web site hit counter Art & Max - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Art & Max

Availability: Ready to download

Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His energy and enthusiasm bring Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His energy and enthusiasm bring the adventure to its triumphant conclusion. Beginners everywhere will take heart.


Compare

Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His energy and enthusiasm bring Max and Arthur are friends who share an interest in painting. Arthur is an accomplished painter; Max is a beginner. Max’s first attempt at using a paintbrush sends the two friends on a whirlwind trip through various artistic media, which turn out to have unexpected pitfalls. Although Max is inexperienced, he’s courageous—and a quick learner. His energy and enthusiasm bring the adventure to its triumphant conclusion. Beginners everywhere will take heart.

30 review for Art & Max

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This is a David Wiesner book so of course it’s a lot of fun. The colors are vivid and the imagination is sparkling. This story actually has words. Art is painting and having a lovely day, when Max comes along and wants to paint too. The trouble starts when Max asks what he should paint and Art says, ‘paint me.’ Max takes him literally and begins to paint him. Art gets mad and all kinds of zaniness begins. It’s a funny little story about lizards. The stage is larger than life and imagination is th This is a David Wiesner book so of course it’s a lot of fun. The colors are vivid and the imagination is sparkling. This story actually has words. Art is painting and having a lovely day, when Max comes along and wants to paint too. The trouble starts when Max asks what he should paint and Art says, ‘paint me.’ Max takes him literally and begins to paint him. Art gets mad and all kinds of zaniness begins. It’s a funny little story about lizards. The stage is larger than life and imagination is the only limit to what goes on. It’s a delightful story. The nephew loved the lizard Art. He thought Art looked like a monster. He thought Max was funny. He thought this was a great book and he gave it 4 stars. He has recently been drawing pokemon cards and he thought it would be fun to paint them like Max paints Art. He wants to try it now.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Illustrators of children’s books are easier to deal with if you can lump them into little boxes. Multicultural family stories that tug at the heartstrings? That’s the Patricia Polacco box. Cute kids in period clothes frolicking with goats? Yup, that’s Tasha Tudor. So my problem with David Wiesner is that he throws my entire system off. Though his style is recognizable in each and every one of his books (Freefall, Sector 7, etc.) his storylines zigzag around the globe. One minute he has a book ab Illustrators of children’s books are easier to deal with if you can lump them into little boxes. Multicultural family stories that tug at the heartstrings? That’s the Patricia Polacco box. Cute kids in period clothes frolicking with goats? Yup, that’s Tasha Tudor. So my problem with David Wiesner is that he throws my entire system off. Though his style is recognizable in each and every one of his books (Freefall, Sector 7, etc.) his storylines zigzag around the globe. One minute he has a book about frogs that unexpectedly take flight. The next it’s a wordless tale about a boy who finds a fantastical camera from beneath the sea. He remains an unpredictable force. You literally never know what he will do next. When Art & Max was first discussed, folks had a very difficult time figuring out what it was about. There are lizards? And painting? As always, Wiesner considers his reader first, then creates a story that will be both fun to read and visually stimulating. Consider this your Example A. Art, a horned lizard with an artist’s temperament, is doing a bit of portraiture in his desert environment when along bounces happy-go-lucky Max. Max wants to paint just like Art, and the grumpy elder agrees grudgingly, informing the little guy, “Just don’t get in the way.” When Max asks what he should paint, Art suggests himself. Unfortunately for him, Max takes this advice a little too literally and Max finds himself covered in oils, turned into pastels, and eventually nothing more than a mere outline of his former self. By the end, however, he has come around to Max’s exuberance and the two decide to paint. Max makes a portrait. Art throws paints at a cactus. The thing I forget about Mr. Wiesner is that he always has the child reader in mind. Sure, he may break down the fourth wall in The Three Pigs, but he’s still having fun with the kids reading the book when he does so. That said, a friend of mine suggested that Art & Max differed from The Three Pigs in this way. She was concerned that Art & Max wasn’t kid-friendly enough. She said it deals with characters coming to terms with the fact that they themselves are drawn, but not in a way that kids would relate to. With that in mind I gave the book another reading and I have to say that I respectfully disagree. I think kids could get a lot out of this book, particularly if it was read in conjunction with fun art projects. Yet Wiesner isn’t treating this book like an art lesson. Certainly an art lesson can be garnered from what he’s done here, but not once does the word “watercolor” or “brush type” enter into the conversation. He lets the books speak for itself. Having previously conquered the world beneath the waves (Flotsam) it seems natural that Wiesner would go 180 degrees in the opposite direction and try his hand at a land bereft of moisture. To this end he has rendered not only the backgrounds of the desert but also its native occupants. Take a look at a photograph of a horned lizard sometime. Note their eyes. That snide, faintly contemptuous glance they give the world. Now look at Art on the cover of Art & Max. Look familiar? David Wiesner knows his lizards, and gives Art most sterling qualities. Max is harder to identify. At first I thought he might be a Jesus Lizard, running hither and thither as much as he does. But his coloring and stripes don’t match the Jesus Lizard’s, particularly with that dexterous little tail of his. Max is a mystery but he feels authentic. Half the time I look at a publication page in a picture book I’ll find that no one bothered to write down the artist’s medium. This is a real pity since the publication page should read like the credits at the end of a film. You want to know who’s responsible. In the case of Art & Max, I need not have worried. Says the tiny text, “The illustrations were executed in acrylic, pastel, watercolor, and India ink.” They had to be, considering what the artist puts his materials through. In the course of a single book Art appears to go through (and correct me if I’m wrong) watercolors to oils to pastels to a thin India ink outline and then back to watercolors (or it is oils again?) in the end. I’m trying to think of books in which characters of different mediums talk to one another within a single story and I’m having a hard time coming up with anything. Feel free to help me out with suggestions of your own. Not mixed media books, necessarily, but anything besides that. I'm a sucker for in-jokes and hidden details in books for kids. In one instance, the last image in the book has Art painting against a cactus in a style reminiscent of Jackson Pollock, while Max engages in a Impressionist style not too far off from Van Gogh. You could have a lot of fun asking kids to identify artists that have painted in the styles that crop up during this story. He’s a detail-oriented man, our David Wiesner, though some of those details are more obvious than others. For example, I’ve little doubt that kids reading the book are going to be interested in the antics of the three little lizards that zip about our two heroes willy nilly. For my part, I was much more interested in the technology at work here. Though they appear to be working in the desert, there seem to be plenty of electrical outlets available amongst the shrubbery. Max is often seen pulling out an old Acme metal fan, an Acme vacuum cleaner, and an old Victrola. Peer around the side of the Victrola and you’ll see that Art has been listening to Pink Floyd (I kid you not) as he paints. This is, to the best of my knowledge, the very first time a Pink Floyd album cover has ever made it between the pages of a children’s picture book. Doff your caps in respect, brothers and sisters. I’ve an Art & Max theory. My theory is that Mr. Wiesner got bored. He was bored with always doing gorgeous watercolors and watercolors alone. Maybe he couldn’t decide on his next medium. I know that the children’s literary criticism community probably would have fallen into a stupor if he had come out with a book done with computer graphics. Who knows? Maybe that’s the way he’ll go next. As I’ve said before, Wiesner’s a wild card. You never quite know what he has up his sleeve. All a person can know is that it’s going to be wonderful. He may not be consistent in terms of his content, but when it comes to quality David Wiesner is ever and always predictably magnificent. Art & Max is no exception. For ages 4-8.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    5 Stars!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Abrey

