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On the cusp of their epic battle with Shinzon, many of Captain Jean-Luc Picard's long-time crew were heading for new assignments and new challenges. Among the changes were William Riker's promotion to captain and his new command, Riker's marriage to Counselor Deanna Troi, and Dr. Beverly Crusher's new career at Starfleet Medical. But the story of what set them on a path aw On the cusp of their epic battle with Shinzon, many of Captain Jean-Luc Picard's long-time crew were heading for new assignments and new challenges. Among the changes were William Riker's promotion to captain and his new command, Riker's marriage to Counselor Deanna Troi, and Dr. Beverly Crusher's new career at Starfleet Medical. But the story of what set them on a path away from the Starship Enterprise™ has never been told. UNTIL NOW. A cataclysmic war between the Federation and the Klingon Empire has been miraculously averted, and a new government is finally in place on the planet Tezwa. But deadly secrets still threaten the fragile peace accord. Rebels still loyal to the old Tezwa regime have captured Commander Riker and are willing to kill to achieve their goals...the Orion Syndicate is interfering in the rebuilding -- and may also be involved in much more than that. But the most devastating revelation of all threatens the very foundations of the Federation itself -- leaving Captain Picard to possibly face the very conflict that he labored so hard to prevent....


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On the cusp of their epic battle with Shinzon, many of Captain Jean-Luc Picard's long-time crew were heading for new assignments and new challenges. Among the changes were William Riker's promotion to captain and his new command, Riker's marriage to Counselor Deanna Troi, and Dr. Beverly Crusher's new career at Starfleet Medical. But the story of what set them on a path aw On the cusp of their epic battle with Shinzon, many of Captain Jean-Luc Picard's long-time crew were heading for new assignments and new challenges. Among the changes were William Riker's promotion to captain and his new command, Riker's marriage to Counselor Deanna Troi, and Dr. Beverly Crusher's new career at Starfleet Medical. But the story of what set them on a path away from the Starship Enterprise™ has never been told. UNTIL NOW. A cataclysmic war between the Federation and the Klingon Empire has been miraculously averted, and a new government is finally in place on the planet Tezwa. But deadly secrets still threaten the fragile peace accord. Rebels still loyal to the old Tezwa regime have captured Commander Riker and are willing to kill to achieve their goals...the Orion Syndicate is interfering in the rebuilding -- and may also be involved in much more than that. But the most devastating revelation of all threatens the very foundations of the Federation itself -- leaving Captain Picard to possibly face the very conflict that he labored so hard to prevent....

30 review for A Time to Heal

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Overall, A Time to Heal is an excellent novel, showing the true difficulty and associated horrors of a prolonged military occupation. David Mack pulls no punches with this one, subjecting our heroes to a quagmire that was clearly inspired by real-life events in our very recent cultural memory. While the subject matter is certainly dark, Mack never loses sight of the humanity of the characters, presenting us with a story that will, sadly, be relevant for a long time to come. Full review: https://w Overall, A Time to Heal is an excellent novel, showing the true difficulty and associated horrors of a prolonged military occupation. David Mack pulls no punches with this one, subjecting our heroes to a quagmire that was clearly inspired by real-life events in our very recent cultural memory. While the subject matter is certainly dark, Mack never loses sight of the humanity of the characters, presenting us with a story that will, sadly, be relevant for a long time to come. Full review: https://www.treklit.com/2019/03/ATtH....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rodney

    Not as good as some of the others. This story seemed forced from the beginning. Throughout, the plot seems very forced. It is a decent story line, but it jumps all around, and the plot follows Murphy's law almost to a ridiculous extreme. I understand that the authors are creating a story line to bridge two of the Trek movies, but the events the crew encounters and the extremes they are subjected to, in about a year's time seem to be overwhelming. The events that transpire "between" the last two Not as good as some of the others. This story seemed forced from the beginning. Throughout, the plot seems very forced. It is a decent story line, but it jumps all around, and the plot follows Murphy's law almost to a ridiculous extreme. I understand that the authors are creating a story line to bridge two of the Trek movies, but the events the crew encounters and the extremes they are subjected to, in about a year's time seem to be overwhelming. The events that transpire "between" the last two movies could be enough for its own movie. While I have enjoyed the series overall, this one just didn't really work for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Bensley

    A very intense novel and David Mack is always fantastic!

