web site hit counter Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles

Availability: Ready to download

After a lengthy period during which scholars paid relatively little attention to the Pastoral Epistles, a spate of studies has suddenly appeared in print. However, except for a small number of commentaries, critical scholars have by and large neglected evangelical scholarship on these letters. To fill in this gap, this volume offers a collection of important essays written After a lengthy period during which scholars paid relatively little attention to the Pastoral Epistles, a spate of studies has suddenly appeared in print. However, except for a small number of commentaries, critical scholars have by and large neglected evangelical scholarship on these letters. To fill in this gap, this volume offers a collection of important essays written by evangelicals on 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. The book aims to inform readers of the history of scholarship on these letters and examine thoroughly Paul’s theology in the Pastoral Epistles. Contributors include several scholars who have done previous advanced work on these letters: I. Howard Marshall (University of Aberdeen, Scotland; Recent Study in the Pastoral Epistles), Andreas Köstenberger (Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary[SEBTS]; Hermeneutical and Exegetical Challenges), Terry L. Wilder (B&H Publishing Group; Authorship), F. Alan Tomlinson (Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary [MBTS]; Purpose/Stewardship), Greg Couser (Cedarville University; Doctrine of God), Daniel L. Akin (SEBTS; Christology), Ray van Neste (Union University; Cohesion and Structure of the PE), B. Paul Wolfe (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; Use of Scripture), Ben Merkle (SEBTS; Ecclesiology), George Wieland (Carey Baptist College, New Zealand; Soteriology), Thor Madsen (MBTS; Ethics), and Chiao Ek Ho (East Asia School of Theology, Singapore; Missiology).


Compare

After a lengthy period during which scholars paid relatively little attention to the Pastoral Epistles, a spate of studies has suddenly appeared in print. However, except for a small number of commentaries, critical scholars have by and large neglected evangelical scholarship on these letters. To fill in this gap, this volume offers a collection of important essays written After a lengthy period during which scholars paid relatively little attention to the Pastoral Epistles, a spate of studies has suddenly appeared in print. However, except for a small number of commentaries, critical scholars have by and large neglected evangelical scholarship on these letters. To fill in this gap, this volume offers a collection of important essays written by evangelicals on 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. The book aims to inform readers of the history of scholarship on these letters and examine thoroughly Paul’s theology in the Pastoral Epistles. Contributors include several scholars who have done previous advanced work on these letters: I. Howard Marshall (University of Aberdeen, Scotland; Recent Study in the Pastoral Epistles), Andreas Köstenberger (Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary[SEBTS]; Hermeneutical and Exegetical Challenges), Terry L. Wilder (B&H Publishing Group; Authorship), F. Alan Tomlinson (Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary [MBTS]; Purpose/Stewardship), Greg Couser (Cedarville University; Doctrine of God), Daniel L. Akin (SEBTS; Christology), Ray van Neste (Union University; Cohesion and Structure of the PE), B. Paul Wolfe (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; Use of Scripture), Ben Merkle (SEBTS; Ecclesiology), George Wieland (Carey Baptist College, New Zealand; Soteriology), Thor Madsen (MBTS; Ethics), and Chiao Ek Ho (East Asia School of Theology, Singapore; Missiology).

30 review for Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a fantastic introduction to the current state of scholarship on the PE, with an intentional focus on significant contributions by evangelicals due to the neglect by the broader guild.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Boling