    Beautiful illustrations, a great story to share with a class.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Holly Hardwick

    I absolutely loved reading Art & Max by David Wiesner because of the beautiful and colorful illustrations throughout the story. The plot is simple enough: two lizard friends, Arthur and Max, are standing in their desert habitat and trying to paint. Arthur is annoyed with Max because Max doesn't seem to be a "real" painter like he is. Max is just excited to be given the opportunity to paint with his friend "Art." When Max tries to paint Arthur, however, comedy ensues. I feel that students would r I absolutely loved reading Art & Max by David Wiesner because of the beautiful and colorful illustrations throughout the story. The plot is simple enough: two lizard friends, Arthur and Max, are standing in their desert habitat and trying to paint. Arthur is annoyed with Max because Max doesn't seem to be a "real" painter like he is. Max is just excited to be given the opportunity to paint with his friend "Art." When Max tries to paint Arthur, however, comedy ensues. I feel that students would really love this book and find it really funny. It would easily engage both boys and girls, and could be incorporated into not only a literacy lesson, but also a science lesson about desert habitats, as well as an art lesson. I would suggest this book for all elementary grades because this book could be enjoyed by all students. It isn't too young or mature for any audience. Wiesner did a remarkable job on the illustrations for this story. There is an abundance of bright colors, examples of various styles of art, and an incredible attention to detail in the characters and their habitat. My favorite page is where Arthur explodes color everywhere. It is really interesting to look at and fully engages my eyes. I really enjoyed reading this book and getting to view all of the incredible illustrations found throughout.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    Wiesner does the most amazing things with the picture book format. I'm dazzled by his virtuosity in so many styles. I'm awed by the humor he manages to imbue every picture with. If you haven't checked out any of his work, it's probably because you're an adult who doesn't read picture books, because they're for kids. Pish, tosh. There is a narrative here, but like the best cartoons, it's going to sail right over the heads of children. Go, get a stack of his books and just wallow in the artistry. Wiesner does the most amazing things with the picture book format. I'm dazzled by his virtuosity in so many styles. I'm awed by the humor he manages to imbue every picture with. If you haven't checked out any of his work, it's probably because you're an adult who doesn't read picture books, because they're for kids. Pish, tosh. There is a narrative here, but like the best cartoons, it's going to sail right over the heads of children. Go, get a stack of his books and just wallow in the artistry. And laugh. And shake your head, and then you'll grab someone and say, "you've got to see this." Library copy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Agnė

