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The Four Noble Truths

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In July 1996, for the first time in the West, His Holiness the Dalai Lama gave two exclusive days of teaching in London on The Four Noble Truths - the heart of the Buddha's teachings. The Four Noble Truths - the truth of suffering, the truth of the origin of suffering, the truth of the cessation of suffering and the truth of the path leading to this cessation - was the firs In July 1996, for the first time in the West, His Holiness the Dalai Lama gave two exclusive days of teaching in London on The Four Noble Truths - the heart of the Buddha's teachings. The Four Noble Truths - the truth of suffering, the truth of the origin of suffering, the truth of the cessation of suffering and the truth of the path leading to this cessation - was the first sermon the Buddha gave after he was enlightened. As well as elucidating these teachings, His Holiness the Dalai Lama also explains the relationship between relative and absolute compassion. "Whenever I have been given the opportunity to introduce Buddhism I always make it a point to explain Buddhism in terms of two principles. One is the development of a philosophical viewpoint based on the understanding of the interdependent nature of reality. And the second principle is that of non-violence which is the actual action of a Buddhist practitioner and which derives from that view of the interdependent nature of reality." - His Holiness the Dalai Lama


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In July 1996, for the first time in the West, His Holiness the Dalai Lama gave two exclusive days of teaching in London on The Four Noble Truths - the heart of the Buddha's teachings. The Four Noble Truths - the truth of suffering, the truth of the origin of suffering, the truth of the cessation of suffering and the truth of the path leading to this cessation - was the firs In July 1996, for the first time in the West, His Holiness the Dalai Lama gave two exclusive days of teaching in London on The Four Noble Truths - the heart of the Buddha's teachings. The Four Noble Truths - the truth of suffering, the truth of the origin of suffering, the truth of the cessation of suffering and the truth of the path leading to this cessation - was the first sermon the Buddha gave after he was enlightened. As well as elucidating these teachings, His Holiness the Dalai Lama also explains the relationship between relative and absolute compassion. "Whenever I have been given the opportunity to introduce Buddhism I always make it a point to explain Buddhism in terms of two principles. One is the development of a philosophical viewpoint based on the understanding of the interdependent nature of reality. And the second principle is that of non-violence which is the actual action of a Buddhist practitioner and which derives from that view of the interdependent nature of reality." - His Holiness the Dalai Lama

30 review for The Four Noble Truths

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    The Four Noble Truths is a philosophical Buddhist novel written by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (I will call him the Dalai Lama because I am unaware of a better term of respect for this man). Allow me to explain 4 reasons why I found this novel of particular interest and why you may as well: 1. It was surprisingly in line with philosophical studies I found what I've spent years to build up and understand was easily referenced by the Dalai Lama. He referenced how everything had a cause and everythin The Four Noble Truths is a philosophical Buddhist novel written by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (I will call him the Dalai Lama because I am unaware of a better term of respect for this man). Allow me to explain 4 reasons why I found this novel of particular interest and why you may as well: 1. It was surprisingly in line with philosophical studies I found what I've spent years to build up and understand was easily referenced by the Dalai Lama. He referenced how everything had a cause and everything was connected through causation, a theory I hadn't heard since my intro to philosophy textbook had stated it. 2. He knows his audience and even his potential audience Knowing your audience is a lot more difficult than it sounds. It's easy to parrot and try and tailor your product to an audience, of course, but to actually know what your audience probably thinks and believes? That's a talent that only a wise man may possess. The Dalai Lama knows not only this, but also mentions how radical atheists may find conform within Buddhism, and I found it interesting of his knowledge of potential as well as practical audience structures. 3. He makes his values of religion very clear I believe in religious tolerance. I go to churches, mosques, synagogues and practically any other places I can find of religious thought and practice. I find most forefront is that most of the spiritual leaders you will talk to will not tell you their opinions as their own, and will instead use some quote of their holy book that seeps from their higher being. The Dalai Lama does not shy away to make clear his believe in spirits, a spiritual realms, and the loving kindness thought of within Buddhism (As well as many other things!). 4. He makes you think Interestingly enough, the Dalai Lama has a intrinsic method of writing that gives a sense of clarity and vision into a mind surely spent in thought. I find that, besides the philosophy books that take me years to build intelligence in, the Dalai lama is the only one that can make me think and reflect on the reality of the world. I would hope, argue even, that anyone who reads this novel will surely receive the same effect that I have. Overview Overall, the Dalai Lama creates an interesting perspective and writing through his use and deployment of his thoughtful mind, his simplistic writing style, and his outlook on life. I think that this wonderful man gives us all something to look towards, inside or outside of Buddhism, and I look forward to reading more from such a beautiful mind.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tereza Frank

