries while others do not have blankets to keep warm, offer great opportunities for student self-reflection, building classroom community, and for having rich classroom discussions. In a 5th grade classroom, after reading the book as a class and reflecting on the main life lesson and moral question raised by the book, the students could be given an individual assignment in which they answer two questions making text-to-self connections. First, they have to write an essay response in which they describe a time that they have shared something they had with someone else and it made them feel good. Second, they have to write another essay describing a time when they did not share something with someone else, and then imagine what the outcome would have been had they chosen to share on that occasion. A second activity for a 5th grade classroom would be to use this book to launch a class service project. The class could discuss how every person has something they can give to someone else, even it is just time or a positive attitude. The class could brainstorm possible service projects at the school, eventually vote to pick a project, and then carry-out that service project over a quarter or semester of the school year. The project could conclude with a class presentation of the results of the project that they share with an audience (parents, another class, school staff, etc.).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janine Weston

    The Quiltmaker's Gift by Jeff Brumbeau, with pictures by Gail deMarken One summer, when I was a little girl...in fact, I was just about your age...I spent a tremendous amount of time exploring in my grandmother's attic. It was while I was up there, poking around in the dust and the must, that I found this quilt. [unfold:] I was amazed at how beautiful it was... When I asked my grandmother about the quilt, she said she had received it as a gift from her grandmother, who received it as a gift from The Quiltmaker's Gift by Jeff Brumbeau, with pictures by Gail deMarken One summer, when I was a little girl...in fact, I was just about your age...I spent a tremendous amount of time exploring in my grandmother's attic. It was while I was up there, poking around in the dust and the must, that I found this quilt. [unfold:] I was amazed at how beautiful it was... When I asked my grandmother about the quilt, she said she had received it as a gift from her grandmother, who received it as a gift from her grandmother, who received it as a gift from her grandmother...well, you get the picture. Anyway, this quilt is very old, but yet, it does not appear to be very old...the colors are just as vibrant as the day the quiltmaker made her very last stitch. In the fable of The Quiltmaker's Gift by Jeff Brumbeau, we learn about the quiltmaker and how she sewed day after day to make the prettiest quilts anyone had ever seen. Many people climbed her mountain, pockets bursting with gold, hoping to buy one of the wonderful quilts. But the woman would not sell them. "I give my quilts to those who are poor or homeless," she told all who knocked on her door. "They are not for the rich." Well, sure enough, there was a greedy king, who had just about everything. So many, many things that the king kept a list of all the lists of things he owned. And yet with all these marvelous treasures to enjoy, the king never smiled. He was not happy at all. "Somewhere there must be one beautiful thing that will finally make me happy," he was often heard to say. "And I will have it!" When the king caught word of news about a magical quiltmaker who lived in the mountains, making quilts for the poor and needy, he demanded, "I want one of those quilts! It might be the one thing that will finally make me happy." Will the quiltmaker honor the wishes of the king and present him with quilt, or will she be true to herself and continue to give her quilts as gifts to the poor and homeless? Find out if the king will pay the price she asks, in The Quiltmaker's Gift by Jeff Brumbeau!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    There is a grandmother that lives in a small house in the misty mountains. She creates wonderful quilts that she gives out to the poor on cold nights. Many rich patrons try to buy her quilts, but she does not take their money and only creates her quilts for the poor. The kingdoms greedy king wants everyone to bring him presents throughout the year, not only on his birthday. He had so many presents; his whole castle was filled with them. He commands the old grandmother to gift him one of her quil There is a grandmother that lives in a small house in the misty mountains. She creates wonderful quilts that she gives out to the poor on cold nights. Many rich patrons try to buy her quilts, but she does not take their money and only creates her quilts for the poor. The kingdoms greedy king wants everyone to bring him presents throughout the year, not only on his birthday. He had so many presents; his whole castle was filled with them. He commands the old grandmother to gift him one of her quilts, but she refuses. The king is very upset and puts her in a bear’s den, among other things. Each time, the grandmother survives and enchants her “captors.” The grandmother tells the king that she will make him a quilt if he gives his treasures to the people in need. She will sow one square on the quilt for each treasure he gives away. At first, the king is not happy to part with his beloved items. By the end, he happily distributes his items to his people and receives his gift from the grandmother. The illustrations were wonderful and very detailed. This book also depicts different emotions from the grandmother, the king, and many other characters in the book. I would use this book for a morning meeting mini lesson about sharing. It is important that students in the classroom create a community of learners that share their materials and their knowledge. This book is a great way to teach students about sharing and expressing their emotions!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    This is such a beautiful story about a generous quiltmaker who makes glorious quilts by day and gives them away to the downtrodden by night. A greedy and unhappy king comes to demand a quilt as the one thing that might make him happy. The quiltmaker says she will make him one only if he gives everything away. Finally, he starts giving away his treasures and finds that he can bring joy to others, and so finally be truly happy. And she makes him a quilt. And they both spend their days giving to ot This is such a beautiful story about a generous quiltmaker who makes glorious quilts by day and gives them away to the downtrodden by night. A greedy and unhappy king comes to demand a quilt as the one thing that might make him happy. The quiltmaker says she will make him one only if he gives everything away. Finally, he starts giving away his treasures and finds that he can bring joy to others, and so finally be truly happy. And she makes him a quilt. And they both spend their days giving to others. This is our current go to book before bed. Beautiful watercolor illustrations also.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lou