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Cipolla

    The book dragged at certain points. Not one of my favorites of the series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elliot Weeks

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well...I certainly think the crew of the Enterprise E will need some time to heal after this action packed and intense novel. There was not a great deal of opportunity to do that in this story, however. David Mack wrote an adrenaline-fueled war story drawing heavy parallels to US conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, right down to suicide bombers, a corrupt administration, and issues of torture. While I enjoyed the book and appreciated the author’s storytelling and social commentary, I did find mys Well...I certainly think the crew of the Enterprise E will need some time to heal after this action packed and intense novel. There was not a great deal of opportunity to do that in this story, however. David Mack wrote an adrenaline-fueled war story drawing heavy parallels to US conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, right down to suicide bombers, a corrupt administration, and issues of torture. While I enjoyed the book and appreciated the author’s storytelling and social commentary, I did find myself feeling quite uncomfortable during several of the ground battle scenes, as well as when Troi was engaging in “enhanced interrogation...” I never would have thought that she would bring herself to engage in those techniques, regardless of her desperate situation. Mr. Mack’s writing was quite violent this time around and I was unaccustomed to reading about such horrifying aspects of war happening to Starfleet officers in a Star Trek book. I can’t say I would like to repeat that experience. I’m also disturbed that the admiralty decided to remove and execute a sitting president. So did everyone on that big conference call just implicitly understand what being put in “witness protection” meant, then? For Jean Luc’s sake I will choose to assume not... Overall, I thought the book and story was strong but these factors ended up leaving a weird taste in my mouth upon finishing the book. I look forward to starting the last book in this series to see the fallout of this explosive, shameful, and corrupt mark on the Federation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brent Knorr

