web site hit counter Keep the Change: A Clueless Tipper's Quest to Become the Guru of the Gratuity - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Keep the Change: A Clueless Tipper's Quest to Become the Guru of the Gratuity

Availability: Ready to download

Tipping is huge in America. Almost everyone leaves at least one tip every day. More than five million American workers depend on them, and we spend $66 billion on tips each year. And everyone recognizes that queasy feeling - in bars and restaurants, barbershops and beauty parlors, hotels and strip clubs, and everywhere else - when the check arrives or the tip jar looms. Om Tipping is huge in America. Almost everyone leaves at least one tip every day. More than five million American workers depend on them, and we spend $66 billion on tips each year. And everyone recognizes that queasy feeling - in bars and restaurants, barbershops and beauty parlors, hotels and strip clubs, and everywhere else - when the check arrives or the tip jar looms. Omnipresent yet poorly understood, tipping has worked its way into almost every part of daily life. In Keep the Change, bestselling author Steve Dublanica dives into this unexplored world, in a comical yet serious attempt to turn himself into the Guru of the Gratuity. As intrepid and irreverent as Michael Moore or A. J. Jacobs, Dublanica travels the country to meet shoeshine men, strippers, bartenders, bellhops, bathroom attendants, and many others, all in an effort to overcome his own sweaty palms when faced with those perennial questions: Should I tip? How much? Throughout he explores why tipping has spread; he explains how differences in gender, age, ethnicity, and nationality affect our attitudes; and he reveals just what the cabdriver or deliveryman thinks of us after we've left a tip. Written in the lively style that made Waiter Rant such a hit, Keep the Change is a fun and enlightening quest that will change the way we think - and tip.


Compare

Tipping is huge in America. Almost everyone leaves at least one tip every day. More than five million American workers depend on them, and we spend $66 billion on tips each year. And everyone recognizes that queasy feeling - in bars and restaurants, barbershops and beauty parlors, hotels and strip clubs, and everywhere else - when the check arrives or the tip jar looms. Om Tipping is huge in America. Almost everyone leaves at least one tip every day. More than five million American workers depend on them, and we spend $66 billion on tips each year. And everyone recognizes that queasy feeling - in bars and restaurants, barbershops and beauty parlors, hotels and strip clubs, and everywhere else - when the check arrives or the tip jar looms. Omnipresent yet poorly understood, tipping has worked its way into almost every part of daily life. In Keep the Change, bestselling author Steve Dublanica dives into this unexplored world, in a comical yet serious attempt to turn himself into the Guru of the Gratuity. As intrepid and irreverent as Michael Moore or A. J. Jacobs, Dublanica travels the country to meet shoeshine men, strippers, bartenders, bellhops, bathroom attendants, and many others, all in an effort to overcome his own sweaty palms when faced with those perennial questions: Should I tip? How much? Throughout he explores why tipping has spread; he explains how differences in gender, age, ethnicity, and nationality affect our attitudes; and he reveals just what the cabdriver or deliveryman thinks of us after we've left a tip. Written in the lively style that made Waiter Rant such a hit, Keep the Change is a fun and enlightening quest that will change the way we think - and tip.

30 review for Keep the Change: A Clueless Tipper's Quest to Become the Guru of the Gratuity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petra-X has been locked down for one full year

    By the end of this book I was amazed, outraged and bewildered by the fact that everyone in America seems to think they should be tipped automatically. That all business owners think they should pay x-15 and the general public can pay for high-priced services +15 (or 20) directly to the staff. Why am I paying the staff you employ to perform certain services for them performing them? Why does a restaurant employ waiters if not to take orders and serve them? Why should they be paid twice? I was nev By the end of this book I was amazed, outraged and bewildered by the fact that everyone in America seems to think they should be tipped automatically. That all business owners think they should pay x-15 and the general public can pay for high-priced services +15 (or 20) directly to the staff. Why am I paying the staff you employ to perform certain services for them performing them? Why does a restaurant employ waiters if not to take orders and serve them? Why should they be paid twice? I was never paid for turning up for work and then the clients paid me doing my job. I stayed in B2 in Miami in September and had very good treatment. I tipped the waiters, I tipped room service, I tipped the maids. This is what I would have done in Europe. I went off to the Bahamas for ten days and then came back to the same hotel in Miami. I was put in a concrete box with scarcely any daylight, moved to another with no aircon, where the shower didn't work and was so small there was no full-length mirror. The night accountant asked me what the fuck I expected him to do when I said (yet again) I couldn't sleep in that room and the night manager declined to see me. Eventually I got a master suite which was not cleaned the next day but the bed thrown together as you would at home. That was it, I threatened reception with writing to the new holding company and the general manager. After that the male receptionists were all rude to me and my phone was disconnected for a day losing me some crucial phonecalls I was expecting. It took me an hour and two engineers (one didn't speak English, this was Miami) to find out that it was reception that had cut off all calls to my room. Then I read this book... ah I was supposed to tip reception as well for checking me in and connecting phonecalls. Really? A while later I began to read Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-Called Hospitality but gave it up (for now). The writing of these books betrays such a self-entitled attitude that it is difficult not to have one's view of the content tinged with utter dislike.Update: So far, it seems that if you don't tip a lot of people from waiters, to car wash people, to hairdressers, to pizza delivery boys they will have their revenge on you. Also if you are a bad tipper. The only people who come out of it looking good are the sex workers who will give you a good time anyway! I don't know how all you Americans can cope with this endless tipping. I even saw tip jars at 7-11 and those people were so rude, never interrupting their personal conversations while they cashed me and they feel entitled to a tip? So Heads in Beds is off the menu for now. __________ (view spoiler)[ Notes before I read the book. How much objectivity about tipping can one expect from an author whose first book was Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip-Confessions of a Cynical Waiter? In the islands, local people rarely tip, but they are loudly rude to people who give bad service, so they get reasonable service. Local whites (like me) get treated like rubbish because we only tip when we feel we have had good service. Which isn't often since we are being treated like rubbish. Americans are fawned over to the point the wait staff are standing in puddles of dripping syrup, but they leave 20%. I hate that. It was explained to me once by a waitress at a notoriously crap place for service, that she wasn't going out of her way to serve people who didn't tip well. She didn't understand that good service would bring the tip. She said that these people were locals and they should tip first and then next time they would get better service. Arrogant? Much! Once in a while I go to a resort on a private island where the day, say lunch and drinks is going to cost us $150+. For dinner we are talking $250+ easily. I am seriously not tipping someone $30 for bringing me a menu, my food and drinks. 10% because that's what the standard was before Americans. The waitresses on this island are paid quite well and they get a share of the service charge, but 15 and 20% is what is "suggested" on the check. You are joking. Why I especially dislike giving these people even a dime (although I do give 10% usually) is because it is a half-hour sail home on the private ferry, and if you get the last one back to the island, you share it with the staff. They sit up top, shouting to each other, "mudderfucker", "cunt", "stupid fucking bitch" and worse, they will criticise the people they just served. I really heard that. The woman was on the boat too. you will hear shouted around. They have their regular seats and like to spread themselves and their gear out, they don't care if the tourists and diners trip or can't get seats together. They just seriously love to show their contempt of these people they were oiling up only half an hour before. And when you go back, they will ooze charm when working and it's the same thing back on the late boat. So why go? Because it is a beautiful island with fabulous beaches, the food is beyond excellent and it is fun to be with these super-wealthy helicoptered in 'we expect only the best' people sometimes. I hate to see a tip jar next to a cashier in newsagent or a fast food joint. In Miami recently the free bus that takes potential customers to Dolphin Mall had a sign about tips being welcome. The driver doesn't even help you with your bags. And on and on... What am I tipping for? I hope this book is going to tell me. (hide spoiler)] Read November 18, 2014

