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Star Wars: Dark Times, Volume Four: Blue Harvest

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Three months after the events in Revenge of the Sith . . . In a time when all Jedi are fugitives, surviving Jedi Dass Jennir is trying to live as an outlaw without actually becoming one. Accepting a job from a mysterious beauty, Jennir sets out to rid her town of a gang of slave runners. But when he finds that his employer hasn't been completely honest with him, he begins Three months after the events in Revenge of the Sith . . . In a time when all Jedi are fugitives, surviving Jedi Dass Jennir is trying to live as an outlaw without actually becoming one. Accepting a job from a mysterious beauty, Jennir sets out to rid her town of a gang of slave runners. But when he finds that his employer hasn't been completely honest with him, he begins to doubt the course she's set him on. Outlaw or not, there's one thing he knows for certain: he has vowed to save this town-and a Jedi never gives up Meanwhile, Darth Vader makes a discovery that has him questioning his own future and the plans of Emperor Palpatine. There are many questions and few answers in these dark times Note: The storyline of Star Wars Dark Times between Volume 2 and Volume 4 is collected in the Star Wars: Vector Volume 1 (978-1-59582-226-0). There is no Star Wars: Dark Times Volume 3.


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Three months after the events in Revenge of the Sith . . . In a time when all Jedi are fugitives, surviving Jedi Dass Jennir is trying to live as an outlaw without actually becoming one. Accepting a job from a mysterious beauty, Jennir sets out to rid her town of a gang of slave runners. But when he finds that his employer hasn't been completely honest with him, he begins Three months after the events in Revenge of the Sith . . . In a time when all Jedi are fugitives, surviving Jedi Dass Jennir is trying to live as an outlaw without actually becoming one. Accepting a job from a mysterious beauty, Jennir sets out to rid her town of a gang of slave runners. But when he finds that his employer hasn't been completely honest with him, he begins to doubt the course she's set him on. Outlaw or not, there's one thing he knows for certain: he has vowed to save this town-and a Jedi never gives up Meanwhile, Darth Vader makes a discovery that has him questioning his own future and the plans of Emperor Palpatine. There are many questions and few answers in these dark times Note: The storyline of Star Wars Dark Times between Volume 2 and Volume 4 is collected in the Star Wars: Vector Volume 1 (978-1-59582-226-0). There is no Star Wars: Dark Times Volume 3.

30 review for Star Wars: Dark Times, Volume Four: Blue Harvest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    MINI REVIEW: It breaks canon law as no other Jedi survived the purge but it's good fun as Jedi Jennir goes about correcting matters in a crime ridden town. It hits some good beats, delivers on a few surprises and has very good art. OVERALL GRADE: B to B plus. MINI REVIEW: It breaks canon law as no other Jedi survived the purge but it's good fun as Jedi Jennir goes about correcting matters in a crime ridden town. It hits some good beats, delivers on a few surprises and has very good art. OVERALL GRADE: B to B plus.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    The art continues to amaze in Dark Times. The story was very solid in this arc as well. Dass Jennir continues to prowl around the seedy underbelly of the galaxy all while trying to keep his morals intact. I really love the sections where Darth Vader struggles with slavery and with Palpatine. It makes perfect sense and makes for good reading. It is a shame that this series is now on hiatus. There is definitely some momentum in this story and there are so many questions yet to be answered. I can o The art continues to amaze in Dark Times. The story was very solid in this arc as well. Dass Jennir continues to prowl around the seedy underbelly of the galaxy all while trying to keep his morals intact. I really love the sections where Darth Vader struggles with slavery and with Palpatine. It makes perfect sense and makes for good reading. It is a shame that this series is now on hiatus. There is definitely some momentum in this story and there are so many questions yet to be answered. I can only hope Dark Horse brings it back in the near future.