    Wow, I'm sure glad I wasn't a security officer on the Enterprise during the events of this novel. A fast paced and action packed conclusion to the story. I found this one to be interesting because the overall mission can't really be called successful, and most of the main characters end up not being particularly pleased with how things turn out. For me, finding out how characters react when they don't achieve the objectives they set out to accomplish makes for a more interesting story than when ev Wow, I'm sure glad I wasn't a security officer on the Enterprise during the events of this novel. A fast paced and action packed conclusion to the story. I found this one to be interesting because the overall mission can't really be called successful, and most of the main characters end up not being particularly pleased with how things turn out. For me, finding out how characters react when they don't achieve the objectives they set out to accomplish makes for a more interesting story than when everything goes according to plan. I'm finding the relationship between Picard and Dr. Crusher to be interesting. I know in the novels further into the timeline they do get married, but in the "Picard" TV series, there is no mention of an ongoing relationship between them. I'm curious to see what the last novel in this series does with this. It is set a few weeks before the events in the movie "Nemesis". I'll also have to read the novelization of "Nemesis" to review what happens there. It looks like there are two books between this one and that, one doesn't sound like it fits into the current story arc, the second fits into the arc, but I'll have to check it if takes place before or after "Nemesis". I'm rather curious to figure at which point the novels would have to be considered to be a completely separate timeline from the TV shows.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 stars. reading reviews of this one I was prepared for the worst - a grim dark story set on a war-torn world, lots of death and destruction etc. and there was a lot of that but it wasn’t as hard of a slog to read as I thought it might be. lots of different viewpoints in this. I wasn’t bored by any of them but I did miss just handing out with the enterprise crew. this was very plot-heavy, not a character book. however there were some good insights into the characters. I was fascinated by Troi’ 3.5 stars. reading reviews of this one I was prepared for the worst - a grim dark story set on a war-torn world, lots of death and destruction etc. and there was a lot of that but it wasn’t as hard of a slog to read as I thought it might be. lots of different viewpoints in this. I wasn’t bored by any of them but I did miss just handing out with the enterprise crew. this was very plot-heavy, not a character book. however there were some good insights into the characters. I was fascinated by Troi’s scenes in this. I was expecting some hardcore torture scenes lol after reading some reviews but again it wasn’t as bad as I imagined. this is probably the best book from the series (so far) though there’s only one book to go. tbh I’m kinda hopeful the next one is a bit more light-hearted/not as heavy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    David Mack's conclusion to the previous "A Time to Kill" is no less a page turner, but somehow loses some of the polish of the first outing. Riker's capture by Tezwan Loyalists (devoted to the deposed Prime Minister Kinchawn) is threaded throughout this volume, and while scenes of his confinement are limited in number, the ramifications of his imprisonment form the foundation for this opus. The multiple events of "A Time to Heal" all take place amidst a background of ever-increasing terrorist atta David Mack's conclusion to the previous "A Time to Kill" is no less a page turner, but somehow loses some of the polish of the first outing. Riker's capture by Tezwan Loyalists (devoted to the deposed Prime Minister Kinchawn) is threaded throughout this volume, and while scenes of his confinement are limited in number, the ramifications of his imprisonment form the foundation for this opus. The multiple events of "A Time to Heal" all take place amidst a background of ever-increasing terrorist attacks and violence on Tezwa as Kinchawn's forces fight a guerrilla campaign against Starfleet and the new Tezwan government. Yet with four starships in orbit and thousands of Starfleet personnel on the surface, the reader is perhaps lulled into a false sense of security that the Loyalists don't have a chance. Indeed, there's an excellent scene near the beginning of the novel where a Starfleet strike team expertly assaults a rebel stronghold and captures the renegade military General Minza... this fed into my expectation that Starfleet wouldn't have any issue holding the planet and effecting the rescue of Riker. Never one to rest on his laurels, David Mack clearly isn't content to give Starfleet an easy job in rebuilding Tezwa after the Klingon attack. He quickly puts our heroes on the backfoot as the Loyalists launch a series of increasingly more daring attacks which succeed in killing thousands of Starfleet personnel and Tezwan civilians, caught off guard by the brazen nature of their aggressors. There are no punches pulled here, this material is graphic and disturbing: the true horrors of war are brought home in some brutally descriptive prose which chronicles every ounce of suffering and barbarity that the victims are forced to endure. I found myself drawing parallels with some of Deep Space Nine's more close-to-the-bone stories such as "Nor the Battle to the Strong" and "The Siege of AR-558", yet I think in some ways Mack sails past that point. Perhaps it's over-sensitivity on my part, but I bordered on uncomfortable when reading some of the more gratuitous sections. That brings me to Counselor Troi. Having Riker missing in both this duology and the last was rather shortsighted in retrospect, but these two incidences are miles apart. First of all, there's no Betazoid-empathy/telepathy at work here to reassure the counselor that her Imzadi is safe or even alive. There's just her own rapidly deteriorating hope and inner fears to guide her. And so begins a slow unraveling of Deanna which was shocking to read. Despite the narrative to the contrary, Deanna is very much complicit in inflicting psychological harm to General Minza as he's held in the Enterprise's brig. I winced as I heard the efforts she went to in order to exacerbate the General's mental condition and push him to his edge. Yet to his credit, David Mack confronts this in a rather stark way: Troi recognizes her innate desire for vengeance driven by grief in the famous Nietzsche quote; "If you gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you." Troi isn't normally known for having dramatic material to play with, so this was a very welcome departure from that norm. The coda to her story where she confronts her dark thoughts with the Amargosa's counselor was a thinly veiled warning to us all: Beware that, when fighting monsters, you yourself do not become a monster. Other things that really worked in this book (because there's so many!): * Geordi slowly piecing together the political corruption scandal and not letting it be swept under the rug. Really nice meaty stuff here for Geordi. * The dance of Beverly and Jean-Luc finally comes to an end. And it's all rather sad as the "chasm" between the characters is laid bare. "Some things you have to leave broken and just move on". Sure, as a P/C fan, this made me sad, but it was so wonderfully written that I can only applaud. * Data steps up to the First Officer plate. It's only focused on tangentially, but I loved the progression of Data as he was given the chance to move up the ranks. And Riker's lamentation that he "held him back" all these years was very moving and convincing. And yet I can't quite bring myself to award the same four stars that the first volume earned. While there's a lot to exalt here, the sheer amount of blood and carnage and hopelessness really got to me after a while. I'd rather Mack had reined some of that in in favor of perhaps more of a focus on Picard. Because this leads to one of my chief complaints here. Picard again comes off as rather ineffectual as the captain. Given the increasing violence on the planet, what could possibly possess him to order all THREE other starships in orbit away to pursue a freighter?! It's a major misstep, and results in much of the devastation and atrocities which unfold in the final act. Speaking of which, Picard's adamance that non-lethal force be used even when hijacked ships are ramming into the Enterprise is so clearly the wrong decision, that no amount of respect for "Rules of Engagement" can justify it. Yet his incompetence is compounded by deciding to wait for a technobabble "solution" to power up so he can repel the ships, rather than using phasers. All this despite the fact that his people are dying by the dozen on the surface and calling out for help. Really not Jean-Luc's finest moment, and it pulled me out of the narrative with it's sheer unbelievability. In a lesser book, such missteps would have reduced a rating down to two stars, but I can't bring myself to do that when there's so much good material here. Mack leaves all the characters in fascinating positions as their life choices in Nemesis grow ever closer.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kai Knetsch

