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The small business guru behind Duct Tape Marketing shares his most valuable lesson: how to get your customers to do your best marketing for you. The power of glitzy advertising and elaborate marketing campaigns is on the wane; word- of-mouth referrals are what drive business today. People trust the recommendation of a friend, family member, colleague, or even stranger wi The small business guru behind Duct Tape Marketing shares his most valuable lesson: how to get your customers to do your best marketing for you. The power of glitzy advertising and elaborate marketing campaigns is on the wane; word- of-mouth referrals are what drive business today. People trust the recommendation of a friend, family member, colleague, or even stranger with similar tastes over anything thrust at them by a faceless company. Most business owners believe that whether customers refer them is entirely out of their hands. But science shows that people can't help recommending products and services to their friends-it's an instinct wired deep in the brain. And smart businesses can tap into that hardwired desire. Marketing expert John Jantsch offers practical techniques for harnessing the power of referrals to ensure a steady flow of new customers. Keep those customers happy, and they will refer your business to even more customers. Some of Jantsch's strategies include: -Talk with your customers, not at them. Thanks to social networking sites, companies of any size have the opportunity to engage with their customers on their home turf as never before-but the key is listening. -The sales team is the most important part of your marketing team. Salespeople are the company's main link to customers, who are the main source of referrals. Getting them on board with your referral strategy is critical. -Educate your customers. Referrals are only helpful if they're given to the right people. Educate your customers about whom they should be talking to. The secret to generating referrals lies in understanding the "Customer Referral Cycle"-the way customers refer others to your company who, in turn, generate even more referrals. Businesses can ensure a healthy referral cycle by moving customers and prospects along the path of Know, Like, Trust, Try, Buy, Repeat, and Refer. If everyone in an organization keeps this sequence in mind, Jantsch argues, your business will generate referrals like a well-oiled machine. This practical, smart, and original guide is essential reading for any company looking to grow without a fat marketing budget.


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The small business guru behind Duct Tape Marketing shares his most valuable lesson: how to get your customers to do your best marketing for you. The power of glitzy advertising and elaborate marketing campaigns is on the wane; word- of-mouth referrals are what drive business today. People trust the recommendation of a friend, family member, colleague, or even stranger wi The small business guru behind Duct Tape Marketing shares his most valuable lesson: how to get your customers to do your best marketing for you. The power of glitzy advertising and elaborate marketing campaigns is on the wane; word- of-mouth referrals are what drive business today. People trust the recommendation of a friend, family member, colleague, or even stranger with similar tastes over anything thrust at them by a faceless company. Most business owners believe that whether customers refer them is entirely out of their hands. But science shows that people can't help recommending products and services to their friends-it's an instinct wired deep in the brain. And smart businesses can tap into that hardwired desire. Marketing expert John Jantsch offers practical techniques for harnessing the power of referrals to ensure a steady flow of new customers. Keep those customers happy, and they will refer your business to even more customers. Some of Jantsch's strategies include: -Talk with your customers, not at them. Thanks to social networking sites, companies of any size have the opportunity to engage with their customers on their home turf as never before-but the key is listening. -The sales team is the most important part of your marketing team. Salespeople are the company's main link to customers, who are the main source of referrals. Getting them on board with your referral strategy is critical. -Educate your customers. Referrals are only helpful if they're given to the right people. Educate your customers about whom they should be talking to. The secret to generating referrals lies in understanding the "Customer Referral Cycle"-the way customers refer others to your company who, in turn, generate even more referrals. Businesses can ensure a healthy referral cycle by moving customers and prospects along the path of Know, Like, Trust, Try, Buy, Repeat, and Refer. If everyone in an organization keeps this sequence in mind, Jantsch argues, your business will generate referrals like a well-oiled machine. This practical, smart, and original guide is essential reading for any company looking to grow without a fat marketing budget.

