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Throughout the widely praised Camulod Chronicles, Merlyn Britannicus has been driven by one sacred dream--to see Britain united under one just, powerful king. In The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis, it is time for the Sorcerer to fulfill his promise--to present the battle-proven Arthur as the Riothamus, the High King of Britain. When Arthur miraculously withdraws the Sword of Kin Throughout the widely praised Camulod Chronicles, Merlyn Britannicus has been driven by one sacred dream--to see Britain united under one just, powerful king. In The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis, it is time for the Sorcerer to fulfill his promise--to present the battle-proven Arthur as the Riothamus, the High King of Britain. When Arthur miraculously withdraws the Sword of Kingship from the stone in which it is set, he proves himself the true and deserving king--sworn to defend the Christian faith against invaders, and to preserve Britain as a powerful, united force. The Sorcerer has fulfilled his promise. The King is crowned, Britain is united--and the face of history and legend is forever changed.


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Throughout the widely praised Camulod Chronicles, Merlyn Britannicus has been driven by one sacred dream--to see Britain united under one just, powerful king. In The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis, it is time for the Sorcerer to fulfill his promise--to present the battle-proven Arthur as the Riothamus, the High King of Britain. When Arthur miraculously withdraws the Sword of Kin Throughout the widely praised Camulod Chronicles, Merlyn Britannicus has been driven by one sacred dream--to see Britain united under one just, powerful king. In The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis, it is time for the Sorcerer to fulfill his promise--to present the battle-proven Arthur as the Riothamus, the High King of Britain. When Arthur miraculously withdraws the Sword of Kingship from the stone in which it is set, he proves himself the true and deserving king--sworn to defend the Christian faith against invaders, and to preserve Britain as a powerful, united force. The Sorcerer has fulfilled his promise. The King is crowned, Britain is united--and the face of history and legend is forever changed.

30 review for The Sorcerer: Metamorphosis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    This is the sixth and final novel in the main “Camulod Chronicles” series which tells the story of Arthur, Merlyn, and the rest from a historically realistic and scientifically plausible way. (There are three other books still to come in the series but they are companion pieces to this main set). This book sees the culmination of all of the fascinating history that has led up to the final crowning of Arthur, making him the king of kings in England. But it begins when Arthur is still only around 1 This is the sixth and final novel in the main “Camulod Chronicles” series which tells the story of Arthur, Merlyn, and the rest from a historically realistic and scientifically plausible way. (There are three other books still to come in the series but they are companion pieces to this main set). This book sees the culmination of all of the fascinating history that has led up to the final crowning of Arthur, making him the king of kings in England. But it begins when Arthur is still only around 14 years old with Merlyn continuing with his education. While Arthur is technically the reason for this entire series, it is once again, not really about him. Once again, Merlyn relates the events from a first person perspective and follow along with his extraordinary life. There are some slowish parts in the first half of the book, mostly surrounding discussions of the influx of Christianity, but they are necessary to the way the final chapters unfold. Merlyn undergoes his own metamorphosis in this book, becoming the more traditional version of the sorcerer we think of today. Of course, just like the rest of this series, it isn’t actual magic but rather his intelligent use of natural chemicals and techniques that allows him to be seen as performing acts of great sorcery and thus his reputation as a sorcerer is born. A very satisfying conclusion to one of my all-time favorite “historical-fantasy” series. I look forward to turning now to the companion novels, which I understand describe many of the same events but from different perspectives.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim The Enchanter

    Unlike the previous book, the Sorcerer maintained a higher level of excitement. Unfortunatly, it felt like the author trying very hard to wrap up the series. On several occasions, blocks of time disappeared and it was not constructed as neatly as the previous books. Regardless, the book is very engaging as we reach what is really the beginning the Arthurian Legend.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    I was a bit worried that this book wouldn't deliver on its promise in the title - that we'd get to see Merlin transform into a sorcerer - because it doesn't happen until the last part of the book. But when it happens, it's really good, so in the end I really enjoyed this book. Same good story as the first five, with an extra bonus at the end. I was a bit worried that this book wouldn't deliver on its promise in the title - that we'd get to see Merlin transform into a sorcerer - because it doesn't happen until the last part of the book. But when it happens, it's really good, so in the end I really enjoyed this book. Same good story as the first five, with an extra bonus at the end.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    One of the weaker installments of this series. Readable, but not highly entertaining.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brentman99

