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Chasing the Sun

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Daisy Etheridge always dreamed of singing on a real stage, rather than in a smoky San Francisco saloon. But along the way she fell in love, had her heart broken, and bore a child to a man who loved another. Now she has a second chance to develop her singing talent. With no other way to get the money she needs to support herself and her child during her training, she and he Daisy Etheridge always dreamed of singing on a real stage, rather than in a smoky San Francisco saloon. But along the way she fell in love, had her heart broken, and bore a child to a man who loved another. Now she has a second chance to develop her singing talent. With no other way to get the money she needs to support herself and her child during her training, she and her daughter travel to New Mexico Territory to seek help from the wealthy family of the man who abandoned her. Jack Wilkins, a carefree adventurer, has always wanted to travel the world, rather than stay home to work the family ranch with his brothers. He thought he'd escaped three years ago when he followed his childhood love to San Francisco, only to find that his devotion wasn't enough to keep her. Now he's back, trying one last time to win her--when out of the blue a woman from his past shows up with a baby who has eyes like his. Caught between his feelings for his old flame, his attraction to Daisy, and his new role as a father, Jack does the honorable thing and offers marriage. But Daisy refuses. Although she has never stopped loving Jack, she's unwilling to risk her dream for a man who might still love another, or who would rather chase the sun west than settle down with her. But Jack won't give up. As spring drifts into summer, tensions build, and the Wilkins family is strained to the breaking point when old enemies and financial ruin threaten the ranch. Then a violent storm brings everything to a head, forcing Daisy and Jack to make hard choices about which dreams are worth fighting for, and what they want out of their lives--and out of each other.


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Daisy Etheridge always dreamed of singing on a real stage, rather than in a smoky San Francisco saloon. But along the way she fell in love, had her heart broken, and bore a child to a man who loved another. Now she has a second chance to develop her singing talent. With no other way to get the money she needs to support herself and her child during her training, she and he Daisy Etheridge always dreamed of singing on a real stage, rather than in a smoky San Francisco saloon. But along the way she fell in love, had her heart broken, and bore a child to a man who loved another. Now she has a second chance to develop her singing talent. With no other way to get the money she needs to support herself and her child during her training, she and her daughter travel to New Mexico Territory to seek help from the wealthy family of the man who abandoned her. Jack Wilkins, a carefree adventurer, has always wanted to travel the world, rather than stay home to work the family ranch with his brothers. He thought he'd escaped three years ago when he followed his childhood love to San Francisco, only to find that his devotion wasn't enough to keep her. Now he's back, trying one last time to win her--when out of the blue a woman from his past shows up with a baby who has eyes like his. Caught between his feelings for his old flame, his attraction to Daisy, and his new role as a father, Jack does the honorable thing and offers marriage. But Daisy refuses. Although she has never stopped loving Jack, she's unwilling to risk her dream for a man who might still love another, or who would rather chase the sun west than settle down with her. But Jack won't give up. As spring drifts into summer, tensions build, and the Wilkins family is strained to the breaking point when old enemies and financial ruin threaten the ranch. Then a violent storm brings everything to a head, forcing Daisy and Jack to make hard choices about which dreams are worth fighting for, and what they want out of their lives--and out of each other.

30 review for Chasing the Sun

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Hoover

    I loved this book and series! It's got it all - great storyline, lots of emotional turmoil, chemistry, and oh-so-much humor! I love this family and am sad to finish the series. While I fell in love with each brother as I read their books, I think maybe Jack, the youngest, may have stolen my heart. This is his and Daisy's (and little Kate's) story - so good and packed with emotion. I like that the entire family is so intertwined in the story as it explores the value of family as some characters l I loved this book and series! It's got it all - great storyline, lots of emotional turmoil, chemistry, and oh-so-much humor! I love this family and am sad to finish the series. While I fell in love with each brother as I read their books, I think maybe Jack, the youngest, may have stolen my heart. This is his and Daisy's (and little Kate's) story - so good and packed with emotion. I like that the entire family is so intertwined in the story as it explores the value of family as some characters learn the definition of "family" may be broader than they thought. I absolutely love the manner in which Warner writes children and slips them into the storyline with both love and humor. These big bad cowboys' shells are cracked wide open more than once by an adorable child. And I have to mention the strong, sassy women that bring each of these brothers to their knees & make them oh-so-happy to be there - here's to the ladies! If you want to explore well-written historical western romance, this is the series for you! A Must Read! I plan to explore more of this author's work. 4.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Misfit

    This is the final book in Warner's Blood Rose trilogy about the Wilkens brothers of RosaRoja ranch in New Mexico. This time we get youngest brother Jack's story, and we haven't seen him since the end of Pieces of Sky when he followed Elena to San Francisco in hopes of winning her hand, but he hasn't been heard from for three years. Not. One. Letter. The book begins with Elena returning home ready to take her final vows and become a nun. Jack was heartbroken when she refused to marry him (there ar This is the final book in Warner's Blood Rose trilogy about the Wilkens brothers of RosaRoja ranch in New Mexico. This time we get youngest brother Jack's story, and we haven't seen him since the end of Pieces of Sky when he followed Elena to San Francisco in hopes of winning her hand, but he hasn't been heard from for three years. Not. One. Letter. The book begins with Elena returning home ready to take her final vows and become a nun. Jack was heartbroken when she refused to marry him (there are reasons for it, but I won't spoil), went on a drunken binge, had a fling with saloon singer Daisy Etheridge, unknowingly impregnated her and then signed up on the first ship headed to parts unknown. Whew, long sentence. Anywho, Daisy's at her wit's end and needs some money and she heads to the Wilkens spread in hopes of finding Jack or sympathetic relatives (she really is a nice girl, and not a gold digger). And just as soon as Daisy and her daughter Kate are welcomed into the bosom of the the Wilkins household, a still heartbroken Jack finally decides to come home and he's definitely surprised to find a woman he barely remembers and a child to boot - let alone his beloved Elena wearing nun's clothing. Hmmm. I did like this well enough, but not nearly enough as the first two, and I'm glad this was left at three books as the story was definitely running out of steam. Neither Jack or Daisy captured my interest like Jessica/Brady and Hank/Molly did in the first two books, and there really wasn't a lot of chemistry between them. The underlying storyline wasn't that compelling either compared to the first two books, the bad guys were rather *meh* and easily whipped, and outside of a nail biter of a rescue after a dangerous storm hits, there's not much else there. Thumbs up on older brother Brady's ever-increasing bunch at the ranch (Warner does write kids very well IMO), but the kids just weren't as funny this time around, at least for me. Loved the epilogue though, that was a perfect finish to the story. 3/5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    What an absolutely fantastic conclusion to this series!! Absolutely loved it - loved Jack, Daisy and especially baby Kate. The banter between the Wilkens brothers had me laughing out loud on several occasions. At other points in the book I found myself sighing out loud or wiping a stray tear from my eyes. Just a beautifully written book! The epilogue at the end 30 years later was perfect! So sorry to say goodbye to this family.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Jo

