web site hit counter Vision of the Future - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Vision of the Future

Availability: Ready to download

Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Han Solo are thrust into the middle of an impending civil war - and discover the shocking truth behind the rumored resurrection of the dead Admiral Thrawn. For a beleaguered Empire, desperate times call for desperate measures. Sowing discord among the fragile coalition of The New Republic, remnants of the once powerful Empire make one las Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Han Solo are thrust into the middle of an impending civil war - and discover the shocking truth behind the rumored resurrection of the dead Admiral Thrawn. For a beleaguered Empire, desperate times call for desperate measures. Sowing discord among the fragile coalition of The New Republic, remnants of the once powerful Empire make one last play for victory. Having implicated the Bothans in the genocide of the Caamasi, they now plan an attack on Han and Leia that is also to be blamed on the Bothans. If they are successful, the New Republic will be torn asunder. To prevent inevitable disaster, Luke, Leia, Han, and their friends must prove the Bothans innocent and reveal the Empire's treachery. But time is running out.


Compare

Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Han Solo are thrust into the middle of an impending civil war - and discover the shocking truth behind the rumored resurrection of the dead Admiral Thrawn. For a beleaguered Empire, desperate times call for desperate measures. Sowing discord among the fragile coalition of The New Republic, remnants of the once powerful Empire make one las Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Han Solo are thrust into the middle of an impending civil war - and discover the shocking truth behind the rumored resurrection of the dead Admiral Thrawn. For a beleaguered Empire, desperate times call for desperate measures. Sowing discord among the fragile coalition of The New Republic, remnants of the once powerful Empire make one last play for victory. Having implicated the Bothans in the genocide of the Caamasi, they now plan an attack on Han and Leia that is also to be blamed on the Bothans. If they are successful, the New Republic will be torn asunder. To prevent inevitable disaster, Luke, Leia, Han, and their friends must prove the Bothans innocent and reveal the Empire's treachery. But time is running out.