    The continuation of the series sees the further development of young King Arthur and his mentor, Gauis Merlyn Brittanicus. I continue to be impressed with the character development and storyline. These are characters that the reader can invest in, knowing that they won't be thoughtlessly killed off. The depth of Merlyn's discoveries about himself and those around him are very well done. If I have one critique of this work, it is that Whyte tends to wait until you are about two thirds to three quar The continuation of the series sees the further development of young King Arthur and his mentor, Gauis Merlyn Brittanicus. I continue to be impressed with the character development and storyline. These are characters that the reader can invest in, knowing that they won't be thoughtlessly killed off. The depth of Merlyn's discoveries about himself and those around him are very well done. If I have one critique of this work, it is that Whyte tends to wait until you are about two thirds to three quarters of the book to get to the point that the title implies. I have to be honest in saying that I found that part a bit annoying. I can live with it not being there in the beginning, but I would have appreciated it more at say the halfway point. That way, the transformation doesn't seem to be a bit rushed. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and look very much forward to the next one. This is a series that I know will be on my retirement re-read list when I have a lot more leisure time. It was well worth the time spent reading it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    We continue with Merlin's story about Arthur. The group leaves Ravensglass to travel to Camulod overland. They meet people who are striving to stay alive and farm. Merlin promises to send help to one of the groups. Upon their arrival home, Merlin learns of the discord in Cambria. He decides to take some of the soldiers to assist the Pendragons. Several battles are fought. Arthur is to live in Cambria for a year to get to know his kinfolk and their way of life. The book ends with Arthur pulling the swo We continue with Merlin's story about Arthur. The group leaves Ravensglass to travel to Camulod overland. They meet people who are striving to stay alive and farm. Merlin promises to send help to one of the groups. Upon their arrival home, Merlin learns of the discord in Cambria. He decides to take some of the soldiers to assist the Pendragons. Several battles are fought. Arthur is to live in Cambria for a year to get to know his kinfolk and their way of life. The book ends with Arthur pulling the sword from the stone and being crowned.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    This is one of my favorite series written by a local man from my area. How I was turned onto this series is a story onto itself. The books in the a Dream of Eagles series are the authors take on the King Arthur Legends and he places the story in the context of actual historic events. I have read it twice and if I ever have the time I will read them all again.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    The saga continues and Arthur is crowned King. Whyte does a good job making it sound real. Tons of true history interwoven with the legend, but the book moves along at a good pace. This is book 6 of 9 in the Camulod cycle, so I'm not quite to the end yet :-) The saga continues and Arthur is crowned King. Whyte does a good job making it sound real. Tons of true history interwoven with the legend, but the book moves along at a good pace. This is book 6 of 9 in the Camulod cycle, so I'm not quite to the end yet :-)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Data

    Always a lucid voice, even in the heat of action and emotion, Whyte tells the magic of Merlyn in a way that smacks of reason and logic. His writing is meticulous, his characters appealing (or horrible) from a brain-first, thoughtful point of view.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Haslam

    So...Arthurian novels are a dime a dozen. I loved this whole series for its historical setting for the plausible ways in which Merlin and Arthur come to be without diminishing the other classic renderings.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    This was awesome. The last couple of books and the beginning of this one seemed a little slow, but read on; you'll be glad you did! This was awesome. The last couple of books and the beginning of this one seemed a little slow, but read on; you'll be glad you did!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    This is the "end" of the main Camulod chronicles story. It was a fine book, but a bit rushed in the final 100 pages. This is the "end" of the main Camulod chronicles story. It was a fine book, but a bit rushed in the final 100 pages.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Loved this one. The true emergence of the legends start here and it is fabulous.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dustman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another great read. Lots of surprises both good and unexpected. Although Merlin really is only a magician, not a sorcerer.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alessandro Pellizzari

    A stunning improvement compared to the previous book. The style and pace is back to the level of the previous books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    GAW

    3.75 stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    Summer Seeds

    The ending felt rushed, and the deaths of many of the primary secondary characters abrupt and quickly moved on from.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Anderson