    Daisy Etheridge has many regrets in her life. She wishes one of them could be Jack Wilkins, but if she’d never met Jack she wouldn’t have Kate. As much as she hates Jack for the whirlwind of emotions he’s dragged her through, she can never regret the daughter they created. Spending many months mending the broken heart he left her with, Daisy finally has the opportunity to realize her dream of training to become an opera singer. When she realizes she needs money in order to take care of Kate duri Daisy Etheridge has many regrets in her life. She wishes one of them could be Jack Wilkins, but if she’d never met Jack she wouldn’t have Kate. As much as she hates Jack for the whirlwind of emotions he’s dragged her through, she can never regret the daughter they created. Spending many months mending the broken heart he left her with, Daisy finally has the opportunity to realize her dream of training to become an opera singer. When she realizes she needs money in order to take care of Kate during her training, she decides it’s time to surprise daddy with a visit. Jack has spent years chasing down Elena...the girl he’s loved since he was a young boy. Now that she has decided to devote her life to the church and God, Jack can’t accept her decision. He has chased her back to the ranch they grew up on hoping to change her mind before she takes her vows to become a nun but is surprised when a girl from his past shows up with his child in tow. A child he didn't know anything about. Daisy thought she just wanted Jack’s money and Jack thought he just wanted Elena. Now the short time that Jack, Daisy and Kate have spent together as a family is making them question what they really want...and whom. All good things must come to and end, right? Such is the case with the last installment of the sensational Blood Rose Trilogy by the clever and talented author Kaki Warner. In Chasing the Sun, we discover the story of the youngest Wilkins brother, the light footed and carefree adventure, Jack. As with the first two installments, Pieces of Sky and Open Country, Warner constructs a tale that is an all consuming emotional adventure that you never wish to end. Chasing the Sun delivers the same heart felt character attachment and overall beauty that was previously seen in the first two novels and that you wish was created in every novel you picked up. For the first time in the series we have a tumultuous love triangle, one which is sure to cause heartache at every turn, yet intensifies the dramatic and complex love story. What draws you into this ever expanding family is the comfort and acceptance they represent. You always feel as is you know each and every member well, as if they are a long lost friend. Daisy is a woman easily guided by her heart, but does everything to avoid that in order to protect her daughter. Her constant struggles with her feelings for Jack show you the amazing character she truly is. Her heart is screaming at her to love Jack, to stay with Jack, but his history as a drifter forces her to ignore her heart and follow her instincts. She is truly a sight to behold. A woman who would overlook the feelings of her heart in order to protect herself and her daughter is courage personified. It may seem a simple plot, but Warner’s writing allows you to feel the pain and heartache with Daisy. It is powerful experience that readers won’t soon forget. Jack is perhaps the most interesting brother in the Wilkins family. One lives and breathes life on the ranch, the other considers home a state of mind and then there is Jack. The one who can’t stay too long in one place and is in love with a woman he can never have. Then Daisy and Kate enter his life and he is forced to sit still and reconsider all the decision he’s ever made and for the first time, consider his future. In essence, you are watching this character fully mature and while you may not fully love him at page one...by the last page you will realize what a fool you’ve been. Here’s the point to remember: Warner may not have written the first historical western romance, and she certainly hasn’t written the last, but no reader ever knew what a perfect romance novel could be until she put it to paper. You may think you know historical romance, but Kaki Warner will show you how it’s really supposed to be done. This isn’t the novel to pick up for a light read on a Sunday afternoon and it certainly isn’t the novel you’ll feel content with after you’ve finished. This is the novel that will consume your thoughts while you are reading it and long after you’ve finished it. You’re still reading this review? You should be on your way to the bookstore or typing in your favorite online book site by now, because every page of this beautifully crafted series is worth every penny, every tear and every smile. Be prepared to visit a place in history when tough and courageous men are brought to their knees by the women who loved them. Be prepared to never leave this wonderful universe Warner has created, because just like the Wilkins family, you will open the first page as this family would open it’s arms and it’s doors and welcome you. In this world you are family...in here, you are home. Overall Rating: 5/5 Heat Level: 2/5 Lisa @ Once Upon A Chapter

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mandi

    Set in 1873, Jack Wilkins left his family’s ranch three years ago with his love, Elena to see if they could get her injured hip repaired. But after the devastating news her hip would never get better, and she would never be able to enter into a physical relationship with a man, Elena turns to God and decides to become a nun. Jack is hurt – he tells Elena the physical stuff doesn’t matter, but she has her path set and leaves. Falling into drinking, Jack starts spending time at the local saloon, w Set in 1873, Jack Wilkins left his family’s ranch three years ago with his love, Elena to see if they could get her injured hip repaired. But after the devastating news her hip would never get better, and she would never be able to enter into a physical relationship with a man, Elena turns to God and decides to become a nun. Jack is hurt – he tells Elena the physical stuff doesn’t matter, but she has her path set and leaves. Falling into drinking, Jack starts spending time at the local saloon, where he hears Daisy’s amazing voice – and eventually they share a passionate night together. But soon after that, Jack feels antsy and leaves to explore Australia. Daisy becomes pregnant as a result, and continues for two years singing in the saloon. But she has bigger dreams. She finally gets the break she has been waiting for, to sing in Rome – but she can’t afford to take her daughter with her. And she could never leave her behind. Determined to have a better life, she sets out to RosaRoja Ranch, to demand money from Jack’s family. But when she arrives, Jack himself has just come into town too….and so has Elena. Chasing the Sun is the final book in Kaki Warner’s Blood Rose trilogy. What an excellent series she has written. We finally get to meet the long lost brother Jack. Jack who has seen the world, and finally makes his way back to the family ranch. His first intention is to convince Elena not to become a nun and marry him. But she is firm, and set in her beliefs. He doesn’t have much time to sway her, until Daisy arrives – with his daughter. He is shocked he is a father, but he adapts to the role quickly. He is the charmer out of the brothers, and quickly has Daisy feelings doubts about her future. Their romance takes a nice slow pace throughout the book. My favorite part of this book, and the series in general is the way Kaki Warner weaves in the entire family. Brady and Hank and their wives and kids all have big roles in this book. We get the fun relationship the brothers have together, mixed with their wives and how the females in the house have bonded. While there is a definite love story, some of my favorite scenes are with the brothers alone together, or with the wives becoming friends with each other. And we also get such a great sense of the ranch, and the country they live in. Kaki Warner really hits all the angles and makes this series such a warm, romantic read. There are no sex scenes in this book, but they are not missed. The romance and the love between the family members more than makes up for the absent bedroom scenes. As with the two previous books, there is also a villain and in this one, it is toned down a bit, and I think fits the book really well. I’m sad to be done with the Wilkins’ family. They will definitely be missed! Kaki Warner gives us a nice glimpse into the future in the epilogue of this book. And I noticed at the end of the book, there is an excerpt for Heartbreak Creek, I assume a new series! Can’t wait! Rating: B+