30 review for Vision of the Future

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This definitely wasn’t as good as I remember it being, which is sad. But it was still good! It’s just, I remember swooning pretty hard during the scene where Luke and Mara Jade finally confess their love. I remember it being epic, and significant (both in terms of importance and length). And reading that scene again, it didn’t feel either of those things. I guess I was bringing the swoon myself last time, which makes sense. I was very practiced at doing that in the late 90’s/early 2000’s. (I defi This definitely wasn’t as good as I remember it being, which is sad. But it was still good! It’s just, I remember swooning pretty hard during the scene where Luke and Mara Jade finally confess their love. I remember it being epic, and significant (both in terms of importance and length). And reading that scene again, it didn’t feel either of those things. I guess I was bringing the swoon myself last time, which makes sense. I was very practiced at doing that in the late 90’s/early 2000’s. (I definitely didn’t remember that the love confession scene involved what is essentially mind-sex, and then an immediate marriage proposal. I guess I was just hoping for text than subtext leading up to that moment, so it didn’t feel so out of place.) Anyway, that complaint aside, the sci-fi/space opera part of this book is absolutely spot on. Zahn creates an epic cast of characters to join the already existing ones, whom he serves pretty well. In fact, Zahn’s Luke is much more developed than movie Luke, even if his Han is somewhat less of a smart-arse. The scope of the story was great. I love the whole trajectory of this book being about finally ending the Empire, not by defeat, but with a peace treaty. And I love that the way to oppose that isn’t by outright simple defeat or super weapon (things Star Wars writers both tend to over-rely on), but by infiltration and instigation of civil war. I love that Zahn acknowledges that not everyone in the Empire is faceless and Evil. The Empire is made up of people, and people are complicated. Pellaeon is a good guy who just happened to believe in an institution that sucked hairy donkey balls. What are you going to do. I seem to remember that further Zahn books after his initial trilogy and this duology only produced diminishing returns, so I don’t know if I will be re-reading any of them. Maybe next year, if The Force Awakens reignites my Star Wars love even more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Vision of the Future finishes off the Hand of Thrawn duology. Most of what I have to say about it would reiterate what I said about Specter of the Past; Zahn's strengths are characterization and plotting (though this particular book suffers a tiny bit from Loads and Loads of Characters and approaches a Thirty Xanatos Pileup toward the end). The biggest weakness of this book is that Zahn is burdened with a lot of junk from other EU authors, making the book inaccessible to people who haven't read Vision of the Future finishes off the Hand of Thrawn duology. Most of what I have to say about it would reiterate what I said about Specter of the Past; Zahn's strengths are characterization and plotting (though this particular book suffers a tiny bit from Loads and Loads of Characters and approaches a Thirty Xanatos Pileup toward the end). The biggest weakness of this book is that Zahn is burdened with a lot of junk from other EU authors, making the book inaccessible to people who haven't read the EU. He seems to be most positively influenced by the X-wing series. On the negative side, there's one scene that just screams RETCON as Mara provides an alternate explanation for her apparent hookup with Lando. I can't really blame Zahn for wanting to retcon that, because c'mon, Mara and Lando? That wouldn't happen. But the execution is a tiny bit hamfisted. One interesting facet of the duology is that Zahn actually picks up threads from the Thrawn trilogy that were never explained, such as the old beckon call Luke found in the dark side cave on Dagobah. In the Thrawn trilogy, that beckon call appears to be simply a MacGuffin that sends Luke to Nkllon at a plot-convenient time, but in this duology, we learn that it actually had some significance. I mentioned in my Specter of the Past review that the real genius of this book is that it finally puts an end to the Empire as the major threat to the EU. It also presents Thrawn as not the Big Bad Evil Guy he appeared to be; Thrawn was attempting to gain control of the galaxy because he believed that the galaxy's best chance against the Yuuzhan Vong was to unite under his command. Incidentally, how terrible is it that I haven't read a single book about the Yuuzhan Vong and they're not even named in any book I've read and yet I still know who/what they are? I'm going to go give myself a wedgie now.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Superb. If I were to give Timothy Zahn’s novel “Vision of the Future” a one-word review, it would be “superb”. But since I am chronically verbose, I can’t stop at just one word. So, those of you in the “less is more” camp will simply have to deal with it. Zahn’s second book in his “Hand of Thrawn” duology is not only a satisfying conclusion to his Thrawn series, it is also an excellent conclusion to the entire “Star Wars” series started by George Lucas in 1977 with “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hop Superb. If I were to give Timothy Zahn’s novel “Vision of the Future” a one-word review, it would be “superb”. But since I am chronically verbose, I can’t stop at just one word. So, those of you in the “less is more” camp will simply have to deal with it. Zahn’s second book in his “Hand of Thrawn” duology is not only a satisfying conclusion to his Thrawn series, it is also an excellent conclusion to the entire “Star Wars” series started by George Lucas in 1977 with “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope”. Well, it would be an excellent conclusion if the Expanded Universe didn’t continue on long after the events of this novel, which it does. Roughly forty-plus more books have been written since Zahn published “Vision of the Future” in 1998. Of course, this number only includes the post-”Return of the Jedi” novels and doesn’t include the countless other novels dealing with the Old Republic, the Rise of the Sith Lords, the events leading up to the prequels, the Clone Wars, and the many spin-off series involving events tangential and unrelated to the events of the original films. So, yeah, Zahn’s novel could have been the last “Star Wars” novel ever published, and, with it, the final say on the fate of the SWEU, and all would be well and good. But where’s the fun in that? Especially when Zahn basically opens the gateway, literally, to a whole unexplored sector of the Expanded Universe, creating an even vaster playing field in which writers have to explore Lucas’s vision. Many integral events happen in this novel, not the least of which is the marriage of Luke Skywalker and Mara Jade. It is a turning point not only for the prototypical “lone gunman” persona of Luke’s character but a turning point for the maturity of the entire “Star Wars” series. The first trilogy is basically a coming-of-age story. When Luke is first introduced in “A New Hope”, he is, essentially, a child: naive, unworldly, with few aspirations due more to lack of opportunity than lack of will. He is a simple farm boy who knows that he will, most likely, live---and die---the forgotten life of a farmer on a backwater planet. Luke not only discovers that there is something larger than himself in the universe, but he also discovers that he has a significant role to play in history. In the first film, that revelation comes with joyous celebration. He is is still a child, but he is now a child with a purpose. In “Empire Strikes Back”, Luke has a lot of painful growing up to do. Not only is he introduced to the tragedy of losing close friends and loved ones, but his entire world is turned upside down when he discovers who his real father is. There is the painful discovery that evil not only exists, it also exists within himself. It is within this second film that Lucas changes the game, taking the black/white, good/evil dichotomy of the first film and adding the element of a gray area. “Return of the Jedi” is about redemption and finding an inner peace. Luke, ironically, wears black throughout most of the film: a visual indicator of the moral game-changer that Luke has become in these films. He is neither a good guy nor a bad guy in this film, but a human Schrodinger’s Cat that could go either way at any point in the story. It isn’t until the end that Luke makes the choice to deny the Dark Side, an act which ultimately inspires his father to do the right thing. Darth Vader is destroyed, and Luke’s father, Annakin, is reborn in a noble death. Luke, however, is continually fearful of joining the Dark Side, and rightfully so. In Zahn’s novels, Luke purposely refuses to use the Force because he is afraid that even an innocuous use of the Force could ultimately send him down the path that his father once took. Mara Jade, the once-evil Imperial assassin who joined the Rebel Alliance, is the perfect yin to Luke’s yang. Like Luke, she is reluctant to use the Force for completely opposite reasons. She is afraid of opening herself completely to the Force. She believes that doing so will result in the loss of her own dark side, which she feels gives her an inner strength. Zahn deftly avoids sentimentalizing the love story between Skywalker and Jade. It never devolves into sappy romance, mainly because it is not necessarily a love based on romance. It is, ultimately, a love based on mutual respect and need. The two physically and spiritually need each other to survive and thrive. Zahn’s choice to have Luke marry is not a simple one. Like most archetypal western heroes, Luke’s power comes from his being a singular hero, a lone wanderer, not tied down to anyone or anything. When Luke and Mara discover that true power comes from connection and opening one’s self completely to each other, the repercussions of this discovery are felt throughout the SWEU. Nowhere is this felt more than with the surprising end to the war between the Empire and the New Republic. Even more surprising is the source of this push for peace: Imperial Admiral Pellaeon, probably one of the most mature characters in the SWEU. Pellaeon is fascinating if only for the fact that he represents a very radical element to the “Star Wars” universe: a warrior who longs for peace. His character represents an end to the very thing that keeps the momentum of “Star Wars” going. Here’s a clue: it’s one of the two words in the main title. Not that there will ever be an end to war, and certainly there will be no end to “Star Wars”, because Zahn pretty much secures a no-end clause by introducing the potential for bigger and badder threats from the unexplored reaches of outer space. It will be interesting to see where J.J. Abrams takes the film franchise. As someone who has grown attached to the many new characters of the SWEU, it will be sad if Abrams chooses not to follow the SWEU narrative. Then again, I won’t be too upset because Abrams and Zahn are simply two talented visionaries---one working in film and the other in print---who are bringing their own unique worldviews to the SWEU.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    3.5 Stars. The second and final book in the Hand of Thrawn was everything it was supposed to be. Nothing more and nothing less. I must admit to enjoying the story, I think it was very well crafted by Zahn, told at a great pace and delivered masterly by the narrator. Certainly an enjoyable story. It has still left me on the fence with Star Wars books though, I can quite easily take em or leave em. I don't know what it is about them, that doesn't have me clamoring for more. Given that I enjoy scifi 3.5 Stars. The second and final book in the Hand of Thrawn was everything it was supposed to be. Nothing more and nothing less. I must admit to enjoying the story, I think it was very well crafted by Zahn, told at a great pace and delivered masterly by the narrator. Certainly an enjoyable story. It has still left me on the fence with Star Wars books though, I can quite easily take em or leave em. I don't know what it is about them, that doesn't have me clamoring for more. Given that I enjoy scifi and have been know to enjoy scifi opera, but when it comes to Star Wars I always feel slightly under awed. I guess it has something to do with knowing the characters and it being strange reading other stories that they are in, I don't know. But all in all, I enjoyed the story and I LOVED the narration. Hard enough to do multiple characters, but when you have to make them sound alien as well..... well that takes skill. I probably won't be jumping into the earlier trilogy any time soon, as I definitely prefer to catch up on my Alistair Reynolds reads first.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    "The more you tap into [the Force:] for raw power, the less you're able to hear its guidance over the noise of your own activity" The New Republic is on the brink of collapse as members use the Camaas Document and the situation of the Bothans as an excuse to let loose on each other. Han and Lando make a desperate mission into the heart of the Empire; Luke goes to rescue Mara on a world in the Unknown regions; Leia receives word of the transmission from Admiral Paelleon--the first signal of peace "The more you tap into [the Force:] for raw power, the less you're able to hear its guidance over the noise of your own activity" The New Republic is on the brink of collapse as members use the Camaas Document and the situation of the Bothans as an excuse to let loose on each other. Han and Lando make a desperate mission into the heart of the Empire; Luke goes to rescue Mara on a world in the Unknown regions; Leia receives word of the transmission from Admiral Paelleon--the first signal of peace between their governments. But can their be peace when "Thrawn" has appeared? In the tradition of the review of the previous Hand of Thrawn entry, I want to give you the ABC's of Timothy Zahn: Adventure, Big, and Clever. Whenever you open up a Zahn book, you expect ADVENTURE, action, and intrigue. With Vision of the Future, you get it. Specter of the Past was 300+ pages of setup: the background (where are the characters now and what is the situation), the contention point (the discovery of the Camaas document), the history (the destruction of Camaas, the unravelling of the New Republic, the Empire's bid for peace), and the plan (find the full Camaas document!). So, while I still very much enjoyed Specter, it was a much drier read, particularly in comparison to Vision. Vision is the payoff, seeing one plot thread after the other, how they intertwine, how they accomplish the final outcome; Luke is here, Leia is here, Han is here. Wedge and Corran meet Moranda; Lando is with Han; Talon is with Shada. Again, each character is given a mission befitting their personality; each mission has some intrigue, some "danger", some adventure! It's just like watching Star Wars, only with words and images that Zahn creates in your mind! There are also many personal adventures. Shada Du'Kal desperately seeks vengeance for the destruction of Emberlene, disgusted at how it was overlooked in favor for the more "chic" Camaas. Talon Karrde must seek after Jorj Car'das...but the last time he saw Jorj, Jorj was a ruthless smuggler. Can Karrde survive a meeting with Car'das? Mara is frustrated with her Force powers, her inability to hear the Qom Qae and the Qom Jha. Plus, she is hoping to bring Luke back to the man he had been ten years ago, the man she respected and admired. Luke is trying to figure out the path of the Jedi. And so on. And so forth. Vision of the Future is BIG. Literally AND figuratively. Clocking in at 694 pages in paperback, this novel remains THE largest novel of the Star Wars Expanded Universe. And when you start reading what is inside, you learn why. There are SO many plot threads, so many characters, so many storylines, it couldn't be any shorter without losing something vital to the story, to the essence. If there is any complaint, it is that there is no Character Sheet at the beginning to remind us of all the participants, because Timothy Zahn does what we love and creates new, amazing characters like Moranda Savich (a personal favorite), Shada Du'Kal (seen in his short story in Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina), and Child of Winds (Luke and Mara's native guide). Lastly, Zahn once again writes a CLEVER novel. Gone are the overblown, useless superweapons. Gone are the silly warlords who are said to be worse than they really are. Gone are the too-powerful Jedi who are too easily undermined by even more absurdly powered Sith. This book is smart, this book has intelligence, this book is founded at least partially in the real world. I've said it before in Specter, but the overarching conflict over the Camaas Document doesn't sound too out of place on our planet. I liked how Zahn removed the "evil" from the Empire, how he made the INDIVIDUAL the evil one instead of the side. I love how Zahn imitates life in having people have over-blown opinions of others (such as how everyone in this book thinks Thrawn is unable to be defeated, even though Thrawn lost several battles AND was never able to anticipate his death). I love how the characters are intelligent, likeable, good at what they do. There are no bumbling idiot bad guys, no doofus good guys meant for bad jokes, and no sexy women thrown in just to be sexy women. Everyone has a purpose, everyone has a motivation, and everyone has a story. Some characters get along, some don't. It's beautifully done. There are so many aspects to love about this book, let me make a list of my highlights of the book: 1.Mara and Luke's relationship: Mara and Luke finally break down and talk about their previous relationships. I can't help but think that Mara had a crush of sorts on Luke, but could never get close to him because his mind was always on someone or something else. Here, she finally can break down that wall and show him how she feels. And Luke of course does the same. 2.Paelleon's call for peace: When Leia discovers the message Pellaeon sent to Garm Bel Iblis, I was choked up. Having Leia, who negotiated a cease-fire with the Bakurans, and Pellaeon , who was a staunch Imperial of a new, more benign order, both sit down and talk peace was brilliant and poignant. 3.The Qom Qae and the Qom Jha: I love how they talk, I love how they assist Mara and Luke. Their concept is interesting, and I just think Child of Winds is adorable. 4.Moranda Savich: This woman is pure brilliance to me. Independent, smart, and not some sexy, young thang...thank you, Zahn! 5.Flim as Thrawn: This poor man, whose only skill to the Triumvirate is the fact he can impersonate Thrawn. He tries desperately hard to ingratiate himself to the group, to "hang on" with the threat of the Hand of Thrawn returning and supplanting Flim. It's sad to see his struggle and you can't help but feel for the guy. 6.A hint at the Yuuzhan Vong: Parck tells Mara that there are things, ominous things in the Unknown Regions. A nice entry into the New Jedi Order. Of course, no book is perfect. The beginning is long; the book itself is very long. It's easy to become disheartened and stop, then to resume and forget where you were. I got lost in some of the descriptions of some of the settings. And this book makes almost no sense without Specter. Years ago, I read this book without having read Specter and I spent half the book playing catch-up and failing. Vision reminds us why we love Star Wars, why we love Han, Luke, and Leia, and why Timothy Zahn is so amazing at plots. It is the crown jewel in Timothy Zahn's Star Wars work, his biggest, most elaborate contribution. I highly recommend.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    (rating relative to other Star Wars novels) Excellent. Good plot twists, good suspense. Great character development. This edition, BTW, had 694 pages, not the lesser number displayed by Good reads. It must be hard to write a book in which none of the main characters can have much happen to them...like die. But Zahn did a great job, again, within the constraints of fan fiction. Even though he was not credited for it, Drew Struzan's cover art was good, too. If George Lucas hadn't already said that no (rating relative to other Star Wars novels) Excellent. Good plot twists, good suspense. Great character development. This edition, BTW, had 694 pages, not the lesser number displayed by Good reads. It must be hard to write a book in which none of the main characters can have much happen to them...like die. But Zahn did a great job, again, within the constraints of fan fiction. Even though he was not credited for it, Drew Struzan's cover art was good, too. If George Lucas hadn't already said that no future SW movies would include the original characters, I'd suggest this story as a candidate plot line.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Here's the thing- I read this when I was 13. I don't remember much about it (a lot of action and general gripping thrillingness) except for one scene, but I remember that scene word for word. Probably because I am incredibly sappy. Here's the thing- I read this when I was 13. I don't remember much about it (a lot of action and general gripping thrillingness) except for one scene, but I remember that scene word for word. Probably because I am incredibly sappy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    Luke and Mara!!!! Reading this book was such a fun time, I loved diving into this version of what had happened after the original trilogy and especially being reminded of what an amazing character Luke is. This book is almost 700 pages but it just flew by.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Krishna