    Book 2 completed the story arc from where Book 1 left off. It really fleshed out the aftermath of Book 1. The scope of the book was really big, talking about some politics, Section 31, the Orion Syndicate, the Tezwan planet, and other ships. It also brought to life some of the characters, especially Peart and Vale. I thought the Dr Crusher storyline was a bit boring though, but her stories usually are. I liked that they couldn't break the Tezwan prisoner they captured. Overall, I enjoyed these t Book 2 completed the story arc from where Book 1 left off. It really fleshed out the aftermath of Book 1. The scope of the book was really big, talking about some politics, Section 31, the Orion Syndicate, the Tezwan planet, and other ships. It also brought to life some of the characters, especially Peart and Vale. I thought the Dr Crusher storyline was a bit boring though, but her stories usually are. I liked that they couldn't break the Tezwan prisoner they captured. Overall, I enjoyed these two books by David Mack. I look forward to finding out what happens next with the politics too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    Probably my least favorite Star Trek book of all time. Of course it was part of a series I haven’t read but I didn’t think it would matter. It mostly follow b-characters while the famous crew are relegated to obscure side roles. Many of the story directions seem very out of place for the characters including Troi engaged in torture of a foreign general. Ugh. I was so excited to read this but it was so disappointing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Really enjoyed the story line and looking forward to the next book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne Schelhorn

    A lot of red shirts died in this book

  13. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    The end of the Enterprise? Never!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicky2910

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A Time to Heal leaves me quite pensive as it deals with the aftermath of the Federation's invasion of Tezwa (even if that invasion was done to prevent worse from the Klingons). First of all - as we all know it will happen since Riker's still part of the crew in Nemesis -, Riker's rescue from being a captive of Kinchawn's people is a rather minor plot point. Granted, it drives the search parties, but otherwise it remains quite understated. Even his return to the ship - to a captain who regards him A Time to Heal leaves me quite pensive as it deals with the aftermath of the Federation's invasion of Tezwa (even if that invasion was done to prevent worse from the Klingons). First of all - as we all know it will happen since Riker's still part of the crew in Nemesis -, Riker's rescue from being a captive of Kinchawn's people is a rather minor plot point. Granted, it drives the search parties, but otherwise it remains quite understated. Even his return to the ship - to a captain who regards him as a son (would have loved to see more of that!), to a fiancée who contemplated torture to learn his whereabouts - is a minor affair. At least, now that he's realized his complacency and that he might have hindered Data's advance through the ranks, which the android never pursued because he lacks ambition, he accepts command of the Titan. What I don't quite understand, though, is why Deanna couldn't detect him via their telepathic link. It might be weak since she's not a full telepath but it's there - and Deanna has shown quite remarkable abilities before (or rather afterwards, in Nemesis). The situation on Tezwa is quite dire - acts of sabotage put Tezwans and Starfleet personnel alike in danger. And only slowly the fact that the relief efforts are being misguided towards apparently minor issues comes to light. Of course, in the greater scheme of things those minor issues are keeping the Federation's involvement with Tezwa's weaponry secret... at all costs. In the end quite a few Starfleet officers who risked their lives and led colleagues into battle and to death over a dubious cause become disillusioned and leave the service. And finally, the secrets come to light... and in a move certainly very similar to a coup d'état, the president, his chief of staff and the minister of military intelligence are asked to resign, and unbeknownst to the public, handed over to Section 31 - and I guess a certain death. Handed over by Admiral Ross - what does Section 31 have over him? Because the Admiral Ross I know from DS9 wouldn't have done that but kept his promise of a anonymous but secure life outside the public. I hope there will be more to this story, and those who conspired to get rid of Zife (but not kill him) will learn the truth, including Picard. Apart from Riker's decision to accept command, there are other little tidbits that tie into Nemesis - such as Beverly accepting a post as Chief of Starfleet Medical. Knowing what will happen in the post-Nemesis books, Picard's regret over her decision, Beverly's moving on after pining over Picard for quite some time, and Picard's realization that it might be too late for them are quite bittersweet. Interestingly, save for a few comments and the appointment of a new and not favorable ambassador to the Federation Worf and the consequences of his actions during "A Time to Kill" are practically left out of the story entirely. This, too, I hope will be resolved in the final part of the A Time to-series. Overall, A Time to Heal is a quite good book, dealing with the consequences of an occupation (written I guess, having the experiences of the American forces in Afghanistan in mind) and a large-scale, but secret, conspiracy which put the Federation and the Klingons to brink of war. But it doesn't succeed on all levels. The horror of war are addressed, but then practically swallowed up by another action-sequence, another terror attack. David Mack is good with action, but the quiet moments are those which a story and its protagonists need to come alive. Granted, there's Peart, there's Perrim, there's also the figurative red-shirt... but they feel a bit interchangeable. Maybe that's because I didn't read the other parts of the series, and therefore am not familiar with those characters. I'm not saying that Mack can't write those scenes I'm yearning for - he certainly can as he's shown time and again in other works -, but the balance between action and reflection isn't always working out for me. And in this case, virtually leaving the aftermath of Riker's captivity out of the story (except for a small scene at the end) although it was one of the driving forces of the Enterprise's crew seems a bit like cheating me out of the satisfying emotional reward for sitting through those two rather demoralizing (because of the Federation and Section 31's duplicity and unethical decision) books. Instead, I'm left with a secret coup d'état, a likely assassination of the 3 ringleaders of the Tezwa situation, the assassination of the middlemen - all amongst lots of death and destruction. And the light at the end of the tunnel seems virtually invisible. Not an easy or satisfying place to finish a book - but there's still hope that not all remains as bleak. There's still another part left in the A Time to-series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonne Steen Redeker

