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Why religion must be separated from politics if democracy is to thrive around the world For eight years the president of the United States was a born-again Christian, backed by well-organized evangelicals who often seemed intent on erasing the church-state divide. In Europe, the increasing number of radicalized Muslims is creating widespread fear that Islam is undermining W Why religion must be separated from politics if democracy is to thrive around the world For eight years the president of the United States was a born-again Christian, backed by well-organized evangelicals who often seemed intent on erasing the church-state divide. In Europe, the increasing number of radicalized Muslims is creating widespread fear that Islam is undermining Western-style liberal democracy. And even in polytheistic Asia, the development of democracy has been hindered in some countries, particularly China, by a long history in which religion was tightly linked to the state. Ian Buruma is the first writer to provide a sharp-eyed look at the tensions between religion and politics on three continents. Drawing on many contemporary and historical examples, he argues that the violent passions inspired by religion must be tamed in order to make democracy work. Comparing the United States and Europe, Buruma asks why so many Americans--and so few Europeans--see religion as a help to democracy. Turning to China and Japan, he disputes the notion that only monotheistic religions pose problems for secular politics. Finally, he reconsiders the story of radical Islam in contemporary Europe, from the case of Salman Rushdie to the murder of Theo van Gogh. Sparing no one, Buruma exposes the follies of the current culture war between defenders of Western values and multiculturalists, and explains that the creation of a democratic European Islam is not only possible, but necessary. Presenting a challenge to dogmatic believers and dogmatic secularists alike, Taming the Gods powerfully argues that religion and democracy can be compatible--but only if religious and secular authorities are kept firmly apart.


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Why religion must be separated from politics if democracy is to thrive around the world For eight years the president of the United States was a born-again Christian, backed by well-organized evangelicals who often seemed intent on erasing the church-state divide. In Europe, the increasing number of radicalized Muslims is creating widespread fear that Islam is undermining W Why religion must be separated from politics if democracy is to thrive around the world For eight years the president of the United States was a born-again Christian, backed by well-organized evangelicals who often seemed intent on erasing the church-state divide. In Europe, the increasing number of radicalized Muslims is creating widespread fear that Islam is undermining Western-style liberal democracy. And even in polytheistic Asia, the development of democracy has been hindered in some countries, particularly China, by a long history in which religion was tightly linked to the state. Ian Buruma is the first writer to provide a sharp-eyed look at the tensions between religion and politics on three continents. Drawing on many contemporary and historical examples, he argues that the violent passions inspired by religion must be tamed in order to make democracy work. Comparing the United States and Europe, Buruma asks why so many Americans--and so few Europeans--see religion as a help to democracy. Turning to China and Japan, he disputes the notion that only monotheistic religions pose problems for secular politics. Finally, he reconsiders the story of radical Islam in contemporary Europe, from the case of Salman Rushdie to the murder of Theo van Gogh. Sparing no one, Buruma exposes the follies of the current culture war between defenders of Western values and multiculturalists, and explains that the creation of a democratic European Islam is not only possible, but necessary. Presenting a challenge to dogmatic believers and dogmatic secularists alike, Taming the Gods powerfully argues that religion and democracy can be compatible--but only if religious and secular authorities are kept firmly apart.