    This is a simple story about the joy of giving. Not unlike stories told by another storyteller a long time ago except he was a fisherman instead of a quilt maker. The story is simply told so that a child can understand it and be held spellbound by the luscious illustrations on every page. The turning of a page is done with much anticipation and wonder and each page is a story in of itself...as is the King’s quilt. The story of his journey and realization.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Allison Turkish

    Truly an amazing book that I wish I could read with every child in the world that is older than 5-years-old and can therefore feel empathy. My 5-year-old son actually had tears in his eyes when we discussed poverty and how important it is to SEE beyond where we live in an affluent area of California. Beautiful colors and quilt patterns.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shaeley Santiago

    How can you truly be happy? Does having many things make a person happy? The king thinks having a quilt made by the quilt maker will make him happy, but she only gives her quilts to the poor and needy. Can the king force her to give him a quilt?

  12. 4 out of 5

    June Guymon

    Quite a nice little picture book with an excellent message on the joy of giving.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Slaght

    This was my favorite of the two Quiltmaker books when my mother and I used to read them. A beautiful story of how a greedy life was transformed into a giving heart.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This is a beautiful book, worth looking at again and again. And the story is lovely, about the joy and pleasure of giving. A good read every time of year.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lila Lovebug

    Mommy read this to Lila. "This is a wonderful story" - Lila, age 5. Mommy enjoyed the story as well and the illustrations were beautiful!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Mentions “bewitched”. But overall a nice story of unselfishness.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    Stunning illustrations and even more beautiful message about generosity & happiness. Stunning illustrations and even more beautiful message about generosity & happiness.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Way too long to use as a group read aloud, this book nonetheless would make a great one-on-one read aloud. The illustrations are gorgeous and the message is uplifting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    We recently read The Quiltmaker's Journey by Jeff Brumbeau and we really liked it. It was a wonderful tale about helping others, being less materialistic, and giving without expecting a reward or acknowledgement. The narrative is engaging and dramatic and the illustrations are amazing. We really enjoyed matching the quilts from the endpages to each quilt as it is depicted in the story. We knew that this book continued the story of the Quiltmaker and we were eager to read it. This story has much We recently read The Quiltmaker's Journey by Jeff Brumbeau and we really liked it. It was a wonderful tale about helping others, being less materialistic, and giving without expecting a reward or acknowledgement. The narrative is engaging and dramatic and the illustrations are amazing. We really enjoyed matching the quilts from the endpages to each quilt as it is depicted in the story. We knew that this book continued the story of the Quiltmaker and we were eager to read it. This story has much of the same charm as the first. I love the message about letting go of the excesses of materialism and dedicating yourself to helping others. The message is woven throughout with illustrations that complement the story nicely. We didn't love this book as much as we did the first, and I think it was a bit too heavy- handed with the concept of giving up our things and helping the needy. Still, it was an entertaining story. We enjoyed reading it together and we loved looking at all of the quilt patterns.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Burris