  3. 5 out of 5

    DC

    This story arc feels like it's going somewhere again. Jennir is conflicted yet like-able, and the artwork is consistently good. Coming back to finish this series - it is really good. This is such a solid entry for the story and the art is detailed and approachable. This story arc feels like it's going somewhere again. Jennir is conflicted yet like-able, and the artwork is consistently good. Coming back to finish this series - it is really good. This is such a solid entry for the story and the art is detailed and approachable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    A small, largely self-contained story about a Jedi resolving a complex situation. The story has layers of deception and schemes but they are relatively simple and slow and countered meaningfully by strategy and moral character by Jennir, and the minor characters here--Fish, Dado, Nikollane, Demanna--have just enough of their own goals and personalities to sell the drama of the scenario. The story here echoes the kind of local planetary dispute that would make the planet quest in a game like KOTO A small, largely self-contained story about a Jedi resolving a complex situation. The story has layers of deception and schemes but they are relatively simple and slow and countered meaningfully by strategy and moral character by Jennir, and the minor characters here--Fish, Dado, Nikollane, Demanna--have just enough of their own goals and personalities to sell the drama of the scenario. The story here echoes the kind of local planetary dispute that would make the planet quest in a game like KOTOR--two competing criminal factions, innocent civilians, hidden schemes and betrayals, questgivers who aren't entirely honest, and a meaningful sense of local culture and history. Like the best of that sort of story, it's not clear that there are morally coded solutions here; Jennir uses plenty of violence, doesn't side with either faction, and may not have created a stable long-term peace, but his solution is elegant and principled. The relation to the Dark Times theme is not as clear here; this story could easily be set before TPM and would feel the same. The big difference is that Jennir can't rely on any outside help to set this situation right in the long term--he has to do his work and walk away. The other stories in this collection are sort of keeping time; nothing interesting happens to Greenbark or Vader, they're just hanging out. Vader hanging out is about as good in Stradley's hands as it ever is, though, so that's not a bad thing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    Star Wars Legends Project #178 Background: Blue Harvest was released in November of 2010. It collects Dark Times #13-17 (alternately, Republic #96-100), first published April 2009-June 2010 (plus a "0 issue" originally published online as a prequel to the main story). It was written by Randy Stradley (under the name Mick Harrison) with art by Douglas Wheatley. Stradley wrote most of the Dark Times (under various names), and a few dozen other comics. Wheatley has a very similar Star Wars bibli Star Wars Legends Project #178 Background: Blue Harvest was released in November of 2010. It collects Dark Times #13-17 (alternately, Republic #96-100), first published April 2009-June 2010 (plus a "0 issue" originally published online as a prequel to the main story). It was written by Randy Stradley (under the name Mick Harrison) with art by Douglas Wheatley. Stradley wrote most of the Dark Times (under various names), and a few dozen other comics. Wheatley has a very similar Star Wars bibliography. This is the fourth storyline in the Dark Times series. The story takes place immediately after the events of Dark Times: Vector (my review), (19 years before the Battle of Yavin). The main recurring characters are Jedi Master Dass Jennir and Darth Vader, along with a new character, Ember Chankeli. Most of the action takes place on Telerath. Summary: Cast off from the Uhumele, Dass Jennir finds himself adrift and unsure of how, or if, he can still follow the Jedi way. But it seems he can't help himself, and he soon accepts a job from a beautiful damsel in distress to deal with a gang of slavers terrorizing her homeworld. When he arrives, however, he soon discovers that neither the damsel nor her distress are exactly what they seem. Meanwhile, Darth Vader must deal with the fallout from his disappointing defeat by Celeste Morne, even as he begins to worry that his Master is plotting against him. Review: Another fantastic storyline in the tank for the Dark Times series! This one is paying obvious homage to the Kurosawa film Yojimbo, always a great source for inspiration considering that Lucas paid similar homage to the Kurosawa film Hidden Fortress in Star Wars. Jennir, sporting a great new look, plays wandering samurai in a story full of intrigue and action. The aesthetic is fantastic, and a (slightly weird) plot contrivance sees most of the combatants armed with swords. Stradley and Wheatley find great ways to make even the minor characters feel important and memorable, and this is probably the most stand-alone of the series so far, so I definitely recommend it, even on its own. Jedi stories of this era actually remind me of the Knight Errant series, because they feature heroes who often find themselves trapped in seemingly no-win scenarios, outnumbered and outgunned, hunted, with no safe haven to turn to and no backup to call for. It makes for high drama and high stakes, and I look forward to a lot more of it! A