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Estep

    Chasing the Sun by Kaki Warner is the third and final book in her Blood Rose western historical romance trilogy. Daisy Etheridge has always dreamed of being an opera singer, and she finally has a chance to travel overseas and train with a famous singer. However, Daisy needs money for the journey and to hire someone to care for her young daughter. With no one else to turn to, Daisy sets out for New Mexico to reach out to the family of Jack Wilkins, the man who fathered her child and then left her Chasing the Sun by Kaki Warner is the third and final book in her Blood Rose western historical romance trilogy. Daisy Etheridge has always dreamed of being an opera singer, and she finally has a chance to travel overseas and train with a famous singer. However, Daisy needs money for the journey and to hire someone to care for her young daughter. With no one else to turn to, Daisy sets out for New Mexico to reach out to the family of Jack Wilkins, the man who fathered her child and then left her to go see the world. What Daisy doesn't know is that Jack has finally come home from his years of wandering -- and is shocked to learn that he has a daughter. Daisy wants to leave before she falls in love with Jack again and gets her heart broken once more, but Jack isn't about to let his daughter or Daisy go without a fight. Too bad there's a man who's desperate to get his hands on the family ranch no matter what ... I'm always on the lookout for new western romance authors to read, and I'd heard a lot of good things about Warner's books so I decided to try her. I liked a lot of things about this book, including the descriptions of the New Mexico countryside. (And is that cover gorgeous or what?) I also enjoyed Daisy's character and how strong she was to go after her dream of being an opera singer and to protect her daughter no matter what. Jack was likable as well, although I think I would have gotten more out of his character (and the extended Wilkins clan) if I'd read the other two books in the series. However, there were a few things that just didn't work for me, namely the villain. We get a scene or two from the villain's point of view and learn why he's after the ranch -- and then he just disappears. The villain and the threat he poses to the ranch is taken care of off page, so to speak, instead of giving the reader a showdown with Jack and the villain at the end. That disappointed me. Also, the action drags a little in the middle of the book when Jack and Daisy are caught in a storm. Overall, though, this was a solid read. If you're looking for a sweet western romance, give Warner a try.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Regan Walker

    4 and 1/2 Stars! 3rd in the Blood Rose Trilogy is a Unique Western Historical Very Well Done! The first thing I realized when I began to read this novel was that it obviously had to be a part of a series as there were two existing couples (two other brothers to our hero) and some allusions to happenings I had no knowledge of, which was frustrating. In researching it, I learned this book is part of a trilogy. Soooo…I do not recommend reading this as a stand alone or first when it is actually 3rd in 4 and 1/2 Stars! 3rd in the Blood Rose Trilogy is a Unique Western Historical Very Well Done! The first thing I realized when I began to read this novel was that it obviously had to be a part of a series as there were two existing couples (two other brothers to our hero) and some allusions to happenings I had no knowledge of, which was frustrating. In researching it, I learned this book is part of a trilogy. Soooo…I do not recommend reading this as a stand alone or first when it is actually 3rd in the trilogy. However, I do recommend reading the trilogy as Warner tells a really good tale and even with the issues of stepping into the story part way, I enjoyed it. Set in 1873, it tells the story of Daisy Etheridge, a singer with a beautiful voice and a great talent who has had several years of bad luck, starting with her being an orphan, falling in love with a cowboy who loved another and left Daisy pregnant and alone, and now she has killed a man and had to flee San Francisco. She has a great opportunity to study voice under a master but she needs funds for a nanny for her young daughter. So, she decides to go to New Mexico Territory where the father of her child has family who might help. Little does she know Jack Wilkins, the father of her child, is there as well as his childhood love, Elena. Jack comes across as a self-indulgent man who is careless with his relationships with women and not very attuned to his own feelings. He’s the charming younger brother who only wants to chase the sun around the world. I’m not sure how convinced I was at the change in him but he does come out smelling like a rose in the end. I loved Daisy. She had made mistakes and taken life’s bumps on the chin, but she also had gumption, talent and insight—and was a fiercely protective mother of young Kate. Warner develops her characters with meticulous care so you have no trouble visualizing them. The three brothers and their interactions are priceless and very well written. She paints vivid word pictures of the historic setting and the environs around the New Mexico ranch that make you feel like you’ve lived there. The only thing some romance readers might see as a negative is that the love scenes are only alluded to. But there’s enough chemistry that you can still see the physical attraction the couples have for each other. Here’s the Blood Rose trilogy so you read them in order: Pieces of Sky (RITA winner for Best First Book) Open Country Chasing the Sun

  8. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Writing the last book in a romance trilogy can be a tricky thing for an author. New characters and old must interact. Loose ends must be tied up, mysteries explained and conflicts resolved. Oh, and one must still find room for romance. Kaki Warner delivers on all counts in Chasing the Sun, the last book in her Blood Rose trilogy about the Wilkins brothers and the women who love them in late 1800s New Mexico. Readers have eagerly anticipated the story of Jack, the youngest Wilkins, whose conflict Writing the last book in a romance trilogy can be a tricky thing for an author. New characters and old must interact. Loose ends must be tied up, mysteries explained and conflicts resolved. Oh, and one must still find room for romance. Kaki Warner delivers on all counts in Chasing the Sun, the last book in her Blood Rose trilogy about the Wilkins brothers and the women who love them in late 1800s New Mexico. Readers have eagerly anticipated the story of Jack, the youngest Wilkins, whose conflicted relationship with his brothers has been woven through the first two books, Pieces of Sky and Open Country. As I read about the Wilkins family, he has not been the easiest character to love but any younger sibling understands Jack’s feelings of suffocation and need for adventure. He is not the oldest, hardened but caring, like his brother Brady. He is not the gentle, thoughtful giant like his brother Hank. Jack is the wanderer, the least responsible of the three, and the most in need of a wake-up call. In Warner’s delightful style, he gets one. In Chasing the Sun, just as in Pieces of Sky and Open Country, Warner provides the hero with a worthy heroine. She tests Jack, challenging his rough edges and weaknesses, and ultimately opens him to new possibilities of love and commitment. A true page turner, Chasing the Sun is full of action and adventure described with Warner’s trademark detail. Once again, her characters’ relationships provide a story filled with emotional, humorous, and gut-wrenching moments. With its background on the brothers’ tangled relationships with each other, the history of their homestead and description of Old West struggles, Chasing the Sun is more than just a satisfying end to a trilogy. I found myself describing this book, these books, as a saga, an epic adventure I am sorry to see end.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Finally! I've been so busy this week that I never thought I'd finish this book. I enjoyed it, but not as much as the other two in the trilogy. Jack and Daisy just didn't work for me as well as the other pairings. However, it was nice to be back amongst the Wilkins family again, and the story was a nice sendoff to the series. Finally! I've been so busy this week that I never thought I'd finish this book. I enjoyed it, but not as much as the other two in the trilogy. Jack and Daisy just didn't work for me as well as the other pairings. However, it was nice to be back amongst the Wilkins family again, and the story was a nice sendoff to the series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cherise