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book! It was a beautifully illustrated story through words and imagery. This is a selfless story about a quilt maker who uses her talent of sewing quilts to give to the poor and needy in her town. The King is a hard hearted, greedy man who wants everything but is never happy. When he learns of the quilt maker's majestic quilts, he believes a quilt is the only thing that will bring him happiness but she refuses to give him a quilt unless he gives away his treasures. He t I thoroughly enjoyed this book! It was a beautifully illustrated story through words and imagery. This is a selfless story about a quilt maker who uses her talent of sewing quilts to give to the poor and needy in her town. The King is a hard hearted, greedy man who wants everything but is never happy. When he learns of the quilt maker's majestic quilts, he believes a quilt is the only thing that will bring him happiness but she refuses to give him a quilt unless he gives away his treasures. He tries to get rid of her multiple times but even bears and birds come to her rescue because she is so loving and giving of her quilt making talents. Finally, the King becomes so desperate for a quilt that he gives away his treasures and becomes poor himself, at least through monetary worth, so the quilt maker gives him a promised quilt since he is now poor. But he grows to be rich with happiness out of receiving such joy from giving all over the world! This book could be beautifully integrated as a read aloud when discussing morals and themes of texts; as well as discussing how plots develop when sequencing events and story lines. This is a wow book because it carries a beautiful story accompanied with colorful illustrations and a heartwarming message.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elfdart