    The discipline known as Pauline studies has certainly had its share of ups and downs over the years. Furthermore, much ink has been spilled on the subject of Paul and the New Testament epistles he wrote. Thus to a certain degree, there can be a sense of confusion as to what Paul was addressing in his letters, how they are to be understood within the greater context of Scripture, and perhaps most importantly, how does one apply the writings of Paul to life in the present tense. Focusing specifica The discipline known as Pauline studies has certainly had its share of ups and downs over the years. Furthermore, much ink has been spilled on the subject of Paul and the New Testament epistles he wrote. Thus to a certain degree, there can be a sense of confusion as to what Paul was addressing in his letters, how they are to be understood within the greater context of Scripture, and perhaps most importantly, how does one apply the writings of Paul to life in the present tense. Focusing specifically on the Pastoral Epistles, Andreas Kostenberger and Terry Wilder have provided Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul’s Theology in the Pastoral Epistles in an effort to clear the proverbial air on the issue of Paul to include engaging with the state of current scholarship on this particular issue. This book is a collection of twelve valuable essays from some very noted New Testament scholars. Each essay covers an important aspect of the Pastoral Epistles ranging from some fundamental hermeneutical and exegetical challenges that impact how one interprets these letters, the function of salvation as it is related in 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, as well as the ethics of the Pastoral Epistles. All of the essays are worthy of discussion but to address the topics and insight provided in each chapter of this helpful book would be outside the scope of this particular review. With that said, I will focus on two chapters I found particularly insightful, that of Andreas Kostenberger’s chapter on the Hermeneutical and Exegetical Challenges in Interpreting the Pastoral Epistles and B. Paul Wolfe’s treatment of The Ethics of the Pastoral Epistles. Kostenberger rightly notes there are a number of hermeneutical and exegetical challenges that face the reader of the Pastoral Epistles. These challenges include issues of authorship, genre, the historical background of the books, and the function and establishment of church leadership to include the offices of elder and deacon. Such issues permeate the discussion on these texts and thus must be addressed. While some NT scholars, even noted scholars such as I. Howard Marshall have asserted authorship as existing with someone other than the Apostle Paul, Kostenberger avers “the internal evidence strongly suggests the Pauline authorship of the Pastorals, and all views posting pseudonymity or allonymity face considerable difficulties.” If indeed Paul wrote these epistles, the question of establishing the proper genre is also of great relevance. There are some scholars who suggest what is termed as an “ad hoc” approach to the subject matter discussed in the Timothy and Titus letters, thus restricting the discussion solely to the “original situation at hand”. Such an approach according to Kostenberger “denies Paul, the author, the ability to make any pronouncements in a Pastoral or any letter that transcend his immediate circumstances.” Kostenberger rightly rejects this ad hoc approach given such a perspective does not allow the principles shared by Paul, principles by the way that were intended both for his immediate audience and the church in succeeding generations to follow, to be understood as timeless truths within the church body. He also correctly notes that the ad hoc approach leads to hermeneutical extremes that are inconsistent with the purpose of Paul’s instructions to Timothy and Titus. One final issue Kostenberger addresses is that of the role of the overseer, namely elders and deacons. There is the seemingly age old question of whether such duties are restricted to men as well as the qualifications associated with the office that must be met. Building on his previous statements about how the Pastoral Epistles should be interpreted, Kostenberger engages the offices of elders and deacons providing valuable insight into the intent of Paul’s statements regarding each function. Kostenberger correctly notes that the basis for the injunction of elders and deacons being restricted to men is not some sexist or chauvinistic attitude. Conversely, such a position is rooted in I Tim. 2:12. Furthermore, the restriction of the office of elder and deacon to men is also found in the qualifications for these offices. He aptly notes the question that exists in the minds of some specifically in regards to the “husband of one wife requirement.” Does this mean someone who has been divorced can never serve in the office of elder or deacon? Kostenberger shares some valuable insight into the various viewpoints on this issue to include the connection of marital fidelity for church leaders with the Decalogue’s prohibition against adultery. He ultimately concludes that “when coupled with the requirement that an overseer be above reproach (which includes community reputation), it may be best not to appoint divorcees to the role of oversee, especially when qualified candidates are available that did not undergo a divorce.” Some may certainly disagree with Kostenberger’s position; however, his exegesis and analysis are such that it is hard to argue against his position on this matter. If anything, his discussion of such an issue reveals the variety of thought and the need to carefully investigate Paul’s statements based on a consistent hermeneutical approach to the Pastoral Epistles as a whole. Another chapter in this book worthy of discussion is that of Madsen’s overview of the ethics of the Pastoral Epistles. In keeping with Kostenberger’s hermeneutical view that Paul intended his statements to be of value to both his immediate audience (Timothy and Titus) as well as the Church at large to include future generations of believers, Madsen notes “The Pastoral Epistles contain two types of statements to proper conduct.” He avers these as being ones that “capture various aspects of the Christian worldview, declaring what God is like and what he has done for particular groups of people – Paul, Timoty, the church, and so forth. Others state or imply what the affected person’s duties are, given that same set of facts.” Madsen rightly notes that in the writings of Paul it is declared “Believers have died to sin and must therefore resist its waning influence.” When it comes to the message of the Pastoral Epistles, one must recognize the exhortations provided by Paul that focus on those in leadership positions within the church body, namely that of the pastor, elders, and deacons. One of the important ethical issues facing the pastor is that of the protection of the message of the gospel. Madsen aptly comments that “False doctrine threatens the very existence of the church by obscuring its distinctive identity and the gospel itself.” Furthermore, the pastor must address false doctrine by remaining faithful to the preaching of the word to include the promulgation of sound doctrine. Madsen rightly points out that Paul charged Timothy to “preach the Word at all times, under all conditions, assuming these will often be unfavorable.” Thus, in the face of the tide of false doctrine that continues to this day, the pastor must stand firm on the truth of Scripture. It is also important to note the ethical behavior that should permeate the life and preaching of those in authority within the church, to include that of love, humility, gentleness, contentment, and chastity. As noted in I Corinthians 13, even the best sermon that is shared without love is nothing but a noisy gong or a clanging symbol. Madsen correctly states “The Christian leader must habitually sacrifice his own interests and well-being for the sake of those under his care. He will give up rights when necessary and appreciate that he cannot serve Christ without serving his people, as opposed to using them for supposedly higher purposes.” In the Pastoral Epistles, we find the message noted by Madsen, namely the “Pastoral Epistles imply that ministry entails almost constant struggle against false doctrines, false disciples, and cavalier disobedience.” I highly recommend this book for all believers, but especially for Seminary students, pastors, elders, and deacons. The contributors to this excellent resource provide salient insight into the purpose and application of the Pastoral Epistles that constantly reminds the reader of the importance of the offices within church leadership and the great care those who occupy said offices must take as they do the work of the Lord in ministry. I received this book for free from B&H Acaedmic for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Reagan