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I left it a day before I rated this one, also left it a few days before starting on the review as I need to sort out what I think about this book. It's always a bittersweet feeling to finish a series, I sometimes will leave the last book unread as I don't want the series to end. I like Warner's style though, and I anticipated that even though I didn't like H much in the first book, and don't really think much about this one's synopsis, I want to give it a go. I think I would have felt better if I I left it a day before I rated this one, also left it a few days before starting on the review as I need to sort out what I think about this book. It's always a bittersweet feeling to finish a series, I sometimes will leave the last book unread as I don't want the series to end. I like Warner's style though, and I anticipated that even though I didn't like H much in the first book, and don't really think much about this one's synopsis, I want to give it a go. I think I would have felt better if I didn't read the epilogue, which in my opinion sucks big time, totally regretted it and would have preferred to leave it to my imagination how things progressed. Same goes for the whole storyline of the book, really, I just was so pissed at the way things progressed that I guess I really didn't pay much attention to the romance part, which really didn't take up that much space to begin with given the fact that a majority of it's also on the other 2 books' couples' issues. The H, I just cannot like, he's footloose, irresponsible in the 1st book, and seriously by the end of the book, he didn't grow, is still footloose and irresponsible. I never understand how I can like a H that never has to work a day in his life (mind, his other brothers are breaking their backs trying to run a ranch and he just wanders in and out at will without offering any help). He's just totally spoiled and owns some shares in a shipping company and hence never has to work a day in his life (I think his money mostly came from poker or something), just DON'T work, I do not see how I can like a H like that. He's also got an inferior complex that makes him angry and resentful of his elder brothers, brothers that had been again, breaking their backs trying to feed and cloth him, giving him the freedom not to work or do anything useful with his life except to travel around the world and do as he pleases, not even dropping a note or two to make sure they're not worried about him. Seriously... The only good thing I do enjoy is how there's no wicked villain and psychopath in the end and how the H can easily singlehandedly handled the whole mess in a few pages. (I guess I'm only enjoying it because that will mean the end of the book soon, which I cannot wait...) The h is ok, in that she's got a backbone and also did try to kick the H to the curb, which I totally applaud. The plot again, I have a serious issue with. We're told in book 1 and 2 how great that place is, and with all the descriptions and background story we're given, I got attached to that place too. Now in book 3, we're suddenly told, nope this place is totally claustrophobic, and boy both H and h cannot wait to be rid of it, family ties be darned. OK this I cannot get around, I kept spending nearly the whole book wanting them to come around and appreciate how great this place is because we've been told how great this place is and given the sweat and blood of the family history, we want them to finally be able to settle down there and enjoy. So by the end of the book, I was disappointed. Hoping to assuage my disappointment, I went to epilogue and was even more disappointed. Seriously, book 1 is my fav, I appreciate how H tried so hard to keep together his family, but it's like all he's built has been in vain, and everyone's just all around like the H of book 3, so that seriously left a bitter taste in my mouth. How things ended with book 2's couples also left me strangely dissatisfied. I don't know what the purpose of their little problem is for this book but to take up space, which since the main plot is already seriously disappointing and I cannot wait to be rid of, I found this extremely annoying. This is probably how in reality life will play out, but all the same, I don't like this much. So all in all, I seriously wish I'd just left this book alone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    The final book of the trilogy and I'm sorry to see the end of the Wilkins brothers. It's Jack's turn to find his woman, convince her he's the one and ride off into the sunset together. Except Jack's a little confused about what he wants as well as who he wants. And his life is about to get a lot more complicated. Daisy Etheridge is running out of time and running from the law. She has no choice but to head to New Mexico Territory and the home of the man who broke her heart. She doesn't expect to The final book of the trilogy and I'm sorry to see the end of the Wilkins brothers. It's Jack's turn to find his woman, convince her he's the one and ride off into the sunset together. Except Jack's a little confused about what he wants as well as who he wants. And his life is about to get a lot more complicated. Daisy Etheridge is running out of time and running from the law. She has no choice but to head to New Mexico Territory and the home of the man who broke her heart. She doesn't expect to find him there so she's shocked when he shows up. Chasing the Sun is a reunited lovers story with the added bonus of a baby. Then there's the "other woman" and one sided love. Wow - that's a lot for these confused, former lovers to deal with. Deal with it they do, Daisy showing maturity and Jack, well he's working on it. He does come around and finally makes some decisions he should have made long ago. Jack is suffering from misunderstandings and misguided love. He has been in love with Elena for years. The problem is that he's always thought it was the love a man has for a woman not the love of siblings or friends. With Daisy back in his life, he's starting to see his love for Elena in a different light. Jack is hard headed and on the outside it looks like he has close relationships with his brothers, Elena and the other residents of the ranch where he grew up. But he's not close with anyone. He's had this adventurous nature, this need to get away from the ranch. I think that's what kept him from getting too close to anyone - knowing that he would eventually leave. It's what he found when he left that has brought him back to the ranch. Daisy and her daughter Kate make the difficult trip from San Francisco to the Wilkins' ranch in New Mexico Territory. Once there they are welcomed into the family while Jack gets over the shock of not only seeing Daisy again but finding out he's a father. Daisy was pretty good about letting Jack spend time with Kate. She didn't try to use the baby to get Jack to do what she wanted. Daisy is still in love with Jack which is unfortunate since she's aware of his feelings for Elena. It's drama central at the ranch with Elena determined to leave, Jack determined she stay and Daisy wanting to leave but wanting Jack too. Jack does man up and asked Daisy to marry him - she says No. LOL That was funny. Jack has a rep for being a ladies man but his charm wasn't working on Daisy. Jack was surprised but not deterred. In the end, they not only worked out their differences but were both able to live out their dreams. Along with Jack, Daisy, Elena and baby Kate we also get to revisit with Brady, Jessica, Hank and Molly - heroes and heroines from the previous books. It was good to see how they were doing. Both couples had problems they were still working out while Jack and Daisy worked on their own problems. It did seem like too much was going on at times. I would have preferred there be less of everyone else and more of Jack and Daisy. What there was of them was sometimes sweet and sometimes frustrating with both being too stubborn to see one solution to their problems. The series ended the way it started, with Brady and Jessica, now in their later years, reminiscing about their loved ones. It was a sweet, sentimental look back on the lives of everyone in the Wilkins family both by blood and by love. A nice way to wrap up the trilogy. While this may be the end of the Blood Rose trilogy the good news is that Ms. Warner has a new series coming out. Heartbreak Creek, the first book in the Runaway Brides series is out in July. It's another western series which makes me a very happy reader. :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Kaki Warner really is a true western romance writer. She nails it in the final book of the Blood Rose Trilogy. Jack Wilkins is the adventurous, easy-going brother. He is so different from his worrying, hard-ass brother, Brody and his strong, silent brother, Hank. He is looking for the right place to fit in. The problem is that Jack doesn’t want to be tied down to anything. He wants to see the world. After visiting Australia, he returns home in hopes to win over his childhood sweetheart but inste Kaki Warner really is a true western romance writer. She nails it in the final book of the Blood Rose Trilogy. Jack Wilkins is the adventurous, easy-going brother. He is so different from his worrying, hard-ass brother, Brody and his strong, silent brother, Hank. He is looking for the right place to fit in. The problem is that Jack doesn’t want to be tied down to anything. He wants to see the world. After visiting Australia, he returns home in hopes to win over his childhood sweetheart but instead he gets a rude awakening when a blast from his past shows up on the ranch with his child in tow. Daisy Etheridge has hopes of becoming a famous singer. An opportunity presents itself and she needs some way to support her baby with a man whom she had fallen in love with. She seeks Jack Wilkins’s family while believing he is away in another country. This is probably the most emotional and touching book in the trilogy. The way the story unfolds and the way that the ties that binds are threatened will capture a reader attention from the very start until the last page. I’m a reader who enjoys romance in my romance stories. The sex, secondary characters, and scenery are all additional elements that when they are combined with the romance makes the “perfect” story in my opinion. I got so much more than romance from this story and that is what makes this a good and solid read. It is wonderful to watch Daisy and Jack fall in love with so many obstacles blocking them from their own HEA. Their daughter, Kate, is a wonderful addition and Jack falling for his own child is such a joy to watch. I believe that the child in the story (I’m not always a big fan of that) does add to this because it is another way of reflecting on how much Jack will evolve as a man throughout the story. As Jack is falling for little Kate and discovering the joys of being a father, Daisy is falling for him, knowing that she will never have him. “I know you, Jack,” she went on before he could speak. “I’ve seen your ocean in the mountains and I know why it draws you. You need to be out there somewhere, chasing the sun across the sky. You need to be free.” Daisy is a strong heroine and though her affair with Jack was brief, she knows how to handle him. I laughed at the banter between those two. Jack tries so hard to charm her and he fails miserably and his brothers are there to laugh at him the whole way. There is a lot of humor in this book. All of the characters from the previous books are present and more problems are presented. The author does a great job resolving all problems and tying up loose ends from previous books in this installment. I loved reading the epilogue and learning what happened to all of the characters. Everything comes full circle and readers will be completely satisfied.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anne OK