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I thought I was picking up a little how-to title about tipping. Little did I know the book would take me through the 5 stages of grief. Denial: No. He *cannot* be starting out a book about tipping with a lap dance. Anger: If he doesn’t stop talking about his first book, and how it was so successful that it landed him this sweet gig flying around the country on an expense account, I’m going to throw the cd out the car window. Bargaining: Please, please, just tell me how much to tip. I’ll finish read I thought I was picking up a little how-to title about tipping. Little did I know the book would take me through the 5 stages of grief. Denial: No. He *cannot* be starting out a book about tipping with a lap dance. Anger: If he doesn’t stop talking about his first book, and how it was so successful that it landed him this sweet gig flying around the country on an expense account, I’m going to throw the cd out the car window. Bargaining: Please, please, just tell me how much to tip. I’ll finish reading the book if you stop interviewing sex workers and pretending it’s because you’re interested in how much people tip them. Depression: It’s never going to end. He’s going to interview every stripper, prostitute, dominatrix and phone-sex worker in America. I’ve lost the will to live. Acceptance: Yes, I understand. I should tip everyone. Absolutely everyone. I should start every morning with a visit to the ATM, and leave a trail of bills in my wake. For a guy who covered the sex trade a little too thoroughly, he sure quotes the Bible a lot. It’s a little jarring to go from an interview with a working girl to a verse from Ecclesiastes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This book had all the potential to be a really dull read. Dublanica (in spite of his smug, smarmy, smartass attitude that made me want to kick him in the liver) has managed to make the mundane interesting by actually going out and rubbing shoulders with the people in professions that depend on tips for a living. in the case of the strippers, a little bit more than shoulders got rubbed. Hard to take, I'm sure, but one must suffer for his art. No doubt the suffering was eased by the fact that his This book had all the potential to be a really dull read. Dublanica (in spite of his smug, smarmy, smartass attitude that made me want to kick him in the liver) has managed to make the mundane interesting by actually going out and rubbing shoulders with the people in professions that depend on tips for a living. in the case of the strippers, a little bit more than shoulders got rubbed. Hard to take, I'm sure, but one must suffer for his art. No doubt the suffering was eased by the fact that his trips were claimed as a tax deduction. My desire to give Dublanica the mother of all wedgies aside, I think he did a creditable job of writing, but I got a kick out of the cast of characters he encountered in his travels...they saved the book for him. I do take exception with some of his conclusions, however. For example, he opines that Canadians are bad tippers. There is some justification for this position, but only in comparison to Americans. People in other parts of the world think that Americans are just plain nuts in their tipping habits, and in fact have turned some of the service industries into extortionists. Don't tip? I won't change your sheets, or throw your newspaper in a puddle, or rub my private parts on your coffee cup. Apparently the land of the free allows the practice of paying people a substandard wage (or no wage at all), forcing employees to rely on tips. Visitors to the USA probably come from a country (like Canada) that enforces minimum wage laws. Naturally we tip as well, but we don't grease every palm we encounter. The mechanic? Seriously? Charges over $100 per hour and you want me to tip him? Dublanica did engender some sympathy...particularly for the shoeshine guy who works only for tips. In spite of that, I feel that these people are being victimized by their employer, who is getting richer on the basis of the fact that he is guilting the consumer into paying his employees' wages through gratuities. Why not campaign for legislation that bans tipping and forces the billionaire hotel owners to take a couple of billion out of petty cash to give their employees a living wage? Back in the real world, Dublanica's book is nicely developed, the only flaw being that he lets some of his own personality show through. He is unnecessarily profane and a name-caller, and obviously thinks quite highly of himself. But he did write a decent book, and thoughtfully added a couple of appendices to let us know whose palms should be greased at Christmas and at weddings. Sorry grandkids, if Poppa follows these guidelines there won't be a penny left for Christmas gifts!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian Saul

    The guy who wrote this, author of "Waiter Rant" , must have used up every dime he made on that NY Times Best Seller in order to do the research for this one. I never considered myself a Cheap Charlie, but according to what he comes up with in "Keep the Change" I must big one of the biggest tightwads on earth! I don't tip at McDonald's, as do those described in this book (but then, I don't even GO to McDonald's much less eat there). He does cover the gamut of service providers fairly well: restaur The guy who wrote this, author of "Waiter Rant" , must have used up every dime he made on that NY Times Best Seller in order to do the research for this one. I never considered myself a Cheap Charlie, but according to what he comes up with in "Keep the Change" I must big one of the biggest tightwads on earth! I don't tip at McDonald's, as do those described in this book (but then, I don't even GO to McDonald's much less eat there). He does cover the gamut of service providers fairly well: restaurant servers, Maître d', doormen, bellhops, maids, concierges, auto mechanics (???), parking valets, car wash attendants, baristas, bartenders, tattoo artists, massage therapists, barbers, hairstylists, beauticians, pet groomers, deliverymen, movers, casino hosts, card dealers, cocktail waitresses, shoeshine men, bathroom attendants, taxi drivers, & limousine chauffeurs. Then, of course, he goes into great length (two full chapters), gleaned from his research(!), on tipping practices at "sexy time" with dominatrixes [sic], phone sex operators, prostitutes, strippers, and exotic dancers. He failed to include tipping practices aboard cruise ships - big bucks involved in that. Also, he limited himself to tipping within the United States. Tipping while on guided tours is also not mentioned. After reading this book and, especially, after copying down all of these categories, it occurred to me that I don't USE most of these types of services. I polish my own shoes, I drive around for blocks to find my own parking space, I arrange for my own tickets to the theatre, etc. For the above mentioned services I DO use, I tip reasonably. Steve Dublanica, author, doesn't argue one way or another except that in one section he totals up what it might cost to for a visit to a VIP lounge in Las Vegas. All too much a foolish squander in my book. But then, the baseline for all of this is that one must pay for their vices, be they great or small. I guess I'm not that vicious. Interesting read, and it will undoubtedly come to mind as I go about daily life and employ the service of others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan (aka Just My Op)