30 review for Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dmitri

    In this 2010 book Ian Buruma, a Dutch-American journalist, writes 'religion is back' but 'more newsworthy in Europe than the United States', where it presumably never left. Since the end of the Cold War the schism has only grown. This work investigates the relationship between modern democracies and religions. Its findings are presented in an extended essay spanning geography from the US to UK, western Europe, China and Japan. The book is divided into three parts which cover Christianity, easter In this 2010 book Ian Buruma, a Dutch-American journalist, writes 'religion is back' but 'more newsworthy in Europe than the United States', where it presumably never left. Since the end of the Cold War the schism has only grown. This work investigates the relationship between modern democracies and religions. Its findings are presented in an extended essay spanning geography from the US to UK, western Europe, China and Japan. The book is divided into three parts which cover Christianity, eastern religion and Islam. It has the style of a scholarly article from the New York Review of Books. Buruma begins with Protestants and Catholics following the Enlightenment, in the old and new worlds. Spinoza's radical secularism is compared to compromises made by Hume and Locke. Europe's secular nature is contrasted with the fervent faith of America's camp meetings and bible belt during the last two centuries. Alexis de Tocqueville, who wrote "Democracy in America" in the 1830's, is used as a guide. Although a son of the French revolution, he believed religion was needed to hold society together. Europe's liberals are more recently inclined to view American religiousity as a provincial backwardness. Matteo Ricci and the Jesuits reached China in 1583. Since a moral code predated Christianity, it presented a challenge. Was civilization possible without divine revelation? The goal became to prove a Chinese belief in God. Voltaire would idealize Confucius as a paragon of secular virtue, but later Chinese scholars criticized those values as an obstacle to democracy. The Boxer and Tapei Rebellions are considered, and Mao is compared with the First Emperor who lopped off Confucian heads. In Japan secular democracy prevailed, after Shinto beliefs had been hijacked by Meiji militarists to elevate the emperor to divinity. The interaction of Islam with western ideals is also explored. While Voltaire could countenance no religion, Tocqueville saw a conflict in the legal and political aspects of the Quran. Bernard Lewis and Samuel Huntington's clash of civilization theories are dismissed, with the secular autocracies of Egypt, Iraq, Turkey, and Syria being cited. Extremism is examined in the cases of Van Gogh, Rushdie and the London bombings. Those involved were second generation youth with little connection to Islam. Buruma sees the acts of violence as more akin to anarchism and social protest than any real adherence to religion. Europe's recent political struggles have involved the proponents of secularism versus those of multiculturalism. Buruma maintains a shared cultural identity is not essential to democracy if citizens abide by laws. The question posed is what role will religion play in future democracy? Buruma argues religion should be respected, but has no place within the state. That seems a basic premise of modern governance, but this global survey shows it is not a given. The writing is at times difficult to unravel, and it's brevity allows for little development. Once its intent is parsed, it offers interesting insights to reflect on.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Neotony21

    This book consists of three connected essays. The common thread of the three essays is the relationship of religion and government in different societies. The first essay focuses on development in America and Europe, the second focuses on China and Japan particularly in their meetings with the West, and the third focuses heavily on the reaction in Europe to the increasing presence of Muslim groups. The subject matter to me is both fascinating and important. Buruma raises issues of critical signi This book consists of three connected essays. The common thread of the three essays is the relationship of religion and government in different societies. The first essay focuses on development in America and Europe, the second focuses on China and Japan particularly in their meetings with the West, and the third focuses heavily on the reaction in Europe to the increasing presence of Muslim groups. The subject matter to me is both fascinating and important. Buruma raises issues of critical significance (one example : does a tolerant society have to extend tolerance to those groups in the society who themselves are intolerant). He also adds details which are both interesting and well related to his topic (the Elmer Gantry phenomenon in the United States, the Taiping Revolution in China). But the book left me somewhat less than completely satisfied. First, I would have much preferred more in depth information focused on China and Japan. Second, I found that the flow of the presentation was difficult to follow. I felt somewhat like being in a class with a tremendously interesting professor who is introducing many stimulating ideas but I am not catching completely the flow of idea to idea. Both of these issues are not so much shortcomings of the book, but rather a mismatch of what was presented and what I would have preferred to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Juha

