web site hit counter Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom

Availability: Ready to download

There’s a rebel within you. It’s the part of you that already knows how to break free of fear and unhappiness. This rebel is the voice of your own awakened mind. It’s your rebel buddha—the sharp, clear intelligence that resists the status quo. It wakes you up from the sleepy acceptance of your day-to-day reality and shows you the power of your enlightened nature. It’s the There’s a rebel within you. It’s the part of you that already knows how to break free of fear and unhappiness. This rebel is the voice of your own awakened mind. It’s your rebel buddha—the sharp, clear intelligence that resists the status quo. It wakes you up from the sleepy acceptance of your day-to-day reality and shows you the power of your enlightened nature. It’s the vibrant, insightful energy that compels you to seek the truth. Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha. He explains how, by training your mind and understanding your true nature, you can free yourself from needless suffering. He presents a thorough introduction to the essence of the Buddha’s teachings and argues that, if we are to bring these teachings fully into our personal experience, we must go beyond the cultural trappings of traditional Asian Buddhism. “We all want to find some meaningful truth about who we are,” he says, “but we can only find it guided by our own wisdom—by our own rebel buddha within.”


Compare

There’s a rebel within you. It’s the part of you that already knows how to break free of fear and unhappiness. This rebel is the voice of your own awakened mind. It’s your rebel buddha—the sharp, clear intelligence that resists the status quo. It wakes you up from the sleepy acceptance of your day-to-day reality and shows you the power of your enlightened nature. It’s the There’s a rebel within you. It’s the part of you that already knows how to break free of fear and unhappiness. This rebel is the voice of your own awakened mind. It’s your rebel buddha—the sharp, clear intelligence that resists the status quo. It wakes you up from the sleepy acceptance of your day-to-day reality and shows you the power of your enlightened nature. It’s the vibrant, insightful energy that compels you to seek the truth. Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha. He explains how, by training your mind and understanding your true nature, you can free yourself from needless suffering. He presents a thorough introduction to the essence of the Buddha’s teachings and argues that, if we are to bring these teachings fully into our personal experience, we must go beyond the cultural trappings of traditional Asian Buddhism. “We all want to find some meaningful truth about who we are,” he says, “but we can only find it guided by our own wisdom—by our own rebel buddha within.”

30 review for Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie *Eff your feelings*

    Psst. I going to tell you a little secret. I have this plan. I read these books on Buddhism because one day when I am old and can't take care of myself that good anymore, when I am close to homeless and seriously considering cat food as an option, I will walk into the nearest Buddhist temple thingy and offer myself up as a monk. Sure I will have to shave my head and wear orange, but I'll just be old enough that I won't care about being cute anymore. Hey, it beats being a nun. Psst. I going to tell you a little secret. I have this plan. I read these books on Buddhism because one day when I am old and can't take care of myself that good anymore, when I am close to homeless and seriously considering cat food as an option, I will walk into the nearest Buddhist temple thingy and offer myself up as a monk. Sure I will have to shave my head and wear orange, but I'll just be old enough that I won't care about being cute anymore. Hey, it beats being a nun.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    Don't let the title scare you into thinking that it is just "Pop-Buddhism". It definitely is, but it is much more as well. I almost didn't read the book because I thought it would be repackaged Buddhism for yuppies or worse "Buddhism-made-hip". Which in some ways it is but then I had the other thought "does it have to be old and obscure to be authentic Buddhism?" To me that is an equally obnoxious thought to disregard or discredit a message simply because it isn't old or difficult to understand. Don't let the title scare you into thinking that it is just "Pop-Buddhism". It definitely is, but it is much more as well. I almost didn't read the book because I thought it would be repackaged Buddhism for yuppies or worse "Buddhism-made-hip". Which in some ways it is but then I had the other thought "does it have to be old and obscure to be authentic Buddhism?" To me that is an equally obnoxious thought to disregard or discredit a message simply because it isn't old or difficult to understand. This does make Buddhism more accessible to the modern Western reader. The author is quick to make the distinction of core Buddhist concepts and cultural Buddhism and how one is universally applicable and the other is culture specific. Americans don't need to shave their heads and wear Tibetan Buddhist robes to understand to experience it. Buddhism is about diving into the present and living fully, which can be achieved through meditation to help focus the mind and clear out all the mental pollution that keeps our minds running at insanely fast pace with no breaks jumping from past to future to past to future and stressing about events that are not even here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    A plain vanilla milkshake of Buddhism. Nothing new here. Not awful, just kinda useless if you have any prior knowledge on the topic.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Reid

