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So where are the real superheroes? The warriors for truth and justice, the defenders of the American way, the heroes who fight to make things right and ask for nothing in return? Hughie finds out when he meets the teenage adventurers known as SUPERDUPER... but unknown to the little Scotsman, Butcher has finally learned his secret. A dire scheme is set in motion, and at the So where are the real superheroes? The warriors for truth and justice, the defenders of the American way, the heroes who fight to make things right and ask for nothing in return? Hughie finds out when he meets the teenage adventurers known as SUPERDUPER... but unknown to the little Scotsman, Butcher has finally learned his secret. A dire scheme is set in motion, and at the vast superhero evangelist festival of BELIEVE, Hughie's relationship with Annie January - aka Starlight of the Seven - reaches its terrible conclusion. And soon The Boys themselves risk being torn asunder. The Boys, Vol. 7: The Innocents reprints issues 39-47 of the New York Times Best-Selling series by Garth Ennis, Darick Robertson, Russ Braun and John McCrea, and features all of the covers by Robertson!


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So where are the real superheroes? The warriors for truth and justice, the defenders of the American way, the heroes who fight to make things right and ask for nothing in return? Hughie finds out when he meets the teenage adventurers known as SUPERDUPER... but unknown to the little Scotsman, Butcher has finally learned his secret. A dire scheme is set in motion, and at the So where are the real superheroes? The warriors for truth and justice, the defenders of the American way, the heroes who fight to make things right and ask for nothing in return? Hughie finds out when he meets the teenage adventurers known as SUPERDUPER... but unknown to the little Scotsman, Butcher has finally learned his secret. A dire scheme is set in motion, and at the vast superhero evangelist festival of BELIEVE, Hughie's relationship with Annie January - aka Starlight of the Seven - reaches its terrible conclusion. And soon The Boys themselves risk being torn asunder. The Boys, Vol. 7: The Innocents reprints issues 39-47 of the New York Times Best-Selling series by Garth Ennis, Darick Robertson, Russ Braun and John McCrea, and features all of the covers by Robertson!

30 review for The Boys, Volume 7: The Innocents

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    At Butcher's insistence, Hughie stakes out the team Super-Duper, only to discover that they are a group of special needs superheroes. Malchemical is a psychotic bully, who is now assigned to Super-Duper as their 'leader'. This was his punishment for shape-shifting into another supe on his team and fucking his girlfriend in the pooper. The team already had an unofficial leader who was basically a super-caretaker, and she tries to stand up to Malchemical - but it turns out she has her own set of is At Butcher's insistence, Hughie stakes out the team Super-Duper, only to discover that they are a group of special needs superheroes. Malchemical is a psychotic bully, who is now assigned to Super-Duper as their 'leader'. This was his punishment for shape-shifting into another supe on his team and fucking his girlfriend in the pooper. The team already had an unofficial leader who was basically a super-caretaker, and she tries to stand up to Malchemical - but it turns out she has her own set of issues that he exploits. Of course, once things get out of hand, you know Hughie isn't going to stand by and let Malchemical hurt these kids. Oh, and Butcher (having learned Annie's true identity) is convinced Hughie is a mole. Plus, it looks like Homelander is getting ready to spring something on the world. So. Yeah, lots of good stuff in this one. Still a great comic, but this isn't for the squeamish or easily 'triggered'.

  2. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    this collection pulls The Boys out of the low lows of the past two books. I enjoyed the overarching exploration of Innocence Sullied that carries over two narrative arcs and one ongoing romance. the first arc is all about the Legion knock-off team called Super Duper learning that the world is a gross place. it features a particularly fun asshole in the Metamorpho parody that is superhero(villain) Malchemical, who is the new leader of those poor dumb kids. the second arc is about a popular Christ this collection pulls The Boys out of the low lows of the past two books. I enjoyed the overarching exploration of Innocence Sullied that carries over two narrative arcs and one ongoing romance. the first arc is all about the Legion knock-off team called Super Duper learning that the world is a gross place. it features a particularly fun asshole in the Metamorpho parody that is superhero(villain) Malchemical, who is the new leader of those poor dumb kids. the second arc is about a popular Christianity-palooza where various superheroes(villains) make lucrative appearances, including the pedophile Oh Father - a less fun character obviously, but the point is certainly made. those stories were both fine but I especially appreciated the sweetly carnal innocence of Hughie and Starlight's charming relationship, which has always been a refreshing island in the cesspool ocean that is the world of this comic. so sad that their relationship took a major hit, but it was time - at least in order for narrative and characterization to continue moving forward. we're still in a holding pattern as far as learning what's it all about and where it's all going, but that's fine when the stories told here hold together so well and have, at long last, some genuine emotional resonance.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I don't mean to imply that the only thing going on in this story is personal relationships. There's good action. Good mystery. A lot of worthwhile social commentary. A lot of lampooning of superhero comics themselves. All of this is done well, is entertaining, and is (almost entirely) done in service to the overarching story. (Continued in Volume 8.) I don't mean to imply that the only thing going on in this story is personal relationships. There's good action. Good mystery. A lot of worthwhile social commentary. A lot of lampooning of superhero comics themselves. All of this is done well, is entertaining, and is (almost entirely) done in service to the overarching story. (Continued in Volume 8.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luana