    This seminary student turned waiter turned blogger turned author set out to become “the Guru of the Gratuity.” I thought that his first book, Waiter Rant, was a fun, light read, better than I was expecting, so I was happy to give this one a try. I'm a self-serve kinda gal living in a self-serve kinda community so I don't have a lot of tipping angst. Still, there are those occasions when I don't know if I should tip or how much I should tip. I thought that looking through a former waiter's eyes wo This seminary student turned waiter turned blogger turned author set out to become “the Guru of the Gratuity.” I thought that his first book, Waiter Rant, was a fun, light read, better than I was expecting, so I was happy to give this one a try. I'm a self-serve kinda gal living in a self-serve kinda community so I don't have a lot of tipping angst. Still, there are those occasions when I don't know if I should tip or how much I should tip. I thought that looking through a former waiter's eyes would be a good place to find the answers. I found a good deal more than that. The book was sometimes funny, as I expected. There were tipping guidelines. But as much as anything, the book was a social commentary containing some psychology, some philosophy, a dash of religious viewpoint, and some seriously good insight. And serious research, as the several-hundred dollar tab for one evening at a strip joint in Vegas proves. Hey, I never said he did his research in a lab. The beginning was a bit dry, too much information for me on the origin of the term “tipping.” and I didn't quite follow some of his logic. Any dryness disappeared in the description of the tipping habits of Lexus drivers, and of Buffy and Tyler. No offense to Lexus drivers, some of my best friends are Lexus drivers, but it was really funny. (Truth in advertising: Actually, I don't think I know anyone, other than casually, who drives a Lexus.) Mr. Dublanica doesn't cover just the professions that normally come to mind when I think of tipping: waiters, hair stylists, the obvious layer that most of us see on a regular basis. He looks at parking attendants, doormen, shoe shiners, hotel housekeepers. He also delves into tipping for the sex trade, including some information about an S/M “dungeon” that I could have gone to my grave without knowing and not felt overly ignorant. What was most important to me was not how much I should tip a dominatrix but that he gave faces to the people working in the trade. People were amazingly open with him, and he looked beyond the trade and into their hearts. Sounds cheesy, but he did. He also showed how some of the people working in the service industry see us, their customers. Not always flattering. And then there was the down-and-out couple who stopped their cab ride short of their destination and walked the rest of the way so that they could give the driver a $2 tip of the $10 total they had to their names. For those with tender sensibilities, you can skip the sex trade parts, although I found that some of the most interesting. There are some bad words sprinkled throughout, but nothing you haven't heard before. The way some of the people who work for tips are cheated should be and often is criminal. Kickbacks are rampant. So next time it comes to leaving a tip, don't be a flea or a schnorer. And read the book. A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I won this book on an Ecco Books giveaway on Facebook . A solid, three-and-a-half star book. It's a very quick and interesting read. The author has a down-to-earth, conversational writing style. He explores tipping in many different professions--from movers and delivery people (think furniture and food) to barista and bar tenders; from beauty workers and bathroom attendants to sex workers and concierges . And, of course, restaurant wait staff. Much of the information I will never use (if I ever f I won this book on an Ecco Books giveaway on Facebook . A solid, three-and-a-half star book. It's a very quick and interesting read. The author has a down-to-earth, conversational writing style. He explores tipping in many different professions--from movers and delivery people (think furniture and food) to barista and bar tenders; from beauty workers and bathroom attendants to sex workers and concierges . And, of course, restaurant wait staff. Much of the information I will never use (if I ever find myself at a point in my life needing to know how much to tip a prostitute or stripper, I'm probably not far from BEING one, and someone should hold an intervention, please!). But, much of the information was enlightening. I've always been a good tipper of restaurant workers (even--at times when I've dined with family members who I know are not good tippers and were treating me to lunch or dinner--excusing myself "to go to the restroom," finding our server, and giving them the tip I know they deserve but won't get from the person kindly paying for lunch), but I had no idea how much I was under-tipping my massage therapist and the cocktail waitresses in Vegas when I was there several years ago. Oh! And taxi drivers, too. It was a good education for me. I also liked how he got into the psychology of the workers he interviewed; for the most part he was very good at not being judgmental and at seeing the person as a human being.There are also three appendices at the back of the book, and they hold almost as much valuable information as any other chapter in the rest of the book. I particularly found the first one on holiday tipping to be useful (it being so close to Christmas as I write this).In the early parts of the book, he also goes into explorations of why people tip (and why some don't) and how tipping got indoctrinated in American culture. And, at the end, he finally figures out what tipping is all about (but you'll have to read it to find out yourself!).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I was ready to smack the author about 10 pages in. The subject is no doubt fascinating, and I did learn some interesting things here and there. However, I had two big problems with this book. The author's writing style was incredibly distracting from the topic. He was trying to be a smart ass, but he wasn't any good at it (clearly, he should have consulted me). He seemed to think he was clever to use examples like going to a strip club and describing the lap dance he received (and presumably tip I was ready to smack the author about 10 pages in. The subject is no doubt fascinating, and I did learn some interesting things here and there. However, I had two big problems with this book. The author's writing style was incredibly distracting from the topic. He was trying to be a smart ass, but he wasn't any good at it (clearly, he should have consulted me). He seemed to think he was clever to use examples like going to a strip club and describing the lap dance he received (and presumably tipped for, but I'd long since moved on), but he's got a pretty big ego if he thinks I really want to hear about it. And I like a good swear word as much as the next guy--perhaps more, in fact, when used in the particularly expressive, illuminating, and enlightening manner that I try to model--but once again, he wasn't GOOD at it. Point of information. Knowing how to use these words make them fun to say and can be quite entertaining. Just throwing them around for the sake of saying them is crass. And that was only the first issue. The other is that he went way beyond describing how, why, and what people tip to put forth his own opinion that the general public doesn't tip enough. Which I suppose he can do, what with it being his book and all, but what happened to objectivity in journalism? It's not fair to force people to live off a couple of dollars an hour pay and then expect everyone else to fill in the blank. IMHO. So reading over and over again about how I need to be tipping more, both in how much and to who (did you know you're supposed to tip both your auto mechanic AND your local phone sex operator? I know. Right?). I just kept getting angry that we can't seem to pay these people a decent wage in the first place. I barely made it through the book, but I needed to know how much to tip the tattoo artist.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Reviewed on my blog: Escapism Through Books Waiter Rant has been on my radar for a long time, but for some reason just never got around to picking it up. I waitressed for a period of about 3 months back when I was 16, and even from such a short amount of time, I had some crazy stories! I've worked directly with customers in a service industry in some way or another since then (until last July anyhow), so the premise of Waiter Rant and all that it entailed was appealing to me. Sharing experience s Reviewed on my blog: Escapism Through Books Waiter Rant has been on my radar for a long time, but for some reason just never got around to picking it up. I waitressed for a period of about 3 months back when I was 16, and even from such a short amount of time, I had some crazy stories! I've worked directly with customers in a service industry in some way or another since then (until last July anyhow), so the premise of Waiter Rant and all that it entailed was appealing to me. Sharing experience stories with people who've been there and who know what it's like to be on the receiving end of someone else's bad day with a smile plastered on your face is only one of the aspects that appealed to me about the book. But I'd also heard that it was funny, and I love funny. And then there's the added bonus of maybe people on the other side of life seeing a bit of perspective in the "people in the service industry are people not slaves" variety... Anyway, when I saw that the author of Waiter Rant had a new book coming out, I requested a review copy. I worked in the service industry, as I mentioned, since I was about 16, but only the 3 month waitressing segment involved tipping. Still I considered myself to be a good tipper anyway... Until now. I've learned quite a lot from this book, and find that my tipping habits don't quite make the grade except in the case of restaurant gratuities. In almost every other category, I'm abysmally ignorant of correct tipping etiquette. My tipping habits: - I tip 20% of the total whenever we go out to a restaurant. (Grade: A) {Industry standard is 15% of the bill, including drinks.} - I tip $1 a drink at bars. (Grade: C) {Should be approx. 20% of the bill. I do not give myself a lower grade here because drink prices are pretty reasonable in my area: $2-4/beer/shot or $7-9/mixed drink.} - I did not know to tip the doorman at hotels. (Grade: F) {Shame!!} - I tip cabdrivers, but generally far below average. (Grade: D) {Should be around 20% of the fare. But in my defense, I don't use cabs often!} - I didn't know to tip car mechanics or detailers. (Grade: F) {Should be $20-50 or so, depending on the work.} ... This is getting ugly, so I'm going to stop now. If an A grade is 5 points, B is 4 points, C is 3 points, D is 1 point and F is 0, my average would be... 1.8 - D minus. Ouch. So, needless to say, I feel like I've learned something from Steve here. I feel like I've been something of a tipping stiff in my life... and this despite the fact that I've worked for tips in my life and know how hard they are to come by and live on. But, the good thing is that Steve has given me the means to mend my ways, and I intend to follow them. I kind of feel like keeping this book with me at all times, kind of like a Tipping Bible, to be used in times of need (when stepping out of a cab, or into a hotel, etc) and containing words to live my life by. That might seem a little extreme, but honestly I don't think so. Steve represents the facts of the working-for-tips way of life, and they aren't pretty. I knew that wait staff is usually underpaid, which is why I tip 20% rather than 15%, but I had no idea that was the case with so many other service jobs. It makes me rather ashamed of myself for not realizing this was the case, and corporate America for allowing and encouraging this kind of workforce exploitation. Steve presents the situation as he sees it, and in often brutally honest, no-holds-barred way, but still with an edge of wit and humor that makes the message a little easier to swallow. It still packs a wallop, at least for me it did, but it's a necessary evil to learn these things. Ignorance is bliss... for the ignorant. For the person on the other end, another's ignorance isn't going to put food on the table or a roof over their family's heads. I found this book to be very informative and entertaining while still providing me with information I might never have learned on my own. I appreciate that. And not only did it serve both of these purposes, but Steve seems to also something of a philosopher and has an ability to understand human nature. Probably this is from so much time working with people, but it's refreshing to see a book about human nature that's not pretentious and not full of drivel. It's refreshing to see a book which doesn't feel like its author is above the reader somehow. This is just a regular guy, trying to understand a prevalent issue. I liked that. So I will definitely be going out this weekend and picking up Waiter Rant. I know it's a little backwards, but better late than never, right? I definitely recommend this book for anyone who is confused by tipping (as I was!)... And remember - when in doubt, ask. :)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    Ever feel clueless about tipping? Who gets a tip and who doesn’t? How much should you leave? Lately it seems like tip jars are popping up everywhere, creating tipping anxiety for a large number of Americans. I include myself in that group. I know to give my hair stylist, waiter, tax driver and bartender a tip, but what about the barrista or the fast food worker? How about the guy at the car wash, or my auto mechanic? And how much do I give the delivery person? What do I do about the holidays? Wh Ever feel clueless about tipping? Who gets a tip and who doesn’t? How much should you leave? Lately it seems like tip jars are popping up everywhere, creating tipping anxiety for a large number of Americans. I include myself in that group. I know to give my hair stylist, waiter, tax driver and bartender a tip, but what about the barrista or the fast food worker? How about the guy at the car wash, or my auto mechanic? And how much do I give the delivery person? What do I do about the holidays? Whew. Steve Dublanica has made a book about tipping interesting and entertaining. He traveled the county doing research observing, interviewing and even working with people in a multitude of industries where tipping is a significant part of the worker’s income. Written in a humorous, witty and engaging style, it’s as if he was chatting with me, telling me stories and at the same time explaining the ins and out of tipping. He begins with a brief history and explains, for better or for worse, how it became such a large part of the American economy. He goes on to interview a wide assortment of workers including waiters, bartenders, hair stylists, spa workers, doormen, valets and casino dealers. Want to know who’s cheap and who’s generous? They will tell you. The valet doesn’t want to see the Lexus pull up, they tend to give bad tips, but the guys driving big trucks give big tips. Do you tip your auto mechanic? It might be a good idea to do so. A little money spent now will get your car in and out of the shop faster the next time it breaks down. There are different types of tipping as the book will explain. There are tips as rewards, tips as a gift and those to ensure better service. There is a lot to learn from this book. Some of the suggestions I was already practicing. I don’t like to use valet parking because I’m fussy about my car. When I do use the valet I tend to tip up front so my car gets a safe parking space and not double parked somewhere. And you don’t even want to know what one valet did to a habitual cheapskate. I didn’t know to tip the pet groomer and while I tip delivery people such as the pizza guy I didn’t know to tip the furniture delivery men. The few times I’ve played blackjack I didn’t realize I should tip the dealer. Maybe that’s why I got separated from my money so quickly. There is also an entire chapter on tipping in strip clubs, phone sex workers and prostitutes. Interesting, but not something I’ll ever use! The author is a former waiter and it shows in the way he presents the information. There is a darker side to the industries that make their workers earn their pay through tips and he does an excellent job of exposing that. Many of these people are paid so little by their employer that on a bad day when tips are scarce they will make less than minimum wage per hour. Keep The Change is more than just a guide to tipping although it is very useful in that regard alone. It’s also a commentary on the tipping system in the US and why tipping won’t be going away any time soon. Once you understand how employees dependent on tips for their income are compensated or, in some cases not, by their employer you realize that the tip is their income and part of the cost of the service. In the end, if you can’t afford the tip you can’t afford the service. I recommend this book for a good inside look at tipping in the service industry told by people who have experienced the work. Plus, it’s an enjoyable and entertaining read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill Elizabeth