    This book, edited by Andreas Kostenberger and Terry Wilder, collects 12 scholarly articles on the Pastoral Epistles. They cover matters similar to what you might find in the introduction of a major commentary and discussions of theological issues. The editors provide the first two articles while the others are provided by other scholars who have a good background in the Pastoral Epistles. You will likely find some articles more interesting than others, just as I did, as a matter of personal inter This book, edited by Andreas Kostenberger and Terry Wilder, collects 12 scholarly articles on the Pastoral Epistles. They cover matters similar to what you might find in the introduction of a major commentary and discussions of theological issues. The editors provide the first two articles while the others are provided by other scholars who have a good background in the Pastoral Epistles. You will likely find some articles more interesting than others, just as I did, as a matter of personal interest. For example, I’m so convinced that the books in the New Testament are written by those they’re attributed to, that I find a discussion of pseudonymity pointless. Still, if that’s your thing, you’ll find a good article about it here. I found the article that describes the stewardship theme of the Pastoral Epistles to be very interesting, as was the one on cohesion and structure. There is good coverage of Christology and the prevalence of salvation found in these letters. One of the very best articles was the one on ecclesiology as there are so many local church issues discussed in the Pastoral Epistles. Paul Wolfe has an article that exegetes several of the more debated versus in these epistles. In addition to ethics and mission in the pastoral epistles, well-known scholar Howard Marshall gives a detailed overview of all the recent literature on these epistles (since 1998). This book accomplishes exactly what it sets out to do. The contributors are more conservative and the scholarship more dependable than many such books. This book is important in any major scholarly study of the Pastoral Epistles. I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Woolery

    Very good articles on 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. They are written from a conservative Baptist background.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Brown