    A symbolic one-star because of my feelings of absolute raging hatred towards nice guy protagonist Wee Hughie by the time this volume ended. The plot continues apace, with intrigue on the side of Vought-American rising to an admirable boiling point as regards Homelander's instability and resentment. The arc with the faux Legion of Doom is equal parts charming (their cluelessness) and tense (the truly horrifying not-Metamorpho they suddenly have to contend with). The art by Russ Braun is actually A symbolic one-star because of my feelings of absolute raging hatred towards nice guy protagonist Wee Hughie by the time this volume ended. The plot continues apace, with intrigue on the side of Vought-American rising to an admirable boiling point as regards Homelander's instability and resentment. The arc with the faux Legion of Doom is equal parts charming (their cluelessness) and tense (the truly horrifying not-Metamorpho they suddenly have to contend with). The art by Russ Braun is actually more pleasing to me than Darick Robertson's, so all in all, if you are not me and you had been enjoying The Boys up until now, you'll most likely keep enjoying it with this volume as well. HOWEVER When Hughie finds out what Annie had to do to join the Seven, he unleashes a tirade of misogynist invective before walking out on her in a huff. Now, the book suddenly invokes the voice of an omniscient narrator (a new stylistic trick that hadn't been done before at all) to tell us that "Hughie knew how wrong he was but he couldn't help himself" (paraphrased) seeing as how one of the men Annie serviced was A-Train, the notFlash who accidentally killed Hughie's fiancée. Unless Hughie gets utterly fucking demolished in the next volume, and my boy Ennis assures us that he is wrong for being angry at any part of that situation that DOESN'T involve Annie blowing Robin's killer and him having an emotional response to that (and even then how the fuck was she gonna know), this series and indeed Ennis as a writer will get some serious fucking moral caveats in my mental registry. I hope I don't have to put you in the Shane Black drawer, Garthy!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Clausen

    Something about the pure innocence of Super Duper really touched my heart. In a cold-blooded world of narcissistic coked-up superheroes, these are the dorky useless underlings who get wedgies and wet-willies. But their sweet innocence is also something to admire in this dark world. It's also something that touches Wee Hughie as well as he goes on his emotional journey. There is one more thing I will say about The Boys -- the sure do know how to maximize the comedic value of fat superheroes. From Something about the pure innocence of Super Duper really touched my heart. In a cold-blooded world of narcissistic coked-up superheroes, these are the dorky useless underlings who get wedgies and wet-willies. But their sweet innocence is also something to admire in this dark world. It's also something that touches Wee Hughie as well as he goes on his emotional journey. There is one more thing I will say about The Boys -- the sure do know how to maximize the comedic value of fat superheroes. From Blowchowski to Bobby Badoing, they never miss a chance to use a fat superpowered moron for a few laughs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I dunno, I didn`t love this one. I`d say probably 3.5 stars. What I did like is that we finally get the revelation that Hughie`s lady isn`t who he thought she was, but he doesn`t take it well at all... There`s an evolution in the relationship between the team, as MM calls Butcher out on some assumptions he makes, and Butcher is ready to let Hughie pay for it. Luckily, there is some relief, but it only subsides long enough for us to see Hughie`s world fall apart. There`s some more scenes of Supes beh I dunno, I didn`t love this one. I`d say probably 3.5 stars. What I did like is that we finally get the revelation that Hughie`s lady isn`t who he thought she was, but he doesn`t take it well at all... There`s an evolution in the relationship between the team, as MM calls Butcher out on some assumptions he makes, and Butcher is ready to let Hughie pay for it. Luckily, there is some relief, but it only subsides long enough for us to see Hughie`s world fall apart. There`s some more scenes of Supes behaving badly, and it looks like the Homelander is about to go rogue, and maybe take some others with him. We also get a revelation about another member of the Seven and where loyalties really lie... It will be interesting to see where things go from here... The only comic relief is from the Female, undercover with the Frenchman, and her antagonizing at the hands of a bully...the thought bubbles of what she`ll do, and how Frenchy responds are the only lightness in this otherwise VERY dark book. Lots of rape, mentally challenged folks being treated like shit by a big bully, and the collapse of one of the bright lights of the series. I commend Ennis for not taking the easy way out of that, I just don`t think he would have gone that way. Get this review and more at:

  7. 4 out of 5

    Britton

    Ennis got his start in the mid to late 90s, establishing a reputation as an extremist in the comics community alongside Warren Ellis, though Ennis would become the Grant Morrison to Ellis' Alan Moore, with Ennis sometimes going to extremes without letting his story threads come together in a natural way. Does that mean Ennis is a bad writer? Of course not. He wouldn't be a favorite of mine if that were the case. While The Boys doesn't entirely reach the heights of some of Ennis' finer outings li Ennis got his start in the mid to late 90s, establishing a reputation as an extremist in the comics community alongside Warren Ellis, though Ennis would become the Grant Morrison to Ellis' Alan Moore, with Ennis sometimes going to extremes without letting his story threads come together in a natural way. Does that mean Ennis is a bad writer? Of course not. He wouldn't be a favorite of mine if that were the case. While The Boys doesn't entirely reach the heights of some of Ennis' finer outings like Preacher or Punisher MAX, The Boys proved itself to be another interesting series in Ennis' catalogue. Garth Ennis is never one for the easily offended, the copious amounts of sex, violence and mayhem that inhabits this series can test even the most mentally and physically strong of people, as I said earlier Ennis is rather extreme with his content. Though luckily, Ennis does know how to pace himself and provide a good plot to keep you invested unlike some of the other artists and writers from the uber grimdark period of comics (cough cough, Rob Liefeld, cough cough, Frank Miller). Ennis, much like Alan Moore, makes a point to show that if superhumans were to exist in our world, they would bring about an apocalyptic sense of change to the world. Though unfortunately, I'm not quite as sure that Ennis is as thorough in his exploration as Moore was. He never fully goes deeper in his critique of superheroes, which is rather unfortunate. Though unlike Moore, Ennis pulls no punches when taking shots as superheroes, this is unsurprising given his well known disdain for the superhero genre, yet again, I don't find that his satire nearly goes far enough to make a grand point of it all. While The Boys' satire is admittedly simplistic unlike something that is more nuanced like Watchmen, we see Ennis' reputation for characterization shine through, with Billy Butcher being a standout and even Ennis himself lamenting that he was his favorite character to write. Most of the characters in The Boys are strongly developed and their depth and likability is reminiscent of Preacher, but we also see how they change over time. Wee Hughie in particular changes from a mild mannered normal person into a hardened, but still well intentioned person. The satire of The Boys, while sometimes going overboard and becoming crude, usually does its job, with targets being of corporatism, crony capitalism, and the incompetence of government, in particular the Bush era. I have often complained about how many modern comics have problems with pacing. But luckily Ennis doesn't have this issue, and I would lobby him alongside Ed Brubaker as having a mastery of pacing, as Ennis knows when he should slow things down and when to let things speed up. It is nice to find someone else to use as an example of how to pace your stories in a way to where you won't lose your audience, and Ennis definitely knows how to keep his audiences attention, for better or worse. Few problems come through in the series, Ennis's writing teeters in quality near the end, with some unexpected twists coming in that shakes up the story at hold and not in a way that feels natural. Though luckily Ennis manages to make it work as best as he can and manages to wrap his story up in a satisfying way. While Ennis is ruthless in his mockery of the superhero genre and its conventions, some of his edgy, extreme humor doesn't really seem to go anywhere, which is a problem that pervades through much of his work. Though unlike Preacher or Punisher MAX where he manages to tamper it with volumes of excellent story, The Boys sometimes does get brought down by its over the top extremes. The art from Derrick Robertson, while very good and well drawn, I often compare to his extraordinary work on Transmetropolitan, and I found that he hasn't ever surpassed the strange and surreal visuals from that series. Cruel and crass as The Boys may be, Ennis rarely forgets character motivation or good plotting to keep readers invested, while he may lose some of his steam by the end of the series, The Boys remains a strong and enjoyable outing from Ennis' catalogue.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Dark. That's how this book hits me. I can't help it, I know that's so over-used these days, but when I think about how Butcher and Malchemical and a couple of the Boys act, that's where my brain goes. This is a serious book, many dramatic turns and little to redeem the optimist inside me. I did *not* think Ennis would take us here, and as I saw it unfolding I just assumed he'd let us off the hook sooner or later. Now I really want to read the next volume immediately - this suffering has to end and Dark. That's how this book hits me. I can't help it, I know that's so over-used these days, but when I think about how Butcher and Malchemical and a couple of the Boys act, that's where my brain goes. This is a serious book, many dramatic turns and little to redeem the optimist inside me. I did *not* think Ennis would take us here, and as I saw it unfolding I just assumed he'd let us off the hook sooner or later. Now I really want to read the next volume immediately - this suffering has to end and quickly. That's the sign of good writing, and while I'm not feeling happy right now, I know that this book has affected me - which is the highest honour. The art is keeping up its amazing standards of quality - without this visceral, line-crossing work I think this series could've lost me a while back.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Extremely disappointing. Maybe I've matured out of the target demographic lately. I mean, I still love all the "stickin' it to the supes" stuff, but Butcher and Hughie are painted so unsympathetically here it's really difficult to root for them at all. We've always known Butcher & Co were a bunch of right bastards, and that was fine, because we had Simon Pe... err, Wee Hughie to identify with, as the "regular guy" we could all see as us (and by we I mean of course white cishet dudes). But by the Extremely disappointing. Maybe I've matured out of the target demographic lately. I mean, I still love all the "stickin' it to the supes" stuff, but Butcher and Hughie are painted so unsympathetically here it's really difficult to root for them at all. We've always known Butcher & Co were a bunch of right bastards, and that was fine, because we had Simon Pe... err, Wee Hughie to identify with, as the "regular guy" we could all see as us (and by we I mean of course white cishet dudes). But by the end of this book, I could no more identify with Hughie than with Butcher. They're both pretty reprehensible, and I don't know if I care enough to read another few volumes about them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Another double story arc book. Things are certainly heating up. The Legion of Superheroes parody in the first arc made me smile. It's perhaps not as on point as some of the arcs in The Boys have been, but it's still fun. We're starting to see some dissention in the ranks. As for the second arc, well, we knew that moment was coming, but it still sucked ... Looking forward to volume 8! Onward! Another double story arc book. Things are certainly heating up. The Legion of Superheroes parody in the first arc made me smile. It's perhaps not as on point as some of the arcs in The Boys have been, but it's still fun. We're starting to see some dissention in the ranks. As for the second arc, well, we knew that moment was coming, but it still sucked ... Looking forward to volume 8! Onward!