    Don’t you love it when you learn something and are vastly entertained at the same time? I certainly do, and Steve Dublanica’s latest – Keep the Change – is my new favorite exemplar of this. The book, a follow-up to his 2008 hit “Waiter Rant”, is a fascinating exploration of the service industry and tipping. Read it – you’ll love it and I guarantee you will never look at a waiter, taxi driver, valet, or any other service worker the same way again. A review copy of the book was provided free of cha Don’t you love it when you learn something and are vastly entertained at the same time? I certainly do, and Steve Dublanica’s latest – Keep the Change – is my new favorite exemplar of this. The book, a follow-up to his 2008 hit “Waiter Rant”, is a fascinating exploration of the service industry and tipping. Read it – you’ll love it and I guarantee you will never look at a waiter, taxi driver, valet, or any other service worker the same way again. A review copy of the book was provided free of charge by LuxuryReading.com. The original (shorter version) post of this book review was made available through LuxuryReading. The book opens with a trip to Vegas to learn about the proper etiquette for tipping a lap dancer – and it only gets better from there… And just to cover this right up front, he does it in an entirely non- skeevy way, even though much of the tipping does border on – if not downright enter – some potentially skeeve-worthy territory. Because yes, his exploration of “personal services” tipping includes how to compensate strippers, prostitutes, dominatrixes (or is it dominatrices? who really knows?), and phone sex operators for their time, as well as the more conventional waiters, bellhops, concierges, and cab drivers. I’ve never waited tables or relied on tips for my survival – and boy oh boy am I glad. The history of tipping is oddly fascinating, as is the compensatory schemata for all the various service-providing professionals covered in the book. In fact, the information on how all these different jobs pay (or more accurately fail to pay) their practitioners is almost more interesting than the information on how we, the consuming public, are supposed to tip them. I was quite surprised to learn how many ridiculous ways employers screw service personnel out of minimum wage (and sometimes even out of the tips they actually manage to earn) – and once I had read through them all, I found myself a lot more sympathetic as far as tipping is concerned… The take-home message that Dublanica delivers at the very end is a sparkling little bit of insight that – in the way of all the best sparkling little bits of insight – seems extremely simple and obvious yet contains layers of wisdom: tipping is all about relationships. Relationships between people. Relationships between people who each need something – one needs a service, the other needs to earn a living. And with this realization, comes a way of re-humanizing a lot of jobs that have been dehumanized for far too long. Pretty cool, huh? I thought so too… Dublanica’s writing style is conversational and extremely engaging. He pulls you right along with him on his tip-exploring adventures, and I dare you to not find him to be a fun companion. And if that wasn’t reason enough to read the book, there are also sections within a number of the chapters that tell you in explicit detail how to handle tipping in certain situations – with specified dollar amounts for appropriate tips that come straight from the workhorses mouths. Add in appendices on holiday and wedding tipping and an interesting review of the literature on the correlation (or lack thereof – you be the judge) between tipping and race, and you have both a great read and a useful reference book. Pick this one up – I promise it’s worth it. So worth it that I’m now hunting down “Waiter Rant” and eagerly waiting to see where Dublanica will go next…