    What could possible go wrong when His Holiness writes a book. Short yet full of so many truths and thoughts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Carmona

    Es increible como Dalai Lama se las arregla para transmitir sus pensamientos con tanata claridad haciendo que el lector los capte fácilmente y se de tiempo a reflexionar sobre el mundo en que se vive hoy en dia. Creo que es un libro bastante filosófico, donde Dalai se encarga de explicarnos como TODO tiene su causa, como piensa acerca de las diferentes religiones y sobre todo, nos da una oportunidad de conocer un poquito mejor el budismo.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carola

    Excelente lectura, con ciertos pasajes muy complejos. Claramente, necesito un maestro que me explique muchas cosas de la doctrina que son complicadas, como la vacuidad. Quisiera compartirles lo sgte sobre la compasión: - La compasión es el fundamento de toda la doctrina budista, es también la base del dharma. La práctica de enardecer nuestro buen 💓 y desarrollar una mente altruista está encaminada a profundizar nuestra comprensión de la compasión y a estimular el potencial compasivo que todos pose Excelente lectura, con ciertos pasajes muy complejos. Claramente, necesito un maestro que me explique muchas cosas de la doctrina que son complicadas, como la vacuidad. Quisiera compartirles lo sgte sobre la compasión: - La compasión es el fundamento de toda la doctrina budista, es también la base del dharma. La práctica de enardecer nuestro buen 💓 y desarrollar una mente altruista está encaminada a profundizar nuestra comprensión de la compasión y a estimular el potencial compasivo que todos poseemos innatamente. - Para que la compasión sea auténtica, tiene que basarse en el respeto por el otro y en la convicción de que los demás tienen el derecho de ser felices y superar el sufrimiento. El sentimiento de compasión genuino debería ser imparcial y ecuánime. Engloba a amigos, seres amados e incluso enemigos. - Todos los seres sensibles son considerados por igual por el budismo. Se considera que la vida de cualquier ser es tan valiosa como la nuestra y, que a partir de ahí, desarrollamos nuestro interés por los demás. - Solo a través de la compasión podemos desarrollar la aspiración altruista de la búsqueda de la iluminación en beneficio de los demás. Qué hermoso 💜💞

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vo Khon

    Sách trình bày về lí do cần tôn trọng lẫn nhau, tôn trọng những người theo tôn giáo khác nhau trong phần dẫn nhập. Sách xoay quanh 4 chủ đề chính: 1. Có 3 dạng khổ đau: khổ khổ, khổ do thay đổi và khổ do duyên sinh. _ Lí do chúng ta khổ vì vô minh, tập quen cũ, khổ vì bám víu vào cảm giác. Một dẫn chứng là nếu bám vào cảm giác đó là hạnh phúc thì tại sao càng có nó thì hp không càng tăng lên? 2. Nguồn gốc khổ đau do nghiệp chi phối. Các ham muốn được cái này hoặc tránh cái kia là biểu hiện cho thấ Sách trình bày về lí do cần tôn trọng lẫn nhau, tôn trọng những người theo tôn giáo khác nhau trong phần dẫn nhập. Sách xoay quanh 4 chủ đề chính: 1. Có 3 dạng khổ đau: khổ khổ, khổ do thay đổi và khổ do duyên sinh. _ Lí do chúng ta khổ vì vô minh, tập quen cũ, khổ vì bám víu vào cảm giác. Một dẫn chứng là nếu bám vào cảm giác đó là hạnh phúc thì tại sao càng có nó thì hp không càng tăng lên? 2. Nguồn gốc khổ đau do nghiệp chi phối. Các ham muốn được cái này hoặc tránh cái kia là biểu hiện cho thấy mình còn tin vào một thứ hằng còn, không thay đổi nào đó. 3. Cách chấp dứt khổ đau: Dựa vào nhận biết về tánh không, tiến trình nhân duyên nên sự vật sẽ thay đổi. Từ việc biết đến điều này, để có mối nghi ngờ  có nhiều lập luận tin là đúng  trỉa nghiệm trong cuộc sống xem nó đúng không  làm nhiều nhiều thành thói quen. 4. Chỉ ra 3 con đường của thanh văn thừa, đại thừa và bồ tát thừa. _ Thanh văn thì đi theo tuần tự: giới, định( chỉ và quán), từ nếp đó sẽ có tuệ giác về tánh không. _ Đại thừa: Chú trọng 2 phương diện tích lũy công đức và trí tuệ. Chú trọng tâm từ bi. _ Bồ tát thừa: chú trọng tâm bồ đề gồm tâm từ và tâm mong muốn đạt đến giác ngộ. 2 phần phụ lục cuối sách không ấn tượng gì.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mckinley

