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Behind Green Glass: A Fantasy Novel

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Immortal but imperfect. There are those who have been left out of the fairytales. When painfully shy Isolde moves into an old farmhouse in the countryside, she imagines what little social life she had is about to disappear. Instead of solitude, however, she is haunted by a ghostly presence. A shard of green glass reveals Lyric, one of a band of ethereally beautiful creature Immortal but imperfect. There are those who have been left out of the fairytales. When painfully shy Isolde moves into an old farmhouse in the countryside, she imagines what little social life she had is about to disappear. Instead of solitude, however, she is haunted by a ghostly presence. A shard of green glass reveals Lyric, one of a band of ethereally beautiful creatures known as The Forgotten Ones. Labeled imperfect for their physical and mental differences, The Forgotten Ones have been cast out of their native realm. Isolde's friendship with Lyric and The Forgotten Ones teaches her that sometimes our "imperfections" can also be our greatest strengths.


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Immortal but imperfect. There are those who have been left out of the fairytales. When painfully shy Isolde moves into an old farmhouse in the countryside, she imagines what little social life she had is about to disappear. Instead of solitude, however, she is haunted by a ghostly presence. A shard of green glass reveals Lyric, one of a band of ethereally beautiful creature Immortal but imperfect. There are those who have been left out of the fairytales. When painfully shy Isolde moves into an old farmhouse in the countryside, she imagines what little social life she had is about to disappear. Instead of solitude, however, she is haunted by a ghostly presence. A shard of green glass reveals Lyric, one of a band of ethereally beautiful creatures known as The Forgotten Ones. Labeled imperfect for their physical and mental differences, The Forgotten Ones have been cast out of their native realm. Isolde's friendship with Lyric and The Forgotten Ones teaches her that sometimes our "imperfections" can also be our greatest strengths.

48 review for Behind Green Glass: A Fantasy Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Araujo

    Whenever you see a Fairy novel and read the synopsis, there always seems to be one thing in common. A human girl meets a fairy boy and falls in love for his beauty and his perfection and something happens where they can not be together and they meet the fairy world and they live happily ever after in the end. You never hear about fairies that are not perfect and the girls who do not fall in love with them. Until one novel came along. Behind Green Glass changed that all. The story centers around a Whenever you see a Fairy novel and read the synopsis, there always seems to be one thing in common. A human girl meets a fairy boy and falls in love for his beauty and his perfection and something happens where they can not be together and they meet the fairy world and they live happily ever after in the end. You never hear about fairies that are not perfect and the girls who do not fall in love with them. Until one novel came along. Behind Green Glass changed that all. The story centers around a girl by the name of Isolde who moved into a new house with her mother. The house, which is in fact very old, is rumored to be haunted. And finding fingerprint smudges on one of your paintings just does not help that rumor go away. But when Isolde finds a green glass, suddenly her perspective of the house is different. Literally. Through the said green glass, Isolde see’s a figure of a boy who she believes is a ghost. She learns of his story, how he fell in love with a human girl who lived a miserable life and ended up killing herself to be with this boy, who she also believed was a ghost and saw through the same green glass. It is not until this boy, Lyric, shows Isolde his family that she discovers that he is not a ghost but a fairy. Isolde wonders why there are only four and why they all look so different. And that is when she discovers the truth. These fairies were cast out of their realm because of their imperfections. What we find common troubles, they find something vile and so cruel and an abomination to their perfection. We are talking about stutters, bipolar disorders, deceased wings and even no wings. It is not a surprise when Isolde wants to help these fairies in any way possible. And so their adventure begins. Behind Green Glass is not just about the adventure though. It is about lessons. Amanda Vonn Hoffmann does an amazing job at making these two different creatures learn from each other. Isolde who is shy and non-risk taking soon learns that she must live for herself when she meets a boy in her new town. And Lyric who lived life full of sadness and loneliness must learn that he can make everything around him alive including himself. The novel is not a huge monster of a novel. It’s close to 200 pages which makes displaying your story perfectly a challenge. In just those 200 pages, Amanda Vonn Hoffmann gave us exactly what we wanted. Forget about the fairy world this is about the fairies themselves. She gives enough insight to all the characters to make us want to dig deeper into their story. She gives the characters life by giving them troubles that many people experience ever day. No, I’m not talking about dating troubles, although that is in the novel, but real troubles. Troubles that people suffer from and can not escape at all. Another example of why her writing is spectacular is that she is giving us a novel of fairies. But how do we know that it is not about something else. By now we know this is a book about mental illness’. About a girl who just moved to a new house and is starting to see these mythical creatures. At times I was thinking about how if Isolde herself was mentally ill and if all this was just in her head. How she couldn’t see anything except if she had the green glass. How the previous owner of the green glass was always kept in the home because her father was “horrible” to her and she later killed herself. When I clearly think about it, I do see that these two girls, the only owners of the glass and the only ones who we know saw the creatures, were in fact mentally ill. Yet, Amanda Von Hoffman did a wonderful job at adding a thick layer of fantasy on top and beautifully written words that we have to dig deep for them. It is like a dollar bill. In our hands we have a piece of paper that is green with some stuff on it. But when we think about it, that dollar bill is much more than a piece of paper. That dollar bill brings us a whole new world to our fingertips. All in all, Behind Green Glass is an amazing novel that makes one think and think again. The ending leaves us at a bit of a cliffhanger that makes us create our own in our head. Whether you go with the outer layer of fairies or if you go with the inner layer of Isolde’s supposable mental illness, this novel will not disappoint you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Majanka