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wellington

    Tipping. It's so confusing and this book aims to shed some light into the mystery. The book skips restaurants because that was served in an earlier book of his. Instead we jump into shoe-shiners, bathroom attendants, people who man (or should I the gender neutral word "human" as a verb?) the door, and taxi cab drivers. Steve even dives into the world of "escort services", gentleman clubs and even an S&M dungeon. So, if you ever wondered how much to tip at your local S&M club, you can ask me. :) M Tipping. It's so confusing and this book aims to shed some light into the mystery. The book skips restaurants because that was served in an earlier book of his. Instead we jump into shoe-shiners, bathroom attendants, people who man (or should I the gender neutral word "human" as a verb?) the door, and taxi cab drivers. Steve even dives into the world of "escort services", gentleman clubs and even an S&M dungeon. So, if you ever wondered how much to tip at your local S&M club, you can ask me. :) Mainly, Steve gives a human face to people we avoid or just refuse to see. The book is less breezy than I imagined. Like other reviewers mention, there's a lot of social commentary here. And he points out a lot on the shady world of kickbacks. Next time at Vegas, I have an idea how to EARN money just by jumping into a cab. But as they say, what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas. Actually, a rule of thumb ... tip 20% on anything. For Xmas tips, just tip the cost of a normal business transaction. Or if you want to boil it down even more, just treat people, all people, with respect. And next time, instead of just pretending he doesn't exist, I'll tip the bathroom attendant.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    If you ever wanted to know who to tip and how much to tip them, this book is for you. The author goes through practically every industry where tips are commonplace and breaks it down on what exactly the worker does, how their hourly wage is less so that tips are considered into their total earnings, and how much to tip them. He interviews workers and finds out what amount of a tip they expect for a service rendered, such as what is a good tip vs. a bad tip. He gets the inside scoop about the typ If you ever wanted to know who to tip and how much to tip them, this book is for you. The author goes through practically every industry where tips are commonplace and breaks it down on what exactly the worker does, how their hourly wage is less so that tips are considered into their total earnings, and how much to tip them. He interviews workers and finds out what amount of a tip they expect for a service rendered, such as what is a good tip vs. a bad tip. He gets the inside scoop about the type of people that tip well vs those that do not tip at all; and what these workers do to insure you get better service if you do tip well. Parking lot attendants and car washers for instance, you'll get your car faster and cleaner respectively. He travels with cabbies and furniture delivery men. He talks to strippers, waiters, bathroom attendants, door men, shoe shiners, barristas, bartenders, and hair dressers. He gets to the bottom of the dos and don'ts in the world of tipping. Very informative with a touch of humor.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I read Steve's first book Waiter Rant last year and really enjoyed it but I like Keep the Change even more. It's well-written, informative, witty and entertaining with some good life lessons as well. For instance - "Beauty workers can't fix who you are as a person. Beauty comes only when you accept who you are. When you accept the truth of yourself. It's a journey we all have to make. I'm still working on it." "Any job doing is worth doing well." "And as I've learned from bitter experience, you ca I read Steve's first book Waiter Rant last year and really enjoyed it but I like Keep the Change even more. It's well-written, informative, witty and entertaining with some good life lessons as well. For instance - "Beauty workers can't fix who you are as a person. Beauty comes only when you accept who you are. When you accept the truth of yourself. It's a journey we all have to make. I'm still working on it." "Any job doing is worth doing well." "And as I've learned from bitter experience, you can never make anyone change her life until she's ready to change it." It's interesting to read why some people are better tippers than others and what those in the service industry have to say about it. I'll remember this book the next time I leave a tip!