    this is anti materialist propaganda!!! i’m just joking (those people bother me), this was a nice little story about a greedy king who demands more and more presents from everyone in his kindgom, but no matter how many presents he has he’s never happy, hence the constant demand for more. then one day he sees a quilt this quiltmaker gave someone as a present and the person seems pretty happy so he demands that the quiltmaker make him a quilt. the quiltmaker refuses to do this however and says that this is anti materialist propaganda!!! i’m just joking (those people bother me), this was a nice little story about a greedy king who demands more and more presents from everyone in his kindgom, but no matter how many presents he has he’s never happy, hence the constant demand for more. then one day he sees a quilt this quiltmaker gave someone as a present and the person seems pretty happy so he demands that the quiltmaker make him a quilt. the quiltmaker refuses to do this however and says that she’ll only make the king a quilt when he gives his stuff away, then he’ll be able to be happy. so the king tries this out. he gives one of his presents to someone and it makes him feel kind of good inside, so he does it again and again. years later the king is practically poor, but he’s smiling a lot and the quiltmaker gives the king a quilt. he says he doesn’t need the quilt, but the quiltmaker gives it to him anyways. the pictures are colourful and expressive and there’s a nice moral to the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    This, and The Quiltmaker's Journey, can be read independent of each other, and it really doesn't matter at all which order you read them in. I reviewed the Journey a week or so ago, and then borrowed both from the library. Tonight I read them both to my almost-5-yr-old grandson. I think they're a little old for him and that he only managed them because it meant delaying lights-out. Nevertheless, the moral of the stories will be sinking in, and the sheer sumptious delight of the illustrations wil This, and The Quiltmaker's Journey, can be read independent of each other, and it really doesn't matter at all which order you read them in. I reviewed the Journey a week or so ago, and then borrowed both from the library. Tonight I read them both to my almost-5-yr-old grandson. I think they're a little old for him and that he only managed them because it meant delaying lights-out. Nevertheless, the moral of the stories will be sinking in, and the sheer sumptious delight of the illustrations will undoubtedly add to the richness of how he experiences books. I can't think of anything except superlatives for this book. It's a lovely tale of learning to give, told completely without preaching. It's quite extraordinarily beautiful to look at. And it praises the crafting of quilts. Gorgeous!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The illustrations of this book far exceed the predictable text. I loved the explosions on color on each page and how the illustrator includes quilt blocks to match the narrative. For example, a Northwind block appears when the Quiltmaker goes into town while it is cold and dark, and Bear Paw illustrates the scene with the bear in the cave. The pictures seem to have an Eastern European flavor, so I was not surprised to find that Gail de Marcken modeled the King on a head she found in a Latvian ch The illustrations of this book far exceed the predictable text. I loved the explosions on color on each page and how the illustrator includes quilt blocks to match the narrative. For example, a Northwind block appears when the Quiltmaker goes into town while it is cold and dark, and Bear Paw illustrates the scene with the bear in the cave. The pictures seem to have an Eastern European flavor, so I was not surprised to find that Gail de Marcken modeled the King on a head she found in a Latvian church or that the Quiltmaker herself was inspired by a cheerful Greek woman. Postscript: My mother, who was a quilter but now has Alzheimer's, enjoyed looking through this book with me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    This was such a sweet book about the joys of giving. The artwork is stunning. It made me want to learn to quilt even more. I read this with my three year old book lover. He's been a bit turned off of story time these days thanks to all the television time at his daycare, so finding a book that he grabbed with excitement was unexpected. Though it was a library borrow, I think we need to get a copy! Additionally, there are games online that go with the story, which brings it in to another level of This was such a sweet book about the joys of giving. The artwork is stunning. It made me want to learn to quilt even more. I read this with my three year old book lover. He's been a bit turned off of story time these days thanks to all the television time at his daycare, so finding a book that he grabbed with excitement was unexpected. Though it was a library borrow, I think we need to get a copy! Additionally, there are games online that go with the story, which brings it in to another level of enjoyment.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    What a treasure. I love this book. Someone read it to my kids recently and they begged to get it. I already had it in my collection, but had never read it. (gulp). I loved it. It will be forever a family favorite, I'm sure. A story of giving and finding happiness in helping others.Gorgeous illustrations and the amateur quilt historian in me appreciates the great attention to detail in the patterns.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    this is a joy to read and a true classic.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    What a lovely book about the joy of giving and kindness.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I have found a new treasure among children's books!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Jake rates this book 3 stars. Ellie rates it 3 1/2 stars. Mom rates it 5 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is a fantasy book for children that teaches the lessons of kindness and generosity. The story is about a mystical quiltmaker who lives in the clouds creating quilts for the poor and a greedy king who wants presents all the time, so much so that he declares his birthday would be celebrated twice a year so he could have twice as many gifts. The king decides that he wants one of the quiltmaker's quilts. She sets conditions for him that he does not like. Eventually, after some very terrible beh This is a fantasy book for children that teaches the lessons of kindness and generosity. The story is about a mystical quiltmaker who lives in the clouds creating quilts for the poor and a greedy king who wants presents all the time, so much so that he declares his birthday would be celebrated twice a year so he could have twice as many gifts. The king decides that he wants one of the quiltmaker's quilts. She sets conditions for him that he does not like. Eventually, after some very terrible behavior, the king decides to do as the quiltmaker wishes and he earns his quilt. The illustrations are water color paintings and they are beautiful. Sometimes, the pages are a bit overcrowded, but as this is a children's book, I can understand why. It is very visually stimulating. I would use this book with elementary students. It could be used with older students but it would have to be carefully prepped as part of a very well thought out lesson. This book would be excellent when discussing concepts like generosity, kindness, and being part of a community. It would also be great in a lesson on the concept of "paying it forward." Excellent discussion questions could center on why they king needs so much? Why don't his presents bring him happiness? Why does the quiltmaker only give quilts to the poor? This book has the ability to teach so many wonderful life lessons.

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