    A very entertaining story full of metafictive humor, which celebrates art and introduces different artistic media and styles. Love love love the detailed, dynamic, colorful illustrations: A very entertaining story full of metafictive humor, which celebrates art and introduces different artistic media and styles. Love love love the detailed, dynamic, colorful illustrations:

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Mckay

    Art and Max are two best friend iguanas that have one thing in common: They love to paint! Now, the only difference is that Art is an excellent painter who takes life very seriously, and Max is a small less serious painter who always seems to get in Art's way. As the story begins, Art had been working on his most recent piece when Max barged in his way asking what he should paint. Art seemly already bothered by his presence, quickly suggest "paint ME" without remembering how literal his friend w Art and Max are two best friend iguanas that have one thing in common: They love to paint! Now, the only difference is that Art is an excellent painter who takes life very seriously, and Max is a small less serious painter who always seems to get in Art's way. As the story begins, Art had been working on his most recent piece when Max barged in his way asking what he should paint. Art seemly already bothered by his presence, quickly suggest "paint ME" without remembering how literal his friend was. Before he knew it, Max had him painted head to toe! Art was furious at this; he obviously did not mean that Max should literally paint him, he meant to paint a picture of him! Bursting with anger the two argued for a while until finally the most incredible thing happened: Art bursted. Well, sort of. Art was so mad that he burst the whole top layer of his iguana skin. Max looked stunned and so did Art. They had no idea what had happened, but soon decided they needed to fix it. Max first suggested a fan, but that only caused Art to be very thirsty. Then once Max got him some water, his whole body started to disappear! Before the two iguana's eyes was the outline of Art's large body. Outraged once again, Art told Max he would fix this on his own and suddenly an even weirder thing happened: the outline of Art's body began to unravel. Before they knew it, Art's body was laying on the ground resembling nothing more than a black string. Max sat in disbelief for a little bit, when finally he decided that he got himself into this mess and he owed it to his friend to make it right. He picked up the string and began racking his brain for what he knew about art. He started with a sketch, then added some detail. As he did this, Art's body was beginning to form again and it wasn't before long that he was able to talk. Soon, all Max needed was to add some paint and his friend would be back! Max was right. He added some paint and his best friend was alive again! By the end of this story Art was alive again and Max had not only proven that he was a true artist, but that he was also a great friend! I would recommend this story as a read aloud for grades 1st-3rd. I think this story would be an excellent way to introduce the writing process. Sometimes it is hard to explain such abstract things like making a plan for writing and this story makes it fun. As Max had to begin with a rough draft, then add detail, and finally color, we as writers also have to follow a process. In addition to teaching the writing process this book would also be a great tool in teaching students that they must always be mindful of their word choice. In having great word choice, they can avoid situations like what Art and Max had found themselves in. If Art knew his audience, he should have known that he needed to be extra clear in what he was trying to tell his friend. Wiesner, David. 2010. Art and Max. Clarion Books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cris Ingram