    Tezwa is under federation control, and the dictator has been deposed, but their problems are long from over. With the federation in control of Tezwa, the real work begins to rebuild, and figure out where the artillery came from. Enterprise's crew work hard to maintain the peace, which becomes increasingly more costly as loyalist forces attack over and over again Riker is imprisoned and there are still people from within the federation trying to hide what actually happened on Tezwa to cause this Tezwa is under federation control, and the dictator has been deposed, but their problems are long from over. With the federation in control of Tezwa, the real work begins to rebuild, and figure out where the artillery came from. Enterprise's crew work hard to maintain the peace, which becomes increasingly more costly as loyalist forces attack over and over again Riker is imprisoned and there are still people from within the federation trying to hide what actually happened on Tezwa to cause this mess to begin with. The truth will have far reaching consequences and might cause the biggest war in centuries. Truly epic, and well written. The story is compelling from beginning to end, and will have far reaching consequences. Some will not be fully resolved until 75 books have past in the post nemesis chronology. It really sets up all those stories, and having read those it is great to see where it started. These two books are why I started this series to begin with, and they were more than worth it, which is good considering the misses this series has had so far.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Palmatier

    This is the second part of the duology that began with A Time to Kill. I read the first book rather fast and moved immediately on to this one to see how it would end. That first book was action-packed in true Star Trek tradition, and this book deals with the consequences of what happened there. The premise is that the Federation armed a non-aligned planet called Tezwa as a last-ditch strategy during the Dominion War, but the Tezwans decided to use those illegal weapons to antagonize the Klingons. This is the second part of the duology that began with A Time to Kill. I read the first book rather fast and moved immediately on to this one to see how it would end. That first book was action-packed in true Star Trek tradition, and this book deals with the consequences of what happened there. The premise is that the Federation armed a non-aligned planet called Tezwa as a last-ditch strategy during the Dominion War, but the Tezwans decided to use those illegal weapons to antagonize the Klingons. Picard and the crew of the Enterprise managed to avert a potentially disastrous war in the first book by destroying the armaments, the political power that had threatened to use them going into hiding. During their efforts, Picard and crew also discovered evidence that the armaments were from the Federation, in violation of the Khitomer Accord. Now, they've been told to help the Tezwans rebuild their devastated planet from the damage done by the Klingons. But the missing Tezwan military has formed guerilla groups and are attacking key elements of the Federation's aid, including hospitals and food stations, as well as soldiers. Picard and crew must find the military leader Kinchawn before he can do serious damage, perhaps even push the Federation off the planet, and find Riker, taken hostage by the rebels as they fled. But as events continue, more and more evidence accumulates that someone in the Federation is using Picard and crew to cover up their crimes. This second book isn't as action-packed as the first, although there's still plenty of action. In the first, there was a single focus: destroy the armaments. Here, the enemy is much more elusive, since the rebels are in hiding. I still loved teh book, and in particular love how the situation affects the crew. There is emotional turmoil, brought on by Riker's abduction and the desperate search to find him, along with the frustrating task of trying to stop soldiers who blend in with the crowd and use terrorist tactics to inflict as much harm as possible. And harm is inflicted, which is probably one of the reasons I like David Mack's writing so much. There are real-world consequences for what happens, meaning death, violence, etc. While the tenants and underlying hopefulness of Star Trek still remain, we see that the real world isn't always as nice as we'd like to think. In other words, this is a darker Star Trek universe. And anyone who has read my own books knows that I like things a little darker and realistic. Again, the writing is great, the characters come alive, and they are forced to deal with some realistic problems here. Troi dealing with Riker's capture was great, in particular. Crusher, Hughes, and Picard (especially at the end) was great. La Forge's slow discoveries and Vales' attempts to fight the rebels . . . all of it, really. A great book that wasn't just plot, but characterization as well. Great book, and great addition to the Star Trek universe. I know David Mack has written other books in the Star Trek universe. Can't wait to get to them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jesse L