    Behind Green Glass focuses on Isolde, a young adult who recently moved to the country with her mother. Isolde is a shy, artistic and kind person but she often struggles with who she is, and wishes she could be more outgoing, like her best friend. Soon after moving to the old countryhouse, Isolde starts feeling like she is being watched by someone or something, and strange occurances happen in her room. Convinced she is being haunted by the ghost of a girl who passed away in that very room – Mere Behind Green Glass focuses on Isolde, a young adult who recently moved to the country with her mother. Isolde is a shy, artistic and kind person but she often struggles with who she is, and wishes she could be more outgoing, like her best friend. Soon after moving to the old countryhouse, Isolde starts feeling like she is being watched by someone or something, and strange occurances happen in her room. Convinced she is being haunted by the ghost of a girl who passed away in that very room – Meredith, Isolde is determined to help the ghost move on to the afterlife. It’s only when she discovers a shards of green glass in her drawer, and sees the ghost of a young boy through this glass, that Isolde realises it isn’t Meredith who haunts her. It’s Lyric. He was in love with Meredith and stayed in her room even after she died, unable to let go of the girl he loved. It doesn’t take long before Isolde figures out that Lyric, and his friends, aren’t really ghosts. They’re faeries. And not just faeries: they are the Forgotten Ones, imperfect faeries cast out of the faerie world. I can’t begin to explain to you how much I liked Isolde. Right when I was so fed up with always having to read books about feisty, fiery and stubborn heroines who take feminism one step too far, in walks Isolde. Such a refreshing change from the usual: so innocent and kind, and yet so strong and determined. It’s been a while since a character has managed to surprise me in such a nice way like Isolde did. For one, she was an actual human being, with all sorts of contradictory emotions, a desire to be someone else than who she really is, and all the insecurities normal human beings feel. She reminded me a lot of myself when I was that age, and it was pleasant to see that not all fantasy heroines need the same generic personality to accomplish things, and kindness can get you a long way as well. The other characters were very interesting as well. I simply loved how Amanda von Hoffmann described the imperfect faeries: Fafnir with his stutter, Nola with her childlike behaviour and Lyric himself. The faeries had personalities of them own, but none were the cunning, mischevious and somewhat-evil kind described in mythology, fairytales and recent faerie-related books like The Iron Fey series and Glimmerglass. Von Hoffman’s faeries are kind, friendly creatures, who might be holding a few secrets of their own, but who won’t plan on feeding humans enchanted food or trick them into deals they don’t want. It was so refreshing not having to think about ‘what will the wicked faerie do next, and how will they trick the humans into making a deal with them’, and seeing another aspect of the faerieworld for once. I also like the character of Matt, although I was Team Lyric all the way. Lyric just had that mystery charm working for him that made me like him even more than I liked Matt. That, and he managed to show Isolde some of the strengths she possessed without her even realising it. That gives him additional credit as well. Although the storyline evolves around a little of different things:the possible haunting, Isolde’s issues with her mother homeschooling her, her relationship with Matt, the journey to the faerie realm, etc., I had the feeling Behind Green Glass is mostly a sort of coming-of-age story. We see how at first, Isolde is filled with concerns and insecurities. She isn’t happy with the person she is, and wants to be stronger and more outgoing. As the story develops, and Isolde is forced to make some harsh decisions and to rely on her own strength and courage to not only save herself, but also the friends she cares deeply about, I could see her personality developing as well. It was quite clear and easy to see, and I love it when a character manages to grow throughout the story, and become a better person in the end. This growth process is wonderfully written and shown, and in some ways it made me feel very proud of Isolde. By the end, I was going all ‘You go, girl!’. I really enjoyed reading Behind Green Glass. I thought the writing was spot-on, the characters had interesting personalities, and the entire take on the faerieworld was refreshing, new and innovative. The storyline itself was fast-paced and original. If you want a light and easy read, but a well-written one with a more original take on faeries, then Behind Green Glass is definately an excellent option.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rollie

