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"A truly inspiring story, in gorgeous prose, about one family's journey into blueberry farming. Delicious reading.", Naomi Wolf, author of "The End of America". The Blueberry Years is a mouth-watering and delightful memoir based on Jim Minick's trials and tribulations as an organic blueberry farmer. This story of one couple and one farm shows how our country's appetite for "A truly inspiring story, in gorgeous prose, about one family's journey into blueberry farming. Delicious reading.", Naomi Wolf, author of "The End of America". The Blueberry Years is a mouth-watering and delightful memoir based on Jim Minick's trials and tribulations as an organic blueberry farmer. This story of one couple and one farm shows how our country's appetite for cheap food affects how that food is grown, who does or does not grow it, and what happens to the land. But this memoir also calls attention to the fragile nature of our global food system and our nation's ambivalence about what we eat and where it comes from. Readers of Michael Polland and Barbara Kingsolver will savor the tale of Jim's farm and the exploration of larger issues facing agriculture in the United States like the rise of organic farming, the plight of small farmers, and the loneliness common in rural America. Ultimately, The Blueberry Years tells the story of a place shaped by a young couple's dream, and how that dream ripened into one of the mid-Atlantic's first certified-organic, pick-your-own blueberry farms.


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"A truly inspiring story, in gorgeous prose, about one family's journey into blueberry farming. Delicious reading.", Naomi Wolf, author of "The End of America". The Blueberry Years is a mouth-watering and delightful memoir based on Jim Minick's trials and tribulations as an organic blueberry farmer. This story of one couple and one farm shows how our country's appetite for "A truly inspiring story, in gorgeous prose, about one family's journey into blueberry farming. Delicious reading.", Naomi Wolf, author of "The End of America". The Blueberry Years is a mouth-watering and delightful memoir based on Jim Minick's trials and tribulations as an organic blueberry farmer. This story of one couple and one farm shows how our country's appetite for cheap food affects how that food is grown, who does or does not grow it, and what happens to the land. But this memoir also calls attention to the fragile nature of our global food system and our nation's ambivalence about what we eat and where it comes from. Readers of Michael Polland and Barbara Kingsolver will savor the tale of Jim's farm and the exploration of larger issues facing agriculture in the United States like the rise of organic farming, the plight of small farmers, and the loneliness common in rural America. Ultimately, The Blueberry Years tells the story of a place shaped by a young couple's dream, and how that dream ripened into one of the mid-Atlantic's first certified-organic, pick-your-own blueberry farms.

30 review for The Blueberry Years: A Memoir of Farm and Family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    So here's my issue with too many memoirs: I make photo books on photography websites for my kids, since I'm not patient or crafty enough to scrapbook. I go through all the pictures I took of them over the course of a year or two and try to cram all the best ones into forty or so pages. Inevitably, I end up with 80 or 100 pages on the first go and have to ruthlessly cull all those pictures down to a manageable number. I imagine it must be similar to write a memoir. You want to include everything i So here's my issue with too many memoirs: I make photo books on photography websites for my kids, since I'm not patient or crafty enough to scrapbook. I go through all the pictures I took of them over the course of a year or two and try to cram all the best ones into forty or so pages. Inevitably, I end up with 80 or 100 pages on the first go and have to ruthlessly cull all those pictures down to a manageable number. I imagine it must be similar to write a memoir. You want to include everything important, but after it's all down on the page, no one really wants to see four pictures of your toddler's face smeared with yogurt. And this is my repeated complaint with memoirs. Instead of leaving me wanting more, I usually think, "Enough, already!" Maybe I should avoid memoirs as a general rule, but I always come across interesting lives that I want to read about...and then it becomes too much. So this one -- the story of a couple who dreamed of being self-sufficient blueberry farmers/ homesteaders -- seemed to have a lot of promise, but got bogged down in the details. It doesn't help that the author is a professor/poet. (I found the poetic excerpts at the beginning of each section a tad painful.) Too many customers described, too many mundane details of their lives, just a little too much in general. And many of the chapters felt disconnected, like they were written as blog entries, or more likely in this case, newspaper columns, and then strung together, with information repeated or out of chronological order. I think I would have enjoyed the book more if it had lost 1/3 to 1/2 of its 300 pages in the editing process. (I fully admit that I skimmed or skipped most of his "blue interludes.")