    After reading six Tim Zahn-Star Wars books, I feel like I've been beaten up by Sugar Ray Leonard. No mas. I'm done. After reading six Tim Zahn-Star Wars books, I feel like I've been beaten up by Sugar Ray Leonard. No mas. I'm done.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    audiobook narrated by Marc Thompson Vision of the Future is 2nd book of The Hand of Thrawn duology. Zahn always does a great job with Star Wars and does not disappoint here. Is the New Republic going to enter a civil war over the atrocities some Bothans helped commit? How is the New Republic going to react to these rumors that Grand Admiral Thrawn is back from the dead? Will Luke manage to save Mara and discover the secrets behind these strange craft being spotted? What or who is The Hand of Thra audiobook narrated by Marc Thompson Vision of the Future is 2nd book of The Hand of Thrawn duology. Zahn always does a great job with Star Wars and does not disappoint here. Is the New Republic going to enter a civil war over the atrocities some Bothans helped commit? How is the New Republic going to react to these rumors that Grand Admiral Thrawn is back from the dead? Will Luke manage to save Mara and discover the secrets behind these strange craft being spotted? What or who is The Hand of Thrawn? So many questions to answer and it's no surprise that this book is kind of long for a Star Wars book. The book keeps up a steady pace and does manage to resolve all the different threads and plot points introduced in Specter of the Past. There are many different threads at work in this book but Zahn manages to juggle them well. At one point I got the feeling that more than half of the threads involved characters trying to recover a copy of the Caamas document in their own ways which felt like a lot. At least they were all good reasons to have some crazy adventures. All in all I'd say that you can't go wrong with a Zahn Star Wars book but I would definitely start with his Thrawn trilogy (starting with Heir to the Empire) or Allegiance. Marc Thompson does a great job with impressions of all our favorite characters and the special effects are great too. There was some great use of music during more sensitive moments that helped bring them to a nice crescendo. The pirate's voice sounded just like ones you'd find in the Caribbean - which was interesting, and the Caamas apparently have an island accent. There were a few times I found the sound effects a bit distracting but overall they are awesome.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    Fantastic ending to a killer 5 book series from Zahn. The layers of storytelling with the Empire and Republic perspectives along with the individual character stories for Luke with Mara, Talon and Shada, and Han and Leia is simply masterful. He weaves so much into one final book its amazing and all boils down to the Camass document and the Bothan planet. Luke goes after Mara who is on a distant planet in search of clues to the "hand of Thrawn". Han goes in search of the Camass document and Leia Fantastic ending to a killer 5 book series from Zahn. The layers of storytelling with the Empire and Republic perspectives along with the individual character stories for Luke with Mara, Talon and Shada, and Han and Leia is simply masterful. He weaves so much into one final book its amazing and all boils down to the Camass document and the Bothan planet. Luke goes after Mara who is on a distant planet in search of clues to the "hand of Thrawn". Han goes in search of the Camass document and Leia gets a cryptic deal presented to her from Admiral Palleon. Meanwhile Talon is with Shada on their own wild goose hunt for Car'Das, Talon's old boss. The Luke and Mara relationship finally gets traction and its really well written. Its a story full of intrigue and espionage, with some minor battles here and their. The nostalgia meter is at max and I loved every page. I guess I have to read more Zahn star wars because I cant get enough.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darryl Dobbs