    Yay! I’m very much grateful for giving me a chance to read this book. Isolde, usually called Izzy by her friends, is the newly resident of a rumored hunted house. When she found a green glass, weird things started to happen. She supposed that standing of her hairs on the back of her neck was as normal as living in her newly house. But when she saw a man behind the green glass, she concluded it wasn’t part of the normal stuff she forced to believe anymore. Lyric was an amnesia ghost. He didn’t rem Yay! I’m very much grateful for giving me a chance to read this book. Isolde, usually called Izzy by her friends, is the newly resident of a rumored hunted house. When she found a green glass, weird things started to happen. She supposed that standing of her hairs on the back of her neck was as normal as living in her newly house. But when she saw a man behind the green glass, she concluded it wasn’t part of the normal stuff she forced to believe anymore. Lyric was an amnesia ghost. He didn’t remember what life he was in before he died even the day when he died. When a new girl resided in the new house where his first love used to live, his world started to be revealed again. But part of the revelation of his existence was the imminent truth to be unfolded. Would it cause him a relief out of joy or rage for committing mistakes due to his false belief? I expected this book to be more in romance, for the synopsis almost implied how romantic the story is. After reading this book, now, I would say that this is not totally a love story. If you stick with the synopsis of this book, I’m telling you: you’re lost. The relationship of Izzy and Lyric isn’t relatively romantic. At first, I admit, I thought the book was meant for the two main characters but it declined at the last quarter when I realized that the relationship of the two characters to evolve can’t already make it till the last page. Isolde is a conservative girl and I love to know that even in books there are still people living like her. I admire his personality and, of course, her intelligence is with it. I even like how she balances the fairness situation between the people involved in a certain issue. Overall, she’s an interesting character of a book. However, I found surreal reactions of this character at the first quarter of the book. She fathoms ideas absurdly—too impossible to be done in real situation. But it wasn’t a big issue to me, then. And it didn't give me a big impact to dislike the character nor the book. The concept has a brush of spiderweck. Using a glass of seeing otherworld beings is still a trend concept. It hasn’t been used too much in literary world as much as the vampire stuff does. The tone of the book is light and this book is an easy-read one. I don’t usually read fair folks novels but this book has changed my taste.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    Behind Green Glass is a wonderful blending of classic young adult fiction in the vein of authors like Judy Blume and contemporary fantasy young adult fiction which now holds the spotlight. This is only one of the reasons that Behind Green Glass offers the reader something new. The book also offers engaging characters and envy-inspiring description for the writer camping out inside all of us. After reading I wanted more, especially more on the fairies, who are portrayed in a unique way when compa Behind Green Glass is a wonderful blending of classic young adult fiction in the vein of authors like Judy Blume and contemporary fantasy young adult fiction which now holds the spotlight. This is only one of the reasons that Behind Green Glass offers the reader something new. The book also offers engaging characters and envy-inspiring description for the writer camping out inside all of us. After reading I wanted more, especially more on the fairies, who are portrayed in a unique way when compared to other depictions of fairies in fiction. We have the stuttering Fafnir, the beautiful Nola with a childlike disposition and diseased wings which render her unable to fly. Finally we have Lyric, who has been away from his home land for so long that he's not sure of his lineage or race. The entire cast revolves around Isolde, a young girl who is taken to the country by her reclusive mother. There she must cope with the awkward stares of the townspeople, the loss of her friends, her mother's psychological disposition, and the fledgling feelings of love we all encounter at some point in our lives. While on the surface her life seem quite normal, her introduction into the world of exiled fairies leads to the unraveling of a mystery that has caused rumors and legends to surface in her new home town for decades. It's always refreshing to see an inventive and unique re-imagining of ancient mythical creatures. I would recommend this book to any fan of fairy lore or young adult fiction, both classic and contemporary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    YA Reads Book Reviews