    I enjoyed this as well, it stands with its prequel as 2 of the better books in the series. I, again, really enjoy the intensity of the writing and the complex plot. I would say this one is worse than its predecessor just because parts of it felt illogical and placed in there just to encourage the plot. The raiding of a building with no intel? The rushing into oncoming foes from a point of defense? It just didn't make sense. I understand the intention was to relate how difficult guerilla warfare is I enjoyed this as well, it stands with its prequel as 2 of the better books in the series. I, again, really enjoy the intensity of the writing and the complex plot. I would say this one is worse than its predecessor just because parts of it felt illogical and placed in there just to encourage the plot. The raiding of a building with no intel? The rushing into oncoming foes from a point of defense? It just didn't make sense. I understand the intention was to relate how difficult guerilla warfare is, and even to point out that these are the exact reasons the federation doesn't get involved in local affairs, but that could have been done without forcing characters to make bad decisions to prove a point. A good example of this in the plot is the helicopter scene with Crusher, which was totally reasonable (and really effed up!) Additionally, I want to just point out that star trek is about the potential of humanity to be great. This book walked a fine line between showing a struggling federation and the author missing the point of the federation. Example: it is 100% not believable that the enterprise, and Troi, would have tortured that general. I didn't guy it *at all*. There are many comments and even whole episodes of star trek devoted to why torture 1) is always wrong and 2) doesn't even work. There's simply no way that would have happened in a legit star trek universe. Also, the book kind of acts like they haven't seen violence before - as if the situation on Tezwa is so horrible that they push aside their morality in a moment of 'getting the job done' or 'vengeance'. This is a facetious (and conservative) idea that has no place in the progressive and liberal world of star trek. They've fought worse battles than this and managed to figure out a balance between human rights and war. Besides the torture being an example of this, just some of the language and actions - I found it hard to believe Picard would just be willy nilly sending in staff to areas they KNOW are going to be bombed. With the advance technology, and the philosophy of non-intervention, it just seems like they would have set up a far more defensive and less invasive operation from the start. Not to mention the technological advantage that seemed to never really do anything (they couldn't detect weapons?). still, overall I think the story was an enjoyable one, I think it just drifted out of some basic star trek truths.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maurice Jr.

    A satisfying conclusion to the two part Tezwa storyline- well, as satisfying as it could be under the circumstances. Having sucessfully prevented the Klingons from obliterating Tezwa (and discovering that the pulse cannons they used to destroy a Klingon attack fleet were from the Federation), Captain Picard and his crew spearhead Federation efforts to provide relief to the suffering populace. The initial Klingon attack destroyed many of their cities and left millions without adequate food, clothi A satisfying conclusion to the two part Tezwa storyline- well, as satisfying as it could be under the circumstances. Having sucessfully prevented the Klingons from obliterating Tezwa (and discovering that the pulse cannons they used to destroy a Klingon attack fleet were from the Federation), Captain Picard and his crew spearhead Federation efforts to provide relief to the suffering populace. The initial Klingon attack destroyed many of their cities and left millions without adequate food, clothing or shelter. Starfleet and civilian personnel are there by the thousands providing aid, but deposed Prime Minister Kinchawn and his rabid followers attack the relief workers at every opportunity. Starfleet and Tezwan security forces are stretched to their limits trying to protect the relief workers and find Commander Riker, who Kinchawn's forces captured when his strike team destroyed their assigned pulse cannon in A Time To Kill. The action is fast and furious, the behind the scenes machinations are moving and in the end, Picard and crew may not be able to resolve things the way they would like. I could have used a few less people dying in this story, but given the nature of this assignment, lots of deaths were inevitable. A lot of characters we met at different points in the A Time To series died in this book, and you just hate to see them go. I was particularly upset with a heroic last stand by two of the brave security folks who distinguished themselves in A Time To Kill helping to destroy the pulse cannons (I won't ruin it by naming them, but they deserved better than to die like they did). Having seen the movie Nemesis, we already knew that Commander Riker agreed to become captain of the Titan, but it was nice to see him formally accept his command once he was rescued from Kinchawn's clutches. It was also good to see what went into Dr. Crusher's decision to return to Starfleet Medical, and to see Commander Data shine as first officer while Commander Riker was missing. Overall, an action packed end to a complicated storyline. The next book ends the A Time To series, and I can't wait to see this "epilogue" book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jimyanni