    The last chapter was EPIC, the rest of the book felt a little slow.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    This is the sixth book in the "Camulod Chronicles" a realistic, historically grounded telling of the King Arthur legends. Although there are further books in the series, this was initially planned to be the culmination of the series. In a preface to one of the earlier books Whyte explains how the kernel for this series was his idea of just how a young Arthur pulled off pulling the sword from the stone, and it's that act that acts as the climax of this book and a series that began with its forgin This is the sixth book in the "Camulod Chronicles" a realistic, historically grounded telling of the King Arthur legends. Although there are further books in the series, this was initially planned to be the culmination of the series. In a preface to one of the earlier books Whyte explains how the kernel for this series was his idea of just how a young Arthur pulled off pulling the sword from the stone, and it's that act that acts as the climax of this book and a series that began with its forging--from a skystone--a meteor. And that in itself gives you a flavor of the books. It's not magic that makes Excalibur special--but metallurgy and craftmanship. A lot of this series could be called military fiction, and through the books we've been taken through the introduction of the stirrup, the invention of the flail and lance, and here the conception of knighthood. In a way, ultimately, I find that a bit disappointing. I've read a lot of books based on King Arthur. In Gillian Bradshaw's series, Camelot is conceived to be a "firebreak" that seeks to preserve the flame of civilization from antiquity. In T.H. White's, admittedly anachronistic conception, Camelot wasn't an attempt to preserve the past, but a premature glimpse of the future--of Marta Carter and a conception of the rule of law. In the end Whyte seems a bit more prosaic, orthodox, that I might like. I do still like how this does work with the legend to give us a Camelot and King Arthur that might have existed during the Dark Ages and was part of the transition from antiquity to the medieval. In that I don't feel a sense of tragedy for what could have been. Because Whyte's Camulod is simply one of many transitions to what will be. But I definitely thought it worth a read. I'm told Bernard Cornwell and Stephen Lawhead also wrote historically-basted Arthurian tales, but for now at least Whyte's books stand as unique in its historical grounding. There are Arthurian books with stronger prose and characters, but the attempt to eschew all magical elements certainly makes this one unique. And I did grow to care enough about this version of Merlin (he carries the narrative in all but the first two books) that I do feel I'm going to miss this world, although I think I'll stop here, where Whyte first intended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David

    Jack Whyte's Camulod Chronicles continues to be an exhilirating read. In this portion of the story- Merlyn Britanicus takes it upon himself to wreck vengeance using the appearance of magic and sorcery. He plans for Arthur to draw the sword from the stone (in a manner that makes sense. This is a wonderful retelling of the Arthurian saga. Whyte seems to have a decent grasp of the peoples once occupying the Island we know of as Britain. We met the Angles, the Belgae, the Saxons, the Danes, the Celts Jack Whyte's Camulod Chronicles continues to be an exhilirating read. In this portion of the story- Merlyn Britanicus takes it upon himself to wreck vengeance using the appearance of magic and sorcery. He plans for Arthur to draw the sword from the stone (in a manner that makes sense. This is a wonderful retelling of the Arthurian saga. Whyte seems to have a decent grasp of the peoples once occupying the Island we know of as Britain. We met the Angles, the Belgae, the Saxons, the Danes, the Celts, and so on along the way. The story, at times, bogs down, because Whyte wants us to see the evolution of knight's armor, equipment, value system, and combat methods. Merlyn and his fellows continually make new discoveries as they seek to apply things they see and learn and make improvements on them. After a time, the description of battles grows burdensome and seem to be a plot device to wring yet one more book out of the series. The story, by the way, though it is an Arthurian saga, is really about the men who dedicated their lives to build Britian following the withdrawal of the Romans and to establish a supreme king who would bring about justice for the common man. Therefore, this saga is as much about Arthur's uncles and the officers that surround him as it is about the boy king. I've enjoyed the series thus far, avoiding "Uther" thus far, though I have it on my shelf and will eventually discover what happened to Arthur's father. This novel ends with the dream fulfilled, Arthur is crowned, Merlyn is old, and Arthur is riding out to bring peace to the land. How that comes about may or may not be in future books.. It is obvious that this book was intended to be a conclusion, a culmination of the dream, but for me, it was anti-climactic. The actual drawing of the sword from the stone was as dramatic as the throne room scene from the original Star Wars movie.. in other words, cool and spectacular, but lacking any conflict. I wanted to see Merlyn's nemesis "Peter Ironhair" show up and attempt to disrupt the proceedings.. but instead, we learn his fate in an almost matter-of-fact manner.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gerry