    This is one time where I actually wished the series was stretched out by a book instead of shrunk down by a book or two. This is a duology and it could have been a trilogy. Leia is still fighting to keep the New Republic together, the Empire under Thrawn are still causing havoc and Pellaeon is finally starting to hear rumors about Thrawn being alive - and it's thwarting his plans for peace. Meanwhile, Han and Lando are off to the heart of the Empire to find the list of names of the Bothans respo This is one time where I actually wished the series was stretched out by a book instead of shrunk down by a book or two. This is a duology and it could have been a trilogy. Leia is still fighting to keep the New Republic together, the Empire under Thrawn are still causing havoc and Pellaeon is finally starting to hear rumors about Thrawn being alive - and it's thwarting his plans for peace. Meanwhile, Han and Lando are off to the heart of the Empire to find the list of names of the Bothans responsible for the betrayal (with the theory being that those names would then stop all the vengeful planets/races from wanting to destroy or cripple the entire race of Bothans - still a dumb premise, but we have to go with it to enjoy an otherwise solid novel). Meanwhile, Mara Jade had disappeared and Luke Skywalker and R2 went off to find her. I was pleasantly surprised about how those two made my day near the end. Tim Zahn is the best SW writer hands down.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James

    Disappointing. I loved Zahn's original Star Wars trilogy and had high hopes for this book. It's an okay story, but it has too many threads, drags on, and the ending feels very much like "happily ever after." i think part of the problem comes from tying into too many other stories from the larger Star Wars universe. I haven't read any SW books other than Zahn's and there are times when the backstory looms very large. I frequently felt like I lacked the background to understand all the nuances of Disappointing. I loved Zahn's original Star Wars trilogy and had high hopes for this book. It's an okay story, but it has too many threads, drags on, and the ending feels very much like "happily ever after." i think part of the problem comes from tying into too many other stories from the larger Star Wars universe. I haven't read any SW books other than Zahn's and there are times when the backstory looms very large. I frequently felt like I lacked the background to understand all the nuances of certain scenes. it also felt to me like Zahn wanted to give everyone character his or her own thread, and this would have been fine, but it feels like some of them get stretched too long to make the timing work out. Overall this didn't impress me as much as the previous trilogy and didn't deliver on the promise of Specter of the past.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ashish

    There are some books that you know are a bad idea. I got this around a third of the way through, but kept going hoping it'll get better. Past the halfway mark it was beyond redemption, and I just wanted to get it done. When I got it done, it was even worse than I expected. A story weighed down by not one, not two, but more than a dozen millstones in the form of extremely complex, unwieldy, and verbose story arcs attached to both old and newly introduced characters, all of whom are on their own l There are some books that you know are a bad idea. I got this around a third of the way through, but kept going hoping it'll get better. Past the halfway mark it was beyond redemption, and I just wanted to get it done. When I got it done, it was even worse than I expected. A story weighed down by not one, not two, but more than a dozen millstones in the form of extremely complex, unwieldy, and verbose story arcs attached to both old and newly introduced characters, all of whom are on their own little jaunts and rarely speak to each other except in passing; poor planning, bad backstories, c-grade comic releief and villainy, and in the end, a series of desperately-used plot devices to escape the corner Zahn painted himself into; he was able to finish the story, but not well. Not remotely well. Please avoid this. It's nowhere near the first trilogy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tony Evans

    Great book. Surprising, I though the more interesting parts of the book were about Disra, Flim and Tierce. And the parts about Luke and Mara stuck in the Hand of Thrawn were kind of tedious. But the ending really saved the book and Admiral Palleon is my new favorite Star Wars character.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fox