    Book Three in Blood Rose Trilogy (1/2011 Release Date) (Jack/Daisy) Another wonderful story from Kaki Warner and the last in this series. This is a well-written series and I'm anxiously awaiting the new series by this author. Although I was a bit disappointed in the ending to this one, it did come to a complete closure with everyone and their families accounted for and nothing left to question. However, it was Jack and Daisy's book and I felt their HEA got less then it deserved. Jack was my favor Book Three in Blood Rose Trilogy (1/2011 Release Date) (Jack/Daisy) Another wonderful story from Kaki Warner and the last in this series. This is a well-written series and I'm anxiously awaiting the new series by this author. Although I was a bit disappointed in the ending to this one, it did come to a complete closure with everyone and their families accounted for and nothing left to question. However, it was Jack and Daisy's book and I felt their HEA got less then it deserved. Jack was my favorite character from the beginning and I just felt he faded into the "Sun."

  14. 5 out of 5

    The Book and Beauty Blog

    Spoilers I officially have a book hangover after finishing this trilogy. I have NEVER given five stars to each book in a series; that is, until now. Chasing the Sun, wasn’t quite as good as the previous two books, however, I still think it deserves a five star rating. Chasing the Sun picks up three years after the end of Open Country. The first two books told the stories of Brady and Hank while this one focuses on the youngest brother, Jack. Jack is honestly not that likable. I immediately loved B Spoilers I officially have a book hangover after finishing this trilogy. I have NEVER given five stars to each book in a series; that is, until now. Chasing the Sun, wasn’t quite as good as the previous two books, however, I still think it deserves a five star rating. Chasing the Sun picks up three years after the end of Open Country. The first two books told the stories of Brady and Hank while this one focuses on the youngest brother, Jack. Jack is honestly not that likable. I immediately loved Brady and Hank but I never quite developed that connection with Jack. He’s a well written character but immature and a little bland. However, while I didn’t love his character, I do love that Warner went in a different direction with him. All three of the brothers are very different which makes for a unique reading experience with each book. I definitely didn’t hate Jack, I just didn’t find him to be a super attractive hero. The same goes for his love interest, Daisy. When the book starts, Jack is pining over his childhood love, Elena. Elena has decided to become a nun which has left Jack with a broken heart. I literally never believed or cared about their “love” story. Elena has the personality of white bread and was easily my least favorite character of the trilogy. The two had nothing in common and it was clear that she was only his love interest to create later drama between Jack and Daisy. As for Daisy, I like her but not quite as much as Jessica and Molly; Brady and Hank’s wives, respectively. Like with Jack, she’s a well written character and unique but she REFUSES to communicate. Literally 75% of the drama in this book could have been avoided if Jack and Daisy would have simply talked to each other. I don’t enjoy drama that is caused by miscommunication, or lack thereof. I know it sounds like I don’t like Jack and Daisy but I really do. I just don’t like them as much as the couples in the first two books. One of the things that makes Warner a favorite author for me is her ability to write believable, slow burn romances. In the previous books, the romances are slow burns but we do eventually see the characters together. This book is the ultimate slow burn because they don’t fully end up together until the end. I guess I’m a sucker for an ooey gooey romance because I wanted to see them as an actual couple a bit more. Don’t get me wrong, I LOVED the build up of their relationship and if there was a fourth book, I wouldn’t have even cared but since this was the end, I wanted a bit more. So, why am I giving this book five stars when I clearly have issues? Honestly, I can’t bring myself to give it anything less. I adore the Wild West setting, the characters as a whole, the writing, the humor and the romances. I may have petty issues with some of the characters but everything else is perfect. I think this book, and the epilogue at the end, was an excellent finale to a beautiful series. Historical fiction lover? Read this trilogy. Romance lover? Read this trilogy. Western lover? Read this trilogy. Seriously, just read this trilogy. For other reviews, go to https://thebookandbeautyblog.com/

  15. 5 out of 5

    Judy Benvin

    The first 2 books in this trilogy were excellent. This one - not so much. After the second book, it seemed as if there were a pattern: woman in distress with 1 or more children, a bad guy or two, a cowboy. Luckily there was a splash of humor here or there or I would have dropped this third book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Final book in the Blood Rose trilogy. I thought it went on a bit too long in some parts but overall a nice wrap up of the story. Historical western romance (post Civil War era) about a New Mexico ranch and the family who run it. 3.5 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Well, at least the depraved villain is split between two characters and watered down a bit. Still, I was a little bored with this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    3 1/2 stars. A good story. Out of the three brothers in the series Jack was the least likable in my opinion. I liked the way this last book in the series ended and wrapped up in the epilogue.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Vonda M. Reid ♥