    I admit to mostly skimming this book. There is really nothing new here, though it is restated in terms that perhaps the author hopes will be attractive to those who need to feel they are rebelling in choosing the path of the dharma. Ho hum.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    Don't judge a book by its title! This work may not pioneer new ground concerning Buddhist thought, but that's not its purpose. What Dzogchen Ponlop does very well here is make the central foundations of Buddhism accessible, underscore the need for self-trust and individual responsibility in practitioners, and -- most importantly -- separate Buddhist thought from its accumulated cultural, historical, and religious contexts. Don't judge a book by its title! This work may not pioneer new ground concerning Buddhist thought, but that's not its purpose. What Dzogchen Ponlop does very well here is make the central foundations of Buddhism accessible, underscore the need for self-trust and individual responsibility in practitioners, and -- most importantly -- separate Buddhist thought from its accumulated cultural, historical, and religious contexts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Noah Rasheta

    This book does a great job of explaining the Buddhist philosophical approach to life without the dogma or religious strings attached. This is written for the westerner who wants to understand Buddhism without having to learn any of the typical Buddhist lingo or vocabulary. I loved this book. I purchased 5 copies to give to friends and family to help them understand my philosophical approach to life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    Dzogchen Ponlop uses REBEL BUDDHA to discuss the origins, practices, and misconceptions of Buddhism within the context of current society. He is quick to point out that it is not a theistic "religion" but a mindset, a way of life. Even then, there are many aspects of this book that can teach and encourage everyone, regardless of religious backgrounds. For instance, Buddhism advocates that kindness is the greatest gift that anyone can give because it's free and plentiful. In addition, people shou Dzogchen Ponlop uses REBEL BUDDHA to discuss the origins, practices, and misconceptions of Buddhism within the context of current society. He is quick to point out that it is not a theistic "religion" but a mindset, a way of life. Even then, there are many aspects of this book that can teach and encourage everyone, regardless of religious backgrounds. For instance, Buddhism advocates that kindness is the greatest gift that anyone can give because it's free and plentiful. In addition, people should never give up on others no matter how many times they get let down because they never know when their efforts will pay off. At the same time, however, it's important to note that individuals must take the time to replenish themselves so that they are able to give to others - kind of like a banking system. Therefore, selfishness is acceptable when performed in the context of "emptiness," the ultimate form of dharma. This book doesn't address anything new or profound, but I really enjoyed approaching concepts and lessons that I already believed presented from a different perspective. Whether people are Christian, Jewish, Muslim, or Buddhist, we can all read this book and relate to the importance of equality, responsibility, kindness, and identity. While we are all products of our environments, and hold certain biases because of social mores perpetuated by them, we have the authority and power to move past them in an effort to seek a greater understanding or path. This gives me hope. We have the power to evoke positive change, but it must start within.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tony Riches

    Life changing. If you have any interest in learning more about what Buddhism is about read this. Namaste!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The title on this book is somewhere between being trendy and slightly misleading. Linking Buddhism with rebelling has at least as much to do with trying to link the particular appeal that anything smacking of rebellion has for some people as it does with being a reasonable approach to Buddhism, and once we get beyond the title and into the book itself, the author uses the "rebel buddha" motif very little. But he does do a very good job of presenting Buddhist thought and practice in a way that's v The title on this book is somewhere between being trendy and slightly misleading. Linking Buddhism with rebelling has at least as much to do with trying to link the particular appeal that anything smacking of rebellion has for some people as it does with being a reasonable approach to Buddhism, and once we get beyond the title and into the book itself, the author uses the "rebel buddha" motif very little. But he does do a very good job of presenting Buddhist thought and practice in a way that's very approachable and appealing, not to mention readable. And this is definitely an approach for Westerners - his roots are in Tibetan Buddhism and that's the path this book describes, but it's also a Buddhism that is being developed in Western society and intended for Westerners. I don't generally find that Tibetan Buddhism makes quite as much sense to me as Zen - there's always a certain point at which I just can't quite go along with the author, and that was true with this book. But not nearly to the extent that is usually true for me. And that in no way took away from my appreciation of what is a very interesting, well written book. If the Tibetan approach does it for you, or you're totally new to this topic and looking for a good place to start, then this could be right up your alley.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nik