    You call that healing? Overall, I have some mixed emotions about this book; the writing is very vivid, very powerful. On the other hand, it is seriously depressing, dealing with literally hundreds of deaths of both Starfleet officers and civilians, with some of the most vivid writing describing their agonizing deaths. It clearly details the futility of the efforts of Dr. Crusher and the other medical personnel in trying to minimize the loss of life in the war zone, and the impossibility of dealin You call that healing? Overall, I have some mixed emotions about this book; the writing is very vivid, very powerful. On the other hand, it is seriously depressing, dealing with literally hundreds of deaths of both Starfleet officers and civilians, with some of the most vivid writing describing their agonizing deaths. It clearly details the futility of the efforts of Dr. Crusher and the other medical personnel in trying to minimize the loss of life in the war zone, and the impossibility of dealing with political manipulations without being stained by them. All in all, it was a very trying book to read, so even though it was well-written, I still wouldn't have rated it higher than four stars just on that score. But to make matters worse (and cost it another star), it is misplaced in the series; each book in this series until now has done a fair to middling job of matching its tone and its plot to its title; this one might have been appropriate for the "A Time To Die" title, the "A Time To Hate" title, or even the "A Time To Kill" title. In fact, it might have been MORE appropriate for any of those titles than the book that actually was written for them. But it is seriously miscast for the title, "A Time To Heal"; there was little if any healing to be found in this book, unless one stretches the definition of "healing" to "cutting ones losses by amputation", and even then it would be a stretch. If the story had not been shoehorned into its place in the series by the need for it to follow immediately after David Mack's previous effort in the list of titles for the series, I'd have accepted it as a painful but powerful read and rated it four stars. But if you're going to have a series like this, with titles taken from Ecclesiastes and supposedly demonstrating that there is "a time for every purpose under heaven", then you really OUGHT to have the book under this title NOT be the bloodiest in the entire series (to say nothing of the entire Star Trek ouvre).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I enjoyed this book, but found it slow going. The search for Riker continues and the Enterprise finds themselves in the midst of a political crises that is escalating. The book also has a nice collection of new characters and sets several characters on course for what happens next. While enjoyable, I don't feel like it was a must read. I enjoyed this book, but found it slow going. The search for Riker continues and the Enterprise finds themselves in the midst of a political crises that is escalating. The book also has a nice collection of new characters and sets several characters on course for what happens next. While enjoyable, I don't feel like it was a must read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “Thousands of lives were sacrificed here in the service of a lie. All that we stand for has been betrayed.” This was a hard book to read. Hard because after Starfleet has conquered Tezwa, they now have to fight a war of attrition there. It feels like engineers, security officers, doctors, who Mack tells us about a lot, and gets us to care about, are killed constantly. Starfleet is battling Kinchawn’s followers, people from the current government who don’t want their secrets known and the Starfle “Thousands of lives were sacrificed here in the service of a lie. All that we stand for has been betrayed.” This was a hard book to read. Hard because after Starfleet has conquered Tezwa, they now have to fight a war of attrition there. It feels like engineers, security officers, doctors, who Mack tells us about a lot, and gets us to care about, are killed constantly. Starfleet is battling Kinchawn’s followers, people from the current government who don’t want their secrets known and the Starfleet President, and his cronies. After 2,000 dead and who knows how many Tezwans, Captain Picard has the admirals depose the President, but the Captain, his senior staff and admirals are the only ones who know very culpable they are. It’s a thoroughly depressing end, there is little healing, as promised in the title, except that Riker is found after a month’s captivity and torture and has decided he will captain the Titan.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Spoilers! Very satisfying, Though it might be partly because the previous books in this long series have been fairly unremarkable. Mack Is clearly a superlative writer. I was pleasantly surprised to see these last two books return to the classic Trek tradition of taking on contemporary issues. This one seems fairly inspired by the American invasion and occupation of Iraq, the warfare in the book being based upon a lie, much like the Iraq war. Except in the case of the novel, justice prevails, a Spoilers! Very satisfying, Though it might be partly because the previous books in this long series have been fairly unremarkable. Mack Is clearly a superlative writer. I was pleasantly surprised to see these last two books return to the classic Trek tradition of taking on contemporary issues. This one seems fairly inspired by the American invasion and occupation of Iraq, the warfare in the book being based upon a lie, much like the Iraq war. Except in the case of the novel, justice prevails, after a fashion. I would say anyone taking a crack at the Time to series can skip the previous duologies and just start with the Mack books.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