    The pictures were colorful and realistic as usual for David Wiesner, but the story of the two lizards and their wacky paint day just didn't grab me, kids would like it because they are messy and no imagination is needed. The pictures were colorful and realistic as usual for David Wiesner, but the story of the two lizards and their wacky paint day just didn't grab me, kids would like it because they are messy and no imagination is needed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    I always approach a new Wiesner book with huge expectations. I mean, this is the three-time Caldecott medalist! I guarantee this will not disappoint, no matter how high your expectations are. Arthur is quite a painter. He does portraits of lizards as they pose for him. Max wants to learn and Arthur is willing to teach him. The first step is Max figuring out what to paint. Arthur grandly suggests that Max could paint him. So Max does exactly that, with deep blue and bright yellow, he paints Arthur I always approach a new Wiesner book with huge expectations. I mean, this is the three-time Caldecott medalist! I guarantee this will not disappoint, no matter how high your expectations are. Arthur is quite a painter. He does portraits of lizards as they pose for him. Max wants to learn and Arthur is willing to teach him. The first step is Max figuring out what to paint. Arthur grandly suggests that Max could paint him. So Max does exactly that, with deep blue and bright yellow, he paints Arthur right in the face. Arthur gets cross and bursts free of his paint-filled skin only to find that the colors have stayed and now his skin is chalk and pastels. When a blowing fan won’t fix it, Arthur takes a drink of water to feel better. It erases his color, leaving just a line drawing behind that Max quickly unravels. Now it is up to Max to figure out how to get Arthur back. Wiesner’s only text in this picture book is Arthur and Max’s dialogue with each other. The illustrations really tell the story. Wiesner has a great sense of comic timing from the first spurt of paint onto Arthur all the way through to Max rebuilding him in a very simplistic style. The moments are ones that will have young readers and listeners laughing out loud. As they are enjoying the story, they are being taught about the way that different media react, work and appear. It is a very skillful and clever introduction to art styles and formats. Exceptionally, the book is also about creating art yourself. It is about a painter with his own distinct style working with a younger artist. It is about restraint meeting freedom. About creativity and letting loose and what happens when you do. It is a book that has many layers, several of them from paint. A colorful, dynamic picture book that embodies what it is also conveying. This picture book needs to get in the hands of your art teachers, children who enjoy art, and anyone looking for a good laugh. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Todd Burleson

    This review is one of my additional picture books for RLS 520 Art & Max written and illustrated by David Wiesner This book is also a Monarch Award Nominee for 2013. I’m going to come right out and say it about this book: I don’t really like it. Now, let me explain why. The idea is quite simple and one that kids will love. Two friends Art(hur) and Max (both lizards) are standing in front of a canvas. Max insists that he can paint, just as well as Arthur, much to Arthur’s chagrin. The story goes on This review is one of my additional picture books for RLS 520 Art & Max written and illustrated by David Wiesner This book is also a Monarch Award Nominee for 2013. I’m going to come right out and say it about this book: I don’t really like it. Now, let me explain why. The idea is quite simple and one that kids will love. Two friends Art(hur) and Max (both lizards) are standing in front of a canvas. Max insists that he can paint, just as well as Arthur, much to Arthur’s chagrin. The story goes on to show Art and Max in a variety of painting ‘messes.’ A careful observer might notice that each of the messes is actually a different type of painting or drawoing. For example, after draining all the color from Art, Max blows it all back onto Art and it looks quite like a Jackson Pollock drip painting. Another mess ends up looking like Seurat’s ‘dot’ work. Now, that all sounds pretty interesting, but the book is sorely lacking a couple of elements, most notably a few pages in the back that explain each of the different ‘styles.’ I turned the last page of the book thinking that I would be able to share a few key points about each of the ‘styles’ that were represented in the beautiful illustrations, but there was nothing to share. The book’s format is almost ‘graphic novel.’ There are various cells within each of the pages and acrylic illustrations are vibrant and alive. It was tough to read aloud to a group of students, but I must say, the kids loved it. Then again, they love anything that shows characters throwing paint at one another! I had very high hopes for this book. In the end, as I’ve said, I was disappointed. The book works well as an independent reading book for mid to older elementary students. It might work really well in an art class with an instructor who could point out and name each of the allusions. Again, this is where I wish the author had added just a couple of pages to make the book even richer and more useful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (not getting friends updates) Vegan

    I love David Wiesner's books and I felt as though I waited forever for this one to be ready for me at the library. I’ve loved a few of Wiesner’s wordless picture books; they’re brilliant. This one I found very disappointing, much to my surprise. I didn’t like the cover illustration but I thought that it would get better, but for me it really didn’t. I didn’t enjoy the art and, even though this book has words as well as illustrations, it is a picture book; in order to like it I have to better apprec I love David Wiesner's books and I felt as though I waited forever for this one to be ready for me at the library. I’ve loved a few of Wiesner’s wordless picture books; they’re brilliant. This one I found very disappointing, much to my surprise. I didn’t like the cover illustration but I thought that it would get better, but for me it really didn’t. I didn’t enjoy the art and, even though this book has words as well as illustrations, it is a picture book; in order to like it I have to better appreciate the art than I did here. Yes, there is some cleverness with the illustrations, and some I’m sure kids will find funny, maybe laugh out loud funny, but while I was mildly amused a few times, I never really became a fan. Art and Max and the others, the way they are depicted, kind of gave me the creeps. I appreciate what he is trying to do with the story and I’ve liked other such books, but here it didn’t work so well for me. I am shocked that I’m not giving this book 4 or 5 stars or even 3 stars. I still love Wiesner’s books and I’ll still eagerly await future books. I’m assuming that this one is an anomaly for me. And, I guess it’s just me, well not JUST me, but most Goodreads members think highly of this book: 37% gave it 5 stars, 43% gave it 4 stars, so far seeming like my usual ratings for this author-illustrator’s books, 13% gave it 3 stars. AND, only 4% also gave it 2 stars, what is wrong with me?!?, and only 2 people gave it 1 star, and their percentage isn’t enough to show more than 0%. So, don’t pay attention to my opinion here, but I’m giving it anyway: I am disappointed and I only somewhat enjoyed this; it was okay.