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    This is the soap-opera book of the series - besides a storyline involving a disgraced hero taking command of a weird kids-oriented supergroup who barely have powers, the bulk of the book focuses on Hughie and Starlight's relationship. Yup, this is the one where Hughie finds out about Starlight being part of the Seven and what she had to do to get into it... There is a setup for a larger storyline involving a possible "Civil War" type scenario happening between the Supes and Vought, but it's just This is the soap-opera book of the series - besides a storyline involving a disgraced hero taking command of a weird kids-oriented supergroup who barely have powers, the bulk of the book focuses on Hughie and Starlight's relationship. Yup, this is the one where Hughie finds out about Starlight being part of the Seven and what she had to do to get into it... There is a setup for a larger storyline involving a possible "Civil War" type scenario happening between the Supes and Vought, but it's just a hint of foreshadowing that shows you where the series is headed. It's not a bad book but feels a bit lightweight. There's a lot of pages but besides the Hughie/Starlight storyline advancing and the Supes go rogue/Vought storyline that's been hinted at since "Herogasm" being hinted at yet again, nothing much else happens. A few cool moments aside, I wanted more from this volume than there was. If you're a fan then of course you'll get this one and it's still a fun read. Oh well, hopefully Book 8 will be a corker!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim Gorman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another chapter in the Boys series. In this one we find out that Hughie really loves Annie and tells her. Billy sees them together and recognizes her as Starlight from the Seven. He naturally thinks Hughie is a spy and goes to the Legend to discuss this turn. He could not be further from the truth. it is just that Hughie doesn't realize she is in the Seven, since I don't think he has seen her on any of the tapes from the hidden cameras. Meanwhile Annie is coming out of her shell and takes him sh Another chapter in the Boys series. In this one we find out that Hughie really loves Annie and tells her. Billy sees them together and recognizes her as Starlight from the Seven. He naturally thinks Hughie is a spy and goes to the Legend to discuss this turn. He could not be further from the truth. it is just that Hughie doesn't realize she is in the Seven, since I don't think he has seen her on any of the tapes from the hidden cameras. Meanwhile Annie is coming out of her shell and takes him shopping for porn.Over at Vought we have a new player who will be in charge of the Seven, when the original handler moves up the corporate ladder. She is rather gung-ho and all. She has seen the files on the Seven though and knows they are just horrible at times, especially the photos of Homelander destroying a bunch of people for fun. Mothers Milk confronts some other Vaught managers about their attack on them earlier. Billy decides to test Hughie by sending him to bug SuperDuper, a very low power team. Half of the team has mental disabilities, and powers that don't work all the time. They are being sent a new leader by Vought, a total sick mental case. Billy figures of Hughie gets seen then he won't do anything because both sides work for Vought. Hughie winds up liking them, since they are "mentally just kids", and they do things like rescuing cats from trees and all. The woman in charge of SuperDuper gets into it with the new leader and he decides he had enough of them and goes to town with going to rape them all. Hugie steps in and gets messed up and Billy busts in and ends the jerk and saves Hughie. Later we get into the Capes for Christ event in the park. It's where Vought ties the supes with religion and get the fans to pay to see them all and attend. Homelander doesn't want to do it, neither does Annie. Vought lets them know that this isn't opional. Hughie and Annie are at the park later and Hughie lets Annie know how his former love was killed by a supe, namely A-Train by the Seven. she gets upset and then confesses she is in the Seven. This totally destroys Hughie, with all he has seen and done. He has to run off, while Annie still shouts her love for him. Billy sends Frenchie and Female to spy at Capes for Christ and we see Oh Father, a pedophile superhero with 12 kid sidekicks. Homelander approaches him and asks him to ask around to find other supes who might want to make a change on who is in charge of the country. Oh Father knows a few and they discuss this while Annie as Starlight puts on this act about how great belief is and all that. She talks to Homelander later and he is a jerk but then lets her go because the only thing left for the day is the contest of "win dinner with the homelander".Hughie then meets up with Billy all upset with what he found out about his girl. he confesses to Billy and Billy sees that he is telling the truth, that he knew nothing. They discuss about how Billy doesnt think Hughie is a spy, but maybe Annie is. They go back to their HQ and discuss how they have cameras and bugs on the Seven's lair because Queen Mave decided to help the Boys years back. Billy suggests that Hughie start checking the tapes right before he met Annie to see if they planned anything, knowing he will see what she did to join the Seven. He gets so pissed and confronts Annie in the park. He goes to town on her, super mean language and all, breaking her heart because of her secret. So mad and sad and all, totally great writing and all of an irrational breakup fight. They both leave crying.To end the book we have Homelander with the winning family who will go to dinner with him. They are in their car and he picks it up and flies off with it. Frenchie see that a lot of other supes fly off after them as well. After a long flight Homelander just throws the car in the ocean killing the family and discusses his plans with the large group of supes with him.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ross Alon