  2. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    After reading Jim’s book, I’m left craving fresh blueberries and sadly they are out of season now! This book is an energetic tromp through ten years of creating a blueberry farm from a backwoods place that I would love to visit. The field stared as a dense mass of bull pines and finished under Jim and Sarah’s hands as blueberry heaven for their pickers. This book reminds me much of the Kingsolver/Hopps book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. I’m struck by the hard work it takes for the American farmer After reading Jim’s book, I’m left craving fresh blueberries and sadly they are out of season now! This book is an energetic tromp through ten years of creating a blueberry farm from a backwoods place that I would love to visit. The field stared as a dense mass of bull pines and finished under Jim and Sarah’s hands as blueberry heaven for their pickers. This book reminds me much of the Kingsolver/Hopps book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle. I’m struck by the hard work it takes for the American farmer to bring us our food and saddened by our lack of appreciation for that hard work when we succumb to buying produce grown halfway around the world! Through the hard work and triumph of getting the farm established, there still runs a sentiment of loneliness and longing -- a longing for cultivating his art of writing, a longing for the land, and a longing to continue life’s journey wandering toward satisfying endeavors. I appreciate Jim’s attitude toward children, sustainability and the desire for creative endeavors. His writing style is makes me feel as if I’m sitting on the front porch with a glass of tea enjoying a summer evening and his occasional disclosure of life’s less than pleasant moments add a humorous honesty to his story. He structures his memoir in a way that keeps the reader going wondering what triumph or calamity might happen next and pushing them toward the end to see what really happens with that blueberry field but more importantly what will Jim and Sarah do next and do they ever have the chance to own that perfect piece of land they visited in Wythe county. This book is highly recommended to any who can appreciate the struggles to realize a dream, for anyone who has been raised in the country (and knows how hard it is), currently lives in the country or someday wants to return to the country. If you are into sustainability, ecological responsibility, being green or being a locavore, then don’t miss this one. I hope this book will give Jim the national exposure he deserves.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Caley

    While I enjoyed this memoir, there was something very... highschool-ish about the writing. The strange interludes where Minick tries his hand at poetry were just bad and the chapter sequencing was completely off. Needs some major polishing. But the story itself is very strong. I loved vicariously tasting the blueberries and romping through the fields, learning about the tough job of working the land. It's a decent read for adult memoir lovers, but best suited for a younger audience. While I enjoyed this memoir, there was something very... highschool-ish about the writing. The strange interludes where Minick tries his hand at poetry were just bad and the chapter sequencing was completely off. Needs some major polishing. But the story itself is very strong. I loved vicariously tasting the blueberries and romping through the fields, learning about the tough job of working the land. It's a decent read for adult memoir lovers, but best suited for a younger audience.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    A nice warm story of Jim and Sarah's struggles to become Blueberry Farmers...which really started out as a summer thing for them when their teaching schedules allowed it. It of course became all encompassing in their lives...which they grew to love, in spite of the hardships involved. A nice warm story of Jim and Sarah's struggles to become Blueberry Farmers...which really started out as a summer thing for them when their teaching schedules allowed it. It of course became all encompassing in their lives...which they grew to love, in spite of the hardships involved.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    A charming narrative of one couple's dream to own and operate an organic blueberry farm in Virginia, all while learning a lot about farming, and its difficulties, along the way. The book does have a sad ending, one that the author acknowledges at the beginning of the book. One of the most interesting things about this book was its cross genre nature, as Jim Minick not only tells of the farm and his own family history, which is packed with a wide variety of characters, but also the history of blu A charming narrative of one couple's dream to own and operate an organic blueberry farm in Virginia, all while learning a lot about farming, and its difficulties, along the way. The book does have a sad ending, one that the author acknowledges at the beginning of the book. One of the most interesting things about this book was its cross genre nature, as Jim Minick not only tells of the farm and his own family history, which is packed with a wide variety of characters, but also the history of blueberry farming and the organic movement in the United States, in a series of blue interludes. Some of these chapters read like poems, others like newspaper articles, and there are also the blueberry recipes in the back of the book to keep you coming back for more. An enjoyable read, and one that I will gladly recommend to those who are interested in the small farm movement.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    This is a wonderful, warm, and honest story about attempting to be more self-sufficient while still looking for community. I enjoyed the short chapter stories describing the hard work at preparing the land and planting and caring for the blueberry bushes. My Dad grew up in Otter Lake, Michigan and worked for Mr. Elliott of Blueberry Lane, developer of the late-season Elliott Blueberry. I fondly remember picking those giant blueberries when we visited my grandparents. It was a treat to get to know This is a wonderful, warm, and honest story about attempting to be more self-sufficient while still looking for community. I enjoyed the short chapter stories describing the hard work at preparing the land and planting and caring for the blueberry bushes. My Dad grew up in Otter Lake, Michigan and worked for Mr. Elliott of Blueberry Lane, developer of the late-season Elliott Blueberry. I fondly remember picking those giant blueberries when we visited my grandparents. It was a treat to get to know some of the Jim and Sarah's neighbors and regular pickers. I think that was a start on the community they were looking for but sometimes, you have to look elsewhere too. This was a delight to read, even through their difficult times. Looking forward to trying a few of the recipes too!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Florence