  14. 4 out of 5

    W. Frazier

    I picked up this book after much angst over holiday tipping. Let’s get the straight scoop, or so I thought. This book is written like an extended blog, full of tidbits and interesting anecdotes. But then the complete overview of tipping in the sex industry began...really didn’t want to go there. There are some interesting interviews, and yes, a lot of workers depend on tips to survive. Who knew Starbucks can’t call their tip jar a tip jar? Or that running a bar tab leads to better tips for the b I picked up this book after much angst over holiday tipping. Let’s get the straight scoop, or so I thought. This book is written like an extended blog, full of tidbits and interesting anecdotes. But then the complete overview of tipping in the sex industry began...really didn’t want to go there. There are some interesting interviews, and yes, a lot of workers depend on tips to survive. Who knew Starbucks can’t call their tip jar a tip jar? Or that running a bar tab leads to better tips for the bartender? Or that if you are a card dealer you get better tips at the poker table than at the blackjack table? Or that there are well-known profiles to the worst tippers? All of these discoveries are little gems, but still not enough to generate a long-form narrative standout.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John

    I liked his previous book Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip-Confessions of a Cynical Waiter well enough, but not so much this one. Actually, by the end, I developed a mild dislike for him. As a disclaimer, I should say that I'm one of those who feel there's too much tipping expected in America, so his exhortations to tip generously at every turn were grating. Not particularly recommended. I liked his previous book Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip-Confessions of a Cynical Waiter well enough, but not so much this one. Actually, by the end, I developed a mild dislike for him. As a disclaimer, I should say that I'm one of those who feel there's too much tipping expected in America, so his exhortations to tip generously at every turn were grating. Not particularly recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fate's Lady

    I bought this book on sale, and I'm pretty sure I overpaid. The author is obnoxious, self-involved, homophobic, and obsessed with sex workers. He spent a whole section on salon treatments making gross "no homo" style comments and commenting selfconsciously about how brave he was for getting a damn facial. He also managed to work the word fag in multiple times by worrying an allegedly overheard conversation... Yeah, I think he probably made that up. The book is boring and unfunny and this guy des I bought this book on sale, and I'm pretty sure I overpaid. The author is obnoxious, self-involved, homophobic, and obsessed with sex workers. He spent a whole section on salon treatments making gross "no homo" style comments and commenting selfconsciously about how brave he was for getting a damn facial. He also managed to work the word fag in multiple times by worrying an allegedly overheard conversation... Yeah, I think he probably made that up. The book is boring and unfunny and this guy deserves an atomic wedgie.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I don't know if I learned everything I need to know about tipping from this book. I do know that a lot of people expect tips and a little more about the culture behind tipping, but I still don't know why we are expected to give tips in certain situations and not in others. The bottom line of this book seems to be--when in doubt--tip. Not very helpful. I don't know if I learned everything I need to know about tipping from this book. I do know that a lot of people expect tips and a little more about the culture behind tipping, but I still don't know why we are expected to give tips in certain situations and not in others. The bottom line of this book seems to be--when in doubt--tip. Not very helpful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Probably 3 and 1/2 stars. The concept was interesting and I learned a lot about who I haven't tipped and probably should. But it felt too focused on sex workers, as though the author wrote this whole book as an excuse to write off going to strip clubs, etc. but that might just be because those are industries I have no interest in. The writing was okay. Overall, not a bad book. Probably 3 and 1/2 stars. The concept was interesting and I learned a lot about who I haven't tipped and probably should. But it felt too focused on sex workers, as though the author wrote this whole book as an excuse to write off going to strip clubs, etc. but that might just be because those are industries I have no interest in. The writing was okay. Overall, not a bad book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ashley FL

