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My eyes, perversely shaken open, gazed for an instant upon a sight which no human creature could even imagine without panic, fear and physical exhaustion... A wax museum in London boasts a new exhibit, which no man has seen and remained sane... A businessman is trapped in a train carriage with a madman who claims to have created a new and efficient method of capital punishm My eyes, perversely shaken open, gazed for an instant upon a sight which no human creature could even imagine without panic, fear and physical exhaustion... A wax museum in London boasts a new exhibit, which no man has seen and remained sane... A businessman is trapped in a train carriage with a madman who claims to have created a new and efficient method of capital punishment... A doctor plans a horrible revenge, using as his murder weapon an insect believed capable of consuming the human soul... Within these pages, some of H P Lovecraft's more obscure works of horror and science fiction can be found, including several fantastic tales from his celebrated Cthulhu Mythos. No true Lovecraft aficionado dare be without this volume.


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My eyes, perversely shaken open, gazed for an instant upon a sight which no human creature could even imagine without panic, fear and physical exhaustion... A wax museum in London boasts a new exhibit, which no man has seen and remained sane... A businessman is trapped in a train carriage with a madman who claims to have created a new and efficient method of capital punishm My eyes, perversely shaken open, gazed for an instant upon a sight which no human creature could even imagine without panic, fear and physical exhaustion... A wax museum in London boasts a new exhibit, which no man has seen and remained sane... A businessman is trapped in a train carriage with a madman who claims to have created a new and efficient method of capital punishment... A doctor plans a horrible revenge, using as his murder weapon an insect believed capable of consuming the human soul... Within these pages, some of H P Lovecraft's more obscure works of horror and science fiction can be found, including several fantastic tales from his celebrated Cthulhu Mythos. No true Lovecraft aficionado dare be without this volume.