    A couple of city folks bought a 90 acre homestead in Floyd County Virginia and planted 1000 blueberry bushes. There. That sounds easy. To realize their dream of having a "pick your own" farm they first had to clear the land which had lain fallow for decades. Then they had to enrich the soil. And finally they had to protect their precious plants from birds, raccoons, insects, weeds, the weather, and rampaging children. All of this was a lot more work than the Minicks had counted on but for a few A couple of city folks bought a 90 acre homestead in Floyd County Virginia and planted 1000 blueberry bushes. There. That sounds easy. To realize their dream of having a "pick your own" farm they first had to clear the land which had lain fallow for decades. Then they had to enrich the soil. And finally they had to protect their precious plants from birds, raccoons, insects, weeds, the weather, and rampaging children. All of this was a lot more work than the Minicks had counted on but for a few seasons all was good and their land produced a bounty of fruit. The idyllic days had to end some time and they make for lots of amusing anecdotes about community and oddball neighbors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I fell into the dreaded reading slump during my reading of this book. It had nothing to do with the novel! This was an enjoyable look into one couple's foray into blueberry farming. The chapters are many but short, with interesting tidbits about blueberries as well as pictures of the farm and its pickers and berries. There are many scrumptious recipes at the end, too. I'm glad this book chose me; I recommend reading this memoir to anyone who enjoys them. ... PS: Make sure you have fresh blueberr I fell into the dreaded reading slump during my reading of this book. It had nothing to do with the novel! This was an enjoyable look into one couple's foray into blueberry farming. The chapters are many but short, with interesting tidbits about blueberries as well as pictures of the farm and its pickers and berries. There are many scrumptious recipes at the end, too. I'm glad this book chose me; I recommend reading this memoir to anyone who enjoys them. ... PS: Make sure you have fresh blueberries on hand while reading this one! You'll want to pop them into your mouth as you read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Holly Dickson-Ramos

    I picked this book up hoping to dip into an interesting memoir and learn a bit about growing blueberries. Although the pace was a little slower than I prefer, I enjoyed the story and absorbed some tips for tending my own bushes. Minick writes well and does a beautiful job not only relating incidents and describing facts, but also conveying the feelings associated with people and happenings during the blueberry years.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Barnes Deeg