    In 360 pages, fourteen chapters, we find Merlyn moving Arthur back to Camulod (Camelot), establishing alliances with nearby peoples, developing new cavalry tactics, getting married and fighting battles against the bad guys. That’s about it. There are his usual friends, all forming sort of a Fifth Century League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, of whom the only one with some character is Dedalus. The women, of course, are overachievers not afraid to keep Our Hero in line should he be foolish. Against In 360 pages, fourteen chapters, we find Merlyn moving Arthur back to Camulod (Camelot), establishing alliances with nearby peoples, developing new cavalry tactics, getting married and fighting battles against the bad guys. That’s about it. There are his usual friends, all forming sort of a Fifth Century League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, of whom the only one with some character is Dedalus. The women, of course, are overachievers not afraid to keep Our Hero in line should he be foolish. Against this team, the bad guys don’t stand a chance. We also get a look at his new palace, and at every ceremony conducted along the way. We also get the impression they ate a lot of bread and cheese back then. It’s in Chapter XIV that things go really wrong for Merlyn and he becomes the sorcerer of legend. We don’t see all that much of Arthur, but his education continues and he’ll wind up ascending to the throne with Excalibur (it says so on the back cover), which is the ultimate goal of this and the preceding five books. After all, what’s a good Arthurian tale without the Sword in the Stone? I found that this book really drags through most of the story and then concludes too hurriedly, as if the writer was smelling the finish line. One thing I liked was the addition of another King Lot. The first Lot, in Cornwall, is a genuine s.o.b. The later one is only mentioned as a ruler of the Orkneys, but folks who know of the Arthurian legends may anticipate the father of some Round Table heroes. May be. There’re two more books to go. Good yarn, but too long in the telling.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Halpern lewis

    Well, I feel bad but I have to say that I really did not like this. It was not nearly as good as Skystone, the first book and the two following. Each book became less and less as good as the first. The history is what makes the book but there are too many pages in between without even that. The story and plot development were weak. We all know the general idea of the story of King Arthur and Jack Whyte's Roman perspective is unique but for such an exciting story he really threw it away with the Well, I feel bad but I have to say that I really did not like this. It was not nearly as good as Skystone, the first book and the two following. Each book became less and less as good as the first. The history is what makes the book but there are too many pages in between without even that. The story and plot development were weak. We all know the general idea of the story of King Arthur and Jack Whyte's Roman perspective is unique but for such an exciting story he really threw it away with the passive voice he wrote in. Merlyn is the narrator and was so disappointing in Whyte's retelling. I hate to give bad reviews especially since I loved Skystone so much, but I'm just going to be honest here. The characters are too similar to all the other characters from his former novels that it feels too much like the same story with a few new scenes. The "mary-sue" quality of the characters became almost embarrassingly juvenile and far too predictable. I had to force myself to finish this one, and that's a shame as this was the book where Arthur is made king-- even that was boring and lacked any sense of relativity to both the Camulud plot and the legends of Arthur. Again, it's too bad because the first book was really good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Althuizen

    Another amazing series by Jack Whyte. If you enjoy being immersed into the story, these tales will certainly provide you with the right tools. From Wikipedia: 'The novels are a rendition of the Arthurian legend that attempt to propose a possible explanation for the foundation of Camulod (an alternate spelling of Camelot), Arthur's heritage and the political situation surrounding his existence. The setting series begins during the Roman departure from Britain and continues for 150 years ending duri Another amazing series by Jack Whyte. If you enjoy being immersed into the story, these tales will certainly provide you with the right tools. From Wikipedia: 'The novels are a rendition of the Arthurian legend that attempt to propose a possible explanation for the foundation of Camulod (an alternate spelling of Camelot), Arthur's heritage and the political situation surrounding his existence. The setting series begins during the Roman departure from Britain and continues for 150 years ending during the settlement of Britain by the Germanic Angles, Saxons and Jutes. The Skystone - 1992 Publius Varrus, Roman-occupied Britain The Singing Sword - 1993 Publius Varrus, Roman withdrawal complete The Eagles' Brood - 1994 Uther and Merlyn control Camulod The Saxon Shore - 1995 Merlyn raises Arthur The Fort at River's Bend (The Sorcerer, Vol 1) - 1999 Arthur grows to manhood Metamorphosis (The Sorcerer, Vol 2) - 1999 Merlyn becomes a sorcerer Uther - 2001 Stand-alone novel about Uther (covers same time period as Eagle's Brood) Clothar the Frank - 2004 Lancelot arrives in Arthur's court The Eagle - 2005 Concluding novel, Arthur's reign ends'