30 review for The Horror in the Museum: Collected Short Stories Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    When I found this collection of short stories, I was a bit confused at first. Having read all of the Del Rey Lovecraft collections during the 1980s, and then worn them dog-eared in the decades that followed, I was sure I had read all of Lovecraft long ago. But, I only recognized one or two of the titles of these stories? Had someone discovered new Lovecraft? Well, I got my answer by reading the Introduction. These are all stories that Lovecraft “collaborated” on with other authors – often doing When I found this collection of short stories, I was a bit confused at first. Having read all of the Del Rey Lovecraft collections during the 1980s, and then worn them dog-eared in the decades that followed, I was sure I had read all of Lovecraft long ago. But, I only recognized one or two of the titles of these stories? Had someone discovered new Lovecraft? Well, I got my answer by reading the Introduction. These are all stories that Lovecraft “collaborated” on with other authors – often doing the hard labor of rewriting their vague ideas and turning them into fully-fledged stories for a few dollars (when they bothered to pay) and then receiving no credit when they published under their own name. Only a few of these did show up in those Del Rey collections, and they are far from the best ones. I greatly enjoyed the opportunity to read new-to-me Lovecraft, so many years after discovering him. I will review each story separately, as I have done for the previous collections reviewed on goodreads. “The Green Meadow” was written in collaboration with Winifred Virginia Jackson, and is a poetic or mythic prose tale of doom that cuts off in the middle to suggest the destruction of its world of origin. It is full of the kind of evocative visuals that Lovecraft excelled in, but with a somewhat different flavor. “Poetry and the Gods” was written with Anna Helen Crofts and concerns an aesthete who dreams that he will one day usher in a new era of poetry and classical values – or at least serve one who does. It actually has a somewhat fascist sentiment, similar to the kinds of prose that was being written in Italy by Futurists. It seems less obviously Lovecraftian than the typical dread of “gods” and other supernatural powers. “The Crawling Chaos” is another collaboration with Jackson and uses an opium dream as its premise, but soon goes into much the same kind of apocalyptic vision we saw in “Green Meadow.” I have reviewed it previously with the collection “The Doom That Came to Sarnath.” “The Horror at Martin’s Beach” was written in collaboration with Sonia Haft Greene, the woman to whom Lovecraft was briefly and unhappily married. It is a typical sea monster story, with definitely Lovecraftian elements, which actually parallels the monster movie “Gorgo” in that it begins with the discovery of a large infant, only to have the even larger adult version come looking. “Imprisoned with the Pharoahs” was a collaboration with the famous Harry Houdini (it is understood that Lovecraft did most of the actual writing). I have covered this one in my review of The Tomb and Other Tales. “Two Black Bottles” is an interesting story about a pair of evil wizards located in a church that reminded me in some ways of “The Haunter of the Dark,” which is also centered around a church. It is one of several revisions Lovecraft made for Hazel Drake Heald. “The Thing in the Moonlight” is a dream or nightmare that Lovecraft told to J. Chapman Miske that was slightly altered after Lovecraft’s death by another writer, Donald Wandrei. It is included as a “fragment” in “The Tomb and other Tales,” and I have reviewed it there. “The Last Test” is the longest of the new piece to this point, and is Lovecraft’s “revision” of a story by Adolphe de Castro. Although it is basically a mad scientist story with some Bierce-ian elements, Lovecraft has slipped in references to some of his mythos gods, and ultimately the scientist turns out to be a wizard ala Charles Dexter Ward. There is an unusually prominent (for Lovecraft) female character/love interest, and a lot of high-level politics that to me rather slows the plot down, but it is ultimately satisfying. “The Curse of Yig” was written from an outline by Zealia B. Reed, and concerns an Indian snake god in the American Southwest. Lovecraft (or Reed) has improved its effectiveness by adding a double surprise ending: one surprise you clearly see coming, but then it is followed by a second which was in no way telegraphed. “The Electric Executioner” was another collaboration with de Castro, and for me it works somewhat better than “The Last Test,” not least because it is shorter. It uses the confinement of a railway car to create a claustrophobic environment for a man trapped with a lunatic. The payoff suggests that the madman may actually have been telling the truth, but goes further to suggest truths beyond even his knowledge, and ties in nicely with Lovecraft’s mythos monsters. “The Mound” is a very long story (65 fairly long pages), and to me the most satisfying new story so far. It is supposedly based on a bit of folklore passed along to Lovecraft by Zealia B. Reed, but unlike “The Curse of Yig,” it shows almost no sign of another author. It neatly works in the Lovecraft mythos, and partially explains how Cthulhu (rendered in this tale as “Tulu”) became such a prominent figure in it. Unlike “The Last Test,” it puts its length to good use in building up a new world and drawing the reader into it. It was not published in his lifetime, unfortunately. “Medusa’s Coil” has a similar structure to Lovecraft’s “The Picture in the House,” in that it involves a traveler seeking shelter in an apparently abandoned house only to hear a bizarre story told by its hermit-like inhabitant. It is another collaboration with Zealia B. Reed, but again it shows little sign of anyone else’s style but HPL’s. It manages to update Greek myth into his particular style and mythos, and the character of the artist has some parallels to “Pickman’s Model” as well. “The Trap” was a singular story produced from an idea of Lovecraft’s by the Reverend Henry St. Clair Whitehead. It involves the familiar story of a person “trapped” inside of a mirror, but uses extra-dimensional travel and an immortal warlock with some similarities to Joseph Curwen of “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward” to make the well-trodden ground appear novel. “The Man of Stone” is a Lovecraft re-write of a story by Hazel Drake Heald. It involves a love triangle and an unfortunate person petrified by chemical processes. It is written in a somewhat unlikely diary format (the author knows too much of what is to happen before it does, and also confesses far more than anyone should on paper), but is still a good chilling story, in part because the victim knows what is happening. “The Horror in the Museum” is another re-write of Heald, and it takes as its premise the story of a man forced to spend a night in a horrific setting, which was often used (and sometimes satired) by Bierce, Lovecraft, however, brings in an eldritch alien God and other mythos elements to produce one of the most frightening stories in the collection, which takes its name from this tale. I found “Winged Death,” also a collaboration with Hazel Drake Heald, to be a bit of a let-down after “Museum,” but that’s a tough act to follow. It involves a scientist who conspires to kill a rival with an infected fly (perhaps the first example of bacteriological warfare in a horror story), only to have a highly suitable revenge enacted upon him. “Out of the Aeons” once again was written in collaboration with Heald, and is about an ancient mummy that is brought to a small Boston museum and promptly becomes the focus of cult activity and madness. I was surprised to find a hint of the “Elder Gods vs. Old Ones” conflict that I had believed originated with August Derleth in this story. “The Horror in the Burying Ground” is, I think, the last of the Heald collaborations. It is something of a black comedy along the lines of “Herbert West: Reanimator” in which Lovecraft indulged his enjoyment of rustic legends and dialects. Next up is “Till A’ The Seas,” which was written with Lovecraft’s prodigy Robert Hayward Barlow when the latter was still a teenager (rumors among Lovecraft fans abound that the two were lovers). This story involves a dystopian image of the world drifting closer to the sun and human civilization dying in the heat over centuries. As an early climate change story, it will remind people of many more recent fictions. “The Disinterment” was a collaboration with Duane W. Rimel, intended to launch a new magazine that would be edited by them both. It involves a mad doctor, voodoo secrets, and a mysterious transplant. It is told from a subjective first-person point of view by a narrator who holds back the truth until the very end, making it similar in structure to “The Outsider.” “The Diary of Alonzo Typer” is a re-write of a story by William Lumley, told in the format of a series of journal entries. It hints at cosmic horrors of a “mythos” nature, but avoids specific references to most of Lovecraft’s gods. The “Necronomicon” and various other books do make an appearance, however, and the story is good on the whole, though the denouement is painfully predictable. “Within the Walls of Eryx,” written in collaboration with Kenneth J. Sterling, is included in “The Tomb and Other Tales,” and I have reviewed it there. It is a surprisingly conventional sci fi story of the period, although much darker and more critical of colonialism than would be typical at the time. The final story is “The Night Ocean,” also written with Barlow. It is a rather poetic and even hopeful story of horror coming from the seas, but its resolution is unsatisfying, perhaps because Barlow and Lovecraft together couldn’t bring themselves down from their delight in one another’s company enough to be really frightened for the future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Harris