    An honest and inspiring journey of a couple setting out to farm. The narrative arc is interrupted by blue interludes - brief history lessons about the fruit's origins, impacts, and inspirations - that make the book that much richer. Recipes are tucked in the back and delicious to make. A lovely read. An honest and inspiring journey of a couple setting out to farm. The narrative arc is interrupted by blue interludes - brief history lessons about the fruit's origins, impacts, and inspirations - that make the book that much richer. Recipes are tucked in the back and delicious to make. A lovely read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    A gentle farming memoir. Emotionally expressive. Each chapter is a little snippet describing some incident or aspect of this decade of the author's life. A slightly sour or cynical view of fundamentalist Christians leaks through here and there. A good choice for readers who like a meandering, gently-paced tale. A gentle farming memoir. Emotionally expressive. Each chapter is a little snippet describing some incident or aspect of this decade of the author's life. A slightly sour or cynical view of fundamentalist Christians leaks through here and there. A good choice for readers who like a meandering, gently-paced tale.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I found the pacing in this book very difficult. I wanted to finish it but it definitely felt like a slog. I was hoping for something as engaging as Barbara Kingsolver's Animal Vegetable Miracle, but this was not it. I found the pacing in this book very difficult. I wanted to finish it but it definitely felt like a slog. I was hoping for something as engaging as Barbara Kingsolver's Animal Vegetable Miracle, but this was not it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Great anecdotes and the truth about the grit and devotion it takes to keep up a 1,000 bush blueberry plot.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I enjoyed reading the experience of blueberry farming from the dream, to the start up & finally the finish. Farmers of any kind are definitely under appreciated.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Isha Erskine

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book, however I wish the ending was somewhat spoiled in the introduction. Otherwise I’d go 5 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vickie

    Gets a bit preachy at times. Still a good read

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    Fun collection of essays about his experiences with growing and selling organic blueberries. More entertaining than it sounds!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Coquille Fleur

    Definitely makes me want to eat blueberries!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tryphena Schrock

    Update: I'm upgrading this to four stars after realizing how much it's living on in my imagination. Also, I've enjoyed blueberries more this spring than I ever have before, and the book has somehow smuggled its way into several conversations. This is a reread after all! I loved this time spent on Jim and Sarah's farm, down country roads in Floyd County. The years of grueling work in the sun and the rain to make their dream of owning a pick-your-own blueberry patch a reality, falling trees, encoun Update: I'm upgrading this to four stars after realizing how much it's living on in my imagination. Also, I've enjoyed blueberries more this spring than I ever have before, and the book has somehow smuggled its way into several conversations. This is a reread after all! I loved this time spent on Jim and Sarah's farm, down country roads in Floyd County. The years of grueling work in the sun and the rain to make their dream of owning a pick-your-own blueberry patch a reality, falling trees, encounters with raccoons and copperheads, hazardous trips down the field on neighbor Joe's ancient tractor. Neighbor Joe who swears by his chemical fertilizer and good-naturedly ribs Jim for their attempts to go organic. And that one time they harvested honey, first and last time. This is not a book I will return to but it was a joy to read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Brothers

