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This booklet is an ideal and significant introduction to classical education. It traces the history of classical education and describes its modern renaissance. The book also highlights the distinctive elements of the movement including its emphasis on teaching grammar, logic and rhetoric (the Trivium), and the extraordinary achievements of students who are receiving a cla This booklet is an ideal and significant introduction to classical education. It traces the history of classical education and describes its modern renaissance. The book also highlights the distinctive elements of the movement including its emphasis on teaching grammar, logic and rhetoric (the Trivium), and the extraordinary achievements of students who are receiving a classical education. It explains the benefit of classical language study (Latin and Greek) and integrated learning through a study of the great books of western civilization. The booklet is written in a colloquial and informative style, with anecdotes, diagrams and charts. This book is recommended to parents just beginning their examination of classical education.


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This booklet is an ideal and significant introduction to classical education. It traces the history of classical education and describes its modern renaissance. The book also highlights the distinctive elements of the movement including its emphasis on teaching grammar, logic and rhetoric (the Trivium), and the extraordinary achievements of students who are receiving a cla This booklet is an ideal and significant introduction to classical education. It traces the history of classical education and describes its modern renaissance. The book also highlights the distinctive elements of the movement including its emphasis on teaching grammar, logic and rhetoric (the Trivium), and the extraordinary achievements of students who are receiving a classical education. It explains the benefit of classical language study (Latin and Greek) and integrated learning through a study of the great books of western civilization. The booklet is written in a colloquial and informative style, with anecdotes, diagrams and charts. This book is recommended to parents just beginning their examination of classical education.

30 review for An Introduction To Classical Education: A Guide For Parents

  1. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    This is one of the books I suggest to parents in Learning How to Think: A Reading List for Parents Considering Classical Education.”. This is a very succinct introduction to classical education. Because of its succinctness, it leaves many questions unanswered and much ground uncovered, but it’s the best starting point I have found for the subject, and it hits on all the major points. Before tackling a larger book, it makes sense to peruse this pamphlet; reading it will give you an overall sense This is one of the books I suggest to parents in Learning How to Think: A Reading List for Parents Considering Classical Education.”. This is a very succinct introduction to classical education. Because of its succinctness, it leaves many questions unanswered and much ground uncovered, but it’s the best starting point I have found for the subject, and it hits on all the major points. Before tackling a larger book, it makes sense to peruse this pamphlet; reading it will give you an overall sense of classical education and enable you to know whether or not you are interested in learning more. The pamphlet offers a definition of classical education, a brief history, and a cursory response to the primary objections to using classical education today. It primarily defines classical education through contrast to modern/progressive education, which began in the late 19th century and became the dominant form of education by the 1950’s. “The modern experiment in education,” writes Perrin, “is about 100 years old, and flagging. The classical experiment is about 1000 years old and reviving.” With the dawn of the modern educational approach, the study of classical languages was dropped altogether (or relegated to small classics departments in colleges or a single high school class in some of the better public schools). Systematic “instruction in phonics decoding was replaced with a ‘whole language’ approach of reading instruction’” (or, a mixed approach, as in the case of the public schools in our area, which use some whole language, some creative spelling, and a smattering of phonics). “Writing instruction guided by imitating the masters and frequent practice was replaced with more individualistic, creative approaches and less practice; math instruction steeped in drill, practice and repletion was replaced with curricula containing less drill and practice and more activities and stories related to the subject; history instruction grounded in and celebrating the western tradition…was gradually replaced with a multi-cultural approach that…presented instead a” mere “smattering of world history." Modern education has often been marked by the philosophy that “there are no universal truths or moral standards” and that “nothing can be known with certainty.” Egalitarianism has replaced healthy competition and “in turn has resulted in grade inflation.” The objections to classical education are that it is too harsh/demanding, too focused on “rote drilling,” too impractical, lacking in extracurricular opportunities, and, while it may be fine for future study of the humanities, it is insufficient preparation for study of the sciences. Perrin answers each of these objections in turn, but a more sustained argument (one with studies and statistics) is probably necessary for convincing a skeptic. The pamphlet is clear, to the point, well organized, and easy to read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    A great introduction to classical education, with some elaboration on Christian classical learning. Here are a couple of excerpts that I enjoyed from the booklet: "I have mentioned that classical educators do not see subjects as self-contained and isolated. Knowledge is more like a web than a chest of drawers; there are no subjects that are unrelated to others. Literature, history, and theology, for example, are quite intertwined. Anything from the past (in any subject) can be history; anything A great introduction to classical education, with some elaboration on Christian classical learning. Here are a couple of excerpts that I enjoyed from the booklet: "I have mentioned that classical educators do not see subjects as self-contained and isolated. Knowledge is more like a web than a chest of drawers; there are no subjects that are unrelated to others. Literature, history, and theology, for example, are quite intertwined. Anything from the past (in any subject) can be history; anything committed to creative or excellent writing can be literature; and any subject considered in relation to God and biblical teaching can be theology. Until the nineteenth century, educators understood and taught knowledge as a web, rather than as separate departments. Classical educators, therefore, while teaching classes in "history" or "literature" keep the boundaries light and fluid and emphasize the inter-relationship of all knowledge." - pg. 26 "Christians should see that all knowledge is, in an ultimate sense, knowledge of God himself and an attempt to reverse the curse and head back to Eden where we can be closer to God and become more like him. That is, Christians face frankly the reality of sin in education and see all knowledge as a means of knowing God, and in so doing attaining "true virtue. From this perspective, then, education entails ongoing repentance and spiritual war. Since the fall of Adam this has been the Christian task, and no less so in education. Students, therefore, need guidance, correction, training, and rebuke, just as they need encouragement, commendation, and praise. They need academic discipleship. To this end, classical Christian educators cannot simply teach subjects; they must teach students made in the image of God. As teachers, they are also shepherds." - pg. 39

