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News From Home: Short Stories (Interlink World Fiction)

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Winner of the 2009 NOMA Award for Publishing in Africa From Zamfara up north to the Niger delta down south, with a finale in Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella respond to and amplify the newspaper headlines in a range of Nigerian voices. Men, women, and children speak out to us from these stories, from immigration centers and police barracks, from street corne Winner of the 2009 NOMA Award for Publishing in Africa From Zamfara up north to the Niger delta down south, with a finale in Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella respond to and amplify the newspaper headlines in a range of Nigerian voices. Men, women, and children speak out to us from these stories, from immigration centers and police barracks, from street corners and maternity wards. Ghanaian writer Mohammed Naseehu Ali says, Sefi Atta writes like one who has lived the life of each single character in her dazzling collection of short stories.


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Winner of the 2009 NOMA Award for Publishing in Africa From Zamfara up north to the Niger delta down south, with a finale in Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella respond to and amplify the newspaper headlines in a range of Nigerian voices. Men, women, and children speak out to us from these stories, from immigration centers and police barracks, from street corne Winner of the 2009 NOMA Award for Publishing in Africa From Zamfara up north to the Niger delta down south, with a finale in Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella respond to and amplify the newspaper headlines in a range of Nigerian voices. Men, women, and children speak out to us from these stories, from immigration centers and police barracks, from street corners and maternity wards. Ghanaian writer Mohammed Naseehu Ali says, Sefi Atta writes like one who has lived the life of each single character in her dazzling collection of short stories.

30 review for News From Home: Short Stories (Interlink World Fiction)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hidayyya MO

    'last trip' is truly a good story .it really interests me... 'last trip' is truly a good story .it really interests me...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darryl

    This was a very good collection of 10 short stories and one novella by the Nigerian author Sefi Atta, which was awarded the 2009 Noma Award for Publishing in Africa. The stories involve the lives of contemporary Nigerians living within the country or abroad in the United States or Britain. My full review appears in issue 6 of Belletrista: http://www.belletrista.com/2010/issue... This was a very good collection of 10 short stories and one novella by the Nigerian author Sefi Atta, which was awarded the 2009 Noma Award for Publishing in Africa. The stories involve the lives of contemporary Nigerians living within the country or abroad in the United States or Britain. My full review appears in issue 6 of Belletrista: http://www.belletrista.com/2010/issue...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Really nice diversity of characters - varied socio-economic strata; male and female; Lagos, London and America.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ibiene Bidiaque

    In News from Home, AttaSefi Atta showcases what, to me, is her finest work. In the collection of ten short stories, we meet funny, engaging, some down-on-their-luck, characters and Sefi is deftly able to narrate the tales of illegal immigration, extra-marital affairs, homosexuality, religion, romance in a way that keeps you immersed in the literature. We meet characters living in Zamfara, in Mississippi, in London, and in between. Already, I loved Atta, after reading three of her other novels (rev In News from Home, AttaSefi Atta showcases what, to me, is her finest work. In the collection of ten short stories, we meet funny, engaging, some down-on-their-luck, characters and Sefi is deftly able to narrate the tales of illegal immigration, extra-marital affairs, homosexuality, religion, romance in a way that keeps you immersed in the literature. We meet characters living in Zamfara, in Mississippi, in London, and in between. Already, I loved Atta, after reading three of her other novels (reviewed below) – but now, now truly I’m head over heels. My favourite story has to be Yahoo Yahoo, told through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy called Idowu, whose parents are quirky and rife with emotional baggage. What Atta gives you are human characters that will make you laugh and sigh.

  5. 4 out of 5

    b bb bbbb bbbbbbbb

    Finally a collection of short stories that really worked for me. It's been a while. And they may not work for everyone. Atta has great range of style, setting and voice. Most of all, the writing has that way of seeming effortless and natural (regardless of how little or much work it may have taken). A lot of the time I was never quite sure what the angle or perspective really was, or where it was going. There's distance in a way that makes it more interesting instead of aloof. There was social c Finally a collection of short stories that really worked for me. It's been a while. And they may not work for everyone. Atta has great range of style, setting and voice. Most of all, the writing has that way of seeming effortless and natural (regardless of how little or much work it may have taken). A lot of the time I was never quite sure what the angle or perspective really was, or where it was going. There's distance in a way that makes it more interesting instead of aloof. There was social commentary and comments about people that didn't always feel good. The way things are written it's hard to tell whether that was real and coming from the author, or meant as critique and commentary.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    A remarkable collection of short stories. Sefi Atta speaks in many different voices, telling tales from all walks of life in Nigeria and the United States. No nonfiction work could do a better job explaining how people live, work, learn, leave, return, get by, whether legally or not. The stories are from men, women, old, young, with widely varying points of view. And she nails them, every one. Beautifully written, absorbing, compelling. And often funny.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anike Disu

    Seff Atta is an incredible writer. News from home is a book which includes short stories which will capture the attention of its readers. The author speaks about contemporary issues (in the era it was written) in a fictional way which is both eye opening and educative at the same time. I really enjoyed reading this book Would definitely recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Precious