    Very good introduction starting with the 2 basic principles of 1. Interdependent nature of reality and 2. non-violence. Followed by taking refuge and generating bodhichitta. Brief explanations of dependent origination and the 2 truths. All that to set the grounds for understanding the 4 noble truths. One of the best introductions I have read. Would recommend it as a starter and for ongoing contemplation. The rest is just as good. Clear, concise, shows where to focus attention. One of my top 10 Bud Very good introduction starting with the 2 basic principles of 1. Interdependent nature of reality and 2. non-violence. Followed by taking refuge and generating bodhichitta. Brief explanations of dependent origination and the 2 truths. All that to set the grounds for understanding the 4 noble truths. One of the best introductions I have read. Would recommend it as a starter and for ongoing contemplation. The rest is just as good. Clear, concise, shows where to focus attention. One of my top 10 Buddhist books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dragomir Draganov

    Absolutely inspirational!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Feil Fernandez

    Bastante aprendizaje de perspectivas profundas, principalmente sobre la genuinidad de la compasión y su importancia

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Read this a few years ago. Pasting some quotes I noted here. “Underlying the strong emotional responses we have to situations, we see that there is an assumption that some kind of independently existing reality exists out there. In this way, we develop an insight into the various functions of the mind and the different levels of consciousness within us. We also grow to understand that although certain types of mental or emotional states seem so real, and although objects appear to be so vivid, in Read this a few years ago. Pasting some quotes I noted here. “Underlying the strong emotional responses we have to situations, we see that there is an assumption that some kind of independently existing reality exists out there. In this way, we develop an insight into the various functions of the mind and the different levels of consciousness within us. We also grow to understand that although certain types of mental or emotional states seem so real, and although objects appear to be so vivid, in reality they are mere illusions.” “When this is combined with an understanding of the interdependent nature of reality at the subtlest level, then we also gain insight into what we call ‘the empty nature of reality’, by which we mean the way each and every object and event arises only as a combination of many factors, and has no independent or autonomous existence.” “Our insight into emptiness will, of course, help us to understand that any ideas that are based on the contrary view, that things exist intrinsically and independently, are misapprehensions...” “Gradually we come to appreciate that it is possible to arrive at a state of knowledge where such misapprehension is eliminated completely; that is the state of cessation.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trenton Judson

    This was a recommend from my little brother and like most of his recommends, it did not disappoint. What stuck out to me is the Dalai Lama's call for expanding emotional intelligence and empathy. Both are invaluable tools that help shape the most important parts of our day and yet many of us spend the least amount of time developing these skills. I was inspired by his devotion to optimism and his commitment to nonviolence. I love that the Dalai Lama views all religions as meaningful. It seems li This was a recommend from my little brother and like most of his recommends, it did not disappoint. What stuck out to me is the Dalai Lama's call for expanding emotional intelligence and empathy. Both are invaluable tools that help shape the most important parts of our day and yet many of us spend the least amount of time developing these skills. I was inspired by his devotion to optimism and his commitment to nonviolence. I love that the Dalai Lama views all religions as meaningful. It seems like he is saying that religions are lenses with which to view the world but that they aren't meant to be methods of separation. I wish more religions had this approach to each other. There was admittedly a lot I didn't understand about the Dalai Lama's sect of Buddhism, but it didn't stop me from reading or being interested. The way that he frames the explanations gives you the sense that he is trying to improve your life and not convert you. I'm sure that this is a book that I could (and will) go back to many times and will continue to get great meaning out of. I'm grateful that I got a chance to read it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ernesto Romero