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Middlestead

    2019 Book Challenge: A book you own but have never read I am glad I finally got around to reading this little gem! A lovely introduction and overview of classical education. This can can also be downloaded as a free PDF Classical Academic Press. Just google “Introduction to Classical Education free PDF” to find and download.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Excellent little introduction to Classical education. While brief, it is also extremely well written and can give parents a solid overview of both the history and the vision of Classical Ed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lekeshua

    I'm going to have to let this digest over night. To say the least, very insightful. Jan. 21, 2016..... I was able to digest The Introduction of Classical Education. This is a great introduction that provides enough of an overview of the intentions of a classical education, "teach students how to learn for themselves". Classical educators strive to provide the tools for a life of learning and not just subjects of information. Knowledge gained is to help the entire student. Holistic learning. I've a I'm going to have to let this digest over night. To say the least, very insightful. Jan. 21, 2016..... I was able to digest The Introduction of Classical Education. This is a great introduction that provides enough of an overview of the intentions of a classical education, "teach students how to learn for themselves". Classical educators strive to provide the tools for a life of learning and not just subjects of information. Knowledge gained is to help the entire student. Holistic learning. I've always been on the fence about learning Latin because I was always told it was a dead language. But learning that 50% of English words branch from Latin and 30% from Greek. Learning Latin aids in understanding vocabulary and help with learning other languages. I agree with the argument made for the importance of learning Latin and Greek. It tickled me that time was taken to discuss the comments given from those outside the Classical Education community. I like that Classical Schools believe, or at least his, that they work for the parents. They understand that they are " assisting [the parents] to fulfill their responsibility ". Classicist believe education is the parents responsibility and are willing to help. Our society sees it differently. There are some rabbit trails I would love to follow and I wish he would write more about the history. His statement, " Classical Education was inherited by the church with some modifications and put into service for centuries", made me scratch my head. Maybe it's because I've never heard classical education without christian associated with it. With the little bit of history I'm aware of regarding religion and about the Greens and Romans, I knew Christianity wasn't a focus. But I would love to learn about the original Classical Education before the modification. He mentioned WTM and Classical Conversations, but he didn't really say which he preferred more. Maybe I missed it cause I see them as different paths through Classical Education. Of course I'm left wanting more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Martin Beamer