    A collection of most of H.P. Lovecraft’s “revisions,” “The Horror in the Museum” showcases the tales co-written by Lovecraft and other would be weird tale writers and correspondents. Ostensibly consisting of stories edited by Lovecraft most, in practice, were completely ghost written by him following a few sparse plot points and published under another’s name. While for the most part lacking the refinement of Lovecraft’s solo works, there are still some very interesting stories included. Whether A collection of most of H.P. Lovecraft’s “revisions,” “The Horror in the Museum” showcases the tales co-written by Lovecraft and other would be weird tale writers and correspondents. Ostensibly consisting of stories edited by Lovecraft most, in practice, were completely ghost written by him following a few sparse plot points and published under another’s name. While for the most part lacking the refinement of Lovecraft’s solo works, there are still some very interesting stories included. Whether Lovecraft himself was experimenting or through the interaction between himself and another writer, many of these tales tackle subjects and ideas not often seen in Lovecraft’s own stories. Other settings are featured (California, Oklahoma, Mexico, even Venus) and many have a much greater use of interpersonal relationships (especially regarding women). In addition, he develops a lot of the ideas of a shared “Cthulhu” universe by including cameo appearances by many of the weird forbidden tomes, beings, and cults created by himself and others in these revisions. By no means, however, can any of these stories be counted among Lovecraft’s best. At times, they reflect the absolute worst writing excesses that he has been accused of (overly purple prose, needless verbosity, etc.) and include by far the worst Lovecraft story I’d ever read, Medusa’s Coil. A few read more like simple writing exercises than complete, coherent short stories. There are few gems included, however that make amusing and creepy, if not masterful, reads; I particularly liked “The Curse of Yig,” written with Zealia Bishop, a spooky tale set on the Oklahoma prairie, and “Winged Death,” with Hazel Heald. The namesake story “The Horror in the Museum,” also with Heald, is probably one of the most self-referencing stories in the “Cthulhu Mythos” and is pretty wacky, in a fun way. Still, this collection is not the best place to start for people new to Lovecraft’s writing. Postscript: There seem to be numerous editions of the collection banging around, often containing or neglecting various stories; this a review of the Wordsworth Edition, part of the Tales of Mystery and the Supernatural Series