    "[Berries] seem offered to us not so much for food as for sociality, inviting us to a picnic with Nature. We pluck and eat in remembrance of her. It is a sort of sacrament--a Communion--the not forbidden fruits, which no serpent tempts us to eat." --Henry David Thoreau, Autumnal Tints, 1862. Sometimes it's just lovely to move inside someone's world for a spell. I usually do this by reading fiction, by escaping into a pretend but parallel world that allows me to get away from my own for a bit. And "[Berries] seem offered to us not so much for food as for sociality, inviting us to a picnic with Nature. We pluck and eat in remembrance of her. It is a sort of sacrament--a Communion--the not forbidden fruits, which no serpent tempts us to eat." --Henry David Thoreau, Autumnal Tints, 1862. Sometimes it's just lovely to move inside someone's world for a spell. I usually do this by reading fiction, by escaping into a pretend but parallel world that allows me to get away from my own for a bit. And while I perennially chide myself for my lack of interest in non-fiction, I have to say that this year has allowed me to live inside some pretty cool places. I started with The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (a wonderful book and one that has sparked more than a little debate in my own home!). More have followed, and I'm not sad. Last night I closed Jim Minick's The Blueberry Years and sighed a little, like I have every night since I started this book, at the thought of all those long hours until breakfast. I've been scarfing down blueberries like a mad woman since Minick's poetic prose began to take hold of me. Poet, scholar, farmer, and writer, Minick takes us along on his blueberry quest. He and his sweet wife want a simpler life, one that will allow them to live as "homesteaders," close to, from, and connected with their land. They want to grow their own food, raise their mutts in peace, and commune with nature and their art. What follows is an engaging narrative of their adventures in blueberry farming, complete with reflections on their pickers (Mennonites, hippies, and real estate moguls). His dogs even learn to pick the berries--they sidle up to a bush, sniff for the ripe ones, and then slobber their harvest into the muzzles. Minick is a poet; his collections read like a rich cobbler--layered, surprising bursts of flavor, comforting, filling. And so does this memoir, arranged around scientific explanations, the anthropology of berry-picking, and song lyrics: I found my thrill...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I did not expect to LOVE this book as much as I did. I was interested in it, but the author's writing is so beautiful, yet funny and warm, that I just flew through reading it. Jim and Sarah Minick are both teachers who long to quit their jobs for a simpler life in the country. They get the opportunity to move to Virginia and start an organic blueberry farm. They can still work their day jobs as teachers and run the pick-your-own farm during the summer, hoping that eventually the income from the I did not expect to LOVE this book as much as I did. I was interested in it, but the author's writing is so beautiful, yet funny and warm, that I just flew through reading it. Jim and Sarah Minick are both teachers who long to quit their jobs for a simpler life in the country. They get the opportunity to move to Virginia and start an organic blueberry farm. They can still work their day jobs as teachers and run the pick-your-own farm during the summer, hoping that eventually the income from the farm can replace their day jobs. LOTS of work was put into getting the farm starting and planting 1,000 blueberry bushes. Even though the peak of their business was 6 weeks in the summer, Jim did not anticipate how much year round work there would be with mowing, mulching, pruning, etc. After more than a decade, they decide that running their blueberry farm is no longer their dream and they move to another farm property nearby. They still enjoy living in the country and growing their own food, but they finally realized the blueberries were not going to financially support them. Even though some may say they failed or quit, their experience was overall a good one and I don't think either of them would regret doing it. And despite leaving their blueberry farm Jim still has a passion for the fruits and they continue to grow them for their own household. There are also quite a few recipes at the end of the book to sample! I just loved how this book was written. Jim tells their story of buying the farm, planting and tending the blueberry bushes and opening for business. But, he also intersperses this with stories of regular customers, friends, neighbors, crazy customers, etc. I also related to them since they have chosen to not have children and deal with trying to find friends and fit into their new community. I would definitely recommend this one!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Csaki

    I had a hard time coming up with a numerical rating for this book. At its best moments, it reminds me of that "Humans of New York" blog--interesting vignettes of the widely diverse visitors who come to the author's pick-your-own blueberry farm. There are also many enjoyable moments of poignant introspection and charming storytelling that rank among the better of the farm-dream genre. The book desperately needs some editing, however. It tries to weave a few different threads together, jumping bac I had a hard time coming up with a numerical rating for this book. At its best moments, it reminds me of that "Humans of New York" blog--interesting vignettes of the widely diverse visitors who come to the author's pick-your-own blueberry farm. There are also many enjoyable moments of poignant introspection and charming storytelling that rank among the better of the farm-dream genre. The book desperately needs some editing, however. It tries to weave a few different threads together, jumping back and forth from one to the next throughout the narrative, but it's less than fully successful. And at times the author waxes a little too poetic. He doesn't seem to be able to sort out which stories are worth including and which aren't. With better structure and a culling of the weaker tales, it could be a real gem. As it stands, it's more like a diamond in the rough.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Moore

    It really is hard work keeping a blueberry farm! I love to pick them and eat them, but I don't think I'd be cut out for tending to them. Jim and Sarah learned a lot in their years as berry farmers. What seemed to be the best part of their enterprise, other than the sweet taste of blue, was all the friends they made. I enjoyed the memoir but I also liked the blueberry facts and trivia. There are some tasty recipes to try in the back of the book ... one called Blueberry Grunt. If I recall it is a It really is hard work keeping a blueberry farm! I love to pick them and eat them, but I don't think I'd be cut out for tending to them. Jim and Sarah learned a lot in their years as berry farmers. What seemed to be the best part of their enterprise, other than the sweet taste of blue, was all the friends they made. I enjoyed the memoir but I also liked the blueberry facts and trivia. There are some tasty recipes to try in the back of the book ... one called Blueberry Grunt. If I recall it is a sort of steamed blueberry dumpling and it got its name from the sound made by the berries as they cooked. That is neat ... it makes me imagine that berries have feelings too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Connie T.