    ‘Ojos rasgados’, de la escritora taiwanesa Elena Li Chow, nos ofrece relatos para percibir matices de la realidad social asiática. Cultura y tradiciones que configuran la vida de personajes en Beijing, Tokyo, Bangkok, Hong Kong o las estepas de Mongolia. Denuncia social mediante historias, como la de pescador de cadaveres que lucra con muertos o suicidas, que flotan en el río Amarillo, pero teme encontrar a su pareja sentimental entre los cuerpos en descomposición; o el aniversario de la “Revoluc ‘Ojos rasgados’, de la escritora taiwanesa Elena Li Chow, nos ofrece relatos para percibir matices de la realidad social asiática. Cultura y tradiciones que configuran la vida de personajes en Beijing, Tokyo, Bangkok, Hong Kong o las estepas de Mongolia. Denuncia social mediante historias, como la de pescador de cadaveres que lucra con muertos o suicidas, que flotan en el río Amarillo, pero teme encontrar a su pareja sentimental entre los cuerpos en descomposición; o el aniversario de la “Revolución de los paraguas”, cuando miles de manifestantes protestaron pacíficamente contra la intervención de China en las elecciones en Honk Kong; así como los desalojos colectivos del gobierno chino, para apropiarse de casas populares para demolerlas y construir edificios acordes a la modernidad imperante. A nivel familiar, el pago del dote por una prometida, los matrimonios arreglados y la dificultad de encontrar pareja en una sociedad desbalanceada en género por la intervención gubernamental que prohibió tener más de un hijo por familias (preferían a los varones para perpetuar el apellido). En su opera prima, Li Chow nos entrega trece cuentos que, además de entretener, nos invitan a reflexionar sobre los lineamiento sociales que condicionan nuestra vida.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Khanh Nguyen

    Cuốn sách đầu tiên về Phật giáo. Tứ diệu đế là nền tảng của các giáo lý Phật giáo (Theo lời tác giả). Sách song ngữ, dễ đọc ngay cả cho người ngoại đạo, các khái niệm qua đó cũng thực sự sáng tỏ hơn. Như Quy y (Refuge), Tam bảo (Three Jewels), duyên khởi (Dependent Origination), vô minh (Ignorance), nghiệp (Karma), tính không (Emptiness)... Không thần thánh, rất khoa học và dễ chấp nhận ngay cả một kẻ vô thần như mình. Lời của tác giả khiêm nhường, đầy kính trọng. Cuốn sách trình bày logic về sự Cuốn sách đầu tiên về Phật giáo. Tứ diệu đế là nền tảng của các giáo lý Phật giáo (Theo lời tác giả). Sách song ngữ, dễ đọc ngay cả cho người ngoại đạo, các khái niệm qua đó cũng thực sự sáng tỏ hơn. Như Quy y (Refuge), Tam bảo (Three Jewels), duyên khởi (Dependent Origination), vô minh (Ignorance), nghiệp (Karma), tính không (Emptiness)... Không thần thánh, rất khoa học và dễ chấp nhận ngay cả một kẻ vô thần như mình. Lời của tác giả khiêm nhường, đầy kính trọng. Cuốn sách trình bày logic về sự khổ, nguyên nhân cái khổ, diệt khổ và thực hành con đường diệt khổ, hướng tới hạnh phúc. Quan điểm cá nhân. Đời người thât ngắn ngủi, ta dành cả cho tu thân, kiềm chế ham thích, sống trong tập quy tắc; cách đó liệu có là hay. Dẫu biết, còn ham thích tức còn vô minh, còn vô minh tức còn khổ. Nhưng vẫn ủng hộ cách sống hết mình ở hiện tại, giúp mình, giúp người, giúp đời hay chí ít không làm điều gì sai trái và gây hại cho người. Tôn trong tư tưởng về Từ bị (compassion) và chắc chắn sẽ cố gắng sống với compassion. Totally agree!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    AnanaLalala

    Una revisión de la filosofía budista, sus bases y los diferentes planteamientos de sus escuelas con algunas Respuestas que da el Dalai Lama a cuestionamientos comunes de la vida y el Dharma. Lo recomiendo como una lectura básica para quien quiere adentrarse en la historia, base y conceptos de la filosofía budista

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Mind Opening Guidance As I first began reading, :-/ came across very intellectually and I considered it possibly beyond my mental scope. I persisted and as the reading progressed I became more aware of how well it all tied in together. :/ authored an excellent book on guidance and instruction.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Http://booksperweek.blogspot.com Loved this. My soul feels like i have taken a bath. Http://booksperweek.blogspot.com Loved this. My soul feels like i have taken a bath.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Tapia

    Recomendable Lectura recomendable sobre todo para aquellos interesados en conocer el budismo por primera vez. Gran recopilación de enseñanzas que van más allá de la religión.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marjo

    Mooi kort boekje dat beknopt de basis van het boeddhisme vertelt. Biedt stof tot nadenken en vooral smaken naar meer.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allisonperkel