    Parts were amusing, but the basic thesis is: Tip More. And Tip Almost Everyone. Given that it is written by an ex-waiter, that's probably not surprising. Parts were amusing, but the basic thesis is: Tip More. And Tip Almost Everyone. Given that it is written by an ex-waiter, that's probably not surprising.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    My husband and I are always arguing over how to tip our waiter. I have always felt my husband to be entirely too generous, while I am much more stingy. No, he was never in the service industry. I was. Still, I see the amount of tip as being conditional upon our quality of service. My husband lays out an even 20% to everyone. I certainly came out of this book with a much different attitude about tipping. I am now likely to be MUCH more generous than I ever have been before (and less argumentative My husband and I are always arguing over how to tip our waiter. I have always felt my husband to be entirely too generous, while I am much more stingy. No, he was never in the service industry. I was. Still, I see the amount of tip as being conditional upon our quality of service. My husband lays out an even 20% to everyone. I certainly came out of this book with a much different attitude about tipping. I am now likely to be MUCH more generous than I ever have been before (and less argumentative with my husband). Steve took us directly into the lives of the tippees and that perspective in itself changes things in my mind completely. When you realize that the person you are tipping relies on this little extra from each person to add up into a decent living wage, that additional $5 that doesn't mean so much to me, but for them - in bulk - means the car payment - rearranges the meaning of tips for me. I've also never considered how demeaning it would feel to get a crappy tip or NO tip. I've never thought about the maid service or the car wash attendent - aren't they just fulfilling jobs? Honestly, I'm not a mean person but I had no clue what an impact tips make for people in these low paying jobs. My eyes have been opened and I realize now how important it is to show appreciation to these folks. I'm still never going to tip the fast food worker...then again, when you really think about it...in an industry with such notoriously HORRENDOUS service, maybe that would change the world of fast food completely?? Huh. I have always thought that the $4 pizza delivery charge we pay goes to the delivery guy to "ensure" their tip. Steve sets me straight on that one too. I have always figured that charge in when determining the tip I give the deliverer. Now I know better and feel terrible for having been such a crappy tipper in the past, substituting $4 from each of their tips! I also learned a TON about other circumstances that require tipping that I was completely unaware of. Seriously, our tipping "world" almost REQUIRES that you read this book before becoming a service consumer. There's a lot to know. Luckily, my husband has always known and has always handled it without my even noticing. I'm reading the book, thinking about times we should have tipped - so I'm asking him - how much did you tip that valet when we went to lalala place, and are you tipping the car wash extra for my car (an suv)? How much are you tipping the bartender when we go out? We've never left $ for the maids at hotels have we? If it were up to me all this time, I'd probly have butt grease on my back seat, crinkly crumbly sheets and notoriously bad car wash/ travel experiences!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I snapped up this book after being constantly confused about what to tip people on my business trips. I enjoyed most of his tipping tips and especially thought he did a good job portraying the many service workers he came across. However, I didn't entirely agree with all of his tipping advice. I felt a little like the fact that he was tipping on the publisher's dime made him more inclined to drop a lot more money and be a lot harsher at those who don't match his big spending. And I've been there I snapped up this book after being constantly confused about what to tip people on my business trips. I enjoyed most of his tipping tips and especially thought he did a good job portraying the many service workers he came across. However, I didn't entirely agree with all of his tipping advice. I felt a little like the fact that he was tipping on the publisher's dime made him more inclined to drop a lot more money and be a lot harsher at those who don't match his big spending. And I've been there done, that in terms of serving and barisita-ing (for the record, we didn't expect ANY tips at the coffee shop, even though we had a tip jar). As for Dublanica himself, he was what really carried his first book, Waiter Rant: Thanks for the Tip-Confessions of a Cynical Waiter. However, I found that occasionally Dublanica detracted from this second book. I read this over the course of a couple weeks and found that my tolerance varied from day to day. Tipping, as he even says repeatedly, is a touchy subject and sometimes he didn't walk that delicate line very well. But, at the end of the book, I did feel a little wiser on what and when to tip. I'd also recommend skipping the Prologue. While I didn't mind the Vegas chapter in itself, the stripper anecdote just gave a weird "ickiness" to the start of the book. Bleh, some editor or marketing department had a field day with that decision.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    A pretty good read on various areas where people tip and where you might not think to tip. The author talks to a variety of people, some of whom you might expect: waiters, taxi drivers, doormen, etc. as well as some you might not, pet groomers, prostitutes and card dealers. Overall it was pretty fascinating to see who are good tippers, who are bad, and what people do to get tipped, since so many people working in these industries survive on tips. I found it somewhat frustrating that the author te A pretty good read on various areas where people tip and where you might not think to tip. The author talks to a variety of people, some of whom you might expect: waiters, taxi drivers, doormen, etc. as well as some you might not, pet groomers, prostitutes and card dealers. Overall it was pretty fascinating to see who are good tippers, who are bad, and what people do to get tipped, since so many people working in these industries survive on tips. I found it somewhat frustrating that the author tended to talk about his experiences quite a bit. That's fine if done well, but more often than not I'd skim over it. I could identify when he felt confused and naive, but he was trying to be too smart, as a reviewer said down further. Overall, though, it's a good read that definitely made me think. Some of the stories were quite sad, as a stripper discusses how she raped by her mother's husband at the age of 11 (it's not graphic though). An escort talks about how she felt empowered by taking on her work despite her advanced degree and her wide-range of interests (which perhaps helped her in her escorting). For all those stories of people who felt they should short out a server, etc. because they are too poor to eat out, are too drunk to think straight, pay God, etc., should really read this book. People might not be so stingy if they knew how many livelihoods depending on how much you plunk down after the original amount is paid.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    nonfiction; the practice of leaving gratuities/tips. Basically: don't think of it as extra money you're paying; it's more than just rewarding good service. Leaving a decent tip is something we should think of part of doing business = helping people earn a living wage at the places that we'd like to continue using. Worth reading since this is something I admit I am bad at, though Steve does get typically rant-y sometimes (which can be hilarious but also somewhat jarring if you use audiobooks to h nonfiction; the practice of leaving gratuities/tips. Basically: don't think of it as extra money you're paying; it's more than just rewarding good service. Leaving a decent tip is something we should think of part of doing business = helping people earn a living wage at the places that we'd like to continue using. Worth reading since this is something I admit I am bad at, though Steve does get typically rant-y sometimes (which can be hilarious but also somewhat jarring if you use audiobooks to help you get to sleep). * leave hotel maids $2-5 daily for routine cleanings and $5-10 on checkout days. * tip your mechanic $10 each time he helps you if you want to skip the line, or be prepared to leave your car there all day with everyone else (this is probably why the wait is always longer than they tell you it will be). * tip your bartender for 15-20% of the drink price (at least a dollar, more for pricey drinks); think of it as the same service you'd get if you were sitting at a table. And don't forget to still tip them if it's an open bar party. * give the valet parking attendant at least $2 when you drop off your car (and don't be rude to him/her) if you don't want to wait ages to retrieve the car later (or discover mysterious damage after you've left the lot). A larger tip ($10-20) will suit you better if you want to be able to leave at a moment's notice.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bala

    Tipping is part of American culture. This book provides an insightful view of people whose livelihood depends on the tips their customers provide. The author tackles this often contested and uncomfortable topic of who to tip, how much to tip, and how often to tip. The author took an interesting way to research for this book. He had interviewed tip-ees who work in Manhattan, New York, Florida, Oregon, and California. He adds his personal view through out. The book starts out in a strip club, whic Tipping is part of American culture. This book provides an insightful view of people whose livelihood depends on the tips their customers provide. The author tackles this often contested and uncomfortable topic of who to tip, how much to tip, and how often to tip. The author took an interesting way to research for this book. He had interviewed tip-ees who work in Manhattan, New York, Florida, Oregon, and California. He adds his personal view through out. The book starts out in a strip club, which sounded weird. I assume that he wanted to start with a shock effect for the reader / listener to get the attention. In the end, I have learned a lot about the lives of people who I don’t register often, such as shoe polisher, wash room attendant, cab drivers, hotel attendants, waiters, hair dressers. There is a lot of discussion on tipping sex workers and how to tip in Los Vegas. Both these aspects were not useful to me but was interesting nevertheless. I applaud the author for putting himself in various predicaments to collect first person account on how tips affect those whose livelihood depends on it. A shout out to the reader of the audio book for a job well done. This book is certainly an unique one. I enjoyed listening to it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tim Jin