    Years ago my husband and I moved to the country in the hopes of homesteading, so I could relate to Jim and Sarah's plan, their love of the land, and the lifestyle they tried to pursue. Unlike the Minick's, we didn't have the resources to pull it off. Having said that, I'm always intrigued by the stories of people who attempt to leave the rat race behind and try to live a more simple lifestyle. I enjoyed this glimpse into the Minick's life. I liked the book but not enough to give it 3 stars. It d Years ago my husband and I moved to the country in the hopes of homesteading, so I could relate to Jim and Sarah's plan, their love of the land, and the lifestyle they tried to pursue. Unlike the Minick's, we didn't have the resources to pull it off. Having said that, I'm always intrigued by the stories of people who attempt to leave the rat race behind and try to live a more simple lifestyle. I enjoyed this glimpse into the Minick's life. I liked the book but not enough to give it 3 stars. It didn't "grab me." I wish I could give it 2 1/2 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I thought I would love this book. I like hearing about how people go back to basics and work the land...BUT I could not get into this at all. There were some interesting characters but I didn't feel like I got to really know anyone. I also cringed a bit with what I felt was a sense of entitlement on the author's part. It seemed like he and his wife decided to homestead, and they just assumed all their neighbors would want to get in on the "barn raising." Feelings were hurt, it seems, when they d I thought I would love this book. I like hearing about how people go back to basics and work the land...BUT I could not get into this at all. There were some interesting characters but I didn't feel like I got to really know anyone. I also cringed a bit with what I felt was a sense of entitlement on the author's part. It seemed like he and his wife decided to homestead, and they just assumed all their neighbors would want to get in on the "barn raising." Feelings were hurt, it seems, when they didn't. I kept having to force myself to pick it back up.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I enjoyed reading about Jim and Sarah's decision to start a blueberry farm on top of their day jobs as teachers, and all the work that went into educating themselves and remaining true to their philosophies while establishing their organic farm on formerly forested land. There was a lot in this book worthy of more than three stars, but it really bogged down with scores of anecdotes of individuals who picked berries at the farm. I’m sure these are meaningful to the author, but most are simply no I enjoyed reading about Jim and Sarah's decision to start a blueberry farm on top of their day jobs as teachers, and all the work that went into educating themselves and remaining true to their philosophies while establishing their organic farm on formerly forested land. There was a lot in this book worthy of more than three stars, but it really bogged down with scores of anecdotes of individuals who picked berries at the farm. I’m sure these are meaningful to the author, but most are simply not that interesting to a reader, or at least this reader. I need to go eat some blueberries now.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Every once in a while, I have the dream to go live in the country and give farming a whirl. I loved Animal, Vegetable, Miracle and it is more about a connection with the land, getting back to something real and tangible that makes the world better. This book is about one couples dream to have blueberry farming support them so they can free more time to art, and what happens when dream meets reality.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Curran

    I really enjoyed this book perhaps in part because I am familiar with the hills and hollers of Floyd County. At the same time, the book was packed with insight, inspiration and even a little adventure. I highly recommend it to anyone who has ever dreamed of living off the land on their own Walden Pond.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

    Jim's story is not the typical "young folks go down on the farm to find peace and harmony"-style tale. Yes, that's how it starts. But the evolution of the farm, the sociology of the community, the hard business truths of organic farming and the ultimate melancholy ending run against the tide of current back-to-the-land books. Jim's story is not the typical "young folks go down on the farm to find peace and harmony"-style tale. Yes, that's how it starts. But the evolution of the farm, the sociology of the community, the hard business truths of organic farming and the ultimate melancholy ending run against the tide of current back-to-the-land books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The blueberry facts are very interesting. The story is boring and the writing has a very forced feeling. He's trying to be lyrical and I think he's going against his natural voice trying to write in an expected style instead of as himself. I hope by now someone has enlightened him as to side-by-side toilets being for different types of human waste. The blueberry facts are very interesting. The story is boring and the writing has a very forced feeling. He's trying to be lyrical and I think he's going against his natural voice trying to write in an expected style instead of as himself. I hope by now someone has enlightened him as to side-by-side toilets being for different types of human waste.

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