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    It's always difficult to rate short story collections, because while there are inevitably some gems, there is also invariably some dross. That is certainly true of this second volume of Lovecraft's short stories. This collection covers those stories which are not generally considered to be part of Lovecraft's Mythos Cycle, the series of loosely connected tales where C'thulhu and the Elder Gods make their first appearance. That said, several of the stories, such as The Curse of Yig, The Mound, th It's always difficult to rate short story collections, because while there are inevitably some gems, there is also invariably some dross. That is certainly true of this second volume of Lovecraft's short stories. This collection covers those stories which are not generally considered to be part of Lovecraft's Mythos Cycle, the series of loosely connected tales where C'thulhu and the Elder Gods make their first appearance. That said, several of the stories, such as The Curse of Yig, The Mound, the titular story -- The Horror in the Museum, and The Diary of Alonzo Typer in this collection that do touch on the Mythos. Several of the Mythos mainstays, such as the Book of Eibon and Nameless Cults, make their first appearances in these stories. However, there are also other stories completely unrelated to the Mythos cycle. Overall, the collection seems to be fairly random, without any unifying theme apart from their authorship. The book would have been enhanced if the tales had been organized into Mythos and Non-Mythos stories, as I've seen in other H.P. Lovecraft collections, or if one or the other had simply been omitted. My favorite story in the collection was Till A' the Seas, a short mediation on the last day of the last surviving human on an Earth destroyed by global warming (not man-made global warming in the story, but poignant nonetheless). I would suggest skipping The Green Meadow and Poetry and the Gods, neither of which made much sense.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bekki Pate

    To say I "enjoyed reading" this book is a bit misleading - I found it quite difficult to read - not because it was in any way boring, but because the language was a bit more flowery than I am used to, with words that seemed to be crammed into the pages. I kept picking it up and putting it down in favour of "easier" reads. I'd had it on my list for about a year and decided to just get in there and read the thing. Some stories I found a bit too "sci-fi" for me, but most of them I absolutely loved, To say I "enjoyed reading" this book is a bit misleading - I found it quite difficult to read - not because it was in any way boring, but because the language was a bit more flowery than I am used to, with words that seemed to be crammed into the pages. I kept picking it up and putting it down in favour of "easier" reads. I'd had it on my list for about a year and decided to just get in there and read the thing. Some stories I found a bit too "sci-fi" for me, but most of them I absolutely loved, and some of them scared me to death - especially The Mound and Medusa's coil. Lovecraft just has a knack for taking something grotesque and turning it against you, so that after reading you're checking in cupboards and under your bed for monsters. So when I say it was a struggle - I don't mean that the stories were bad - I mean that you have to absolutely tune everything else out of your brain, sit uninterrupted in silence somewhere and take in every single word, and once you have achieved that - what reveals itself is a beautifully woven collection of stories. Some people may read Lovecraft easily - breezing through each page - I am not one of them unfortunately. So in summary - a well worth while read, but not the type of book you can pick up and read anywhere.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Argetoianu