    In this short and reasoned treatise, Ian Buruma addresses a central issue of democracy, namely the separation of church and state, from a historical, social and political perspective. The book is divided into three main parts. In the first, Full Tents and Empty Cathedrals, Buruma juxtaposes the experiences in Europe and in America, providing an insightful analysis of what separates—and unites—the old and the new continent, including the role of born-again evangelical Christians in American polit In this short and reasoned treatise, Ian Buruma addresses a central issue of democracy, namely the separation of church and state, from a historical, social and political perspective. The book is divided into three main parts. In the first, Full Tents and Empty Cathedrals, Buruma juxtaposes the experiences in Europe and in America, providing an insightful analysis of what separates—and unites—the old and the new continent, including the role of born-again evangelical Christians in American politics. His conclusion, perhaps surprisingly, is that the gulf between ‘secular’ Europe and more traditionally religious America is not as large as it often is made to be. Buruma writes: “Our histories are not the same and we have different notions of who we are. But everywhere people are trying to cope with the confusions of a fast-changing world by reaching for fixed—and quite often newly made up—identities based on race, religion, or national culture” (p. 46). This summarizes one of the main theses in the book: that religious fervor must be understood not in theological, but in social and political terms. The second part of the book, Oriental Wisdom, turns attention to China and Japan. He draws parallels and explains differences in history that led to different outcomes. Buruma is particularly well versed in Japan’s history since the Meiji Restoration through the pre-war years until today, and this knowledge translates into a clear analysis in this book, as well as several others by him. He provides an interesting analysis of Maoism in China and Emperor worship in Japan as examples where state and spiritual authority coincided. While religion today plays a smaller role in these East Asian countries, Buruma traces the rise of a variety of cults and other religious groups, such as the Falun Gong, to the spiritual vacuum left by the collapse of Maoism in China and the prohibition of political participation by the Chinese people. Similarly in Japan the focus on chasing economic prosperity has left such a vacuum. The final part, Enlightenment Values, focuses on how Western liberal societies should deal with the rising multiculturalism in our societies. This is a particularly balanced and coherent section of the book. Buruma draws from well-known cases that have led to the Kulturkampf in Europe, over issues such as the cultural rights (to discriminate against women or for women to wear a veil) of immigrant groups in Europe against the demands for them to integrate into the host societies and their norms. It all boils down to a confrontation between those who defend anyone’s right to stick to his or her culture of origin (with no consideration of its respect for host country values) vs. those (probably in the majority in Europe now) who want immigrants to integrate into the society. It is very interesting to follow Buruma’s argumentation around the very difficult question between people’s right to their own culture vs. respecting ‘universal’ – or at least those of the majority of people in the country – values of Enlightenment. This is a dilemma many liberals in the West face, torn between the values of freedom that we so cherish and the knee-jerk desire to respect others’ cultural values, how much at cross-purposes they might be with ours. Buruma points out how it is often the same people (many of them left leaning intellectuals) who in the 1960s and 1970s defended Third World rights against Western (cultural) imperialism that now are most worried about the spread of illiberal values into Europe through immigration from poor countries. The comparisons between the different approaches towards immigrant groups taken by the UK, Holland and France is quite illuminating. He discusses at some length problems related, especially, to the integration of Muslims (both immigrant and those born there) into the European society. One interesting example is the case of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, who by now is a talk show star in the US, who having overcome her challenges in the home country of Somalia and the morally relativist Holland now fights for the rights of Muslim women to break away from the oppression of their original culture. Another case that Buruma discusses at some length is that of Salman Rushdie who earned himself a fatwa for his book 'The Satanic Verses' and had to go into hiding as a result. Buruma draws a clear line against terrorists and religious fundamentalists who resort to violence. “The use of violence in a democracy, for whatever reason, can only be met with force,” he states (p. 115). He recognizes that while religious orthodoxy and political extremism can be linked, they are not the same thing nor does one necessarily lead to the other. However, discussing the cases of Mohammed Bouyeri, the Dutch born son of Moroccan immigrants who killed the film maker Theo van Gogh in Amsterdam, and Mohammad Sidique Khan, leader of the 7/7 terrorists who bombed the London underground, Buruma traces their violent terrorism and ‘religious awakening’ to the isolation and cultural rootlessness they experienced in the European countries they were born into. Buruma concludes convincingly that the separation of state and religion is quite essential in a democracy. A well functioning democratic society does not have to share the same social or religious values as long as everybody abides by the society’s rules and laws. He also makes a valuable distinction between respecting other people, while not necessarily respecting their beliefs. “Liberal democracies are now well served by laws that limit free speech, such as laws against blasphemy or denying the Holocaust or the Armenian genocide,” he writes, and continues “(T)here are ways, however, to respect the dignity of fellow citizens without recourse to the law” (p. 123). Ian Buruma’s book is fabulously erudite. The writing is stellar and lucid, anchored firmly in the writings of Enlightenment philosophers, such as Spinoza and Hume, as well as Tocqueville, Confucius and others. He gets to the heart of the matter without getting bogged down in unnecessary detail. Born in Holland from Dutch and British parents, Buruma spent a significant portion of his career in Japan and China. He now teaches at Bard College in New York. He is thus extraordinarily well placed to understand the historical and social situations in these countries located on three continents. He ends with paraphrasing Confucius: Let us leave the spirits aside, until we know how best to serve men.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Petr