    The author of this book used to be a waiter and wrote Waiter Rant, which is an excellent book also. As a former waiter, he is expecting to be tip every single time. Keep the Change can be a little outrages. I personally don't feel that I should tip for every single services, like the mailman, but I also think that tipping should be given when service is needed. For instant, I was at a high end restaurant with my caregiver and the waiter offered to give my staff a break and offered to help me with The author of this book used to be a waiter and wrote Waiter Rant, which is an excellent book also. As a former waiter, he is expecting to be tip every single time. Keep the Change can be a little outrages. I personally don't feel that I should tip for every single services, like the mailman, but I also think that tipping should be given when service is needed. For instant, I was at a high end restaurant with my caregiver and the waiter offered to give my staff a break and offered to help me with my dinner. It might been a slow night for the waiter, but I felt like he had my best interest for me and wanted to give my staff a break. We tipped him heavily because he went out of his way to accommodate my needs. Really good book. I just learned when you tip at Starbucks, the workers gets taxed on the tips. At the end of the day, they collect the money from the tip jar and send the tips to corporate and they will add the tip in each employee paychecks and get taxed. I also learned the kick back system, where everyone in the service pool, gets their share of the pie. Awesome book and it is very entertaining.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Giuliano

    I'm really glad that I finally picked this up and read it, because it was the very worthy and capable sequel that Waiter Rant deserved. It starts out as a sort of dry and straightforward paper on the history and practice of tipping, but Dublanica slowly begins to insert his personal opinions, anecdotes, and theories surrounding the practice as the book goes on, making it feel a lot more personal and relatable. The adventures he goes on to learn more about tipping in various industries (in a wide I'm really glad that I finally picked this up and read it, because it was the very worthy and capable sequel that Waiter Rant deserved. It starts out as a sort of dry and straightforward paper on the history and practice of tipping, but Dublanica slowly begins to insert his personal opinions, anecdotes, and theories surrounding the practice as the book goes on, making it feel a lot more personal and relatable. The adventures he goes on to learn more about tipping in various industries (in a wide array of industries, from sex workers to shoe-shiners) are often hilarious and still thought-provoking, and show that Dublanica was extremely thorough to get his information. In the end, while I felt Waiter Rant was more relatable (in no small part due to the fact that my family is in the restaurant business), Keep the Change is a great and informative story about the history of tipping, and a great guide towards proper tipping etiquette in basically any application you can think of.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Raven

    I read "Keep the Change," a follow up to Dublanca's first book "Waiter Rant" because I was very entertained the first time around. This work takes on a more investigative journalistic approach, which I found enjoyable and surprisingly informative. Discussing the economy of gratuity, Dublanca's quest to become a Tipping Guru took him to some of the seedier sides of our culture, exposing the both the necessity and etiquette of greasing the palms for those who provide services many often take for g I read "Keep the Change," a follow up to Dublanca's first book "Waiter Rant" because I was very entertained the first time around. This work takes on a more investigative journalistic approach, which I found enjoyable and surprisingly informative. Discussing the economy of gratuity, Dublanca's quest to become a Tipping Guru took him to some of the seedier sides of our culture, exposing the both the necessity and etiquette of greasing the palms for those who provide services many often take for granted. As a laymen who has never worked in the service industry, I found how much tipped employees not only rely on their gratuities, and was immediately wracked with some guilt for slights dues to my ignorance. Dublanca's exploration of the history of tipping and the importance it plays in society really opened my eyes to this often overlooked aspect of our culture and I feel more informed and better prepared next time I am in line at Starbucks or handing my keys over to the valet!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Larson

    This is the second book by this author who is a former restaurant waiter. This book is better written than his first and reads more fluidly. For this book Dublanica traveled around the country researching each and every profession where tipping is considered the norm and presents stories about the people he intereviewed. I found it enjoyable and informative. I did however, find myself challenging Dublanica's explanation of the etymology of the word "tip". I have believed for many years that the This is the second book by this author who is a former restaurant waiter. This book is better written than his first and reads more fluidly. For this book Dublanica traveled around the country researching each and every profession where tipping is considered the norm and presents stories about the people he intereviewed. I found it enjoyable and informative. I did however, find myself challenging Dublanica's explanation of the etymology of the word "tip". I have believed for many years that the word Tip was an acronym for "To Insure Promptness". Dublanica doesn't give any references as to his explanation but does declare that the word isn't an acronym. I would like to see the sources he used to come to this conclusion. Unfortunately he doesn't cite them. But aside from the etymology of the word, I enjoyed Dublanica's description of the various industries that rely on tips. His coverage is quite thorough.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I read this book as part of a reading challenge for the category "a book written by a blogger". I followed Waiter Rant years ago, just around the time the first book was coming out. When I needed to find another book written by a blogger, I was excited to jump on this one. Dublanica's usual humor is found throughout these pages, though he also lapses into occasional brooding (which also seems normal for his writing). The latter drags the book down a bit, but I feel he makes up for it with the form I read this book as part of a reading challenge for the category "a book written by a blogger". I followed Waiter Rant years ago, just around the time the first book was coming out. When I needed to find another book written by a blogger, I was excited to jump on this one. Dublanica's usual humor is found throughout these pages, though he also lapses into occasional brooding (which also seems normal for his writing). The latter drags the book down a bit, but I feel he makes up for it with the former. Overall I found it a fascinating chronicle of tips - who needs them, who makes them, who gives them. It doesn't cover everyone, and Dublanica makes note of that. But it's an interesting start. There were a large number of situations I can never see myself entering, ranging from small outlines to entire chapters, but I was engaged even so. Overall a compelling read that has already sparked a lot of discussion in my house!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scotchneat

    Mr WaiterRant went off to find out everything he could about tipping (in America). He goes a lot of places including Vegas and an S&M den in California. He talks to shoeshine guys, cabbies, valets, doormen, servers (of course)... Truth told, if we gave the recommended percentages to every type of person that he profiles, our cost of living would rise considerably. He does a good job of explaining how tips came to be, and at least makes an attempt at explaining how so many jobs have moved into this Mr WaiterRant went off to find out everything he could about tipping (in America). He goes a lot of places including Vegas and an S&M den in California. He talks to shoeshine guys, cabbies, valets, doormen, servers (of course)... Truth told, if we gave the recommended percentages to every type of person that he profiles, our cost of living would rise considerably. He does a good job of explaining how tips came to be, and at least makes an attempt at explaining how so many jobs have moved into this category of "gratuity expected" - some make sense, some don't. You might be shocked at how pay is structured for some professions. There are also tidbits about tippers - who's good, who's cheap (Canadians, really?). Down to age, ethnicity and gender. Up to you to decide what you think about that. Dublanica's writing is always an easy go.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.