    Rating: 2,5 ⭐️⭐️ Don’t know how to rate this, some stories were pretty good and others were just boring and not interesting at all.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Lambert

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. some stories are fantastic, anda will fold in the dark recesses of your brain for generations. but as go many short story collections, some are misses (too many diaries). writing style is not totally easily to read, and certain words are overused. getting introduced to cosmic horror here, in a variety of methodologies, is fun my faves, apologies for the recency bias: -soul goes in insect, the concept is killer- "Winged Death" -nihilism 101, the last man- "til a' the seas" -"the night ocean"- yay I g some stories are fantastic, anda will fold in the dark recesses of your brain for generations. but as go many short story collections, some are misses (too many diaries). writing style is not totally easily to read, and certain words are overused. getting introduced to cosmic horror here, in a variety of methodologies, is fun my faves, apologies for the recency bias: -soul goes in insect, the concept is killer- "Winged Death" -nihilism 101, the last man- "til a' the seas" -"the night ocean"- yay I got to read this by an ocean

  7. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    I am amazed with your storytelling, great job! If you allow, may I share your book to facebook in order to reach more readers? And by the way, NovelStar is currently conducting a writing competition - You have a great potential. If you wish to join, link is attached herein. https://author.starlight.ink/essay/in... (PC) http://app.novelstar.top/index/index/... (APP) you wish to join. I am amazed with your storytelling, great job! If you allow, may I share your book to facebook in order to reach more readers? And by the way, NovelStar is currently conducting a writing competition - You have a great potential. If you wish to join, link is attached herein. https://author.starlight.ink/essay/in... (PC) http://app.novelstar.top/index/index/... (APP) you wish to join.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    Utterly creepy...definitely not my cup of tea...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Marano

    Disappointed. I think my hopes were too high.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew H

    Great many stories but doesn't have as good an overall theme cohesiveness as the first volume. Still good though. Great many stories but doesn't have as good an overall theme cohesiveness as the first volume. Still good though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alba