    I've been geek'n out . . . Been looking forward to the new Star Wars movie, so I've just read my way through Timothy Zahn's "Thrawn" series (5 books in 2 series). This one, Vision of the Future, was the grand finale. I've really enjoyed these series. Am now hungry for more! I've been geek'n out . . . Been looking forward to the new Star Wars movie, so I've just read my way through Timothy Zahn's "Thrawn" series (5 books in 2 series). This one, Vision of the Future, was the grand finale. I've really enjoyed these series. Am now hungry for more!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Obrigewitsch

    This was a decent read, a little bit too long I think.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the conclusion to the Hand of Thrawn duology, Vision of the Future by Timothy Zahn. SOME HISTORY: There’s a common misconception about Vision of the Future: mainly, that it was the final Star Wars book released by Bantam. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. After the rele For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the conclusion to the Hand of Thrawn duology, Vision of the Future by Timothy Zahn. SOME HISTORY: There’s a common misconception about Vision of the Future: mainly, that it was the final Star Wars book released by Bantam. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. After the release of Vision of the Future in the fall of 1998, there were still six books to come before the license fully switched over to Del Rey. But it is true that Vision of the Future is the final hardcover release of the Bantam era; it’s also the final book to get lovely cover art from Drew Struzan. And in a way, it was Zahn having the last word about the shape and fate of the Star Wars universe thus far. Vision of the Future made it to number thirteen on the New York Times bestseller list for the week of September 20, 1998, and was on the NYT list for two weeks. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: During past rereads, I focused on just one character (usually the Luke & Mara plot), and skipped the other bits. So I was surprised (again) by how much I enjoyed the different Imperial plotlines. A BRIEF SUMMARY: As Leia Organa Solo travels to a secret meeting with an Imperial commander who claims to want peace, Han Solo and Lando Calrissian journey into enemy territory in search of an intact copy of the Caamas Document. Meanwhile, Luke and Mara Jade infiltrate a hidden fortress where Thrawn's followers await his return. But it is ultimately the fate of Thrawn--living or dead--that holds the future and fate of the New Republic in the balance... THE CHARACTERS: The most progress and character development happened with Luke and Mara. In Specter of the Past, they were in this awkward place where they had weird interactions with each other. In Vision of the Future, Zahn trots out an old trick that he’s used before in Heir to the Empire and The Last Command: “how to make sure Luke and Mara have time for important heart-to-heart convos?” It seems that Zahn's favorite approach is to have them trek through the wilderness for days on end. (In VotF, they trek through caves.) It works; I just hadn't really noticed until this reread how much Zahn relies on this trope. Luke comes to some revelations about how to use the Force and how he's been messing things up for the past ten years. And Mara in turn comes to revelations that, like John Donne said, no man is an island. She has a role to play in the galaxy, and she has friends and family that she’s grown close to. It does feel at times as though both Mara the character and Zahn the author are ganging up on Luke a little; but to be fair, Luke in past Bantam era books has made some very questionable decisions, so I also felt like it was a little justified. But since ten years have elapsed since the Zahn’s Thrawn trilogy, it also felt like both Luke and Mara hadn't really made any progress. Mara obviously no longer wants to kill Luke, but she's still closed off emotionally--not close to anyone, her whole concept of freedom tied up in her ship--and Luke doesn't know what he should really be doing in the galaxy. He started a Jedi Academy, but he’s still questioning everything. It just felt like they were stuck in stasis, and while I’m glad that Zahn wrapped them up (so to speak), I wish it had come a little sooner. Leia felt less like a character, and more like a plot device: Zahn wanted to show us certain situations in the story, so we have Leia go there. Leia goes and meets with Pellaeon (which honestly, I was fine with because she was the Chief of State and she's still a High Counselor); then we have Leia going back to the Bothans’ homeworld because she needs to be there for the final battle. But especially compared to Luke and Mara, it didn't feel like she was going through any sort of emotional arc. Han and Lando go off looking for the Caamas Document--a little strange to me, because they know that Karrde is also off after a copy of the Caamas Document, but i guess everyone in VotF just runs around like chickens with their heads cut off looking for this document. This plotline felt like another attempt to emphasize how many people bought the fake Thrawn act. But since we already got that in book 1 with Lando and the Diamala, it felt unnecessary. I did like seeing the prejudice that normal everyday people feel against clones. You expect it on the Imperial side, which is why it’s so surprising when an outright good guy like Han also displays this antipathy towards them. It takes a lot for Han to trust the Devist brothers, because he just has this ingrained prejudice against them. On the Lando front: I especially liked near the end when they needed someone to take command of the haphazard fleet that had assembled above Bothawuii and Lando did it! People call him “General Calrissian” and then forget that he has actual command experience, so I enjoyed seeing that again. And then speaking of wild goose chases: Karrde's plot line was boring and unnecessary, and he never even got a copy of the document out of it! He's really worried about meeting Jorj Car’das (that's a running theme)--he makes it to Exocron, there’s going to be a huge battle against Rei’Kas and his slavers...but these monks show up from the Kathol Rift and fix everything. (The monks and the Rift are from a supplement to the Star Wars Roleplaying Game, the DarkStryder Campaign, so while I hate the monks, they’re not a new creation.) Jorj Car’das gives Karrde and Shada a datacard that ends up completely debunking the fake Thrawn, which...I'm not crazy about the triumvirate plot only falling apart because of a macguffin given to Karrde by this former crime boss. I would have much preferred if Admiral Pellaeon’s investigation had led to this instead of Karrde showing up from out of nowhere and derailing what looked like a very exciting battle. Bel Iblis is preparing for an attack against Yaga Minor, so they can secure a copy of the Caamas Document. (Another one???) I enjoyed the scenes with Bel Iblis, and with Wedge and Corran and the rest of Rogue Squadron, but their plot ultimately felt useless and futile. I’m sure that Zahn did that on purpose, but it’s frustrating for the reader to be building towards this great battle and then everything just fizzles out. I love Admiral Pellaeon; at this point, I think he’s eclipsed Grand Admiral Thrawn for me in that he’s interesting and intelligent, but not to the unbelievable extent that Thrawn was. We’ve really got to see Pellaeon grow and develop over the course of these books, and you’re rooting for him to get everything he wants--which is mainly peace. The triumvirate also continues to be really interesting to me. There were power plays between various members in Specter of the Past, and their alliance is starting to wear thin here. To break up Flim and Tierce’s close team, Disra reveals the concept of the Hand of Thrawn, which leads to Flim being flat-out terrified at all times. Tierce’s schemes become larger and more far-reaching, and Disra becomes more leery of him. The final revelation about Tierce’s background makes a lot of sense--that he was, in fact, a clone; and not just any clone, but an attempt to combine the original individual (the original Major Tierce) with a more strategic mind like Thrawn. But Tierce isn't Thrawn at all; he’s obsessed with revenge, so while a lot of his plans work, he doesn’t have Thrawn’s ability to look at the broader picture. ISSUES: My main complaint with VotF is that the pacing is sooo slowww. With multiple viewpoint characters, Zahn will sometimes leave a plot thread untouched for a long period of time--that was especially noticeable with Luke & Mara and with Karrde. At one point we didn’t hear about Luke and Mara for almost one hundred pages, which was definitely a lengthy break. I also felt like there was a lot of interesting build-up to these military actions that never panned out. With Zahn, I'm expecting well-written, exciting battle scenes like we saw in the Thrawn trilogy, but the battle scenes in this book were a little disappointing, mostly because they were cut off in the middle of the action. With the battle over Bothawui, Imperial Intelligence spurs everyone on to fight among themselves. Han and the clones discover the cloaked Star Destroyers; Leia on the Ishori ship and Lando on the Diamala ship head off towards them, and everyone unites against the Star Destroyers. Then we cut to a new chapter where the Imperials are escaping back to Bastion. So it felt like the build-up to this battle was interesting--Leia being on one side, Lando on the other, the Star Destroyers lying in wait--but it was over way too fast. I also got the sense from VotF that while Zahn wanted Luke and Mara to get together romantically, he didn't want to write the actual romance aspects. So what we have are a lot of really good conversations--and then Luke says “let's get married” and Mara goes “sure.” Likewise, everything with Karrde and Shada’s plotline felt like them becoming a romantic couple. Karrde completely changes his business just so that Shada can be doing something that she agrees! But that's it. There's nothing overtly romantic about their plot line other than it feels coded as romance to me. I don't think it's surprising then to find that there have been a lot of fanfictions, especially of the Luke and Mara pairing, that either get them together earlier in the timeline or try to add in that romance aspect that we were missing here. So either it takes them a long time to get back to Coruscant and we get all the actual romantic stuff, or it inserts some romantic development into their trek to the fortress. The jump straight to marriage is so abrupt, but Zahn doesn't want to write romance so it's all off screen here. If Stackpole argued that there was “no retconning to see here, move along” in I, Jedi, Zahn outright admits it. (From an interview in 2000: “There were some things there that I thought were out of character, were not the way I saw Star Wars. And I wanted to kind of talk about them, make some kind of rationale about them, bring things back to what I thought.”) That led to some quibbles for me, mainly being that Zahn is beginning to retcon Mara’s backstory and I don’t like it. Usually I’m arguing the opposite, but I felt like the Hand of Thrawn duology might have worked better as a trilogy. There’s a lot to unpack here. Vector Prime, the first book in the New Jedi Order series would be published in October of 1999, so Zahn is setting the stage for what will come. We have Parck and Fel and the Chiss talking about great threats out in the Unknown Regions. We have the fact that Thrawn was building this power base in the Unknown Regions against a nebulous threat. We have Leia resigning from her role as High Counselor--taking her out of politics for the foreseeable future. We have Karrde setting up as a neutral intelligence agency. We have Luke thinking about how he's going to change the Jedi Academy: the praxeum would be for younger students, and then older students would be paired one-on-one with a Master like how he was trained by Obi-Wan and Yoda. And then most important of all, we have the New Republic signing a peace treaty with the Empire so that hopefully they're going to be working together against this unknown force that's out there... IN CONCLUSION: Vision of the Future is a nice tail end to the Bantam era, with good character development and interactions. What lets me down in the end, though, is that the battles end way too soon, and the "romantic energy" in the book is nonexistent. (Admiral Pellaeon and the Imperial Triumvirate, though, are fantastic characters worth revisiting.) Next up: the second book in the Bounty Hunter Wars trilogy, Slave Ship by K.W. Jeter. My YouTube review: https://youtu.be/OzrCqpZpRTQ Extended Vision of the Future rants: https://youtu.be/BLCHJxTq5jA TheForce.net interview with Timothy Zahn: https://www.theforce.net/jedicouncil/...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Helix