    Parts are really great, parts aren't. you can tell several talks were pulled together. Parts are really great, parts aren't. you can tell several talks were pulled together.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anhmai Vu

    Chắc là phải đọc lại rồi :))

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    "Nos hallemos o no en una iglesia o en una catedral, la doctrina de nuestra propia religión ha de estar en nuestro corazón." "Nos hallemos o no en una iglesia o en una catedral, la doctrina de nuestra propia religión ha de estar en nuestro corazón."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    Me encantó.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    Surely a a good way to think, a good way to act, a good way to deal with reality (seen an un/seen) but... only in a positive way... if there's something capable to transform something positive into a negative ignoring it in the real/real with my own thought... mmmmmm... doesn't feel like me fighting for what I think is wrong (if this make sense). I'm no expert in the subject, and I don't want to be, perhaps all I wrote (I'm about to write) is dead wrong but religion has a subtle way to deal with Surely a a good way to think, a good way to act, a good way to deal with reality (seen an un/seen) but... only in a positive way... if there's something capable to transform something positive into a negative ignoring it in the real/real with my own thought... mmmmmm... doesn't feel like me fighting for what I think is wrong (if this make sense). I'm no expert in the subject, and I don't want to be, perhaps all I wrote (I'm about to write) is dead wrong but religion has a subtle way to deal with things which cannot be subject to experimentation and science has a hard way to experiment so hard on any other measurable thing (in the reach of human comprehension)... (*sighs*) So much to say, but without someone by my side, without a coffee/beer/tea to offer and a will to engage in all the intricate situations this kind of read brings upfront I will be wrong and right in small proportions... (*double sighs*) whoever reads this words will see a lot, A LOT of flaws and an abrupt end. Science is so far from the common person that now seems like unreachable sorcery... only the "new wizards" can understand it and make some decisions over all of us (which I consider OK) but are those decisions correct? The last I saw... there's a Falcon Heavy, an (at this point) an hypothetical wall to be built between Mexico and the US, a clear monetary wall between poor and rich, people with some degree of education and those who has nothing, financial "cartels", oil "cartels", politics "cartels" "other cartels" and the only cartel I belong is the you are F***ed UP cartel (in our capitalist way of thinking, surely a Brazilian native has not developed the complexity which binds us all to understand what I just wrote). ... on the other hand, religion gives you the opportunity to un/hook yourself from this "cartel" conception, offering a way of thinking (or approaching to situations: from the we are nothing to the we are gods)... and yet if you mix all this in a hot soup and let every single person be what they want to be... you have a society trying to live not only in a planet on their own which ultimately, will desire to conquer the universe and a thousand more F***ing every god, idea, black hole, white hole, galaxies in between. Is this OK? I don't know, but surely it is possible and probable, just add time. WHAT ARE WE? I think this is the question to be answered individually, in small groups, in big groups and ultimately for all of us. Is it posible to answer it... no, no, no, I don't think so but the constant effort is of great help for all of us. What I don't like about the current situation (for all of us) is that it looks like the output of all our energy transformation hence production, (all of them) if you consider each an every human being alive NOW 2018 in the equation, is sad and sadness. If we do not get along with ourselves war will be the constant even if we succeed leaving earth and implement any number of ecopoyesis projects... we can dream about conquering stars and live in other planets... but our intellectual capacity has been the same since the first Homo Sapiens, our complexity of thoughts, abstraction and memory has increased but, intelligence? I just remembered the Homo Sapiens who ran over people in (anywhere) and killed "someone", used a nice car, I guess had some degree of studies and because all of that, lived in an advanced "country"... killing someone who helped the economy for you to have what you have, even your killing and rage thoughts... again WHAT ARE WE? Man/woman ... I don't know what I'm writing any more. (17 April, 2018) -.- I'm practicing Meditation now. (15 July, 2019)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ero