    Buddha once said that the finger that points at the moon, is not the moon. This book helped me develop a greater interest for the philosophical propositions of Buddhism and other faith traditions without having to accept the dogmatic, or religious symbols and traditions found within each one. Just as the finger that points at the moon is not the moon, the religion that points to God is not God, belief in God is not God either. Maybe if there is an empiric object or personage known as God, it can Buddha once said that the finger that points at the moon, is not the moon. This book helped me develop a greater interest for the philosophical propositions of Buddhism and other faith traditions without having to accept the dogmatic, or religious symbols and traditions found within each one. Just as the finger that points at the moon is not the moon, the religion that points to God is not God, belief in God is not God either. Maybe if there is an empiric object or personage known as God, it can be discovered through philosophical introspection such as Buddhism offers or a greater understanding of natural law such as science offers, or adherence to cultural and societal norms such as religion offers. I hope to show greater respect for the paths that people choose while also helping others arrive at the understanding that not every path works for every person. Great book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A great introduction to Buddhism, if a little bit of prior knowledge might be required. I loved the first half of the book, having been a Buddhist for some time it was a hugely refreshing way of looking at Buddhism as a whole. The book did start to stagnate as it reached the later stages moving to a more traditional outlook, but this isn't a major fault, simply one that stopped me page turning to grasp the fresh outlook of the start. Overall, well recommended. A great introduction to Buddhism, if a little bit of prior knowledge might be required. I loved the first half of the book, having been a Buddhist for some time it was a hugely refreshing way of looking at Buddhism as a whole. The book did start to stagnate as it reached the later stages moving to a more traditional outlook, but this isn't a major fault, simply one that stopped me page turning to grasp the fresh outlook of the start. Overall, well recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Drea

    I skimmed a lot of it. It was a great read but it didn't rock my world. It felt too long. Felt like it could have easily been a pamphlet. But again, I skimmed. I really need to read it again. I skimmed a lot of it. It was a great read but it didn't rock my world. It felt too long. Felt like it could have easily been a pamphlet. But again, I skimmed. I really need to read it again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Enjoyed the modern, plain language of this book - like how to meditate on the subway and use Facebook in your daily practice.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Arlene

    I loved this book. It presents the essence of Buddhism in an easily accessible way, emphasizing the need to trust oneself, and to separate the cultural accouterments from the teachings.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nissa

    Great read to understand the philosophy without the dogma of Buddhism. Awakened mind!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I'm not sure how I really feel about this book. It is a decently good book and offers good insights into practicing the Buddhist way in a new world with many different cultures but I had a really hard time getting into it. I found that I struggled just to finish this book just reading and not taking much in, reading to get it done. There were parts that I found interesting and that resonated but it was more to read the book and finish than anything else for me. I know that there are those that wi I'm not sure how I really feel about this book. It is a decently good book and offers good insights into practicing the Buddhist way in a new world with many different cultures but I had a really hard time getting into it. I found that I struggled just to finish this book just reading and not taking much in, reading to get it done. There were parts that I found interesting and that resonated but it was more to read the book and finish than anything else for me. I know that there are those that will read this book and find it very enlightening and opportune. I hope this book will find itself into those peoples hands. If you are interested in how to modernize your practice then I know this book will fit for you.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sebastiaan De Jong