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "And Grand Admiral Thrawn was once again gone." Yes, thank you for breaking my heart over and over again. Thanks also for the reminder. This was a thrilling ride, and, as I suspected, Zahn is the sort that truly shines in the sequel. The first book is more or less just groundwork, this one is where things truly happened. I guess it goes without saying that I do love the story--it's a page-turner in any case, and I experienced less difficulty with Vision of the Future than I do with Specter of the "And Grand Admiral Thrawn was once again gone." Yes, thank you for breaking my heart over and over again. Thanks also for the reminder. This was a thrilling ride, and, as I suspected, Zahn is the sort that truly shines in the sequel. The first book is more or less just groundwork, this one is where things truly happened. I guess it goes without saying that I do love the story--it's a page-turner in any case, and I experienced less difficulty with Vision of the Future than I do with Specter of the Past. In fact, I do love this one better than the predecessor, where this duology was concerned. However, although the complexity of the story is its strength, it's also its weakness. There's just subplots inside subplots inside subplots like Thrawn had plans within plans within plans, and while this is good and I thoroughly enjoyed the careful unspooling of revelations, at the same time I sometimes wish that I was reading a more straightforward story. Zahn's writing has more knots than about the hardest mathematical equation you can think of. I actually marvelled at this masterful ability to tell the story while moving the plot and the characters and at the same time also tying up loose ends. I mean, how did he do that? It's a mystery, but if I ever had the chance to talk to him, I want him to teach me his ways. What else? I'm not sure if there's anything else to say, but in any case, reading this novel has been an experience. Characters, yes, I'm definitely growing to love Pellaeon and even Mara (I can deeply relate to her on that part about emotional closeness). Kind of sad, really, to let them go, because I've spent five books with them and I even grow to love all the dirty Rebel Scum. Wish there were more to the resolution and we'd know what would happen to that scum Disra? Special mention goes to Zahn's Luke, I really love him. He's so complex and I definitely liked his growth. I enjoyed Leia's growth, too, and Karrde and even Lando. There's just so many things I love about this book, and I'm only knocking off one star because I'm still sad that Thrawn has died and his clone got killed, too, and his plans are foiled. Yeah, I'm salty, sorry. Anyway, overall, I really do enjoy this, but I think now I need a moment to be sad before I start Outbound Flight and gets punched in the feels again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Logan Russell