    First part is great, as Hughie goes on a solo mission, because butcher is an asshole, along the way we discover to other ends of the world's superhero's spectrum. The second part is terrible, with a climax that only manages to turn Hughie to an even greater asshole than Butcher, with text that can only be written by a not very smart writer. And I thought I was starting to really enjoy the series. First part is great, as Hughie goes on a solo mission, because butcher is an asshole, along the way we discover to other ends of the world's superhero's spectrum. The second part is terrible, with a climax that only manages to turn Hughie to an even greater asshole than Butcher, with text that can only be written by a not very smart writer. And I thought I was starting to really enjoy the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I know this series is deliberately over the top and provocative. I'm not bothered by the over the top violence, unlikable protagonists, constant racism, sexism and homophobia, or the black and grey morality of it all. It's Garth Ennis, I get it. He's successfully turned his disdain for superhero culture into a fun, disturbing and interesting romp. The thing that anchors it all is Hughie, the likeable (if somewhat homophobic) protagonist of the series. The final scene of this volume nicely undoes e I know this series is deliberately over the top and provocative. I'm not bothered by the over the top violence, unlikable protagonists, constant racism, sexism and homophobia, or the black and grey morality of it all. It's Garth Ennis, I get it. He's successfully turned his disdain for superhero culture into a fun, disturbing and interesting romp. The thing that anchors it all is Hughie, the likeable (if somewhat homophobic) protagonist of the series. The final scene of this volume nicely undoes everything that was likeable about him. I won't go into spoilers, but it was a real turn off. He crossed some lines that you can't go back on. It's particularly hard to read in a post MeToo world. I don't remember how it all ends, but I assume Hughie apologises and makes up for what he said, but honestly that's not good enough, and right now I've lost the momentum I had for re-reading the rest of this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I love this series by Ennis. Is it crude? Yes. Graphic (sex/violence)? Oh yes. But I really do love the characters and really get a kick out of them. And the world that Ennis has created - where super heroes are shmucks just like the rest of us, or worse - is endlessly captivating. Was volume 7 my favorite volume? No. Sad to say, there was a lot of lovey-dovey detail about Wee Hughie and his love affair with Annie January (aka Starlight) and not nearly enough story given to other "boys" like The I love this series by Ennis. Is it crude? Yes. Graphic (sex/violence)? Oh yes. But I really do love the characters and really get a kick out of them. And the world that Ennis has created - where super heroes are shmucks just like the rest of us, or worse - is endlessly captivating. Was volume 7 my favorite volume? No. Sad to say, there was a lot of lovey-dovey detail about Wee Hughie and his love affair with Annie January (aka Starlight) and not nearly enough story given to other "boys" like The Frenchman and The Female. But all in all, darn satisfying. [Note: for some reason, my cover image is much different - The Female dangling in the sky at the tail end of a bunch of balloons - but I didn't see an alternate image on any of the major book sites so I'll leave my review tagged to this image.]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The Innocents (39-43). This is quite a good story because of its advancement of the plot and the distrust that evolves within The Boys. The final fight is also refreshingly brutal. The problem, of course, is when Ennis decides to be purposefully offensive for no good reason … which unfortunately occurs at least once per issue [7/10]. Believe (44-47). The second story in the volume is brilliant though. It finally sets off all the bombs that have been laid in the series to date and has a wonderful, The Innocents (39-43). This is quite a good story because of its advancement of the plot and the distrust that evolves within The Boys. The final fight is also refreshingly brutal. The problem, of course, is when Ennis decides to be purposefully offensive for no good reason … which unfortunately occurs at least once per issue [7/10]. Believe (44-47). The second story in the volume is brilliant though. It finally sets off all the bombs that have been laid in the series to date and has a wonderful, wonderful ending. This is Ennis at his best (and there are only one or two moments of purposefully, unnecessary crudity) [8+/10].