    Overall Rating: 3.85 // Action: 3.0 / Emotion: 4.5 / Romance: 3.0 / Sensuous: 1.0 / Suspense: 2.0 // Historical Flavor: 4.0 // Laughter: 5 // Tears: 7 / Teary: 5 Chasing The Sun: 3.85: An attention grabbing, interest keeping read even though it did not carry the same powerful punch as the two previous books in the series. This book is definitely not a standalone read, but needs to be read only after reading the previous two books of the trilogy. This book features Brady and Jessica (Pieces of Sky) Overall Rating: 3.85 // Action: 3.0 / Emotion: 4.5 / Romance: 3.0 / Sensuous: 1.0 / Suspense: 2.0 // Historical Flavor: 4.0 // Laughter: 5 // Tears: 7 / Teary: 5 Chasing The Sun: 3.85: An attention grabbing, interest keeping read even though it did not carry the same powerful punch as the two previous books in the series. This book is definitely not a standalone read, but needs to be read only after reading the previous two books of the trilogy. This book features Brady and Jessica (Pieces of Sky) and Hank and Molly (Open Country), who grow right along with Jack and Daisy. The three brothers finally find acceptance and a resolution of their differences with each other in their own unique way. Hero: 3.0: Andrew Jackson "Jack" Wilkins: Warner did a great job of explaining why this carefree, world-traveling youngest brother decided to charm his way through life because it was the only way he could figure out how to live in the shadow to two such imposing big brothers. Even though Jack is the one brother out of the three that you would invite to a party, his tendency to wander made it difficult for this homebody to identify with him. Heroine: 3.0: Daisy Etheridge: Warner did not develop the background details of this stubborn, hard-headed, strong-willed heroine in a manner that created a sympathetic link between the reader and Daisy. Although it was easy to admire Daisy's perseverance and her efforts to follow her dream, her avowals that she longer loved Jack didn't ring true. Story Line: 3.5: Warner did a phenomenal job of entertaining readers by reuniting all the Wilkins brothers and their wives back at the RosaRoja Ranch so they could finally come to terms with their marked differences in personalities. The romance that developed between Jack and Daisy seemed to take a second chair to the interaction between all the members of the cast. Action: 3.0: Warner knows how to draw readers quickly into her stories by opening with a bit of exciting action and adventure sequences before she gets down to the meat of the story, which definitely slows down the excitement aspect of the story. However, the inclusion of a couple of villains and a horse flu epidemic kept the story from dragging. Emotion: 4.5: One of the skills at which Warner is so gifted is her ability to create an emotional connection between the reader and the characters featured on the pages of her books. Warner did bring forth tears and laughter during the telling of Jack and Daisy's story, but they were not what one would expect. Most of the tears shed in this book were brought forth whenever Elena was interacting with the main characters. Romance: 3.0: The romance that developed between Jack and Daisy was a bit lackluster for two simple reasons. First, Daisy had already fallen in love with Jack three years ago (and even though she convinced herself she no longer loved Jack, she didn't convince readers). Second, Jack's attitude towards Daisy and love was too lackadaisical. He couldn't have the woman he had loved his entire life, so why not tie himself to a woman he had apparently physically loved (his daughter being proof positive). Sensuous: 1.0: Warner has expressed her feelings on writing graphically entertaining love scenes, but even the thrill of the mutual lustful attraction between Jack and Daisy was missing from this book. The passion and fire in the few kisses that Jack bestowed upon Daisy was absent. And the one scene where Daisy decided she would be with Jack was even less detailed than in her previous books. Sorry, but for a romance book to be truly outstanding, it needs to include spicy, heated love scenes! Suspense: 2.0: Although there were a couple of villains featured during the telling of the Wilkins Family story, the suspenseful aspect to the book was minimal. Although the villains did add to the interest of the story line, the suspenseful aura of the story was not a necessary factor for the story to flow smoothly. Historical Flavor: 4.0: Warner is truly gifted when it comes to painting a picture of the countryside of the New Mexico Territory during 1873. It is obvious that Warner has done her research and has a good grasp on the nuances of what it was like to live during this time period. Secondary Characters: 4.5: Warner's talent at creating detailed secondary characters that add a hearty flavor to the story is present in this final book of the trilogy. The addition of Brady, Jessica, Hank, Molly, and, particularly, Sister Elena Maria Ramirez to the story are what made this book an emotional and fascinating read. See Wolf Bear Does Books for a more in-depth, detailed review of Chasing The Sun.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sandy M

    I hate it when time gets away from and I don’t get to those books I wanted to months ago. Chasing the Sun is one of those, after I read and reviewed Open Country in Kaki Warner’s Blood Rose trilogy. She gave readers a unique look into life back when our wild west was at its best, especially when it comes to women of the time. Those women are the backbone of who we are today, and Ms. Warner weaves their stories with an exquisite touch. Though this series is basically about the Wilkins brothers and I hate it when time gets away from and I don’t get to those books I wanted to months ago. Chasing the Sun is one of those, after I read and reviewed Open Country in Kaki Warner’s Blood Rose trilogy. She gave readers a unique look into life back when our wild west was at its best, especially when it comes to women of the time. Those women are the backbone of who we are today, and Ms. Warner weaves their stories with an exquisite touch. Though this series is basically about the Wilkins brothers and their want and need to keep their ranch, to make it profitable and a home for their families, it’s the women behind them who have a strength men may not totally understand, but they sure admire it. Chasing the Sun is Jack’s story, the youngest of the brothers. When he left the ranch three years ago, Jack had hopes of a bright future with the woman he loved, but when she finds a different calling, he moves on to seeing the world and all the adventures it holds. Coming home at last, he finds both the woman who left him and another whom he barely recalls from his drunken days and nights of gambling before taking off to Australia and other parts unknown to try to heal his broken heart. Daisy’s dream is to be a singer on a real stage some day. All she’s been able to find so far is singing for drunks and cardsharps in a San Francisco saloon, which pays her just enough for her and her daughter to live on. But when life throws Daisy into a dangerous situation and gives her the opportunity for her lifelong dream at the same time, her only option is to make the trip to RosaRoja and Jack’s family for help. She never expects to see Jack again and is quite surprised and frightened when she discovers he’s home. Jack has always been the charmer of the family, women falling at his feet whenever he feels the need for company. So you can imagine his bafflement when Daisy is the one who refuses him at every turn. I had to chuckle at times when these Wilkins brothers just don’t get women, especially their wives. But I guess that’s how most heroes are in romance until they understand it’s love that pushes them. Jack is typical male. He doesn’t understand why Daisy would rather be on her than married to him when he can’t tell her he loves her, that he’d rather be with her than anyone else, and all those usual things women need to hear from their men. In the meantime, Jack knows something more is going on with Daisy and he’s on a mission to win her, her trust, and her love. Their picnic scenes as a family are some of the best in the book, even when one ends in near disaster. And that leads to more great scenes when the brothers search for Jack and his ladies during a violent storm. There’s a lot of emotion for all involved during suspense-filled days. I like seeing the brothers show their emotions, though they stop short of showing those feelings to others. I had hoped maybe this time we would see more between them, but the boys stayed boys, and I love them anyway. I still have yet to read the first book in the series, but I hope to remedy that soon. So far I have enjoyed Open Country just a tad more than Chasing the Sun, only because of the circumstances Molly and Hank meet and the danger they must survive. But Jack has that way of worming into your heart just as he does into Daisy’s, especially when playing with his daughter. His siblings need to wake up a little sooner when looking at their little brother. He’s become a man they’d be very proud of. See my complete review at http://www.goodbadandunread.com

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I'm sorry to say that I found this one much less engaging than the first two books of the series. It had a strong beginning that started fizzing out around the halfway mark. Up to that point, I really liked the h and seeing the other characters from the previous books. After that point however, I didn't like either of the MCs and that's pretty much a book killer for me. Like many other reviewers have said, the H wasn't much of a hero in this one. Yes, he was the free spirit of the family, the wan I'm sorry to say that I found this one much less engaging than the first two books of the series. It had a strong beginning that started fizzing out around the halfway mark. Up to that point, I really liked the h and seeing the other characters from the previous books. After that point however, I didn't like either of the MCs and that's pretty much a book killer for me. Like many other reviewers have said, the H wasn't much of a hero in this one. Yes, he was the free spirit of the family, the wanderer, and a total manwhore. He had a lot of growing up to do and I didn't really care to read a book about it. I found his inner monologue a little disturbing, like the part early on when he's wondering how many other women he'd, not knowingly, used and hurt (emotionally) in the past. Then he wonders how many other children he may have out there. Yikes. Can you say "cringe worthy"? His change of heart regarding the h wasn't convincing either. I don't think this book was long enough to bring about a believable change in the H, and it's over 400 pages. That's how immature and dumb he was. I admired the h for staying responsible and taking care of her daughter. She finds out she's pregnant after the H ups and leaves. Sure, he was going through a rough patch, was drunk more often than not, was just using the h for sex, and had never made any declarations or promises to her...but still. He was an ass. I liked the h up until the moment she starts (view spoiler)[ falling in love with him again. And it was because he was charming, funny, and good looking. What?! Stay strong, girl! He left you and was whoring around while you were struggling to make ends meet. By yourself. Alone. But no. Good looks and chemistry trump all. Ugh. (hide spoiler)] . I think I face palmed myself. She became a totally weak character after that. The drama that ensued was annoying. All of the hemming and hawing the h did was annoying, and the angst didn't feel angsty because I couldn't find it in myself to care. I'm sorry the series ended with this story. Kaki Warner's writing was charming as always, but even that couldn't save this for me. That being said, I would recommend this book for readers who like historical romance and second chances.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lovetoread