  13. 5 out of 5

    L12_sarah

    Art & Max is another wonderful picture book from David Wiesner. Max is a fumbling little lizard who sees his friend Arthur painting and wants to paint, too. When he asks Arthur what he should paint, Arthur suggests that Max paint him, as in paint his portrait. But, Max misinterprets and starts painting on Art, making Art into art! Arthur gets so angry at Max's antics that his outer shell explodes, revealing that his very skin has been dyed the colors of Max's paint! Max's attempts to "right" A Art & Max is another wonderful picture book from David Wiesner. Max is a fumbling little lizard who sees his friend Arthur painting and wants to paint, too. When he asks Arthur what he should paint, Arthur suggests that Max paint him, as in paint his portrait. But, Max misinterprets and starts painting on Art, making Art into art! Arthur gets so angry at Max's antics that his outer shell explodes, revealing that his very skin has been dyed the colors of Max's paint! Max's attempts to "right" Arthur to his original state follows in a series of pictures that are both silly and clever, pushing the boundaries of what children's book illustrations should look like. Per usual for a Wiesner book, the illustrations in Max & Art are excellent. The pictures go through several artistic styles, from realism to pointillism (the form of impressionism made popular by George Seurat), to expressionism reminiscent of Jackson Pollock. These choices are clearly deliberate and help make Art & Max more than just a book that talks about art; they make it a book about art that is a work of art itself! Because of its content, Art & Max would be a great book to use as an introduction to an art unit focused on different art styles, or a study of books whose illustrations tell a story on their own. Students will enjoy the vibrant colors of the pictures as well as the interesting plot twist at the end of the book. The book is well suited for read alouds with younger students (pre-K through grade 2), but has the potential to be used with older students if the art aspect of the book were emphasized and students were given the the opportunity to study the pictures up close on their own. In the end, this is definitely a book you need to see to appreciate!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Hoschar

    Art and Max is a sweet and entertaining tale of two artists: one who is rather good and one that has alot of learning to do. As the story unfolds, Max comes upon Art completing a painting of another lizard. Max gets very excited at what he sees and decides that he really wants to paint his own picture. Art gets a little annoyed with Max, but lets him paint anyway. Max, however is unsure what his painting should be of, so he asks Art for advice. Art suggests that Max paint a picture of Art, excep Art and Max is a sweet and entertaining tale of two artists: one who is rather good and one that has alot of learning to do. As the story unfolds, Max comes upon Art completing a painting of another lizard. Max gets very excited at what he sees and decides that he really wants to paint his own picture. Art gets a little annoyed with Max, but lets him paint anyway. Max, however is unsure what his painting should be of, so he asks Art for advice. Art suggests that Max paint a picture of Art, except he isn't clear that the painting should be on canvas. Max proceeds to paint his friend- literally. Art, of course, is not happy and ends up looking like a multi-colored mess. Max is frantic to help his friend and in his efforts to clean Art off, he succeeds in diminishing his friend to a simply black thread, void of any life or color. Max rallies, though, and attempts to re-create his friend. In the end the two realize that painting together can be fun and that everyone can have a different opinion on what creativity is. This book is wonderful for children for many reasons. The characters' speech is not marked as normal by words like, "said" or "asked" or "replied". One characters words are in normal font and the other's are in italics. Another great element to the story is the illustrations. The pictures in this book play a huge role in telling the story, as some of the pages don't even have words, just images. The pictures are beautifully colorful and realistc as well. This book is humerous and is also a good reminder to kids that creativity is a wonderful thing and that everyone can be creative in their own unique way. Wiesner, D. (2010). Art & Max New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Wiesner, David. (2010). Art & Max. Illustrated by the author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin/Clarion. 32 pp. ISBN 978-0-618-75663-6. (Hardcover) $17.99. David Wiesner’s picture books are treasures! I teach first grade, but I have always dreamed of working with high school students using Flotsam. I would love to have high school students write two polar opposite texts about what is happening in this book. Art & Max is another book in which older students will find much to appreciate, especially students Wiesner, David. (2010). Art & Max. Illustrated by the author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin/Clarion. 32 pp. ISBN 978-0-618-75663-6. (Hardcover) $17.99. David Wiesner’s picture books are treasures! I teach first grade, but I have always dreamed of working with high school students using Flotsam. I would love to have high school students write two polar opposite texts about what is happening in this book. Art & Max is another book in which older students will find much to appreciate, especially students who are taking art and exploring different media. Arthur is the older and obviously much wiser art instructor and Max is a young, dumb kid (well, actually a lizard). Arthur is very condescending when Max says he can draw, but allows him to attempt to paint with him. When Max asks Arthur what to paint, Arthur suggests that Max paint Arthur. And Max does, literally! Not only does the book take us through acrylic, pastel, watercolor, and India ink, but it also exposes us to many different styles of art in the details of each page. Art students will have a delicious time finding all the references. Arthur is deconstructed in several senses of the word! And Max learns how to draw him back to order. In the end Arthur becomes Art and Max develops an appreciation for classical artist like Van Gogh. For older readers, the book features a profound exploration of the balance between technique and exuberance, between the skill of an artist and the passion of an artist. I also can’t help but wonder whether this book also includes a very personal statement by Wiesner germane to the need for established artists to explore and take risks outside of his or her own comfort zone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Renee (LazyDayLit)

