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The Joy Luck Club (Oxford Bookworms Library: Stage 6 Reader)

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There are so many things that a mother wishes to teach her daughter. This is a story about four mothers born in China, and their daughters born in America. Through their eyes we see life in pre-revolutionary China and life in downtown San Francisco, and also women who struggle to find a cultural identity that can include a past and a future.


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There are so many things that a mother wishes to teach her daughter. This is a story about four mothers born in China, and their daughters born in America. Through their eyes we see life in pre-revolutionary China and life in downtown San Francisco, and also women who struggle to find a cultural identity that can include a past and a future.

30 review for The Joy Luck Club (Oxford Bookworms Library: Stage 6 Reader)

  1. 4 out of 5

    elaney guevara

    i read this book before i watched the movie. this book made me cry. if you know how hard it is for me to cry, that is a feat in itself. i like the characterization in the story, how consistent they are in their portrayal. i love the women in this book, especially june, as she seems to still struggle to win the approval of her mother (as we asian women are wont to do) even as she struggles to find herself in a country so different from what she really is. the main raves about this book though is i i read this book before i watched the movie. this book made me cry. if you know how hard it is for me to cry, that is a feat in itself. i like the characterization in the story, how consistent they are in their portrayal. i love the women in this book, especially june, as she seems to still struggle to win the approval of her mother (as we asian women are wont to do) even as she struggles to find herself in a country so different from what she really is. the main raves about this book though is its great stories of women from the east, a culture so different from their american daughters. for an asian woman, i just like how i can relate to so many things stories told in the book even though i am not chinese. this just proves how brilliant amy tan in telling stories which tells a universal theme - mothers who want the best for their daughters and daughters who want their mother's approval.

  2. 4 out of 5

    anissa

    The first and still the best of Amy Tan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hoss

    The powers that be should reconsider putting this book and Woman Warrior on school reading lists. Books like To Kill a Mockingbird and The Color Purple are challenged while this novel rewards the continuing orientalizing of Asian American identities. While I would never advocate censoring this book, if it is taught, I hope educators will interrogate the identities constructed in these novels. I think it’s relevant like Song of the South is relevant--as a cultural Freudian slip.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maan

    I found the book okay. It was light, it delved on family values, but I wanted more. Bitin!I read the book fast because I was looking forward to know how the author will connect the different stories of the characters. As I read the last line, I found myself saying "That's it?!"

  5. 5 out of 5

    Renée Paradise

    I’m pretty confident this is the second time I’m reading this book, but sometimes you just crave a good story and want a sure bet. I’ll admit I had some trouble keeping track of the genealogies between mother’s and daughters in this story, but each chapter gives a glimpse into what I can only imagine are common relationships between daughters of Chinese immigrants to the US, as well as the lives of the mothers. It’s a quick read which can give you some cultural sensitivity with funny anecdotes a I’m pretty confident this is the second time I’m reading this book, but sometimes you just crave a good story and want a sure bet. I’ll admit I had some trouble keeping track of the genealogies between mother’s and daughters in this story, but each chapter gives a glimpse into what I can only imagine are common relationships between daughters of Chinese immigrants to the US, as well as the lives of the mothers. It’s a quick read which can give you some cultural sensitivity with funny anecdotes and perspective along the way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Colin Darby

    I can pin this one. I read this in my last semester of high school. I loathed it. I still loathe all the things about it that I loathed then - unlikeable characters, no particular interest in any of the plot, and an active dislike of any of the players. I doubt my opinion will change on re-read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tracey A

    Asian culture. Female fellowship. Well written

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon McCafferty

    Really made me think.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    First saw the movie before reading this book. This book was what made Amy Tan one of my favorite authors.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ava 🌙

    i loved this book a lot and as a biracial person waverly did make me feel like we should start making it illegal again bc she was such a clown (wasians 🙄) but every other character was fantastic

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Swensson

    Still the best of Amy Tan!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carofish

    I read this many years ago, well before the movie was made. A fabulous story

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I simply adore this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie Arroyo

    I devoured this book like a really good meal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel “Koala”

    This is a very powerful book. The author led me through so many emotions and it was just incredible.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    3.5/5. It was one of those really rare instances where I actually liked the movie better than the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julio Quero

    The Joy Luck Club is an intriguing true story about the customs of mothers born and raised in China immigrating to the United States and having to raise American born daughters there, also the everyday struggle of relationships between mother/daughter. The Joy Luck club is a gathering that a few families have where they gather to talk and play mah-jong. Jing-Mei who's mother was part of the club dies and she takes her place at the table. Her mother had located the address of her long lost daught The Joy Luck Club is an intriguing true story about the customs of mothers born and raised in China immigrating to the United States and having to raise American born daughters there, also the everyday struggle of relationships between mother/daughter. The Joy Luck club is a gathering that a few families have where they gather to talk and play mah-jong. Jing-Mei who's mother was part of the club dies and she takes her place at the table. Her mother had located the address of her long lost daughters and the people from the Joy Luck club gather mother and encourage Jing-Mei to go find her long lost sisters. This story deals with the conflict of different cultures and generations. The mothers are strictly old school and keep their customs very strong throughout the story. They want their daughters to be raised with these customs, not the American way. The daughters on the other hand feel like they don't know their own identity. They are growing up in an American society but their mothers want them to follow Chinese customs. They feel torn in between what is right and what is wrong. “These kinds of explanations made me feel my mother and I spoke two different languages, which we did. I talked to her in English, she answered back in Chinese. (Tan 84) This is one of the examples that show the barrier between the mothers and daughters. This book appealed to me in an emotional way because my parents are immigrants from the Dominican Republic. Growing up, they wanted to me to things a certain way as if we were living there, but it’s hard to follow those customs when you actually aren’t living in that place. Overall, this was a great story and I recommend it if you are interested in different cultures.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kay Lu

    Q1: I think there is totally different situation between the story and me. My friends and I like to play mah jong and play it for fun during the leisure time or the Chinese New Year but in the story, they play that game to forget the fear and the sadness of the war. Q11: I want to know what happened when Jing-mei Woo met her sisters whom she has never seen before and who lived in Shanghai. I think Jing-mei's sisters had good life in China that she could sent Jing-mei money. I want to know how they Q1: I think there is totally different situation between the story and me. My friends and I like to play mah jong and play it for fun during the leisure time or the Chinese New Year but in the story, they play that game to forget the fear and the sadness of the war. Q11: I want to know what happened when Jing-mei Woo met her sisters whom she has never seen before and who lived in Shanghai. I think Jing-mei's sisters had good life in China that she could sent Jing-mei money. I want to know how they feel when they meet. I've read 35 pages

  19. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    It confused me a little, and I had to consult the page at the front to keep the characters straight, but it was a really engaging book. It made me examine my own mother/daughter relationship. Tan does an excellent job creating rich and singular characters. This is a good read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    A great glimpse into the world of Asian-American immigrants, and in fact the identity struggles of all immigrants, mothers trying to maintain ties to the culture of their birth, daughters trying to establish their own identities in a new culture.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diane Wachter

    PB-B @ 1989 - 8/93. Interesting story about four Chinese mothers and their four Chinese/American daughters. If I read it again, I would read it differently...I would read each chapter about the same family in sequence. Perhaps that way it would not be so confusing!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    good stories however nothing overly rememberable happened and I really struggled to connect to the charters

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Buckles

    EXCELLENT!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alena Vacková

    Interesting and moving - I had watery eyes during the last chapter.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Namiko

    It surprised me with how strong their relationships are, a mother and a daughter. I started to think about my relationship with my mom and my daughter.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yasi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Abby

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