    Clearly written and wonderful. However: why is it that even the most clear, down-to-earth, I-speak-to-you-without-jargon, books on Buddhism, veer directly into lists of rules, concepts-within-concepts, etc? I'd love to see a beginner's-mind approach, a Buddhism-for-dummies. Maybe there are lots of these, but I've never really seen one. One that starts with the basic ideas... (life is suffering, attachments cause illusions, illusions are what we build our lives around --> cessation of suffering com Clearly written and wonderful. However: why is it that even the most clear, down-to-earth, I-speak-to-you-without-jargon, books on Buddhism, veer directly into lists of rules, concepts-within-concepts, etc? I'd love to see a beginner's-mind approach, a Buddhism-for-dummies. Maybe there are lots of these, but I've never really seen one. One that starts with the basic ideas... (life is suffering, attachments cause illusions, illusions are what we build our lives around --> cessation of suffering comes via seeing through illusion and rising above attachments... and so forth) ...and then, after showing the basic concepts, then and only then, gradually proceeds to doctrinal hair-splitting and discussion of which concept comes from which tradition and how it's understood by such-and-such twelfth-century teacher. As a Westerner who grew up immersed in fundamentalist christianity, but who's been reading about, and (extremely intermittently) practicing aspects of Buddhism for, oh, twenty years, I still have a very hard time comprehending some really basic things. I can't be the only one. Ok, done with that rant. I'd better go and meditate now. This is a good book though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kris Stark

    His holiness is always fun to listen to. This is a translated, edited, and organized account of a set of lectures done by the Dalai Lama in London in... '96 I believe? I'm too lazy to grab the book or Google it, so sorry if that's inaccurate. While his holiness is sometimes difficult to follow for some, this is absolutely a great place to start if one desires a playful yet thorough and concise introduction to Buddhism as-the-Dalai-Lama sees it. Selfless compassion is the name of his game, and he His holiness is always fun to listen to. This is a translated, edited, and organized account of a set of lectures done by the Dalai Lama in London in... '96 I believe? I'm too lazy to grab the book or Google it, so sorry if that's inaccurate. While his holiness is sometimes difficult to follow for some, this is absolutely a great place to start if one desires a playful yet thorough and concise introduction to Buddhism as-the-Dalai-Lama sees it. Selfless compassion is the name of his game, and he's damn good at explaining the rules (should be "rules," but I'm just finishing the terrible analogy I used. It's really bad. I'm sorry.). If you're not new to Buddhism, it's still absolutely worth a read. H.H.'s explanation of Shakyamuni's four noble truths is second to none, as he provides a great deal of philosophical and historical context without falling into esoterica.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dan Geddes

    For the Dalai Lama the two basic principles of Buddhism are the interdependent nature of reality, and the principle of non-violence. The interdependence of things is a tenet from which many other Buddhist constructs (including the Four Noble Truths) can be derived. The Dalai Lama introduces each of the Four Noble Truths, drawing on examples both from Buddhist scripture and ordinary experience to support the accuracy of Buddhist philosphy. Buddhism is presented as an antidote to the surfeit of ill For the Dalai Lama the two basic principles of Buddhism are the interdependent nature of reality, and the principle of non-violence. The interdependence of things is a tenet from which many other Buddhist constructs (including the Four Noble Truths) can be derived. The Dalai Lama introduces each of the Four Noble Truths, drawing on examples both from Buddhist scripture and ordinary experience to support the accuracy of Buddhist philosphy. Buddhism is presented as an antidote to the surfeit of illusory pleasure in the West, among other ills. The Four Noble Truths (discussed more fully below) are the Truth of Suffering, the Truth of the Origin of Suffering, the Truth of Cessation, and Truth of the Path. See more at http://www.thesatirist.com/books/Four...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wewewe

    Not really my cup of tea. Neviem, či je to tým, že to bolo preložené do češtiny, ale dve tretiny knihy som skôr trpela ako čokoľvek iné. Neviem, či tento dalajlama nevie prednášať alebo mal len nedostatok času, no celá prednáška bola chaotická a povedala/vysvetlila veľmi málo. (Myslím, že problém bol skôr časový, pretože druhá prednáška, ktorá bola priložená ako príloha, bola výstižná, k veci a veľmi pekná - preto tri hviezdičky namiesto dvoch.)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jen3n

    Clear, and understandable. Short and to the point. A very useful and enlightening book. I really don't know what else to say about this. It is what it is. It doean't really need a review: if you know what it is, you don't need me to tell you. If you DON'T know what it is then it probably doesn't matter what I write. Recommended. If you're into that sort of thing. Clear, and understandable. Short and to the point. A very useful and enlightening book. I really don't know what else to say about this. It is what it is. It doean't really need a review: if you know what it is, you don't need me to tell you. If you DON'T know what it is then it probably doesn't matter what I write. Recommended. If you're into that sort of thing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Will

    bought in SF jan 08

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Song

    Clear, concise, compassionate teaching on the Four Noble Truths. I think this is out of print, but worth picking up if you find it in a used book store.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ian Patrick

    The only book I will have come the zombie invasion ;)

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