    There are many different kinds of artists. Arthur (Art for short) is a professional artist who includes a lot of detail in his paintings. Max on the other hand isn't exactly sure what to paint, or how. Even though Max is trying to prove to Art that he can paint too, he finds himself needing to ask Art what he should paint. Art replies, "You can paint me!" So he does and something terrifying and amazing happens to Art! As Max works on 'painting Art', Arthur learns that all art is different and th There are many different kinds of artists. Arthur (Art for short) is a professional artist who includes a lot of detail in his paintings. Max on the other hand isn't exactly sure what to paint, or how. Even though Max is trying to prove to Art that he can paint too, he finds himself needing to ask Art what he should paint. Art replies, "You can paint me!" So he does and something terrifying and amazing happens to Art! As Max works on 'painting Art', Arthur learns that all art is different and that even a beginner can make something amazing and beautiful. Art & Max is a delightful book for both seasoned and beginner artists! Whether you are coloring with crayons or painting with oils, all art is beautiful! I was most drawn to the cover of this book. The reptiles are very detailed and art has always been a favorite subject of mine. Even with all of the detailed pictures, the story is simple and easy to get through with a small child. Some pages were a little more condensed and looked more like comic book pages with the different frames of pictures on one page. Because of the detail and split pages I would recommend this for kids over 1 or 2 years old.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary Forest

    In the book Art & Max, Max joins art in painting but he doesn't know what to paint. He ends up paining on Art and they go on an adventure where Art becomes a canvas, and after the paint is all on Art he becomes angry and all the paint chips fall off and he is left with a new painted version of himself. Max then tried to dry him with a fan but Art becomes thirsty and on drinking the water the paint starts to melt off of Art, and he becomes just an outline of the animal he used to be. Max then pul In the book Art & Max, Max joins art in painting but he doesn't know what to paint. He ends up paining on Art and they go on an adventure where Art becomes a canvas, and after the paint is all on Art he becomes angry and all the paint chips fall off and he is left with a new painted version of himself. Max then tried to dry him with a fan but Art becomes thirsty and on drinking the water the paint starts to melt off of Art, and he becomes just an outline of the animal he used to be. Max then pulls Arts tail and start to unwind him, and then has to put him back together again. In this book Wiesner uses a lot of framing in the book to show the passing of time during the book, this makes the book able to continue to move the story along without explicitly saying that time passed and one of the characters did this or that. When Wiesner used full bleed photos he wanted the reader to be more involved in the story, and wanted them to pay attention to what was happening.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gianna Petrillo

    1. 1st-3rd grade 2. This book is about two friends Arthur and Max. Max is a lizard and tries to copy Arthur and his painting. Max ends up making Arthur the painting and changing him to different colors, outlines and paintings. 3. I think students would like reading this book because it is a cute story and takes something that is impossible but makes it realistic. It also has great and funny dialogue between friends and the illustrations are very good. 4. I would only use this book for independent 1. 1st-3rd grade 2. This book is about two friends Arthur and Max. Max is a lizard and tries to copy Arthur and his painting. Max ends up making Arthur the painting and changing him to different colors, outlines and paintings. 3. I think students would like reading this book because it is a cute story and takes something that is impossible but makes it realistic. It also has great and funny dialogue between friends and the illustrations are very good. 4. I would only use this book for independent fun reading during the week of fantasy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Destinee Sutton