    This review encompasses both books; I consider the first one incomplete without this, so they are now one (in my mind).   This did have the added bonus of being listened to: audiobook-style. Moreover, it was narrated by Marc Thompson. That voice plus the special effects take Star Wars stories to the next level. The way different species have different accents/squeaks/squawks is priceless.   For the story itself, it was rather good. As part of a duology that spans over 30hrs, you can imagine there is This review encompasses both books; I consider the first one incomplete without this, so they are now one (in my mind).   This did have the added bonus of being listened to: audiobook-style. Moreover, it was narrated by Marc Thompson. That voice plus the special effects take Star Wars stories to the next level. The way different species have different accents/squeaks/squawks is priceless.   For the story itself, it was rather good. As part of a duology that spans over 30hrs, you can imagine there is quite a bit of exposition. The whole Bothan crisis is a through line of both books. While it does, of course, play a major role in the eventual climax, there is a lot of upfront investment. Don't get me wrong, it was a disturbingly (given our current civil unrest) realistic means of division. Maybe that is why I felt it dragged a bit - I experience this rhetoric causing mass divides daily, so I don't need it explained quite as much.   The faux-Thrawn plot was rather fun. I enjoyed that take; a way to "revive" a fallen villain without cheating death. Extra props to Marc Thompson: every time I am picturing Thrawn talking and he slips back to his 'regular' conman voice I can't help but chuckle.   Speaking of Marc Thompson and making me laugh, Car'das reminds me of Megamind's "Space Dad" character.   I very much enjoyed the character's interactions. Mara and Luke's adventure with other species, exploring the force (and maybe each other's bodies), etc. Nothing says romance like your own impending death.. Lando with anyone, but especially his scenes with Han. Same (vice versa?) with Han. I do gotta say sidelining the kids and Chewie for both books was brutal. I kept thinking they were awaiting their deus ex machina moment to show up and save the day. I need as much Chewie as possible; don't take that from me!.. Talon Karde and Shada, both badasses in their own rights, made for a good team. Do not fuck with the Mistryl's.   There was a good 'twist,' and I do love one of those. Didn't see it coming, at all. Didn't even suspect there would need to be a twist. Maybe that's what makes a good one?   I wish I would've wrote this right after I finished these, but things happen. I don't remember it all, but I did enjoy it thoroughly. If you have time for both novels, have at it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brayden Raymond

    At first I was unsure if it was worth 5 stars. By the end I knew for a fact. Zahn easily managed the multiple storylines that are strung throughout this book. Bringing them all into an exciting climax a galaxy wide. I will definitely have to finish off the other few legends books still out there by Zahn but one thing is for sure; A good friend of mine told me that if we were to forget the novels that come after this, the signing of the treaty between New Republic and Imperial Remnant is the perf At first I was unsure if it was worth 5 stars. By the end I knew for a fact. Zahn easily managed the multiple storylines that are strung throughout this book. Bringing them all into an exciting climax a galaxy wide. I will definitely have to finish off the other few legends books still out there by Zahn but one thing is for sure; A good friend of mine told me that if we were to forget the novels that come after this, the signing of the treaty between New Republic and Imperial Remnant is the perfect place for the an "end" to the Star Wars universe that we of course hope will never actually end and he is definitely correct in that assessment.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I really enjoyed listening to this on audiobook! The plot was too complicated for my taste and Luke was extra derpy, but it was fun. I'd love to read whatever book comes next chronologically. I don't think I would have enjoyed this nearly as much if I had read a physical copy. I really enjoyed listening to this on audiobook! The plot was too complicated for my taste and Luke was extra derpy, but it was fun. I'd love to read whatever book comes next chronologically. I don't think I would have enjoyed this nearly as much if I had read a physical copy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Addison Etnier

    In the sequel to Specter of the Past and the finale to the Thrawn Duology, Luke Skywalker is searching for Mara Jade after she disappeared on a planet, while his friends Han Solo and Leia Organa Solo work to keep a civil war within the New Republic from erupting, as well as dealing with an old enemy who has recently returned. This book was very exciting, and it had great character development for new characters, older Zahn characters, and even Luke. The hints of war within the New Republic was In the sequel to Specter of the Past and the finale to the Thrawn Duology, Luke Skywalker is searching for Mara Jade after she disappeared on a planet, while his friends Han Solo and Leia Organa Solo work to keep a civil war within the New Republic from erupting, as well as dealing with an old enemy who has recently returned. This book was very exciting, and it had great character development for new characters, older Zahn characters, and even Luke. The hints of war within the New Republic was very stressful and I was with the characters the whole time, wanting to argue against the politics with the characters. The book also had a few characters in the Empire, and it was very interesting with the different types of people working together and all the evil deeds they had against the New Republic. The book was great, and I'll be moving on to the New Jedi Order series soon. (It's a lot of reading, but I'm sure it's worth it!)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess Neuner

    I think this is my favourite so far of Timothy Zahn's Star Wars books, and considering how much I enjoyed the others, that's saying a lot. We get a little bit of everything in this book - adventure, romance, exploration of new areas of the galaxy, new characters and species, and everything introduced in the last book wrapped up nicely. I'm a big fan of Shada D'Ukal, insanely competent fighter who decides to join the New Republic only to find herself not needed, instead joining smuggler Talon Kar I think this is my favourite so far of Timothy Zahn's Star Wars books, and considering how much I enjoyed the others, that's saying a lot. We get a little bit of everything in this book - adventure, romance, exploration of new areas of the galaxy, new characters and species, and everything introduced in the last book wrapped up nicely. I'm a big fan of Shada D'Ukal, insanely competent fighter who decides to join the New Republic only to find herself not needed, instead joining smuggler Talon Karrde, Mara Jade's old boss from the Thrawn trilogy. Despite being the newcomer, she ends up making a pivotal choice that affects the entire galaxy. I wish they could make a film with her in it - the fight scenes would be incredible. Mara Jade is also back and in need of some help, although she's surprised she warrants Luke Skywalker, Grand Master Jedi, making a trip in person to do so. As it turns out, they need each other and each is able to provide the Force guidance the other needs, resulting in Luke gaining the confidence and understanding he needed to better lead the Jedi, and Mara finally becomes a full Jedi Knight. I actually rather liked their love story, as it wasn't sappy or overly romantic, just two people realising they needed each other and that the other made them a better person. Thrawn was my favourite Star Wars villain, so it was cool to see him as the villain again, even though he's been dead for ten years. Mara and Luke were investigating the Hand of Thrawn and a secret society of Chiss who were devoted to Thrawn and wanted Mara to join them. All the while, there's a fake Thrawn running around the Empire wreaking havoc and striking fear into the hearts of the New Republic. I loved Pellaeon in this book. He's fought hard for the Empire, but he's also realistic enough to know when he's beaten and when he needs to stop before he loses any more. He's the best Imperial I've ever seen - he's not evil and he cares about making the Empire the best it can be, and that means none of the discrimination or ruling by fear that usually went on in the Empire before. I'd actually be perfectly happy to join an Empire run by Pellaeon. It was great to see him sit down with Leia - the two leaders of the greatest factions in the galaxy discussing how to end the war that had been on-going for decades. The conflict that was the establishing feature of the Star Wars universe is finally at an end. This book also does the double duty of hinting at future conflicts (this is Star Wars, after all - with the Empire surrendering, there's got to be a new villain - it wouldn't be Star Wars is there wasn't a war) while also wrapping up loose ends from the Thrawn trilogy. Borsk Fey'lya's anxiety about what might be found in the Emperor's storehouse is explained, as is the beckon call Luke found. We get more background for Karrde, a new set of Force-users that aren't Jedi or Sith, and we even get to see the mysterious Imperial capital of Bastion. Overall, a nice finale to the defining conflict of Star Wars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wade Schacht