    Isolde Rackham isn’t like other kids her age. For one, she is home schooled, automatically different to anyone in the small town of Thornville. Two, she just moved to Thornville with her slightly reclusive mother who is also her teacher. As if this wasn’t enough the house that Isolde and her mother moved into is supposedly haunted by a girl who committed suicide some 50-years before Isolde got there. So you might be able to understand Isolde hesitation to just walk around town, yet she can’t avo Isolde Rackham isn’t like other kids her age. For one, she is home schooled, automatically different to anyone in the small town of Thornville. Two, she just moved to Thornville with her slightly reclusive mother who is also her teacher. As if this wasn’t enough the house that Isolde and her mother moved into is supposedly haunted by a girl who committed suicide some 50-years before Isolde got there. So you might be able to understand Isolde hesitation to just walk around town, yet she can’t avoid going into town forever. On her first trip in she runs into a guy called Matt. Well, not so much run into but Matt’s friends couldn’t leave her alone. So beings the relationship with Matt. At first, it’s a hesitant one, with both of them not really knowing how to act around the other, especially when they are so different to each other. But as time goes by, Isolde finds that she is trusting Matt more and more. Almost enough to tell him her secret – that was if, he wouldn’t think her completely insane for it. After all, how many 16-year-olds do you know that can see fairies? It started when Isolde found a piece of green glass hidden in the draws of her new home. Then came the fingerprint on the painting – a fingerprint Isolde didn’t put there. And by chance, Isolde glances through the glass and in that moment, Isolde’s life as she knew it was changed forever. For through the glass she saw a figure, human in shape yet graceful beyond anything a human could achieve. Isolde’s first thought must be that she is seeing ghosts. Yet ghosts aren’t meant to exist. As she gains courage and begins to have conversation with the mysterious figure, Isolde learns that his name is Lyric and that he isn’t the only one out there. Along with Lyric and his family, Isolde embarks on an adventure to discover the true meaning of who they are, why they are out there, seemingly the only ones of their kind. And not everyone is ready for that information to be uncovered… Behind Green Glass is debut novel from Amanda von Hoffman and is a light and easy read with an engaging and captivating story. I found that reading from Isolde’s point of view to be quite easy and engaging, a skill that not all authors have. The story provided something different in the YA genre – fairies. Apart from Melissa Marr’s Wicked Lovely series, you don’t often see many fairy tales in the young adult section, and with Behind Green Glass, von Hoffman has made a notable contribution to this category. The characters I found intriguing and would have liked to know more about – especially Isolde and her mother’s friendly neighbor Joe Albright. A genuinely easy to read and engaging story – I enjoyed!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sheenah Freitas