  17. 5 out of 5

    D'Iberville Library

    This installment brings in a new element - a group of supes who actually want to do some good. Unfortunately, due to the Dark turn that Victory Comics wants the story arcs to take, Malchemical (one of the worst supes) is sent to lead this group. Butcher loses faith in Hughie after seeing him out with Annie and recognizing her. MM loses it with Butcher and the shadowy figure in charge of the supes. The lightest part of this entire story is the relationship between Frenchie and The Female. Your he This installment brings in a new element - a group of supes who actually want to do some good. Unfortunately, due to the Dark turn that Victory Comics wants the story arcs to take, Malchemical (one of the worst supes) is sent to lead this group. Butcher loses faith in Hughie after seeing him out with Annie and recognizing her. MM loses it with Butcher and the shadowy figure in charge of the supes. The lightest part of this entire story is the relationship between Frenchie and The Female. Your heart will be aching by the end of this book and you'll need to jump right into the next. Highly recommended series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bill Coffin

    The Boys is an unflinchingly graphic, 12-volume descent into sexual violence, exploding bodies, depravity, broken taboos and bodily fluids that purports to deconstruct the superhero genre with a chaser of black humor. All it really accomplishes, however, is a whole lot of sophomoric commentary on power and politics, stretches of exposition that last for entire issues at a time, unpleasant and inconsistent artwork, and a certain hypocrisy from a creative team which seems to revel in depicting all The Boys is an unflinchingly graphic, 12-volume descent into sexual violence, exploding bodies, depravity, broken taboos and bodily fluids that purports to deconstruct the superhero genre with a chaser of black humor. All it really accomplishes, however, is a whole lot of sophomoric commentary on power and politics, stretches of exposition that last for entire issues at a time, unpleasant and inconsistent artwork, and a certain hypocrisy from a creative team which seems to revel in depicting all of the terrible violations it decries. The story involves a CIA black ops group tasked with monitoring, terrorizing and murdering rogue superheroes in a world where pretty much *all* superheroes are nothing more than fraudulent predators and degenerates. Into this mess enters Wee Hughie, a fellow who loses his girlfriend early on as collateral damage in a super-brawl. Hughie, recruited by the Boys’ leader, Butcher, sees just how sick and dirty the world of supes - and those who oppose them - really is. And pretty soon, what begins as a covert containment program turns into all-out war. Put together, what could have been a brilliant criticism of a genre that we take for granted instead feels like a three-day lecture by 15-year-old edgelords who really want you to know why their hormonally supercharged worldview ought to be taken seriously by grown-ups. No, we don’t want to hear why you think sexual violence is okay when it is committed by a bulldog. No, we don’t want to see how often you can fit an act of public excretion into your story. No, we don’t want to see how cool your characters in trench coats are. No, we don’t need to actually see somebody eating a dead infant. One imagines that this entire series is an extended middle finger to the notion of “With great power comes great responsibility.” It often feels like the creators here are angry that superhero comics even exists, and that their fans continue to buy them. We get it - the superhero genre has definitely gotten big enough and overstuffed enough for somebody to take the air out of it. But The Boys ain’t it. This isn’t insightful enough to work as criticism, clever enough to work as parody, funny enough to work as black comedy, or focused enough to work on any of the three previous fronts even if the skill was there for this to succeed. The Boys is just a chronicle of cynicism, vicious and vile, slapdash and self-indulgent, excessive and egocentric. For those looking to read a different kind of take on the superhero concept, there are plenty better to choose from - Brian Michael Bendis’ POWERS instantly comes to mind - that won’t make you want to disinfect your hands when you’re done.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oron

    For me, much better than the last one. Thing is, the only remotely-likable charachter, Hughie, had managed to cross the "likable" line for me at the end of the volume, rendering almost the ENTIRE members of "The Boys" insufferable. Meybe MM can be excluded, but he has a very few moments in the spotlight. The story itself is interesting to keep me on board, though, and I'll keep on reading. It just seems, at the moment, that if at the end of the story the entire cast will be a bloody mess, I whuol For me, much better than the last one. Thing is, the only remotely-likable charachter, Hughie, had managed to cross the "likable" line for me at the end of the volume, rendering almost the ENTIRE members of "The Boys" insufferable. Meybe MM can be excluded, but he has a very few moments in the spotlight. The story itself is interesting to keep me on board, though, and I'll keep on reading. It just seems, at the moment, that if at the end of the story the entire cast will be a bloody mess, I whuold shed to many tears.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Ahmed

    another great Vol. first Butcher sends Hughie after Super-duper team in some kind of a test. then Annie tells Hughie about being starlight and face the consequences. the art improved A lot with John Mccrea

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    Always a lot of fun. Also disgusting. 5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Plot points: (view spoiler)[--Hughie falls under suspicion when Butcher discovers Annie = Starlight and is sent on a bullshit mission to 'infiltrate' Super Duper, a team of weirdos and losers. It almost gets Hughie killed when a psycho is reassigned to Super Duper as punishment for raping another supe's girlfriend. --Hughie freaks out on Annie when he discovers a) she's a supe and b) what she did to join the Seven. (And how much of Hughie's histrionics are due to Starlight's lies--which he is equi Plot points: (view spoiler)[--Hughie falls under suspicion when Butcher discovers Annie = Starlight and is sent on a bullshit mission to 'infiltrate' Super Duper, a team of weirdos and losers. It almost gets Hughie killed when a psycho is reassigned to Super Duper as punishment for raping another supe's girlfriend. --Hughie freaks out on Annie when he discovers a) she's a supe and b) what she did to join the Seven. (And how much of Hughie's histrionics are due to Starlight's lies--which he is equivalently guilty of--how much due to his acute prudishness, and how much due to A-Train being part of her entry fee to the Seven?) --Mother's Milk loses faith in Butcher after what he did to Hughie. --Frenchie infiltrates the Believe expo. (Starlight's speech to the faithful serves as a backhanded indictment of the scorched-earth evangelical mindset.) --Homelander blithely tosses a car full of Christians into the ocean and arranges a meeting in the clouds of heroes who will back a Vought/superhero coup of the American government. (hide spoiler)] Heavy on the plot advancement in v7, which is not unwelcome. It's past due that (view spoiler)[Hughie figures out his girlfriend is a world famous celebrity (hide spoiler)] . The shock humor comes at the expense of the special-needs supe team Super Duper, which can get pretty awkward. Malchemical is a legitimately badass antagonist: clever, casually cruel, and powerful, with a unique, interesting look. There's nothing to particularly recommend for or against this volume. It serves.

  23. 5 out of 5

    VOID Munashii

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. More of the same, and that's no bad thing. As usual,Ennis manages to create a mix of the humourous with the horrible while telling entertaining story. It was nice to see a super group that is composed of genuinely good, if completely useless, people, and the second half of this trade sets things up for some major developments down the road between Hughie and Annie as well as Homelander and the other supes. More of the same, and that's no bad thing. As usual,Ennis manages to create a mix of the humourous with the horrible while telling entertaining story. It was nice to see a super group that is composed of genuinely good, if completely useless, people, and the second half of this trade sets things up for some major developments down the road between Hughie and Annie as well as Homelander and the other supes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    This is probably my favorite of all the trades of The Boys up to now, if only because the overkill in violence and sex and all the rest finally made way for a little bit of humanity and such in the characters. I didn't really see it coming, but the situation with Hughie and Starlight combined with the Butcher handling things the best way he could? Really well done across the board. It's weird to think I'm actually on the back end of this series now, after resisting it for so long. This is probably my favorite of all the trades of The Boys up to now, if only because the overkill in violence and sex and all the rest finally made way for a little bit of humanity and such in the characters. I didn't really see it coming, but the situation with Hughie and Starlight combined with the Butcher handling things the best way he could? Really well done across the board. It's weird to think I'm actually on the back end of this series now, after resisting it for so long.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gary Lee

