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The Latino Education Crisis: The Consequences of Failed Social Policies

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Will the United States have an educational caste system in 2030? Drawing on both extensive demographic data and compelling case studies, this powerful book reveals the depths of the educational crisis looming for Latino students, the nation's largest and most rapidly growing minority group. Richly informative and accessibly written, The Latino Education Crisis describes th Will the United States have an educational caste system in 2030? Drawing on both extensive demographic data and compelling case studies, this powerful book reveals the depths of the educational crisis looming for Latino students, the nation's largest and most rapidly growing minority group. Richly informative and accessibly written, The Latino Education Crisis describes the cumulative disadvantages faced by too many children in the complex American school systems, where one in five students is Latino. Many live in poor and dangerous neighborhoods, attend impoverished and underachieving schools, and are raised by parents who speak little English and are the least educated of any ethnic group. The effects for the families, the community, and the nation are sobering. Latino children are behind on academic measures by the time they enter kindergarten. And while immigrant drive propels some to success, most never catch up. Many drop out of high school and those who do go on to college--often ill prepared and overworked--seldom finish. Revealing and disturbing, The Latino Education Crisis is a call to action and will be essential reading for everyone involved in planning the future of American schools.


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Will the United States have an educational caste system in 2030? Drawing on both extensive demographic data and compelling case studies, this powerful book reveals the depths of the educational crisis looming for Latino students, the nation's largest and most rapidly growing minority group. Richly informative and accessibly written, The Latino Education Crisis describes th Will the United States have an educational caste system in 2030? Drawing on both extensive demographic data and compelling case studies, this powerful book reveals the depths of the educational crisis looming for Latino students, the nation's largest and most rapidly growing minority group. Richly informative and accessibly written, The Latino Education Crisis describes the cumulative disadvantages faced by too many children in the complex American school systems, where one in five students is Latino. Many live in poor and dangerous neighborhoods, attend impoverished and underachieving schools, and are raised by parents who speak little English and are the least educated of any ethnic group. The effects for the families, the community, and the nation are sobering. Latino children are behind on academic measures by the time they enter kindergarten. And while immigrant drive propels some to success, most never catch up. Many drop out of high school and those who do go on to college--often ill prepared and overworked--seldom finish. Revealing and disturbing, The Latino Education Crisis is a call to action and will be essential reading for everyone involved in planning the future of American schools.

48 review for The Latino Education Crisis: The Consequences of Failed Social Policies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Devan Maddox

    I agree completely with the complicated situations and solutions that Gándara and Contreras present, and found many of their insights enlightening. I also believe they sufficiently covered just about every aspect of this education problem, as well as what the costs of success or failure will be. However, I found the book painful to read structurally: it seemed haphazardly organized, difficult to digest, and oftentimes redundant. The book could easily be half its size while making all the same po I agree completely with the complicated situations and solutions that Gándara and Contreras present, and found many of their insights enlightening. I also believe they sufficiently covered just about every aspect of this education problem, as well as what the costs of success or failure will be. However, I found the book painful to read structurally: it seemed haphazardly organized, difficult to digest, and oftentimes redundant. The book could easily be half its size while making all the same points (and probably being more accessible, in the process, to people who are interested in these issues but don't have time to waste dredging though repeated information).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  3. 5 out of 5

    Easten

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    Sarah Schultz

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    Abigail

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    Karen Lapuk

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    Brenda Srof

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    Caity

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    Megan Willis

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    Thomas Tijerina

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    Melissa

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    Denisa Krasna

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    Daniela

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    Maddy Jenkins

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    Raquel Manriquez

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    Tiffiny

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    Pim Trommelen

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    Veronica

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    Cosme Salazar

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    Jaime

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    Claudia Aguillon

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    Tanner Debellis

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    Karina

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    Mindy

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    Lorette

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    Ana Maria

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    Hakija

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    Bianca

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    Alma Tello

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    Lina Rangel

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    Nicole

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    Natalie

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    Kerry

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    Joanna

  41. 5 out of 5

    Ashely Dickerson

  42. 4 out of 5

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    Dan

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    Edward M.

  45. 5 out of 5

    Lorena

  46. 4 out of 5

    Diana Franchini

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Miller

  48. 4 out of 5

    Annette Thompson

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