    Decent, but hardly compelling, transformative, or especially fruitful; I'd shy away from calling it 'good' in any robust sense. Mixed in with the mediocre and lackluster, there are, nonetheless, a few good essays in here (though the format of the table of contents is perhaps the most atrocious I've ever seen, so good luck locating them!). For instance, Terry Wilder has a good abridgment of his work refuting the pseudonymity thesis on Pastoral Epistles authorship. Chaio Ek Ho offers a good treatm Decent, but hardly compelling, transformative, or especially fruitful; I'd shy away from calling it 'good' in any robust sense. Mixed in with the mediocre and lackluster, there are, nonetheless, a few good essays in here (though the format of the table of contents is perhaps the most atrocious I've ever seen, so good luck locating them!). For instance, Terry Wilder has a good abridgment of his work refuting the pseudonymity thesis on Pastoral Epistles authorship. Chaio Ek Ho offers a good treatment of the Pastoral Epistles as mission-focused documents in their own right, contrary to the too-lazy dichotomy many modern scholars foist upon the New Testament. Benjamin Merkle has a chapter on ecclesiology and particularly on the relationship of the titles 'elder' and 'overseer/bishop,' but the four possibilities he considers are too restrictive - an artifact of his writing before the publication of Alistair Stewart's The Original Bishops: Office and Order in the First Christian Communities , which promotes a thesis (if I recall correctly) beyond Merkle's vision. Daniel Akin rightly uncovers a high Christology in the Pastoral Epistles (consistent with the rest of the New Testament: "Paul was comfortable in ascribing divine attributes, titles, and prerogatives to Jesus. He is the Lord (kurios = Yahweh) and he is God. He is the object of doxology (worship) and prayer. He is the heavenly King and eschatological Judge. He is the source of life and the One who with the Father equally bestows the graces of the Christian faith on needy believers" (151) - none of which, Akin goes on to caution detracts from "his true and genuine humanity" (152). I. Howard Marshall's concluding review of commentaries and monographs of the Pastoral Epistles was marred by his own idiosyncratic thesis of 'allonymity.' And numerous essays seemed more concerned to push complementarianism - even those that had to go out of their way to bring the subject up for that sole purpose - than in really elucidating the features of the text they putatively set out to explore. Most of the chapters here are, truth be told, simply forgettable.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Evan Knies

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles was published by B&H in 2010. This book was written with many contributors. Andreas Kostenberger and Terry Wilder served as editors for this work. Dr. Kostenberger is professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dr. Wilder is currently professor of New Testament at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. This book contains a collection of essays from great scholars covering dif Entrusted with the Gospel: Paul's Theology in the Pastoral Epistles was published by B&H in 2010. This book was written with many contributors. Andreas Kostenberger and Terry Wilder served as editors for this work. Dr. Kostenberger is professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dr. Wilder is currently professor of New Testament at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. This book contains a collection of essays from great scholars covering different attributes of the Pauline Pastoral Epistles. The aim of this work is to engage readers and inform them on the current scholarship in the epistles. It is a scholarly work, but it is a very engaging work! This book will help lay men and women in the church grasp the importance of the epistles better. These scholars hold that Paul the apostle wrote the epistles as well provided by internal evidence (pg. 8). The scholars show the sovereign Christ in the epistles, and as a result, readers should proclaim the sovereign Messiah! They also show the importance of doctrine and how it relates to the life of the Church. We need sound doctrine in our churches, and need to guard it closely. If you have neglected the epistles in the past, this work is for you. If your a pastor and struggling preaching from the epistles, this book will help you. If your a scholar, reading this book will not just want you to pursue the King more, but also care for the church more as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    No shortage of good information, but it definitely hits the ground running. This book was part of the required reading for a class I will be taking on the Pastoral Epistles in a few weeks. Some sections are very difficult to follow if the reader does not already have a thorough understanding of the Pastoral Epistles from the outset. I can see this book being a helpful resource for interacting with the text academically, but as an introduction to the PE, it can feel a bit steep.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike Jorgensen

    Not much to object to, but also not very stimulating. If you struggle with higher criticism and theological liberalism then I'm sure this will be a breath of fresh air as it has quality orthodox scholarship. Not much to object to, but also not very stimulating. If you struggle with higher criticism and theological liberalism then I'm sure this will be a breath of fresh air as it has quality orthodox scholarship.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Benninghoff

  10. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  11. 4 out of 5

    STEVEN DOZIER

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim Chandler

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julian Lopatic

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ractery

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Lines

  16. 5 out of 5

    Billy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julius

  18. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pamblanco

  20. 4 out of 5

    David

  21. 5 out of 5

    ANTHONY RIVERA

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark Jackson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  26. 4 out of 5

    Luke Playford

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Stopher

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eric Semjenow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.