    Just finished Chasing the Sun which is the third and last book in Kaki Warner's, Blood Rose series. When I started this series Kaki Warner was a new author for me. I purchased book one of the series and enjoyed it so much that I purchased books two and three. Now one thing about Ms. Warner's writing.....she writes wonderful rememberable stories, and her characters come alive for a reader. I really loved reading the life, loves and times of the three Wilkins brothers and their ranch in Texas. Anot Just finished Chasing the Sun which is the third and last book in Kaki Warner's, Blood Rose series. When I started this series Kaki Warner was a new author for me. I purchased book one of the series and enjoyed it so much that I purchased books two and three. Now one thing about Ms. Warner's writing.....she writes wonderful rememberable stories, and her characters come alive for a reader. I really loved reading the life, loves and times of the three Wilkins brothers and their ranch in Texas. Another thing I should mention is that although there is plenty of sizzling passion in the pages Ms. Warner does not write graphic sexual situations. I really thought this would be a turn off for me. I really enjoy a good hot sizzling romance, but I have to say that with these stories along with the characters and their passion for each other you don't miss it. Book three is about the youngest brother of the Wilkins clan, the free spirited Jack. Daisy Etheridge always dreamed of singing on a real stage, rather than in a smoky San Francisco saloon. But along the way she fell in love, had her heart broken, and bore a child to a man who loved another. Now she has a second chance to develop her singing talent. With no other way to get the money she needs to support herself and her child during her training, she and her daughter travel to New Mexico Territory to seek help from the wealthy family of the man who abandoned her. Jack Wilkins, a carefree adventurer, has always wanted to travel the world, rather than stay home to work the family ranch with his brothers. He thought he'd escaped three years ago when he followed his childhood love to San Francisco, only to find that his devotion wasn't enough to keep her. Now he's back, trying one last time to win her--when out of the blue a woman from his past shows up with a baby who has eyes like his. Caught between his feelings for his old flame, his attraction to Daisy, and his new role as a father, Jack does the honorable thing and offers marriage. But Daisy refuses. And why wouldn't she, who wants to be second best... I highly recommend the Historical romance Chasing the Sun, I would recommend you read this series in order starting with book one Pieces of Sky which is the oldest brother Brady's happy ending with Jessica, then books two Open Country which is Hank's story with Molly, before reading this third and last in the series Jack's story with Daisy. These books will be on my re read shelf. Sensual level is a 6, the author does not write graphic sexual situations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jares

    This entire series has been enthralling; this is my second time to read the 3 books. I was delighted that Warner used this entire book to summarize the lives of the characters. Often, authors use the last few pages (for this) and the summary seems like a quick addendum, not really woven into the story. I particularly liked the fact that Warner used the main characters of the previous series books to play a large part in this book. It was like welcoming old friends again. The story of Jack and Dais This entire series has been enthralling; this is my second time to read the 3 books. I was delighted that Warner used this entire book to summarize the lives of the characters. Often, authors use the last few pages (for this) and the summary seems like a quick addendum, not really woven into the story. I particularly liked the fact that Warner used the main characters of the previous series books to play a large part in this book. It was like welcoming old friends again. The story of Jack and Daisy seemed like the weak part of the series. Unlike Brady or Hank (Jack's brothers and main characters in the previous 2 books), Jack seemed to be a loose cannon, committed only to having a good time. Re-reading the third book, I was able to see Warner's craft - she carefully brought Jack through a metamorphosis from shallow youngster to a man of substance. I don't think I saw that clearly in the first reading. I don't think I've read a series I've enjoyed more. After almost 1200 pages (3 books combined), I KNOW what makes these folks tick, what they worry over and how they react to adversaries. I understand these characters better than most of my extended family! Jack has loved and left saloon-singer, Daisy. Unfortunately for her, Jack left before finding out he was to be a father. Its 2 years after Jack wandered away from Daisy and San Francisco - and Daisy has the chance to study and tour with a famous, retired singer of renown. Daisy doesn't have the money needed for childcare so she plans to appeal to Jack's family. When she arrives in New Mexico Territory, at the Red Rose Ranch, Jack is home. Everyone is amazed by how much Kate looks like her father, Jack. Even Jack is taken aback by Kate's eyes - they look just like the ones he glares at in the mirror each morning. Accepting paternity, Jack begs Daisy to stay at the ranch so he can get to know Kate. He gives Daisy the money she needs and Daisy agrees to 2 weeks. Thus begins the metamorphosis of the couple. This is a story rich in undercurrents and unspoken agendas. Take the time to read this series - it is well worth your time! Blood Rose Trilogy 1. Pieces of Sky (2010) 2. Open Country (2010) 3. Chasing the Sun (2011)

  24. 4 out of 5

    ms bookjunkie

    This book is just as well written as the other two in the trilogy (both of which I enjoyed), but this one didn't work for me. I tried to analyze why I couldn't feel the love, and overall, the answers are various. And I guess, cumulative. I don't want to inadvertently ruin the book for anyone so: (view spoiler)[ I wasn't too thrilled that she was a saloon singer and he a drunk who tumbled and then abandoned her. (Yes, I know that's harsh, but it wasn't very smart of her or heroic of him.) Ominous th This book is just as well written as the other two in the trilogy (both of which I enjoyed), but this one didn't work for me. I tried to analyze why I couldn't feel the love, and overall, the answers are various. And I guess, cumulative. I don't want to inadvertently ruin the book for anyone so: (view spoiler)[ I wasn't too thrilled that she was a saloon singer and he a drunk who tumbled and then abandoned her. (Yes, I know that's harsh, but it wasn't very smart of her or heroic of him.) Ominous threats: Not only is Daisy running from trouble and the possibility of landing in prison, there's trouble at her temporary sanctuary. The Wilkinses might lose the ranch, their home. Shady characters act in various threatening ways, not the least of which is hurting women. There's horse flu, which means the ranch breeding program (and a source of money, not to mention satisfaction) might be wiped out if their quarantine fails. Lack of communication: Brady doesn't talk to his wife about the fact that they might lose the ranch, nor does he tell his brother. Daisy doesn't tell the man she loves about her hopes and plans for the future. There are too many assumptions to go along with the lack of communication. My conclusion: There was no security for me as a reader, not safe place, no source of warm fuzzies. Not in the relationship, not in the home place. No soft place to land. It wasn't comforting or restful to read. (hide spoiler)]