    This is the first book of this sub-series that I've read. I was able to follow along well (the main characters are from the TNG verse) and enjoyed the story. It stands well on it's own although you can tell that it hooks into a larger arc. I particularly liked how it shows the darker aspects of the Federation, and the consequences of those actions. It also makes the characters question their views of what the Federation is, and behaves. (view spoiler)[I also enjoyed the part where Riker finally This is the first book of this sub-series that I've read. I was able to follow along well (the main characters are from the TNG verse) and enjoyed the story. It stands well on it's own although you can tell that it hooks into a larger arc. I particularly liked how it shows the darker aspects of the Federation, and the consequences of those actions. It also makes the characters question their views of what the Federation is, and behaves. (view spoiler)[I also enjoyed the part where Riker finally gets off his butt and takes a command. It was also nice to see Data acknowleged for his work. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    This isn't as fast-moving as its prequel and there were times that I skimmed through a few paragraphs. Having said that, I'm a consummate Star Trek fan, and it's well-written, so I overall enjoyed it. I don't know how the publishers have decided who to put on the front cover though. Picard is on the front cover of this one, and we hardly even talk to him (shame - because I just adore him); and on the first book it's Worf. He had a part in it, but he wasn't the main figure by any means. (These are This isn't as fast-moving as its prequel and there were times that I skimmed through a few paragraphs. Having said that, I'm a consummate Star Trek fan, and it's well-written, so I overall enjoyed it. I don't know how the publishers have decided who to put on the front cover though. Picard is on the front cover of this one, and we hardly even talk to him (shame - because I just adore him); and on the first book it's Worf. He had a part in it, but he wasn't the main figure by any means. (These are the Pocket Books editions). Curious.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This one is part two after the A Time to Kill book. It concluded the story well but it wasn't a book I just had to finish reading fast. A Time to Kill was good like that, not sure if the difference was life getting in the way or if the second half wasn't as good. It did end well, and it was fitting. Lot's of emotion and character development in this one. So, I have one more book to go in the 9 book "A Time to..." series. This one is part two after the A Time to Kill book. It concluded the story well but it wasn't a book I just had to finish reading fast. A Time to Kill was good like that, not sure if the difference was life getting in the way or if the second half wasn't as good. It did end well, and it was fitting. Lot's of emotion and character development in this one. So, I have one more book to go in the 9 book "A Time to..." series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aron

    This is one of the darker ST novels I've read, but it was still a great read & an excellent continuation & conclusion to the story began in A Time to Kill. I havent read a David Mack ST that i didnt love, & this one was no different. The characters are written perfectly, great dialog, action sequences, interesting character development & a highly compelling story,...everything we have come to expect from David Mack. Highly recommend! This is one of the darker ST novels I've read, but it was still a great read & an excellent continuation & conclusion to the story began in A Time to Kill. I havent read a David Mack ST that i didnt love, & this one was no different. The characters are written perfectly, great dialog, action sequences, interesting character development & a highly compelling story,...everything we have come to expect from David Mack. Highly recommend!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

    I really should have reviewed this as a duology, as you can't read this with out reading it's predecessor (A Time to Kill). Now, I thought this was the stronger book ... a great allegory for the the War in Iraq, and over all, the two books combined are probably some of the best Trek I've read ... even better than some of Peter David's Trek books. I really should have reviewed this as a duology, as you can't read this with out reading it's predecessor (A Time to Kill). Now, I thought this was the stronger book ... a great allegory for the the War in Iraq, and over all, the two books combined are probably some of the best Trek I've read ... even better than some of Peter David's Trek books.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Extremely well-written, but uncomfortably dark, book. Suicide bombers and fanatical insurgents with no compunctions about inflicting massive civilian casualties seem out of place in a Star Trek novel - makes famously cynical episodes like Chain of Command and In the Pale Moonlight look bright and sunshiny in comparison.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Riker is still missing, and civil war has erupted on the planet that the Enterprise is giving aid to. This is a follow up to the previous book. There's some nice Deanna moments, yes, Picard is in it but I wouldnt call it a Picard story. The plot is engaging, with starfleet being seen as the enemy no matter what they do. A good read. Riker is still missing, and civil war has erupted on the planet that the Enterprise is giving aid to. This is a follow up to the previous book. There's some nice Deanna moments, yes, Picard is in it but I wouldnt call it a Picard story. The plot is engaging, with starfleet being seen as the enemy no matter what they do. A good read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Ugg. Like most in this series this book was far too long for what it had to accomplish. Most of it read as fan fiction since it introduced and killed off so many new characters no one cares about. I can't wait to be past the "A Time To" series. Ugg. Like most in this series this book was far too long for what it had to accomplish. Most of it read as fan fiction since it introduced and killed off so many new characters no one cares about. I can't wait to be past the "A Time To" series.

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