    Fantastic art is a given with David Wiesner. So is the trippy ordinary-becomes-extraordinary thing. The only thing that holds me back from really loving Wiesner's books is that they can seem a little too serious, like they're art objects more than lovable stories. What I like about this particular David Wiesner book is the quirky sense of humor. Wiesner having fun! Yay! Fantastic art is a given with David Wiesner. So is the trippy ordinary-becomes-extraordinary thing. The only thing that holds me back from really loving Wiesner's books is that they can seem a little too serious, like they're art objects more than lovable stories. What I like about this particular David Wiesner book is the quirky sense of humor. Wiesner having fun! Yay!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    This book is about a young lizard learning how to paint. I would not use this book in my classroom, the story plot was dull, redundant and pointless. I don’t feel my students can gain anything from this book other then practicing reading. I do not recommend this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    Read in the bookstore, thankfully. I would have been even more disappointed had I bought it. The story was nothing new, the art was not the sort of thing I dig, and the lizards were just annoying. I see that I'm in the minority of reviewers, but this book didn't work for me at all. Read in the bookstore, thankfully. I would have been even more disappointed had I bought it. The story was nothing new, the art was not the sort of thing I dig, and the lizards were just annoying. I see that I'm in the minority of reviewers, but this book didn't work for me at all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    A book my 5 yr old as well as my twin 3 yr olds loved. A solid reading level 1 book, this cute story keeps all ages engaged with the bright colorful pictures and cute story. Beautiful illustrations! A great addition to any children's library. A book my 5 yr old as well as my twin 3 yr olds loved. A solid reading level 1 book, this cute story keeps all ages engaged with the bright colorful pictures and cute story. Beautiful illustrations! A great addition to any children's library.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    What a delight! And not just because my son's name is Arthur. Two friends, one magically fantastic goof up and beautiful, fantastical drawings make this book a lovely read aloud or read for youngsters. What a delight! And not just because my son's name is Arthur. Two friends, one magically fantastic goof up and beautiful, fantastical drawings make this book a lovely read aloud or read for youngsters.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Gorgeous illustrations (of course) but the text and story were clunky and almost read like captions to his illustrations. I get why so many of his books are wordless!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    The illustrations are beautiful and the book is very creative, and the characters are fun, but it crossed the weirdness line for me. I also found it a bit hard to follow in spots.

  26. 5 out of 5

    June

    One of my top 2 favorite picture books of 2010. (I'm still have a few I'm trying to get my hands on.) Wiesner out did himself. Ingenious. One of my top 2 favorite picture books of 2010. (I'm still have a few I'm trying to get my hands on.) Wiesner out did himself. Ingenious.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Isobel

    Two lizards love to paint and are very artistic. The illustrations are beautiful with bright and vibrant colours. The book is a message which teaches children about the importance of friendship.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Hoeck