  6. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    I skipped Vector to avoid having to learn a new cast. Only 2 issues from the Dark Times series are included in that 12-issue arc, so it's no biggie. This arc focuses on Dass Jennir and almost completely ignores the pirates and Vader. Still, it's a solid, fairly standalone story that highlights the Jedi code and their impressive skillset. Dass Jennir is in hiding from the Imperial forces. He travels to Noua in Telerath where the beautiful Ember Chankeli has given him a mission to rid the city of t I skipped Vector to avoid having to learn a new cast. Only 2 issues from the Dark Times series are included in that 12-issue arc, so it's no biggie. This arc focuses on Dass Jennir and almost completely ignores the pirates and Vader. Still, it's a solid, fairly standalone story that highlights the Jedi code and their impressive skillset. Dass Jennir is in hiding from the Imperial forces. He travels to Noua in Telerath where the beautiful Ember Chankeli has given him a mission to rid the city of the Slaver gang. (view spoiler)[Dass has had suspicions about Ember from when they first met. They are soon confirmed when he finds the Ember is working for the Spicer gang, a rival of the Slavers. He takes down an operation owned by the Spicers and uses it to spark all-out war between the two gangs. He nearly gets killed in the process, but the few allies he gained help him survive the experience. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Cox

    I love the effort given to provide character development for Das Jennir and the survivors of the Uhumele. This story reads very much like most others where a stranger enters a troubled area and goes against the odds to make life better for the downtrodden who live there. If you like that sort of tale, this is a very satisfying telling with the standard path of success followed by defeat and a beating followed by the inevitable return and victory. Despite this very standard theme, this was immens I love the effort given to provide character development for Das Jennir and the survivors of the Uhumele. This story reads very much like most others where a stranger enters a troubled area and goes against the odds to make life better for the downtrodden who live there. If you like that sort of tale, this is a very satisfying telling with the standard path of success followed by defeat and a beating followed by the inevitable return and victory. Despite this very standard theme, this was immensely enjoyable. It is interspersed a little by Darth Vader and Palpatine, but they don't really add anything much to the story. It does cover a little on Vader's realisation as to his part in the Sith rule of the galaxy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marta Duda-Gryc

    Może 3,5. Naprawdę niezły komiks - a nigdy się z nim wcześniej nie zetknęłam. Dobrze się tłumaczył. Jedi (czy aby nadal?) Dass Jennir wymiata, obawiam się jednak, że jego kariera rewolwerowca-obrońcy maluczkich na Dzikim Zachodzie, tfu, Rubieżach już niedługo źle się skończy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathrin

    I really liked this installment and to see a rouge Jedi after the fall of the Republic.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Overall: 6/10 Pro: good to read a simple story about taking out some gangs. Classic Jedi stuff Con: why does Jennir look like 60 when he beard is grown out??

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    The problem with a lot of the "expanded universe" fiction that's built up around Star Wars (and Star Trek) over the years is that it's attracted a lot of writers who aren't necessarily interested in writing stories in the Star Wars (or Star Trek) universe so much as writing the fantasy (or science fiction) stories that they've loved but don't necessarily, again, have anything to do with Star Wars (or Star Trek). This is definitely a problem, for instance, when you title your story Blue Harvest, The problem with a lot of the "expanded universe" fiction that's built up around Star Wars (and Star Trek) over the years is that it's attracted a lot of writers who aren't necessarily interested in writing stories in the Star Wars (or Star Trek) universe so much as writing the fantasy (or science fiction) stories that they've loved but don't necessarily, again, have anything to do with Star Wars (or Star Trek). This is definitely a problem, for instance, when you title your story Blue Harvest, which has nerdish meaning for Star Wars fans, considering it was the working title as Return of the Jedi was in production. (For the record, Family Guy borrowed it for their Star Wars specials, too.) Whether or not it ultimately has any real significance to the Star Wars universe becomes beside the point. It's a part of the lore. So again, when you title your "expanded universe" story Blue Harvest, that story probably ought to have some special significance to Star Wars as most fans will view it (read: by the movies). And this story just doesn't. Set after the events of Revenge of the Sith, the story features a random Jedi who survived the Order 66 purge, and has, for all intents and purposes, become a ronin, a wandering, masterless samurai (this is a connection that's not usually applied to Star Wars, which was in part inspired by Hidden Fortress, a movie about Japanese warriors). Which, technically, would be pretty accurate, and is the most clever (perhaps only clever) thing to say about the story. The rest of it could really have been done with any other fictional setting and nothing would really have had to have changed. There's a minor subplot concerning Darth Vader's angst about his position as the Emperor's right-hand man (don't blame the prequels for Star Wars angst; this sort of thing existed in the "expanded universe" in spades long before them), but it doesn't really amount to anything, and never ties in with the lone Jedi's adventures. It's clear that the collection is culled from ongoing plotlines, and that's another problem, because there's no real resolution except to say, the lone Jedi (bad fantasy or science fiction often has terrible names, and that's the reason I haven't named this guy in the review) comes to terms with his new lot in life, which is being a ronin. So why was this called Blue Harvest? I honestly have no idea. It's a fine story in a very general sense, but isn't really all that special. Whether or not you, too, judge it by the title, at least a little, you'll probably also come off disappointed. That much could have easily been averted...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rizzie