    A collection of over a dozen Lovecraft stories (Volume 2). I really enjoyed some, while others not so much. Most of these stories were ghost written my Lovecraft and published under other authors (including one 'by' Harry Houdini, the escapist!) or never published at all. The best stories (to me) were: Imprisoned with the Pharaohs (getting stuck in an Egyptian pyramid), The Mound (discovering the secret of what's underneath an ancient haunted mound in Nebraska), Medusa's Coil (an old house haunt A collection of over a dozen Lovecraft stories (Volume 2). I really enjoyed some, while others not so much. Most of these stories were ghost written my Lovecraft and published under other authors (including one 'by' Harry Houdini, the escapist!) or never published at all. The best stories (to me) were: Imprisoned with the Pharaohs (getting stuck in an Egyptian pyramid), The Mound (discovering the secret of what's underneath an ancient haunted mound in Nebraska), Medusa's Coil (an old house haunted by the presence of the former terrifying heiress), The Horror in the Museum (scary story about sleeping the night in a wax museum), Winged Death (revenge tale of death by stinging insect), Out of the Aeons (another museum, this one haunted by the presence of a Polynesian mummy) and Within the Walls of Eryx (colonisation on Venus that leads to a terrifying tale of being trapped in a labyrinth. This is one of the few written stories that actually scared the life out of me, and its probably not what you'd expect!). In typical Lovecraft fashion, the real world is woven with tales of aliens, Old Ones, gods like Yig, Cthulu, Shun-Niggurath, Ghatanthoa and more. Scifi, horror, mystery, and fantasy all wrapped up in one. Most of these stories are shorter than Vol 1, between 10-25 pages. Usually, there's a narrator, a bit too curious for their own good (reminiscent of contemporary and influencer MR James), often telling a tale to someone, listening to someone else's tale, or keeping a diary about their terrible experiences, who gets mixed up in something terrifying and supernatural. Some of the tales, esp. the shorter ones, run together. But in general, a great dive into Lovecraft's more obscure and oft overlooked writings, with a solid intro to tell you the backstory of some of the tales in this book. If you're a fan of Lovecraft, most of these tales will be fascinating!! However, if you're just getting into Lovecraft, I'd say start with the more classic tales in Vol. 1, which is called Whisperer in Darkness (notably, the stories I recommend are: At the Mountains of Madness, the Call of Cthulu, the Case of Charles Dexter Moore and the Dunwich Horror).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    If the first volume of Lovecraft's stories contained many tales that were overlong, the second volume contains many that are tantalisingly short, and somehow I wanted them to continue. There are a few scrappy stories that don't amount to much, but the general quality of stories is very high. This is all the more surprising, as the stories were written in collaboration with other authors. Intriguingly, one tale was written in collaboration with Harry Houdini and contains an escapologist (no prizes If the first volume of Lovecraft's stories contained many tales that were overlong, the second volume contains many that are tantalisingly short, and somehow I wanted them to continue. There are a few scrappy stories that don't amount to much, but the general quality of stories is very high. This is all the more surprising, as the stories were written in collaboration with other authors. Intriguingly, one tale was written in collaboration with Harry Houdini and contains an escapologist (no prizes for guessing who this represents) who falls foul of superstitious Egyptians and encounters long-dead gods. As in the first volume, portrayals of other races and nations are essentially racist, though there are a few prominent female characters here who we can identify with. It would be stretching a point to say that Lovecraft's stories possess a sense of justice or poetic justice. However, there is often a strange morality that runs through them, however imperfectly. The forces of darkness are generally destroyed or contained, a plot necessity since otherwise there would be nobody to narrate the stories, and nobody to listen to the narration. However, the human agents are also frequently hoisted by their own petard. Those who become consumed by study of the darker forces will be destroyed or corrupted by them. Vicious revengers will fall victim to their instruments of revenge. Avaricious adventurers will become trapped by their own greed. The stories also touch on the famous Cthulhu Mythos. However, whereas each tale in The Whisperer in Darkness adds to our knowledge of that horrific world, here the stories are not so much extensions as side-orders, giving us a little extra information, but not developing our understanding of that world. Overall, the stories are a notch down on the first volume, but with many exciting moments that make this another good read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    This is the second volume in a set of 4, all of which are cheap as chips at £2.99 - which is an absolute bargain for the amount of content in each. Having decided I ought to improve my knowledge of Lovecraft's work, which a few months ago stood at approximately nil, I've set out to read all four of these collections. Now that I've started, I think it's fair to say I've become a little obsessed and, while forcing myself to take a break from Lovecraft to read some other things, I've already got my This is the second volume in a set of 4, all of which are cheap as chips at £2.99 - which is an absolute bargain for the amount of content in each. Having decided I ought to improve my knowledge of Lovecraft's work, which a few months ago stood at approximately nil, I've set out to read all four of these collections. Now that I've started, I think it's fair to say I've become a little obsessed and, while forcing myself to take a break from Lovecraft to read some other things, I've already got my mind set on volume 3. Lovecraft's prose is incredible when compared to that most modern horror writers. Often narrated in the first person - either as one primarily involved, or as a peripheral figure with a window of knowledge into the strange happenings - his descriptions are so detailed, dense and evocative that one gets drawn by the sheer earnestness of his accounts into an immersive suspension of disbelief. It is to be expected in a collection such as this that some tales are going to be better than others, and it certainly is the case that some are sublime while others are less so, although there is a consistency of a general sort that the stories contained within this book are really rather good.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angelov Andrej