30 review for The Referral Engine: Teaching Your Business to Market Itself

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This is one of the best marketing books I’ve read! Jantsch, clearly a master marketer, shows how to guide prospects to you. How? Educate, and you won’t need to sell. He tells how to build a referral engine out of thrilled customers and an engaged network of partner businesses. He covers the concepts and many specific techniques for merging the authentic aspects of traditional marketing with online marketing and social media. The book is about more than getting referrals; it’s about running your This is one of the best marketing books I’ve read! Jantsch, clearly a master marketer, shows how to guide prospects to you. How? Educate, and you won’t need to sell. He tells how to build a referral engine out of thrilled customers and an engaged network of partner businesses. He covers the concepts and many specific techniques for merging the authentic aspects of traditional marketing with online marketing and social media. The book is about more than getting referrals; it’s about running your business better. It contains a plethora of success stories from real small businesses, and I highly recommend it! Jantsch explains that doing great work is necessary, but you need to do more to attract referrals. You need to demonstrate your unique way of doing business; something that makes people say, “nobody does that.” It’s crucial to educate by providing great content in several formats. By educating, you become known as a wealth of information and resources; the go-to source. I’ve been blogging for my web design business, OptimWise, and I’ve spoken at a few events. This book convinced me that I need to do more. My blog posts are usually aimed at other web designers and developers, so I’ve decided to write more for prospects. I’m also thinking about creating audio or video content. I read this book because I listen to John Jantsch’s Duct Tape Marketing podcast. The Qualities of Referral • Referred prospects anticipate paying a premium, and do so willingly when given social proof. The Path to Referral 4 Cs of Business Success • Content: valuable, relevant content; often educational, often free • Context: situate information within the context of the prospect’s life; simplify • Connection: live, human interaction; “high-tech, high-touch” • Community: empower people to gather and converse, physically or digitally • Marketing and sales must clearly communicate your core message of differentiation. • Build trust by providing education, such as free reports, how-to checklists, and seminars. • Reputation builds trust; trust builds the brand. • Trial offers, seminars, and anything that allows prospects to sample your product/service prior to purchase makes them more comfortable. • Review results with customers to fix any problems, improve your product/service, teach customers how to get the most from your product/service, and cross-sell other products/services. The Referral System View • At the beginning of a project, tell the customer that at the review meeting, you’ll ask for referrals. Your Authentic Strategy • Ask ideal customers what you do that they value. Tap into this and communicate it as your core difference. • Tell your story (not your history). “It’s hard not to like someone once you know their story.” People must connect logically and emotionally. Tell who you are, why you do what you do, what motivates you, how you’re making a better world. • When people ask how business is going, say “Great, but I’m always looking for more clients who need this” and explain what you offer. Content as Marketing Driver • Educated customers are better customers. Teach them how you work, how you get results, what you expect of them, and why your product/service is more expensive. • White paper elements: title that screams benefit, summary of benefit, stories from customers, images, stats, etc., a call to action, and how you can help. • Educate, and you won’t need to sell. Content draws leads to you and allows them to sell themselves. • Turn your white paper into a seminar, then repurpose into other formats (blog posts, newsletter, audio, video, etc.) • Create a list of trigger phrases that prospect use when they need what you offer, and build marketing around those phrases. • Don’t be afraid to give away secrets; they prove that you know your stuff. • Collect contact info in exchange for free resources, then follow up. Your Customer Network • Involve referral sources in the referral, such as through a conference call to the prospect, or a 3-party lunch. • Combine content and contact; help people connect. Strategic Partner Network • Create a strategic partner network; partners refer far more than customers. • Strategic members are businesses with the same target customer. • Provider members are businesses that complement yours (providing what you don’t), that you can refer customers to. Collaborate to offer more value to customers. • Become known as a wealth of information and resources. Become the go-to source to attract customers. • Partner to educate (cobranded white papers, seminars, videos, etc.). • Partner in marketing (provide each others’ samples, trials, deals, etc.). Ready to Receive • Thank referrers publicly so they feel appreciated, and you reinforce your referral worthiness. • Refer publicly to provide leads to referral partners, and share resources that benefit your prospects and customers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marc Binkley

    There are some very practical tips in this book for everyone. I picked up a few new ones myself. Having said this, it's not my favorite book. The basic framework that John lays out is brilliant. Imagine you had every client refer your company and work backwards from there to map out the amazing experience you'd have to create to get there. However while the volume of lists, websites and digital tools may be useful to some, but i found it overwhelming. Sometimes simpler is better. The tools and l There are some very practical tips in this book for everyone. I picked up a few new ones myself. Having said this, it's not my favorite book. The basic framework that John lays out is brilliant. Imagine you had every client refer your company and work backwards from there to map out the amazing experience you'd have to create to get there. However while the volume of lists, websites and digital tools may be useful to some, but i found it overwhelming. Sometimes simpler is better. The tools and lists distract from the message. Additionally, several of these tools no longer exist which already dates this book. If you had to choose just one book about building a remarkable company I'd recommend Purple Cow over this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Great book! Too much to absorb in two weeks, but alas, someone has a hold on it. Ch 1 People need to make referrals--social capital, save each other time. Nobody talks about boring businesses, so be interesting! Be consistent. Use a system for marketing (figure out what works and develop a process around