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen the Comic Seller

    this is the 6th book in the series, and just as facinating, well written as the first 5. It's more than just a re-telling of the Arthurian mythos. It's historical fiction, starting in the years just before the Roman Legions left Britain...and how two men with vision decided to create a community to withstand the inevitable chaos that would ensue. The art is in how Whyte weaves the Arthurian myths into the historical fiction. There's no magic, no fantasy - yet all the elements of the legends are this is the 6th book in the series, and just as facinating, well written as the first 5. It's more than just a re-telling of the Arthurian mythos. It's historical fiction, starting in the years just before the Roman Legions left Britain...and how two men with vision decided to create a community to withstand the inevitable chaos that would ensue. The art is in how Whyte weaves the Arthurian myths into the historical fiction. There's no magic, no fantasy - yet all the elements of the legends are there, woven into a well crafted period story. "The Sorcerer" is told by Cassius Merlin Britannicus - grandson & grand nephew of the two men who founded the community of Camulod. & covers the period from Arthur's mid-teens until he takes up the mantle of High King. But it also covers the changes in Merlin, Camolud, and the rest of Britain, as invaders try to force their way onto British soil. This is terrific series, whether you're fascinated by all the variations of the Arthurian Cycle, or love historical fiction, early British history...this is a great read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    This sixth book of the Camulod Chronicles tells of the way in which Caius Merlyn Britannicus becomes Merlyn the Sorcerer. I didn't enjoy this book as much as the others, finding it quite slow moving. Most of the book is concerned with the continuing conflict with Peter Ironhair in the south and the threat from the Saxon invaders in the north and east, and also with Arthur's transition from youth to man. Caius's metamorphosis into Merlyn the Sorcerer doesn't occur until the very end of the book, w This sixth book of the Camulod Chronicles tells of the way in which Caius Merlyn Britannicus becomes Merlyn the Sorcerer. I didn't enjoy this book as much as the others, finding it quite slow moving. Most of the book is concerned with the continuing conflict with Peter Ironhair in the south and the threat from the Saxon invaders in the north and east, and also with Arthur's transition from youth to man. Caius's metamorphosis into Merlyn the Sorcerer doesn't occur until the very end of the book, when great tragedy once again strikes Merlyn, and his reaction to that tragedy sets him on a path that causes him to be feared as a magician possessed of evil powers. We do get a glimpse at the end of the book of the man that Arthur has become, and Arthur himself undergoes a metamorphosis into High King of Britain. At this point I am growing bored with Merlyn and looing forward to seeing more of Arthur.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bob Caroti

    I had to have knee surgery this past spring and was looking for something to get me thru being homebound for awhile. I found the 'Camulod Chronicles' that began with 'The Skystone' and has progressed thru this book ... The premise fasinated me ... What happened in Britain between the time the Roman Legions left and when King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table evolved and ruled? Where did Arthur and Merlyn come from? What was so special about the sword 'Excalibur'? How did the church becom I had to have knee surgery this past spring and was looking for something to get me thru being homebound for awhile. I found the 'Camulod Chronicles' that began with 'The Skystone' and has progressed thru this book ... The premise fasinated me ... What happened in Britain between the time the Roman Legions left and when King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table evolved and ruled? Where did Arthur and Merlyn come from? What was so special about the sword 'Excalibur'? How did the church become the dominate force of the middle ages? Jack Whyte weaves a wonderful (but gritty) tale that is well worth the effort. I see there are 3 more volumns to this series and will continue but I think he could have stopped with 'The Sorcerer' and left people happy. I think many of you would enjoy this series ... Loved it!