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Davis

    Chasing the Sun is the final book in the Blood Rose series and it's Jack's story being told with also the tying up of loose ends from the previous two books mking this a very well poignant, believable and enjoyable read. Kaki was able to deliver family dynamics with such flair, bringing each character to life and each with their own uniqe personality. The reader was able to choose a character that closely resembled a part of themselves and fall in love wth that character. Kaki doesn't draw out t Chasing the Sun is the final book in the Blood Rose series and it's Jack's story being told with also the tying up of loose ends from the previous two books mking this a very well poignant, believable and enjoyable read. Kaki was able to deliver family dynamics with such flair, bringing each character to life and each with their own uniqe personality. The reader was able to choose a character that closely resembled a part of themselves and fall in love wth that character. Kaki doesn't draw out the sex scenes in each book which really isn't required because of how wonderfully she created the atmosphere, the ambiance between the main characters in each story. Yes, Brady, Hank and Jack were cowboys and the story was developed in a time where men were men and whre laws were governed by how strong a man protected what is his and in all three stories, family was held in highest esteem. Truly a series very well worth reading for those who love a superbly written, wonderfully delivered drama with twists and turns, suspense all leading up to the finalie, the HEA. Chasing the sun was a wonderful book to which I'm rating this a 4.2 out of 5 but for the entire series, I'm rating this series a 4.8 out of 5.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mrsbooks

    I really enjoyed all three books in this series. This one is about Jack, the youngest of the three brothers, the light hearted immature joker with wander lust of the bunch. Jack ran off to San Fransisco to try to win his love back, a woman who grew up at his families ranch. Things don't go very well and he goes on a drunken binge and has a fling with a Saloon singer for a month or so. Then he takes off for three years traveling to arrive back, once again, trying to win his love's heart only this I really enjoyed all three books in this series. This one is about Jack, the youngest of the three brothers, the light hearted immature joker with wander lust of the bunch. Jack ran off to San Fransisco to try to win his love back, a woman who grew up at his families ranch. Things don't go very well and he goes on a drunken binge and has a fling with a Saloon singer for a month or so. Then he takes off for three years traveling to arrive back, once again, trying to win his love's heart only this time she's returned to his families ranch. As Jack's trying to win Elena's heart unbeknownst to him, the Saloon singer who he had a fling with, Daisy became pregnant with his child. As Daisy's been struggling finding work and supporting a child being unmarried she decides to seek help from Jack's family thinking he's still off adventuring somewhere in the world. Jack, Elena and Daisy are all at the ranch including baby Kate that Jack had no idea about. I thought this was a sweet story and it tied everything up. I actually felt a little melancholy at it's conclusion, like when people you love move away and you know you might never see them again. I didn't find this as good as the first two novels though. I would recommend this series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Concludes the trilogy. Singer Daisy Etheridge is on a run (do you sense a theme here?); even though things are looking up for her professionally, she's shot a man who was trying to kidnap her toddler daughter and her to a brothel. So she seeks out her daughter's father's family for safety and money--not knowing that Jack Wilkins himself is back from Australia. And he doesn't recognize her, at least not until he looks at her breasts. But the Wilkins family is facing other perils--a horse flu, a p Concludes the trilogy. Singer Daisy Etheridge is on a run (do you sense a theme here?); even though things are looking up for her professionally, she's shot a man who was trying to kidnap her toddler daughter and her to a brothel. So she seeks out her daughter's father's family for safety and money--not knowing that Jack Wilkins himself is back from Australia. And he doesn't recognize her, at least not until he looks at her breasts. But the Wilkins family is facing other perils--a horse flu, a played-out mine, and loans in the hands of their enemies. Can this couple, nay this whole extended family, find a happy resolution? I really liked these books. I especially liked the way that Warner followed up with couples from the preceding books--not the delirious, full-of-sparkly-happy-perfection-and-1000-kids that some romance series portray, but couples growing and dealing with new problems together. I also liked the way that Warner dealt with the medical realities of the post-Civil-War era in New Mexico, including especially reproductive health. And the heroines all save themselves! Plus!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Out of the author's books, this story was not my favorite. I felt that the continuation buts of the previous relationships were not interesting. That the oldest brother Brady was still obsessively in charge of everyone was annoying. This cannot be read separately from the other books nor can it be read out of order. I didn't really care for Daisy-it could have been her dream was off putting. I couldn't relate/understand that the dream being so all-emcompassing to put off the relationship with th Out of the author's books, this story was not my favorite. I felt that the continuation buts of the previous relationships were not interesting. That the oldest brother Brady was still obsessively in charge of everyone was annoying. This cannot be read separately from the other books nor can it be read out of order. I didn't really care for Daisy-it could have been her dream was off putting. I couldn't relate/understand that the dream being so all-emcompassing to put off the relationship with the father of your child. It was an interesting dynamic adding in the love triangle with Elena. However, there was part of me that wanted to root for Elena over Daisy because with reading the whole trilogy, the audience has an emotional attachment to Elena but not to Daisy. It is a bit hard to see Jack as truly changed given his story-how he's pined for one woman so long yet slept with who knows how many others? While he does seem to take to being a father, but the idea that he gives up everything for one woman is a bit much.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This last entry in the Blood Rose trilogy is more of a wrap up for a historical-romantic epic than the story of a single couple. Jack and Daisy - yeah, I guess they're good together once Jack pulls his head out of his butt (this takes a long time). But Warner also uses this book to show us how Jessica and Brady are negotiating their places as the heads of this household and equal partners (or are they?), and how Hank and Molly are handling the struggle to have children of their own. The drama th This last entry in the Blood Rose trilogy is more of a wrap up for a historical-romantic epic than the story of a single couple. Jack and Daisy - yeah, I guess they're good together once Jack pulls his head out of his butt (this takes a long time). But Warner also uses this book to show us how Jessica and Brady are negotiating their places as the heads of this household and equal partners (or are they?), and how Hank and Molly are handling the struggle to have children of their own. The drama that opened the trilogy, with the fight over the ranch, Jack's resentment towards his older brothers, and Elena's position signifying both the terrible past and the possibility of a hopeful future (I think Elena is really interesting in this book, although she doesn't play the part hinted at in the cover copy), is wrapped up beautifully in this book. The last chapter, set far in teh future, shows that this book isn't really about Jack and Daisy at all - it is about the family saga. Think A River Runs Through It.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brianne

    3.5 stars I liked this book. But then I Like Kaki Warner's style and am a sucker for the old west. There was A LOT in this book involving the whole family and I think as a result there was some skimping on the story of Jack and Daisy. This was a reunion story as well, so there was less 'relationship' development in the sense that they sorta knew each other already. and I just wasn't as blown away by their story as I was with Brady and Jessica and to a lesser extent Hank and Molly. I think there 3.5 stars I liked this book. But then I Like Kaki Warner's style and am a sucker for the old west. There was A LOT in this book involving the whole family and I think as a result there was some skimping on the story of Jack and Daisy. This was a reunion story as well, so there was less 'relationship' development in the sense that they sorta knew each other already. and I just wasn't as blown away by their story as I was with Brady and Jessica and to a lesser extent Hank and Molly. I think there was an element of real life in the wild west New Mexico Territory in the 1870s in the relationship, which does not always bring out fairy tale types of stories Religion had more of a presence in this story than in the other two in this trilogy

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