    Art & Max by David Wiesner is a story about two lizards painting. Arthur knows how to paint and Max wants Arthur to teach him how to paint. Arthur eventually agrees to teach Max as long as Max stays out of the way. However, accidently, Max does quite the opposite. Upon painting he strips Arthur of his texture, color, and his structure. Eventually, Art is a pile of lines. Will Art be able to put Max back together? The main characters in the story are Arthur and Max. Both characters are round becau Art & Max by David Wiesner is a story about two lizards painting. Arthur knows how to paint and Max wants Arthur to teach him how to paint. Arthur eventually agrees to teach Max as long as Max stays out of the way. However, accidently, Max does quite the opposite. Upon painting he strips Arthur of his texture, color, and his structure. Eventually, Art is a pile of lines. Will Art be able to put Max back together? The main characters in the story are Arthur and Max. Both characters are round because they are well developed, however Arthur is a dynamic character while Max is a static character. In the beginning of the story, Arthur portrays an arrogant, self-absorbed lizard. For example, when Max suggest that he can paint too, Art challenges, “You, Max? Don’t be ridiculous” (p. 3). This shows that Arthur thinks he is better than Max. When Max is about to start painting, Arthur tells Max to stay out of his way. This demonstrates that he doesn’t care to help Max because he only cares for himself. However, by the end of the story, Arthur changes. We know this because at the end of the story when Max asks to paint more, Art agrees with a smile on his face. Max, from beginning to end, is a very enthused character. The audience can assume this because many of Max’s sentences end with exclamation points. Also, Max is usually portrayed with mouth opened smile. His arms are usually spread our wide showing his excitement. These characters are portrayed these ways in order to create contrast between them. The contrast brings out the characters as individuals and allows the storyline to advance because every time Max messes up, Arthur becomes disappointed or angry, allowing Max to become excited about a new idea. This cycle goes around a few times, allowing the story to hit its climax. Art and Max is told through an objective point of view because it is told in third person and the characters are developed through what they say and how they react. For example, Art is portrayed as the more powerful and intelligent character on page three because he is taller and bigger than all the characters. He even has his arms on his hips showing that he has the authority. This point of view allows the audience to dive deeper into the story because they can put themselves in Max’s or Arthur’s shoes because the objective point of view leaves the interpretation more open. David Wiesner uses facial expression and body language to display the characters feelings and reactions. This allows Wiesner to develop the characters and advance the plot because the audience can see how the characters respond to the events in the story. These responses advance the story because they cause the next event. For example on page 17, Art’s eyes are half closed, he is slightly frowning, and his hands are pressed to each side of his face, slightly pulling the skin down. This displays that Art feels sickly. This causes Max to give Art water to drink, which leads to Max having the color literally drained out of him. The author uses line to advance the storyline as well. There is a section of the book where Art is left with no color or texture to design him, only lines. Max pulls on Arts tail while Max is stomping away, leading to all the line creating Max to become unraveled. Eventually, Max is one pile of lines. Through this event, Wiesner not only creates a tension in the plot, but consciously and directly displays a main element in art and its power: line. Overall, I really enjoyed the book. The relationship between the two characters reminded me of a older/younger sibling relationship because Art, the bigger character with more authority, is teaching Max, the smaller excited character, something new. I think this is a good relationship to display to children because it eventually displays both characters having fun together, while both were taught something new. The book is also very self-aware of the effects of elements of art like color, texture, and line, which is different and interesting. It can also teach children a simple lesson about art.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Matthew

    Imagine a scenario in which you are forced to put back together a friend, and the only reason why you are in this position, is from your own negligence. The pressure is on as you're forced to go inch by inch and remember how they look, cobbling them from nothing more than a bundle of lines strewn about on the floor in front of you. High drama and bone chilling adventures like that awaits in the book "Art and Max" by David Wiesner. While I may have embellished just a bit, "Art and Max" still cont Imagine a scenario in which you are forced to put back together a friend, and the only reason why you are in this position, is from your own negligence. The pressure is on as you're forced to go inch by inch and remember how they look, cobbling them from nothing more than a bundle of lines strewn about on the floor in front of you. High drama and bone chilling adventures like that awaits in the book "Art and Max" by David Wiesner. While I may have embellished just a bit, "Art and Max" still contains some pretty dramatic plot for a children's picture book. A small group of lizards stand around the desert as Art, or as he'd like to be known as, Arthur, paints a portrait in the sunlight. Just then Max runs in and demands to paint as well, and then some hilarious hi jinx and misunderstandings ensue that lead to Max having to recreate his friend with only his artistic ability to guide him. According to the 7th Edition of "Children's Literature Briefly", "A good plot shows what happens to the characters in such a way that that the reader cares about the outcome". (Tunnell, Jacobs, Young, Bryan Pg. 11). As Max is forced to recreate Art, arguably creating a more attractive and alluring color for him in the process, readers are kept wondering what will happen next. Will the bumbling klutz we saw running around the desert sand just a while earlier be able to pull this off? Did he really just kill his friend by making him drink a ton of water? What type of desert are we even in in which these strange occurrences can even take place? That's why we're forced to keep reading. In the classroom, this would be a good book to call and response with, ask the students what they think will happen next before going to the next page and continuing to read along. Maybe make some charts or have someone write down what they thought would happen, versus what inevitably does happen. It would be a good exercise to show young readers that an author can use suspense to keep the story going and leave people guessing and wanting more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Kinney

    I chose this book for one of the illustrator project books. This story is about two friends who are painting, one is a really good artist (Art) and one just a beginner (Max). Max got confused and painted Art's entire body and then tried to undo it by blowing a fan on him and then had tried washing it away and then Art became see through. Then Max unraveled Art by pulling on a piece of his tail and then tried putting him back together again. This story is adorable and hilarious and I think it wou I chose this book for one of the illustrator project books. This story is about two friends who are painting, one is a really good artist (Art) and one just a beginner (Max). Max got confused and painted Art's entire body and then tried to undo it by blowing a fan on him and then had tried washing it away and then Art became see through. Then Max unraveled Art by pulling on a piece of his tail and then tried putting him back together again. This story is adorable and hilarious and I think it would be really enjoyable to read this to preschool aged children. The illustrations in this book are absolutely amazing and there is so much detail in every picture and utilizes the entire page for each picture.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.