    "Twilight Trek" was a good one. "Twilight Trek" was a good one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hauwa Samaila

    The ending did it all for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marcy prager

    Too many short stories are hard for me to remember as I read one after another in a short time. That does not mean the stories are not good. In fact, they give deep reflection to the lives of many poor youths and adults from Lagos, told in the first person. It is often not clear whether the story teller in a few stories are male or female, and I often mistook one for the other, discovering 3/4's of the way through the story that I had the wrong visual image of the main character! It is clear in Too many short stories are hard for me to remember as I read one after another in a short time. That does not mean the stories are not good. In fact, they give deep reflection to the lives of many poor youths and adults from Lagos, told in the first person. It is often not clear whether the story teller in a few stories are male or female, and I often mistook one for the other, discovering 3/4's of the way through the story that I had the wrong visual image of the main character! It is clear in many of Sefi Atta's stories how poverty affects Nigerians' lives. Many children and adults turn to crime because of the discontent of their lives. "It occurred to me that there was nothing more precious in the world than satisfaction. That it was possible to end up committing a crime just because you were contaminated by a little discontent. You could convince yourself that you were satisfied, then someone could come along and say, "But I can offer you more," and then you could begin to think, My life is not worth much after all. In fact, you could tell yourself, My life was completely worthless from the start." Some characters have the strength to resist crime; others turn to crime in order to survive. One story, "Last Trip," is about a mother with a challenged child who swallows balloons filled with heroine and smuggles the drugs to London from Lagos out of desperation to feed and school her child. In many stories, it is clear that Nigerians detest the corruption and poverty of their country, yet espouse that white and black people who live overseas, although they live a luxurious life, in comparison to theirs, are spoiled and ungrateful. Nigerians, however, will turn to crime in order buy a plane ticket, longing to break out of the corruption and poverty they currently live in. Sefi Atta tells compelling tales from the past and present that depict the lives of the main characters with depth and clarity.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Di Grazia

    News From Home is a must-read. The short story "Last Trip" is a gripping tale about a young mother who feels that she has no choice but to act as a drug mule; post-colonial Lagos, Nigeria does not offer many job opportunities for a single mother. She briefly considered prostitution before she met Kazeem, a middle-man in a larger drug trade. Her choice comes from the love that she has for her young son, Dara, who has special needs. The narrator does not want her son to attend the public school wh News From Home is a must-read. The short story "Last Trip" is a gripping tale about a young mother who feels that she has no choice but to act as a drug mule; post-colonial Lagos, Nigeria does not offer many job opportunities for a single mother. She briefly considered prostitution before she met Kazeem, a middle-man in a larger drug trade. Her choice comes from the love that she has for her young son, Dara, who has special needs. The narrator does not want her son to attend the public school where he would likely be beaten for being different; she uses the cash she earns to keep him in the very expensive but good Catholic school. The strength of this story stems from the complexity of the characters; Atta is able to create depth by putting her characters in a difficult situation and lets the reader watch as they struggle to find the "most" right answers. I would recommend this story to readers who enjoy realistic stories and welcome moral ambiguities.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marvin chester

    "I read only non-fiction because I want to know about the real world," say some people. But, in fact, it is precisely about the real world that you learn when you read fine fiction. From Atta you learn about the nature of life as a Nigerian. Insights that appear nowhere but in fiction; where time is taken to appreciate the way people express themselves, to explore how they perceive the world - in comparison with how we, in the fortunate west, perceive the world. If you want to know things about "I read only non-fiction because I want to know about the real world," say some people. But, in fact, it is precisely about the real world that you learn when you read fine fiction. From Atta you learn about the nature of life as a Nigerian. Insights that appear nowhere but in fiction; where time is taken to appreciate the way people express themselves, to explore how they perceive the world - in comparison with how we, in the fortunate west, perceive the world. If you want to know things about the real world read this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This book was a glimpse at life in Nigeria; one that is much needed for me as I am tired of reading the same books by Anglo authors about life in the Western hemisphere. These stories were hard to digest--this book is not for the lighthearted looking for a light read. The topics addressed are real, raw and heart-wrenching. I am so grateful to have found this first hand account of life in Nigeria from a Nigerian as I begin my trek into books by non-White authors. Highly recommend this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hiroshi

    colors my experience of Lagos and shows the side I could not really live and know. one line still stays with me - (paraphrased) - the world is round. if you keep chasing something, somewhere (a different cultural identity) you eventually come home.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jekwu Ozoemene

    Best collection of Nigerian short stories I have read in a very long time. I was particularly impressed with her heads-on, no holds barred handling of the oftentimes taboo topic of bipolar in Nigeria (Madness in the Family)...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rita Mutanda

    just read the first 3 stories.....ehhh,not my cup of tea.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ochuko A.

    This book was nothing short of amazing...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rasheedat

  19. 4 out of 5

    Temiloluwa

  20. 5 out of 5

    Titon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gui

  23. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karina

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abraham Definately

  26. 4 out of 5

    Femi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sogie Ogieriakhi

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kefranks

  29. 4 out of 5

    Freyja

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julie Boston

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