    Holy hell that was good. Dass Jennir finally returns, and it was worth the wait. The story builds steadily with setup after setup until, in the final issue, everything pays off beautifully. The final issue in particular really impressed me. Doug Wheatley is really showing off his grasp of the comics medium. One page towards the end has a very simple, quick action scene with a masterful manipulation of the reader's concept of time. Another scene right after has a very cliched situation common in Holy hell that was good. Dass Jennir finally returns, and it was worth the wait. The story builds steadily with setup after setup until, in the final issue, everything pays off beautifully. The final issue in particular really impressed me. Doug Wheatley is really showing off his grasp of the comics medium. One page towards the end has a very simple, quick action scene with a masterful manipulation of the reader's concept of time. Another scene right after has a very cliched situation common in film and TV that usually falls flat because the darkness of the choice presented to the protagonist is rarely believable, but Jennir has been built so well that I genuinely had no idea what he was going to do in the moment. Even the pseudo-cliffhanger was such a thrilling way to close the story, where it might have felt cheap in any other comic. This is about the halfway point for Dark Times, and I can't wait to see where it ends up.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ernest

    Although this is part of a larger story, I was able to follow this volume involving the major story of a Jedi after Order 66 (from Attack of the Clone s) and a minor story of Darth Vader. The art was well done and the story was interesting, and this volume showed how integrated the Expanded Universe has become. However, I would only recommend it to those willing to invest in the Star Wars Expanded Universe.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Beginning to clear out my back log of what is now a discarded timeline in the Star Wars Universe. Blue Harvest is simply another good tale from the fantastic Dark Horse Crew. I highly recommend any Dark Horse title from their Star Wars line. They are a lot of fun and they try very hard to stay true to the original movies. Enjoy!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jedi Sunni

    Star wars meets the punished. The action was non-stop and the storyline was very well put together. We also have another Jeri siteing, who is this mystery man. I also love how the writer show the conflict deep within Darth Vader. I would recommend this book to all star wars fans. The art is beautiful as well. My rating for this issue is a 4.8 out of 5.0.

  16. 4 out of 5

    C

    Surprised I never added this one. Definitely my favorite SW comic book series. Doug Wheatley's art is, as always, phenomenal (what I would give to see his concept art for the live action star wars show that may or may not ever happen...) and the storyline is great as well. Surprised I never added this one. Definitely my favorite SW comic book series. Doug Wheatley's art is, as always, phenomenal (what I would give to see his concept art for the live action star wars show that may or may not ever happen...) and the storyline is great as well.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This book follows a jedi who is trying to do good by just taking on bounty hunter jobs that help people. He lands one to stop a slavers gang. It's a typical western style story, one man alone taking on the bad guys. A good read. This book follows a jedi who is trying to do good by just taking on bounty hunter jobs that help people. He lands one to stop a slavers gang. It's a typical western style story, one man alone taking on the bad guys. A good read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Yojimbo Star Wars-style

  19. 4 out of 5

    Max

    The best story arc in the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eric Mikols

    I liked that it took me a while to notice, but this volume is just a retelling of Yojimbo in the Star Wars universe. But it's great and the art is gorgeous. I liked that it took me a while to notice, but this volume is just a retelling of Yojimbo in the Star Wars universe. But it's great and the art is gorgeous.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kiril

  22. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julien

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rexington

  25. 4 out of 5

    ik.ben.henri

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Salyards

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Fox

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  29. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Olthorn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hector

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