    A quite good essay on the relation of democracy and religion. Focusing strongly on Islam, but without any attacks on the religion itself. Accompanied also with a suitable amount of comments and references. If you want to study the problem deeper, this presents a good introduction. Also if you want to stay on the surface of the relation between government and religion, then you can read Buruma and stop there as he does not present a too simplistic picture and gives you enough insight to let you f A quite good essay on the relation of democracy and religion. Focusing strongly on Islam, but without any attacks on the religion itself. Accompanied also with a suitable amount of comments and references. If you want to study the problem deeper, this presents a good introduction. Also if you want to stay on the surface of the relation between government and religion, then you can read Buruma and stop there as he does not present a too simplistic picture and gives you enough insight to let you feel the lingering depths below you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    It's courageous Buruma takes on this thorny theme. As far as I am concerned, the third essay is most instructive, because it deals directly with the hot issues of the moment. His own point of view is distinguished by his balanced and clear judgement, as a new interpretation of the tolerance concept. The first essay (Western thinkers on politics and the place of religion in it) and the second (on the dubious role of religion in China and Japan) are quite interesting, but rather academic and only It's courageous Buruma takes on this thorny theme. As far as I am concerned, the third essay is most instructive, because it deals directly with the hot issues of the moment. His own point of view is distinguished by his balanced and clear judgement, as a new interpretation of the tolerance concept. The first essay (Western thinkers on politics and the place of religion in it) and the second (on the dubious role of religion in China and Japan) are quite interesting, but rather academic and only slightly add to the debate in number three. Recommended reading!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    An excellent exploration of the interaction between religion and government.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patrick McCoy

    Taming The Gods: Religion And Democracy On Three Continents Ian Buruma's latest book is a short treatise that looks at the relationship between democracy and religion in America, Europe, Japan, and China. In recent years, Bururma has written about the attitude of east with the west in Occidentalism and has investigated the clash between liberal Holland and Muslim fanatics in Murder In Amsterdam:The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance. I think these experiences have inspired him to Taming The Gods: Religion And Democracy On Three Continents Ian Buruma's latest book is a short treatise that looks at the relationship between democracy and religion in America, Europe, Japan, and China. In recent years, Bururma has written about the attitude of east with the west in Occidentalism and has investigated the clash between liberal Holland and Muslim fanatics in Murder In Amsterdam:The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance. I think these experiences have inspired him to search out the connections between the liberal democratic governments and the oppositional forces of religion of late. In the first section, "Full Tents and Empty Cathedrals" he looks at how democratic America and those of Europe differ. Buruma relies on the observations of DeTocqueville on America, which is such a religious country and the fact that religion has largely been left behind and continues to be distrusted in Europe as a reminder of the despotic rule of the church before the French revolution. Buruma rightly praises the division of church and state and analyzes the differences in the relations of politics and religion by looking at the views of influential thinkers like Spinoza, Hume, and Hobbes. Buruma has written extensively on Asia and Japan and China in particular-he is fluent in both languages, thus he shows a strength in analyzing the connections between religion and government in this section. He begins with China from the Quing dynasty and in particular the influence of Confucius. He notes that there never was any true split between spiritual and secular authority. This is realized in the notion that secular power must be justified by moral ideology. He suggests that China must renounce their authoritarian claims on the moral and spiritual lives its citizens. Next, Buruma takes a look at Japan which likes to boast that religion plays no part in politics, which isn't completely true. However, he notes that is mostly in the past where Shinto crushed democratic aspirations and that religion played a role in Japan's response to superior Western power. The fact that Japan was on the periphery and therefore did not see themselves as superior to the Westerners as the Chinese did and who were subsequently subdued by them. Japan sought to learn from them and catch up instead. He also analyzes the influence of Nichiren sects on Tokugawa rule, which resulted largely in a separation of powers. This in turn allowed Japan to make the necessary changes to modernize and fight off western colonialism. it was then noted by a Japanese scholar that the western powers were able to be successful in their rule due to Christianity as a state religion and this led to the establishment of Shinto as the state religion. Thus, they brought state and religion back together. And this justified military conquest, impeded democratic institutions, and made it difficult for a secular dictator to take power. After their defeat, America established a secular democracy and ended state Shintoism. And Buruma suggests, the spiritual vacuum led to the establishment of dangerous cults like Aum Shinrinrikyo that dropped sarin gas in the subways in 1995. However, he suggests that it is not religion alone that promotes ethical behavior and the desire of the right to return to the past is unlikely. The last section, "Enlightenment Values," takes a look at the the impact of the Enlightenment on christianity and in opposition to Islam. He ask whether or not can democratic governments can hold sway over religious people and it seems that they can with Christians, but the jury is still out with Muslims. He notes that most Middle Eastern Muslim countries have been autocratic for a number of reasons, but suggests democracies do exist: India and Indonesia. However, modern concerns are centered around becoming "Islamized." However, these revolutionaries are usually young people born and bred in Europe. He sees that the main challenge posed by Muslims in Europe is social and political rather cultural. How do you deal with Muslims who don't respect the law of the land? Buruma may not have the solution, but he defends the notion that there should continue to be a separation of church and state. I found this to be a thought provoking discussion of the Muslim problem. And a good discussion of the modern history of the connection of religion and democracy on three continents. It is by no means a comprehensive study of the subject, but rather a compelling analysis for the general reader. 2 3 4