    Inportant book for Western Pracitioners Very easy to read and clear book about removing the culture from the true essence of the teachings. I believe this is a very essential book for Western Buddhism moving forwardd also gives some refreshing views on the path in general. For example, I really liked how he described the guru how Gautama had described it: a spiritual friend. Was definitely I in mroe detail and specifics about what this looks like and how he envisions vajryana Buddhism in the wes Inportant book for Western Pracitioners Very easy to read and clear book about removing the culture from the true essence of the teachings. I believe this is a very essential book for Western Buddhism moving forwardd also gives some refreshing views on the path in general. For example, I really liked how he described the guru how Gautama had described it: a spiritual friend. Was definitely I in mroe detail and specifics about what this looks like and how he envisions vajryana Buddhism in the west taking shape moving forward.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Good book, written for an American audience. Maybe a bit simple for me at this point in my studies. I like how the author pointed out the...I guess fetishized Asian cultural stuff in Western Buddhism. Buddha’s message is transcultural: it is true for all people, everywhere and always. Don’t get me wrong, I love the Eastern vibe in spirituality, but it good to be reminded that culture is separate from message. A good introduction. Well written.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Shane Clements

    Being a student of Buddhist teachings for several years, there really isn't any new concepts or practices presented here, but it is a well written expository piece on Buddhism and the study of the mind (which is all Buddhism really is). Dzogchen Ponlop's writing is clear and gives great explanations of the mind and practices that will help tame the monkey mind. This will definitely be a book I would gladly recommend to those looking to explore the teachings and practices of the Buddha. Being a student of Buddhist teachings for several years, there really isn't any new concepts or practices presented here, but it is a well written expository piece on Buddhism and the study of the mind (which is all Buddhism really is). Dzogchen Ponlop's writing is clear and gives great explanations of the mind and practices that will help tame the monkey mind. This will definitely be a book I would gladly recommend to those looking to explore the teachings and practices of the Buddha.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Bachman

    I think the title of this book can be alluring to many interested in Buddhism, but it is much more a text for a dedicated follower. It is not stated or apparent from the outset, but the book is adapted from talks that Dzogchen Ponlop gave. Thus, it often takes a lecture-like structure, sometimes meandering, and is perhaps not the best document for transmitting Ponlop's teachings. I still enjoyed some sections and appreciated the mediation instructions. I think the title of this book can be alluring to many interested in Buddhism, but it is much more a text for a dedicated follower. It is not stated or apparent from the outset, but the book is adapted from talks that Dzogchen Ponlop gave. Thus, it often takes a lecture-like structure, sometimes meandering, and is perhaps not the best document for transmitting Ponlop's teachings. I still enjoyed some sections and appreciated the mediation instructions.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kilman

    Not great for beginners but a great book for those already on their path. Some of the way he explains things are wonderful and accessible but my own background in Buddhism was required to fully understand what he was talking about some of the time. I highly recommend for Buddhist practicioners, especially in the Tibetan traditions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan R

    This book was great. I listened to it on the way to work, and it always got me thinking about how I would approach the day, how I would interact with people, and what was happening around me. So often we sleepwalk through the day not noticing interesting things and opportunities.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David

    A good read if you want to have a fresh view of secular Buddhism. Dzogchen goes to the heart of Buddha's teachings and philosophies devoid of all the religious dogmas and cultural baggage. It also contains some practical guides to meditation. A good read if you want to have a fresh view of secular Buddhism. Dzogchen goes to the heart of Buddha's teachings and philosophies devoid of all the religious dogmas and cultural baggage. It also contains some practical guides to meditation.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cian Kenshin

    what an amazingly accessible text on the meaning behind Buddha's teachings. the narration is easy to listen to and he peels back the onion layer by layer. I'm inspired to seek more and go deeper. what an amazingly accessible text on the meaning behind Buddha's teachings. the narration is easy to listen to and he peels back the onion layer by layer. I'm inspired to seek more and go deeper.

  25. 5 out of 5

    M

    Thoroughly enjoyed. This book was recommended to me at the salon, by the father of one of my children's classmates. Funny how favorite books come up, and make such an impact. Thoroughly enjoyed. This book was recommended to me at the salon, by the father of one of my children's classmates. Funny how favorite books come up, and make such an impact.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jmmaher

    Basics of Buddhism in an interesting format, but had a hard time staying with it (my mind is always wandering... which is why I was reading it in the first place).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sivanathan Subramaniam

    One of the best self help books that I have read in a long time. Love the simplicity in the language that was used to describe the teachings of the Buddha.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ist

    Great book

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shayla

    A view of buddhism as a practice, not a religion, and how you can incorporate being a rebel buddha into daily life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ling Ling

    Yes, very simple and clear introduction to Buddhism. Good read, easy to digest.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.