  27. 5 out of 5

    William

    If you read my review of the first book in this series within a series entitled "The Sorceror: the Fort at River's Bend" you know that I was not all that impressed with it. This second effort, and sixth overall in the series "A Dream of Eagles", makes up for the lack of punch missing in River's Bend. Merlyn, his family, and especially Arthur all undergo tremendous change, thus the subtitle "Metamorphosis", under the most extreme pressures imaginable. This novel both shocked and surprised me as t If you read my review of the first book in this series within a series entitled "The Sorceror: the Fort at River's Bend" you know that I was not all that impressed with it. This second effort, and sixth overall in the series "A Dream of Eagles", makes up for the lack of punch missing in River's Bend. Merlyn, his family, and especially Arthur all undergo tremendous change, thus the subtitle "Metamorphosis", under the most extreme pressures imaginable. This novel both shocked and surprised me as the author readily killed off some of the characters who have been with Merlyn since the beginning of his journey to crown the High King of Britain. Quite simply, it was hard to put this book down once I knew that anything could happen. A great piece of historical fiction and of the Arthurian legend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sherelyn Ernst

    This is a terrific series, the re-imagining of the Arthurian legends, but the first books are more fascinating than the later ones, including this one. The British historical and cultural background is as important as the plot of the legend, so one learns a great deal of detail based on history. For the most part, these are imaginative and well-written, but Whyte sometimes gets lost in the detail, particularly the imagined military detail, and the characterizations become sketchier as the series This is a terrific series, the re-imagining of the Arthurian legends, but the first books are more fascinating than the later ones, including this one. The British historical and cultural background is as important as the plot of the legend, so one learns a great deal of detail based on history. For the most part, these are imaginative and well-written, but Whyte sometimes gets lost in the detail, particularly the imagined military detail, and the characterizations become sketchier as the series proceeds. As a series, it is a 4+, but I would advise starting with The Skystone, which, I think, comes first. I'm going to read the rest of them, but I don't feel the urgency I did after reading The Skystone and The Singing Sword. Warning: It takes six books before Arthur pulls his sword from the stone. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    Merlyn does not want to return to Camulod. He has found happiness in Mediobogdum with his wife, Tressa, and his charge, Arthur Pendragon. However, war is coming. Merlyn’s enemy, Peter Ironhair, has hired mercenaries to attack the Pendragon lands in order to advance the claim of Carthac, a distant relative of Uther Pendragon and a monstrous — some say invincible — psychopath. Meanwhile, the Saxons continue to invade along the southeast coast and there are also rumors of an invasion from the north Merlyn does not want to return to Camulod. He has found happiness in Mediobogdum with his wife, Tressa, and his charge, Arthur Pendragon. However, war is coming. Merlyn’s enemy, Peter Ironhair, has hired mercenaries to attack the Pendragon lands in order to advance the claim of Carthac, a distant relative of Uther Pendragon and a monstrous — some say invincible — psychopath. Meanwhile, the Saxons continue to invade along the southeast coast and there are also rumors of an invasion from the northeast. Clearly, the Britons need a savior king, but Merlyn still worries that Arthur’s metamorphosis into the Riothamus — the high king — is not yet complete. They return to Camulod, where Merlyn and his brother, Ambrose, prepare to ... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Paige

    Excellent retelling of a beloved legend As in all the previous books in this interesting series, Whyte has created a believable retelling of the Arthurian legend. Merlin, as uncle and father figure to the young king-to-be, continues his sharing of his journal's contents relating the events leading to Arthur's crowning. Excellent historical grounding educates while entertaining -whether your interest is mythology/Arthurian legend or early British history you'll be entranced with this series. The b Excellent retelling of a beloved legend As in all the previous books in this interesting series, Whyte has created a believable retelling of the Arthurian legend. Merlin, as uncle and father figure to the young king-to-be, continues his sharing of his journal's contents relating the events leading to Arthur's crowning. Excellent historical grounding educates while entertaining -whether your interest is mythology/Arthurian legend or early British history you'll be entranced with this series. The bad news? The series is almost finished! The next book in the series is Uther. I read it, however, after book 4 (The Saxon Shore) since I had to wait for a copy of book 5 and just couldn't wait!- and I'm happy that I did as, in looking back over the series story line, I think it actually did "fit" better there. I'd recommend doing so to others.

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