    It's building up to something, but it's really hard to determine exactly what that will be. It's building up to something, but it's really hard to determine exactly what that will be.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erin Britton

    As anyone who has read Watchmen can tell you, just because you’re a superhero it doesn’t mean that you can’t be a total arse and a serious danger to humanity. Garth Ennis’ solution to this issue is The Boys, a covert CIA black ops team of very dangerous people – Billy Butcher, Wee Hughie [yes, the Simon Pegg thing is intentional], Mother’s Milk, The Frenchman and The Female – tasked with keeping the masked deviants under control. The controversial and hugely popular series, written entirely by E As anyone who has read Watchmen can tell you, just because you’re a superhero it doesn’t mean that you can’t be a total arse and a serious danger to humanity. Garth Ennis’ solution to this issue is The Boys, a covert CIA black ops team of very dangerous people – Billy Butcher, Wee Hughie [yes, the Simon Pegg thing is intentional], Mother’s Milk, The Frenchman and The Female – tasked with keeping the masked deviants under control. The controversial and hugely popular series, written entirely by Ennis and illustrated by Darick Robertson, debuted in 2006 and will hit the fiftieth issue mark in January 2011. The Boys Vol.7: The Innocents collects issues 39 to 47 of the series. The collection begins with “What I Know”, a single-issue story in which Billy Butcher discovers Wee Hughie’s relationship with Starlight [of The Seven fame]. Butcher is, rightly, unwilling to believe that Hughie is a double-agent in league with The Seven and so, after consulting with The Legend, sends him undercover to observe a joke of a superhero team called Super Duper. Meanwhile, back at Vought American headquarters, Jess Bradley is made privy to information about a shocking incident from The Homelander’s past. “The Innocents” is a multi-issue story-arch originally contained in issues 40 to 43. Wee Hughie is on assignment surveilling Super Duper, a team of earnest and incredibly naïve teenagers from the distant future. Now Super Duper may seem the typical vanilla 1950s style superheroes but, since this is being written by Garth Ennis, the real situation is far more twisted than that and, aside from their dodgy super-names (Auntie Sis, Bobby Badoing, Ladyfold, Stool Shadow, Klanker, The Black Hole, and Kid Camo), there is something bizarrely screwed-up and unfortunate about each of them. However, they are truly do-gooders with no concept of what the rest of the superheroes get up to and so, against his better judgement, Wee Hughie feels protective towards them. Just as well really, as Malchemical has just been drafted in by Vought American to be their new team leader. Vol. 7 finishes with the multi-issue story “Believe”, originally found in issues 44 to 47. Against the backdrop of some kind of religious, fundamentalist festival involving superheroes proclaiming their faith and sponsored [of course] by Vought American, Wee Hughie and Starlight reconnect and learn some of the truth about each other. Predictably, it doesn’t go well. Towards the end of the story, it seems that The Homelander may finally be about to initiative some variety of spectacular villainy rather than just pout and ponder on previous evil deeds. The Boys is certainly a series that pulls no punches. The sex and violence in The Innocents is just as extreme and occasionally gratuitous [more so even than in Ennis’ Preacher series) as long-time followers of the series will expect. For this reason, The Boys isn’t going to be a series that appeals to everyone [fans of the traditional superhero stories would certainly be advised to read an issue or two of the comic before investing in the paperback collections] since some elements of the various storylines are at best extremely cringe worthy and, at worst, decidedly distressing. However, alongside the “adult” issues mentioned, Garth Ennis is a highly innovative and imaginative writer and, after a couple of rather slow volumes, events at the end of The Innocents seem to imply that something big is about to be afoot in The Boys universe and that Volume 8 should be unmissable. While the action might occasionally be a little slow, Ennis has certainly used the time to deliver excellent characterisations – both of The Boys themselves and of the various Supes that they encounter – and in Vol. 7: The Innocents more information is revealed about the twisted back-stories of several principle characters, particularly fan favourite Wee Hughie. Although the main subject matter in The Innocents is love and truth, Ennis’ trademark black humour is still in plentiful supply. Pretty much every scene involving Super Duper is tragically hilarious and there are numerous golden one-liners. As much as I hate to agree with Butcher, I too am sick of living in a world where Jimi Hendrix chokes on puke and Garth Brookes thrives.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    The idea of writer Garth Ennis sending the characters from The Boys to interact with a team made up of developmentaly disabled superheroes should set off alarm bells for anyone who prefers to stay away from schlocky comics. And while I certainly wouldn't call this collection subtle, Ennis has definitely reigned himself in. Not entirely, but a fair amount. There's still the infantilization of one of the heroes, Tourette's used as a humor device (but mainly to point out another character being awfu The idea of writer Garth Ennis sending the characters from The Boys to interact with a team made up of developmentaly disabled superheroes should set off alarm bells for anyone who prefers to stay away from schlocky comics. And while I certainly wouldn't call this collection subtle, Ennis has definitely reigned himself in. Not entirely, but a fair amount. There's still the infantilization of one of the heroes, Tourette's used as a humor device (but mainly to point out another character being awful, I don't think you're meant to laugh at the character, just be angry at the character who laughs at him), and of course a potential rape scene, because Ennis. While the surface story at the heart of this volume is Hughie conducting surveillance on a parody of DC's Legion Of Superheroes, this book is mainly about trust between The Boys, and trust between Hughie and Starlight. And, in that regards, this is a five star book. It's easy to see where every character is coming from, as they are all upset about being decieved while also deceiving the people they're angry at. We also have the Believe festival from the TV show, even though this takes place much much later in the story. Like much of the transition between media, the TV version is much more affecting and well plotted. We don't need the joke about the main religious hero having a bunch of young sidekicks, and The Homelander pointing out that there's blood on their seats when they get up. We didn't need The Female getting revenge on a child by peeing on his lolapalooza. The only thing that's in the story that could have been interesting in the TV show is what The Homelander does to the Christians who win a chance to fly with him. This volume and volume two are by far my favorites of the series, but this is the one I would recommend to more people, as you don't have to endure As Much of the hate speech (there's still some in this volume; massively toned down so that it's only the absolute worst characters saying it, but it's there).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Myk Pilgrim