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This was good! It covered a lot of ground, so some parts were a bit whistlestop, but I quite enjoyed reviewing and refreshing myself on some ideas, and being made to agree, disagree, and generally think about where I stand on things, or more importantly, how I stand on things.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steve Greenleaf

    Ian Buruma’s Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents (2010)(132 p.) is a collection of three essays about the intersection of religion and politics. One essay focuses on the U.S., one on China and Japan, and the last on Islam in Europe. Buruma draws upon a careful review of the history of all three areas to show how complex and historically rich the interaction has been between religion and politics since the advent of the modern period. In the U.S., we’ve always had a cultur Ian Buruma’s Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents (2010)(132 p.) is a collection of three essays about the intersection of religion and politics. One essay focuses on the U.S., one on China and Japan, and the last on Islam in Europe. Buruma draws upon a careful review of the history of all three areas to show how complex and historically rich the interaction has been between religion and politics since the advent of the modern period. In the U.S., we’ve always had a culture of highly individualistic, equalitarian Protestantism along with the more traditional denominations. In addition, the American Founders were all Enlightenment thinkers who incorporated the separation of Church and State into the Constitution and culture. Thus, while religion has to varying degrees always influenced politics, the State has remained neutral. However, as Buruma’s account makes clear, this separation seems always subject to question, especially by evangelical Christians in recent years after staying mostly away from politics after the 1920’s. I think that their influence is waning; it waxed with the G.W. Bush presidency. The second essay addresses the relations of politics and religion in China and Japan, and while we don’t think of either of those nations having current issues about religion and politics, Buruma recounts the history of both that reveals very complex interactions. Indeed, issues of nationalism, Western domination, modernization, and the values of local (and often conflicting) traditions suggests that any current calm could break into a storm if conditions deteriorate too greatly in either country. The Mandate of Heaven can prove fickle. The third and final essay addresses the very tricky issue of Islam and Europe. We think of Europe as too cool, too sophisticated for religion, as religious practice among Christians has fallen especially in the last 30 years. But as Buruma notes, Europe has been through its religious wars and conflicts for centuries, and any lessons it can claim for tolerance and multi-culturalism have been won as much (or more) with blood as with reason. Buruma also notes that radical Islam receives its impetus from feelings of social inferiority and unhinged identities that take the issues to political and then violent extremes in some cases. Buruma discusses how different European nations (Britain, France, and the Netherlands) each address issues of Islam, and even Christianity, quite differently. Britain follows a practice of broad tolerance and even promotion of Islamic culture (which in itself remains quite varied by region of origin), while France continues a practice a strict exclusion of religion from the public sphere. The Netherlands seems to have compromised somewhere in the middle, yet all three have suffered problems, including terrorism, from radicalized Moslem, most of whom are European-born young men who feel cut adrift in the dominant culture. Buruma does a superb job of detailing the history and challenges of each of these cases that he addresses. His take on Europe includes detailed considerations of representative figures like Rushdie, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and Tariq Ramadan, each of whom raises special issues based on their cultural, national, and Western identities. Buruma concludes (and really begins) with the idea that toleration is the key so long as all parties remain non-violent and play by the rules of peaceful, democratic discourse. Of course I can’t disagree. However, the deeper and perhaps unanswerable question remains one of how to prevent the radicalization of individuals to the point where they will murder in furtherance of their agendas. This problem has been with us for over a century (just limiting ourselves to the resistance to modern industrial society). For all of the formal regimes we can consider, none seems perfect to address this issue, but then, perhaps none exists.