    Comparing this to ,,The Whisperer in Darkness" this is a far inferior book. The first book while being slow at times, and some of the stories just being decent it made up for the amazing short stories present in the book. While in this second book of collected short stories its like finding a pin in sand. There were a few gems that stuck out and were interesting from start to finish, it just doesn't feel right to put it on the same level as the first book. Most of the stories and characters were Comparing this to ,,The Whisperer in Darkness" this is a far inferior book. The first book while being slow at times, and some of the stories just being decent it made up for the amazing short stories present in the book. While in this second book of collected short stories its like finding a pin in sand. There were a few gems that stuck out and were interesting from start to finish, it just doesn't feel right to put it on the same level as the first book. Most of the stories and characters were forgettable and uninteresting and most of the book felt very slow at times. While buying the four collections of short stories from the local bookstore was cheap and I do plan on reading the other two, I wouldn't reread this book and you should only read it if you want everything Lovecraft.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Hmmmm....to be honest this does feel like a 'B' selection of Minecraft material..some of it is really good but some of it meanders and plods a bit and though undoubtedly the master of flowery and esoteric language many of these tales I feel the narrative is stilted by the slow build of atmosphere. Many of these tales where rewrites..co-writes or essentially tales ghost written for other names. As such there is a tone of the author generally but sometimes tales that don't engage as much as others h Hmmmm....to be honest this does feel like a 'B' selection of Minecraft material..some of it is really good but some of it meanders and plods a bit and though undoubtedly the master of flowery and esoteric language many of these tales I feel the narrative is stilted by the slow build of atmosphere. Many of these tales where rewrites..co-writes or essentially tales ghost written for other names. As such there is a tone of the author generally but sometimes tales that don't engage as much as others he has written...it took me quite some time to wade through this and if I'm honest times when I questioned my perseverance...however on reflection there's some enjoyable enough tales here. However this kind of feels like when a seventies rock band came out with a triple album inasmuch as the usual format is maybe extended a little ..and yet there's too much filler..as a smaller anthology this may have worked better.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Paccagnani

    The Horror In The Museum è una raccolta che, seppur in gran parte composta di collaborazioni e revisioni, non delude. Da Imprisoned with the Pharaohs a The Last Test, fino a The Trap; l’autore ci trascina alla scoperta di civiltà antiche quanto la terra stessa, divinità tentacolari provenienti da altre dimensioni, fratture dello spazio-tempo che nascondono orrori innominabili e metodi scientifici intrisi di magia nera. Quella raccontata da H.P. Lovecraft, è un’umanità piccola, impotente di front The Horror In The Museum è una raccolta che, seppur in gran parte composta di collaborazioni e revisioni, non delude. Da Imprisoned with the Pharaohs a The Last Test, fino a The Trap; l’autore ci trascina alla scoperta di civiltà antiche quanto la terra stessa, divinità tentacolari provenienti da altre dimensioni, fratture dello spazio-tempo che nascondono orrori innominabili e metodi scientifici intrisi di magia nera. Quella raccontata da H.P. Lovecraft, è un’umanità piccola, impotente di fronte ai misteri del cosmo; un’umanità che nel suo crescere in arroganza ha dimenticato di coltivare la propria umiltà, e la consapevolezza di non essere altro che un puntino minuscolo in un universo sconfinato. Leggi l’intero commento: https://stanzedicognac.wordpress.com/...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gints

    Like coming face to face with the squamous lords of the young antediluvian Earth, this book requires faith to deal with. It starts off with some of the weakest writing I've had the displeasure of acquainting myself with, and ends on some that is marginally better. But the middle is filled with all the hyperlocuous, suggestive and intermingling tangle of always reoccurring myths that you expect from a Lovecraft work. This being a collection of co-authored and ghostwritten stories comes with the a Like coming face to face with the squamous lords of the young antediluvian Earth, this book requires faith to deal with. It starts off with some of the weakest writing I've had the displeasure of acquainting myself with, and ends on some that is marginally better. But the middle is filled with all the hyperlocuous, suggestive and intermingling tangle of always reoccurring myths that you expect from a Lovecraft work. This being a collection of co-authored and ghostwritten stories comes with the assumption that your usual expectations of HPL will not be quite valid here. If you value your time and/or sanity, I suggest skipping the first 3 and the last 1 stories. The rest should find you well entertained.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Farmer