    This was a really cute book. I love the simplicity of it. At first I thought Behind Green Glass was going to be paranormal with the rumors that Isolde's house was haunted and the owner's daughter before her had committed suicide. When Lyric made his appearance and talks of him being a ghost surfaced, I really began to question how this was considered to be a fairy tale at all. Everything is explained when Lyric shows Isolde his home and "family". It's at that moment that Isolde tells the family t This was a really cute book. I love the simplicity of it. At first I thought Behind Green Glass was going to be paranormal with the rumors that Isolde's house was haunted and the owner's daughter before her had committed suicide. When Lyric made his appearance and talks of him being a ghost surfaced, I really began to question how this was considered to be a fairy tale at all. Everything is explained when Lyric shows Isolde his home and "family". It's at that moment that Isolde tells the family that they're not ghosts at all, like they had believed for so many years, but actually fairies. The relationship of Lyric and Isolde is simple. Though there could have been some sort of romantic tension, the two were strictly friends and I wasn't disappointed at all about the lack of a love triangle. It was refreshing. Though I thoroughly enjoyed the book, I did wish that it was longer. The book is only 184 pages long and honestly it might be even shorter if the book was formatted without placing spaces between paragraphs. I felt that some of the developing relationship between Isolde and Matt especially were too summarized. I didn't feel the huge tension between Isolde and Matt, but I did feel the awkwardness that Isolde felt when she was with Lyric because she was always in Meredith's shadow. Overall Behind Green Glass is a very sweet story about being courageous. I really loved watching Isolde evolve and grow out of her shell. If you like stories about coming-of-age and fairies then this is the book for you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Amanda Von Hoffman's Behind Green Glass focuses on a fantasy area often overlooked in today's young adult fiction: faeries. They aren't Disney's fairies (thankfully!) but more akin to J.R.R. Tolkien's. Let me first say that my biggest complaint about the book is the homeschooling aspect. I would love to see a wonderful fiction book about a homeschooled youth, or better yet, an unschooled youth. However, just as with most young adult fiction, Von Hoffman has taken a stereotypical approach to this Amanda Von Hoffman's Behind Green Glass focuses on a fantasy area often overlooked in today's young adult fiction: faeries. They aren't Disney's fairies (thankfully!) but more akin to J.R.R. Tolkien's. Let me first say that my biggest complaint about the book is the homeschooling aspect. I would love to see a wonderful fiction book about a homeschooled youth, or better yet, an unschooled youth. However, just as with most young adult fiction, Von Hoffman has taken a stereotypical approach to this aspect of the book. Isolde was taken out of school by her paranoid mother and is schooled at home, feeling increasingly alone and isolated until they move to a small town and she begins to reach out, much to the displeasure of her emotionally hurting single mother. The stereotype of the homeschooling parent is so discouraging, as I have yet to meet a parent who homeschools their children like this. The story line is intriguing, though. Isolde discovers a connection to the faerie world through the life of a teenage girl who once lived (and died) in her room. Straddling between two worlds, one human and one faerie, she begins to discover her own strengths. I hope this young adult debut author decides to write more about Isolde and the world she uncovers, developing the story line more. It has great potential and showcases a strong female lead, one who previously did not view herself as such. Disclaimer: A complimentary copy of the book was provided by the author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jill Elizabeth

  9. 5 out of 5

    Franz

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chelle

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Bain

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jakeline

  18. 4 out of 5

    Goldie

  19. 5 out of 5

    kwesi 章英狮

    Challenges: Book #162 for 2011

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bethany flatman

  21. 4 out of 5

    Xan

  22. 4 out of 5

    brooke mathews

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Darboe

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  25. 5 out of 5

    Krista (Miura Haruma-san, I will always miss you)

  26. 4 out of 5

    NewMoonGirl (Hazel)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Liza

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hoffmann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Keller

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  31. 4 out of 5

    Lovi

  32. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Silvia

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sequoia

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lacey

  35. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  37. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Rana

  39. 5 out of 5

    Christine Groce

  40. 4 out of 5

    Happy Bookaholic

  41. 4 out of 5

    LAURI CRUMLEY COATES

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  43. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  44. 4 out of 5

    Ashley (Bookaholics Anonymous)

  45. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  46. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

  47. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

  48. 4 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

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