    "...it only takes one generation to stop the transmission of the past." A very helpful and easy-to-read guide for anyone wondering where to start with this "classical education trend." "...it only takes one generation to stop the transmission of the past." A very helpful and easy-to-read guide for anyone wondering where to start with this "classical education trend."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Carlson

    Really good and helpful as a brief overview of classical education. I especially appreciated the rationale he shared for teaching Latin and Greek and other historical languages. I’m not sure the “ages/stages” or trivium as three stages in education linked to age or grade is universally regarded as core to classical education. I am wholeheartedly on board with classical education but not jiving with that aspect, maybe especially because I am coming to it from a Charlotte Mason perspective - which Really good and helpful as a brief overview of classical education. I especially appreciated the rationale he shared for teaching Latin and Greek and other historical languages. I’m not sure the “ages/stages” or trivium as three stages in education linked to age or grade is universally regarded as core to classical education. I am wholeheartedly on board with classical education but not jiving with that aspect, maybe especially because I am coming to it from a Charlotte Mason perspective - which is definitely within a broad understanding of classical education but maybe with a different view of the stages...would be curious for some clarity on this from someone “deeper in” than myself!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Turner

    A short book on Classical Education and the need to return to this very effective form of education. Obviously, most of today’s public schools are FAILING a miserably, a return to classical education would return our schools to their prominence in the world. As our schools have tried the latest fads in education, our children have fallen behind at a faster rate than in previous years. A return to classical education with standards of achievement, we can stem the retreat. Highly recommended for a A short book on Classical Education and the need to return to this very effective form of education. Obviously, most of today’s public schools are FAILING a miserably, a return to classical education would return our schools to their prominence in the world. As our schools have tried the latest fads in education, our children have fallen behind at a faster rate than in previous years. A return to classical education with standards of achievement, we can stem the retreat. Highly recommended for anyone interested in education...SLT

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Sutherland

    This book was not quite what I was expecting it to be. I was hoping for more of a guide on how to begin a classical education, not a persuasive essay on why I should consider a classical education. I was already sold on the idea before I purchased the book. The author does make many very valid points in his argument and I would highly recommend this book to those who are curious as to what a classical education entails.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    This book is recommended reading for the course introduction of "Introduction to Classical Education" by Christoper Perrin, a video course presented on ClassicalU.com. The course introduction along with the reading of Dr. Perrin's book, inspires me to learn more on how to implement a classical education in my homeschool. I am more motivated to continue the courses on Classicalu.com. This book is recommended reading for the course introduction of "Introduction to Classical Education" by Christoper Perrin, a video course presented on ClassicalU.com. The course introduction along with the reading of Dr. Perrin's book, inspires me to learn more on how to implement a classical education in my homeschool. I am more motivated to continue the courses on Classicalu.com.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    A pithy and cogent explanation of the nature of classical education, and a well-argued promotion of the notion (and a rational defense of the topic, which tends to come under a great deal of attack, sadly). A person who is curious - "What is a classical education, and why should I try to make sure that kids get one?" - could hardly do better than to start with this book. A pithy and cogent explanation of the nature of classical education, and a well-argued promotion of the notion (and a rational defense of the topic, which tends to come under a great deal of attack, sadly). A person who is curious - "What is a classical education, and why should I try to make sure that kids get one?" - could hardly do better than to start with this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Great introduction. Quick, easy read with tons of great information.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jarrod

    It is a great introduction and I recommend you begin a more in-depth study using the bibliography.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Great, quick introduction to Christian classical education.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kacie

    This is more of a book than a booklet, and less of a guide than a broad overview of and case for the importance of classical education.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joel Everett