    A collection of stories by other people that were actually pretty much written by Lovecraft. The Cthulhu mythos is plain to see throughout the collection and I really enjoyed most of the stories. Highlights for me were the Harry Houdini story "Imprisoned with the Pharoahs", the one set in the wax museum "The Horror in the Museum" and the story about the gorgon in the painting at the creepy old house "Medusa's Coil". Overall some good creepy stories and an interesting look at how a writer can ear A collection of stories by other people that were actually pretty much written by Lovecraft. The Cthulhu mythos is plain to see throughout the collection and I really enjoyed most of the stories. Highlights for me were the Harry Houdini story "Imprisoned with the Pharoahs", the one set in the wax museum "The Horror in the Museum" and the story about the gorgon in the painting at the creepy old house "Medusa's Coil". Overall some good creepy stories and an interesting look at how a writer can earn a few dollars writing for other people without any credit.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I mean ... seriously. How could I have lived this much of my life without ever having read H.P. Lovecraft? Sure, there was repetition in the various stories, and sure some of them obviously have to do with his Cthulhu mythos, which I have not read. Yet. But the experience of reading these horror stories was so unique ... You're not beat over the head with gore. Instead, the terror sneaks up on you, until you're breathing shallowly and your pulse is racing and you don't even know it till you real I mean ... seriously. How could I have lived this much of my life without ever having read H.P. Lovecraft? Sure, there was repetition in the various stories, and sure some of them obviously have to do with his Cthulhu mythos, which I have not read. Yet. But the experience of reading these horror stories was so unique ... You're not beat over the head with gore. Instead, the terror sneaks up on you, until you're breathing shallowly and your pulse is racing and you don't even know it till you realize you're about to pass out.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    Lovecraft was definitely a talented, imaginative writer, and some of these stories are genuinely terrifying. However, he was also very, very racist, and kind of sexist, which tends to get in the way of my enjoyment. He's fine as long as he is writing about upper class white men, but otherwise... yeah... Lovecraft was definitely a talented, imaginative writer, and some of these stories are genuinely terrifying. However, he was also very, very racist, and kind of sexist, which tends to get in the way of my enjoyment. He's fine as long as he is writing about upper class white men, but otherwise... yeah...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anariel

    Surprisingly good collection of short stories. There are still familiar Cthulhu myths intertwined into most of the stories, but there is also something fresh and somewhat different about most of them. Definitely a must read for all true fans of Lovecraft

  22. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Piña

    3.5 a 4 Será que leí todo de corrido y tiene muy poco que leí otra colección de Lovecraft pero en algunos puntos me empezó a parecer un poquitín repetitivo. Igual me gustó bastante.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krysten

    Favorites: Imprisoned with the Pharaohs The Curse of Yig The Mound The Horror in the Museum

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gianna Rose

    I think I enjoyed volume one a little but more, but it was still a creepy collection of stories!

  25. 5 out of 5

    James Schmidt

    Lovecraft is a marvelous storyteller and I love his stories. I can't wait to get a complete works of his and find some more gems to read! Lovecraft is a marvelous storyteller and I love his stories. I can't wait to get a complete works of his and find some more gems to read!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Chung

    Enjoyed the writing, the words are just beautiful! But some parts are quite off putting just because of the blatant racism and bigotry- Lovecraft's prejudices definitely show through to his work. Enjoyed the writing, the words are just beautiful! But some parts are quite off putting just because of the blatant racism and bigotry- Lovecraft's prejudices definitely show through to his work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Henrik

    My copy is with a different cover. And I am not too excited about the Introduction.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    A collection of some of Lovecraft’s collaborations and less popular stories, including a non-mythos sci-fi story about crystal hunters on Venus. It was good to re-read these.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rafa

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