    I'm writing (and posting) this review across the whole series of The Boys comics because I've experienced the series as a whole. Some volumes may have been better than others, but that's no different from chapters in a novel. The story ends, all the loose threads get tied up. Some of the side plots are worth the pay-off, others not so much. Overall the characters are well-rounded, but the focus of the books isn't really them. What the story is, is a vicious no holds barred commentary on not just t I'm writing (and posting) this review across the whole series of The Boys comics because I've experienced the series as a whole. Some volumes may have been better than others, but that's no different from chapters in a novel. The story ends, all the loose threads get tied up. Some of the side plots are worth the pay-off, others not so much. Overall the characters are well-rounded, but the focus of the books isn't really them. What the story is, is a vicious no holds barred commentary on not just the superhero genre, but human greed. People do terrible terrible things to other people for power and when they have it, that's when the real horror starts. Hugh Campbell comes and goes in your estimation throughout, he swings from the sympathetic core of the main story to a level of hypocrisy that makes you want to slap the teeth out his head with a hammer. Annie is too good for him. The tale is soaked with blood, semen, and entrails, often all three at once. No-one innocent is spared, children and pets die, rape, there are christian sexual-predators, superhuman orgies, terrible terrible costumes, giant penises, and pretty much every taboo you can come up with. So what I'm saying here is there are a LOT of good reasons to make the time to read these. I've been lucky enough to be able to watch the show and read the book in tandem which has made for a far more enriching experience of both. Though, if you are wondering, I think that the show (2 seasons at the point of this writing) is the superior story of the two - it's far more emotion-focused, which to me is a solid strength. That is if you're looking for hard-hitting storytelling that hurts you the way good fiction is supposed to.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sunil

    The Boys is really hitting its stride now! After some uneven setup work and truly vile low point, it's made a swift recovery that's delivering strong storytelling, with this volume focusing on Annie and Hughie's relationship, where the shoe FINALLY drops, and Homelander's personal ascent to godhood. Plus the first arc (the titular one) introduces a truly adorable and dopey superteam that, well, is a wee bit offensive, Ennis-style, since several are essentially portrayed as mentally disabled alth The Boys is really hitting its stride now! After some uneven setup work and truly vile low point, it's made a swift recovery that's delivering strong storytelling, with this volume focusing on Annie and Hughie's relationship, where the shoe FINALLY drops, and Homelander's personal ascent to godhood. Plus the first arc (the titular one) introduces a truly adorable and dopey superteam that, well, is a wee bit offensive, Ennis-style, since several are essentially portrayed as mentally disabled although they're just supposed to be...teenagers from the future or something, who knows what to believe! But it is nice to see supes who aren't assholes, who just like saving cats. And speaking of cats, the cat's out of bag and Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson offer the most emotional punch of the series with Annie and Hughie. Hughie's face especially, excellent work on that face, Robertson. I was much less of a fan of the OTHER big scene with Annie and Hughie, but hopefully these two mixed-up kids can work it out. Also, big shout-out to Mother's Milk, who sticks up for Hughie against Butcher's bullshit manipulations.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Everson

    Almost 5 stars. This is getting better. We meet the new super-hero group Super-duper who are an obvious pastiche of The Legion of Super Heroes, and they are unique in the entire series thus far in that they are undenuably GOOD people. The problem is that they are all on the far far side of the spectrum and can't even team up to rescue a kitten from a tree. I dare you not to fall in love with at least one or two of them though. Hughie is sent in to infiltrate and there's also a swipe at religion (a Almost 5 stars. This is getting better. We meet the new super-hero group Super-duper who are an obvious pastiche of The Legion of Super Heroes, and they are unique in the entire series thus far in that they are undenuably GOOD people. The problem is that they are all on the far far side of the spectrum and can't even team up to rescue a kitten from a tree. I dare you not to fall in love with at least one or two of them though. Hughie is sent in to infiltrate and there's also a swipe at religion (always a plus in my book) in the second arc of the book. Homelander reaches new lows, Annie and Hugie get closer, but some misinterpretations by Butcher may scupper that. I hope not. The one thing that (for me anyway) stops the book from being perfect is the artwork on some of 'The Innocents'. Butcher is hardly recognisable and looks about 17 in some panels. He never looks the same in any panels. I know it's a comic book fantasy but I found it jarring and it took me out of the story at times. So close... so, so close...

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