    Short, but concise, introduction to Classical Education; appreciate the Bibliography in the back for further reading.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hathaway

    Very clear and concise. Interesting history including the description of Classical education and the rise of Progressive education in America.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    This is a great book to set your mind on a goal and to introduce many elements of classical education.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori Wann

    Succinct overview of Classical Education

  20. 4 out of 5

    Edgar Iraheta

    An excellent introduction that highlights it's historical origins with basic insights to help you understand its importance in our modern day. An excellent introduction that highlights it's historical origins with basic insights to help you understand its importance in our modern day.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I found this to be really informative and helpful!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Comis

    This is one of those books on classical education that kind of gives me the creepy crawlies, only because there is so much emphasis put on classical and not nearly enough on the Christian in classical Christian education. We need to remember that our "classical" tradition goes all the way back to the garden, and indeed, the creation of all things. To be sure, our classical tradition did not begin with Greece and Rome. But Mr. Perrin seems to miss this big "C" on the classical eye-chart. I even w This is one of those books on classical education that kind of gives me the creepy crawlies, only because there is so much emphasis put on classical and not nearly enough on the Christian in classical Christian education. We need to remember that our "classical" tradition goes all the way back to the garden, and indeed, the creation of all things. To be sure, our classical tradition did not begin with Greece and Rome. But Mr. Perrin seems to miss this big "C" on the classical eye-chart. I even went back and checked Augustine's book On Christian Doctrine to make sure I wasn't just being anti-Hellenistic due to too much spice in my eggs this morning, but even he was highly critical of Christians who try and appeal too much to the Greek and Roman writers for their intellectual support. He even goes to the extent of saying that Pythagoras (and Plato after him) received their "classical education" (he didn’t actually use these words) from the Jews who taught them about the One True God. I think it makes sense, too, because the beginning of classical education in Greece occurred right at the time God was dispersing His people throughout the known world (ca. 580 B.C.). So I think we Christians need to figure out how to get back to a biblically based classical education. And not just one where the “world-view” is Christian, and then superimposed onto all the basically pagan subjects; but one where even our understanding of what it means to be “classical,” or even the trivium itself, is firmly grounded in God’s Word. Onward, Christian soldiers!

  23. 5 out of 5

    J.A.A. Purves

    A solid little pamphlet, summarizing why our society needs to return to the Classical form of education (e.g., the Trivium and the Quadrivium), why young children still need to be taught Latin, and how progressive reforms over the last century have given us an abominably broken education system that simply does not work. If anyone wants to know how we can have real education again, I believe Dr. Perrin has the answer.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This book is an excellent introduction to classical education. The author is very intelligent and well read, he quotes a wonderful variety of authors, and still writes plainly and clearly for the average parent. I highly reccomend this little book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I just finished this for the second time through, my brain spinning with new ideas. Or should I say old ideas? There’s so much we have missed and I’m intrigued for my own sake as well as that of my kids!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ritsumei

    This one was not up to Dr. Person's usual standard, or else he is simply a better speaker than author. But there are some good ideas in there, and the bibliography -the map of "Where to go from here"- is very good. Read the free pdf; save your book money for something else. This one was not up to Dr. Person's usual standard, or else he is simply a better speaker than author. But there are some good ideas in there, and the bibliography -the map of "Where to go from here"- is very good. Read the free pdf; save your book money for something else.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Finch

    Parents, read this as you're considering your child's education. Parents, read this as you're considering your child's education.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Glaze

    Excellent resource for learning more about classical education. He makes it easy to follow and understand the basic concepts. I wish I would have found this years ago.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lana Glover

    We recently enrolled our daughter in a school that teaches classical education. I'm so excited for her to be able to have this amazing education. I can't wait to learn along side her. We recently enrolled our daughter in a school that teaches classical education. I'm so excited for her to be able to have this amazing education. I can't wait to learn along side her.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Rudd

    Second read-through. Originally read March 14, 2015.

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