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    If one is sufficiently acquainted with historical ideas on democracy it would be entirely possible to skip the first two thirds of the book. The basic premise follows Alexis de Tocqueville in that democracy is a fruit of Divine morality, present and extolled in the Christian Faith, as witnessed by the 'greatest' nation on Earth:) The analysis of religion and democracy in China is very shallow, literally ignoring all, but the reign of the Qin Shi Huangdi and last 200 years of Chinese history. The If one is sufficiently acquainted with historical ideas on democracy it would be entirely possible to skip the first two thirds of the book. The basic premise follows Alexis de Tocqueville in that democracy is a fruit of Divine morality, present and extolled in the Christian Faith, as witnessed by the 'greatest' nation on Earth:) The analysis of religion and democracy in China is very shallow, literally ignoring all, but the reign of the Qin Shi Huangdi and last 200 years of Chinese history. The analysis of Japan doesn't really take in account the important nation-building unification of Shinto movements taken by the government at the suggestion of secular history and linguistic scholars, standardization of creation myth books and the repression of a part of Shinto priesthood, or the post-war increased importance of the Socialist Party and various progressives, who suggested such extremely radical changes going so far as to abolish the writing system and replacing it by Latin alphabet. I was surprised that nothing was said on Turkey or Indonesia, despite numerous references as "model democratic Muslim nations". The last part contains a concise analysis of the modern European situation and problems with religion, drawing right conclusions from legal background, peculiarities of the system and immigrant integration realities of Britain, Netherlands and France. Unfortunately it's too short and simplified to consider it a scientific argument.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Newton

    Generally quite interesting, particularly the middle section on China/Japan/Asian values/religions. It was interesting to read Buruma's (short) discussion on Confucianism, and also about the Taiping Rebellion and Boxer Rebellion. He certainly made clear how it is quite plausible to see links between those events and contemporary China and the attitudes of the current Chinese government to cults and popular religious(/political) movements. The other parts of the book were good, but not quite as int Generally quite interesting, particularly the middle section on China/Japan/Asian values/religions. It was interesting to read Buruma's (short) discussion on Confucianism, and also about the Taiping Rebellion and Boxer Rebellion. He certainly made clear how it is quite plausible to see links between those events and contemporary China and the attitudes of the current Chinese government to cults and popular religious(/political) movements. The other parts of the book were good, but not quite as interesting to me as the middle section.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marketa

    Found the book by chance and bought it without even opening it. Anyways, the buying turned out to be a good decision. Despite Buruma´s style being quite messy and random, I really enjoyed and his thoughts made me focus on certain topics / events / mentioned persons more + the book kind of helped me to realize / reconsider many ideas of mine. I can definitely recommend!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This is a slim 125 pager that’s a dense combination of political theory and current events. Definitely gave me some food for thought regarding the relationship between religion and politics, but I found the writing style too rooted in academic language and analysis for my taste. Quasi-recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    ahhh. not what i expected. some good points once in awhile but a lot of random information thrown together.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Miroslav Libicher

  16. 4 out of 5

    Faiz

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karawyah

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rita

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelsi

  20. 4 out of 5

    James Williams

  21. 5 out of 5

    W S Chiang

  22. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  26. 5 out of 5

    ENYC

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maurice

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Raymer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yu Cheng

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matsini1

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