    Interesting, no gaping holes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Moses

    In some ways this is the MOST IMPORTANT book in the old Expanded Universe. It's the one where (to avoid spoilers) a certain large-scale conflict is finally brought to an end, and a certain protagonist finally gets married. It's good, light entertainment like a Star Wars book should be. I was interested by Mara Jade's assertion that Luke had been under some kind of Dark Side influence since his encounter with the reborn Emperor Palpatine ten years earlier. It made me want to reread the Dark Empir In some ways this is the MOST IMPORTANT book in the old Expanded Universe. It's the one where (to avoid spoilers) a certain large-scale conflict is finally brought to an end, and a certain protagonist finally gets married. It's good, light entertainment like a Star Wars book should be. I was interested by Mara Jade's assertion that Luke had been under some kind of Dark Side influence since his encounter with the reborn Emperor Palpatine ten years earlier. It made me want to reread the Dark Empire graphic novels, in which that story takes place, which I am now doing. If Luke was under dark side influence, then all his missteps in the intervening timeframe (detailed mostly in the X-Wing and Jedi Academy series) were the result of that. Zahn is boldly rewriting Luke's story, which Star Wars novels usually shy away from doing. It's an interesting tactic, it's like Zahn is redacting the Star Wars canon (the "sacred texts," if you will) for his own purposes. Since he is the acknowledged chief priest of Star Wars fiction, no one bats an eye.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    The second - and final - book in Timothy Zahn's Hand of Thrawn duology, Vision of the Future thus follows on from Specter of the Past. In this, Luke is off to rescue Mara, while the New Republic itself moves closer and closer to internal war over the involvement of a group of Bothans in the destruction of Caamas, all of which is due to the (unknown to the Republic) machinations of a trio of Imperials, one of whom is impersonating Grand Admiral Thrawn. Looking back on this, it's also interesting t The second - and final - book in Timothy Zahn's Hand of Thrawn duology, Vision of the Future thus follows on from Specter of the Past. In this, Luke is off to rescue Mara, while the New Republic itself moves closer and closer to internal war over the involvement of a group of Bothans in the destruction of Caamas, all of which is due to the (unknown to the Republic) machinations of a trio of Imperials, one of whom is impersonating Grand Admiral Thrawn. Looking back on this, it's also interesting to note the veiled hints at future events - in particular, at just what is out in the Unknown Regions - that would later come to play a major role in the ongoing series (and, as a side-note, which is round about where I stopped reading them). As this was written before prequels, there's also the occasional jarring note where this doesn't quite mesh properly, in particular with the references to the Clone Wars. Like Specter of the Past, and OK read, but not as good as the Heir to the Empire series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    A solid entry in the Zahn bloc of Star Wars novels, one that marked the end of an era (it was released in 1998 or 99 just before the Prequels, and plotwise is a end point to the New Republic-empire conflict that drove most of the EU books up to that point. Ironically, it has aged well because it seems to fit into the new TFA timeline (Imperial remnants out in the unexplored parts of the galaxy, an extragalactic menace, a weak and divided republic). If you cross your eyes enough the Zahn books ar A solid entry in the Zahn bloc of Star Wars novels, one that marked the end of an era (it was released in 1998 or 99 just before the Prequels, and plotwise is a end point to the New Republic-empire conflict that drove most of the EU books up to that point. Ironically, it has aged well because it seems to fit into the new TFA timeline (Imperial remnants out in the unexplored parts of the galaxy, an extragalactic menace, a weak and divided republic). If you cross your eyes enough the Zahn books are the logical prequels for the new trilogy. This novel does get bogged down in exposition and the sheer weight of different characters and plotlines-- including a character Jorg Cardas who was a in-universe stand in for George Lucas! Not Zahn's best work, but a good end point for the old EU. From here, read Outbound Flight and other prequel era novels and leave the NJO alone...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    A Quickie Review Though George Lucas' space opera is made up of many parts--romance, tragedy, triumph, humor, etc.--the main attractor of Star Wars for most fans is the action. Unfortunately, this last volume of a tie-in duology proved to be a bit light in that department. It still made for somewhat enjoyable reading, but it's not the lightsaber-dueling, interstellar dogfighting adventure that we got on the big screen. Content Concerns: There isn't all that much violence, but one scene does featur A Quickie Review Though George Lucas' space opera is made up of many parts--romance, tragedy, triumph, humor, etc.--the main attractor of Star Wars for most fans is the action. Unfortunately, this last volume of a tie-in duology proved to be a bit light in that department. It still made for somewhat enjoyable reading, but it's not the lightsaber-dueling, interstellar dogfighting adventure that we got on the big screen. Content Concerns: There isn't all that much violence, but one scene does feature a few stabbings. "Shavit," which obviously sounds and looks like an English profanity, is said fully once and left unfinished another time, the latter seemingly indicating the Earth vulgarity. Score: 2.75/5

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Stringer

    I have enjoyed Timothy Zahn's Star Wars novels, and I enjoyed this one. My only contention with it is that Zahn is unable to write romance. The 'romantic' scenes between Luke and Mara are stiff and awkward, which is a shame, because I think Luke finally getting a girl deserved a bit more than that. Maybe that's just because I am a girl, and one who likes romance, but still ... I have enjoyed Mara's character from the first and I was happy to see her evolution as a character in this. Luke's charac I have enjoyed Timothy Zahn's Star Wars novels, and I enjoyed this one. My only contention with it is that Zahn is unable to write romance. The 'romantic' scenes between Luke and Mara are stiff and awkward, which is a shame, because I think Luke finally getting a girl deserved a bit more than that. Maybe that's just because I am a girl, and one who likes romance, but still ... I have enjoyed Mara's character from the first and I was happy to see her evolution as a character in this. Luke's character also goes through some significant development, which I felt was handled well. I also enjoyed the action and storyline.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.