it). Focus on generating referrals--if you're interesting and good, and you have a system for getting them, you will get them. Ch 2 Customers must trust you before they'll vouch for you. Be honest a Great book! Too much to absorb in two weeks, but alas, someone has a hold on it. Ch 1 People need to make referrals--social capital, save each other time. Nobody talks about boring businesses, so be interesting! Be consistent. Use a system for marketing (figure out what works and develop a process around it). Focus on generating referrals--if you're interesting and good, and you have a system for getting them, you will get them. Ch 2 Customers must trust you before they'll vouch for you. Be honest always. Treat your staff as you want them to treat your customer, and hire for attitude/fit. (Train for skill.) Train everyone about what's great about your business and everything they need to know. Empower them and help them understand what makes the business profitable so they can help. Give to get--"what am I here to give" or "how can I serve?" Be awesome and expect referrals. You don't have to compete on price because people who are referred are already partly sold. Focusing on trying to get 100% referrals will force you to be a better business. Ch 3 4 Cs of marketing: content, context, connection, community--make all four an integral part of the customer experience. Ideal customer lifecycle: know, like, trust, try, buy, repeat, refer. Map all potential customer touch points and the tactics to be used at each one. See example at www.referralenginebook.com. Collaboration: with prospects (invite and use feedback, ex. blog comments, reviews, voting); with customers (surveys; get customers together in a web conference to talk about how they use your stuff; ask for feedback on marketing materials, new product ideas, website); with partners (other businesses that complement your offerings--host workshops together, interview); with providers; with staff (mind-mapping, operations manual, email management to delegate incoming email dynamically). Map your marketing functions to an org chart, even if it's just you and an intern to make sure it gets done. Ch 4 Your authentic strategy: - Core talkable difference--easy innovation: take something people already want, need, and buy, and make it easier to get. Ex. restaurant that only does 1 kind of pizza per day--nobody has to think or agree on toppings. Ideally, you are a customer for your offering, the market already understands it and spends money in this area, and it simplifies something. If people don't actually like it, drop it. - Narrowly defined ideal customer--take only your best fit people. Refer the others to other people. To find, look at your current best customers (esp. the ones who refer you a lot) and make offerings to attract more like them. Shift of paradigm from old-style marketing of bothering people to being found. You create valuable content, engagement, and interaction. People who need you look for you and find you. Customer network--customers have used your great stuff and can act as a volunteer sales force. Strategic partner network--other complementary businesses that also serve your ideal customer. Should provide 60% of your referrals. --for both, motivate and stimulate them to make referrals using a creative, on-message offer. And thank them. Expect referrals--we know you're going to be so satisfied with our work, you'll want to refer us to 3 other people who need the same results. Ask for feedback when done, ask for referrals at the same time. Use different approaches for customers vs. partners, obviously. For customers, kick ass, then ask for referral and remind them. For partners, make referring you a way to help them add value to their relationships with their customers. Easiest: co-brand valuable content (white paper, seminar, etc.). Create turnkey tools--put tangible referral tools in the hands of your referral sources. Teach them characteristics of your ideal customer, help them recognize trigger phrases when someone needs you. Build multiple referral entry points for different levels of action/commitment. Measure and adjust based on what's working. Ch 5 Your authentic strategy 3 key to business: You must enjoy what you do & feel sense of purpose, be good at it; be able to convince other people to pay for it. Need a higher purpose. What perception (1+ words) do you want customers to have about your business? Stand out--do what nobody else is doing (ex. dairy bottling milk and selling directly to store, guys doing bathroom remodel in 1 week). Study difference-makers in other industries and talk to your customers for inspiration. Create a mash-up phrase for your difference: "We're like ___ but with ___. (Ex. _Speed_ was _Die Hard_ on a bus.) Visualize your ideal customer in detail. People buy stuff for >=1 of these reasons: make money, save time, save energy, save or not lose money now and in the future, feel better about themselves. Which for your stuff? customer details: -What brings them joy? (ex. time with family, less stress) -What are they worried about? (money, being cheated) -What challenges do they face? (stress, fear, loneliness) -What do they hope to gain from us? (pride, control convenience) -What goals are they striving to attain? (wealth, pleasure entertainment) -Where do they get their information? (search engines, friends, peers) -Who do they trust most? (Rabbi, mother-in-law, nobody) Create a profile, add a real photo, hang somewhere visible. May be easiest to start with who you _don't_ want. Key story--use a story to create buzz and reveal the essence of your difference and what you stand for. Write it (story about you, the company, your products/services), revise down to one page, test on people. Brand: name, logo, product, packaging, process, people. Put your branding on everything. "This is how we do it here." -- set of proven processes = framework for doing business. Be flexible but people who can't work with your ways are probably not your ideal customers. Ex. consulting--specify up front what's expected of client: level of participation, level of disclosure to you, flow of communication. Learn to delegate. For the stuff you do best, figure out your process, document it, and train others. Open book management--all employees know all financials, focus on improving profit. What to measure: lead generation (sources, how many you need); percentage of leads converted (stop chasing leads that are not qualified or not ready to appreciate your products' value); cost per customer acquisition; average dollar transaction per customer (easier to increase sales to existing customers than find new ones). What to do with data: work on increasing lead conversions--3x or 4x not hard if you focus. Increasing # of leads hard. Cut cost/lead by focusing on what works. Cost/new customer => budget for desired growth. Practice/drill: make sure everyone in organization knows things like progress vs. goals, ideal customer details, value your organization provides, etc. Ch 6 Use content to establish relationships, trust. White papers, etc. Get testimonials. Teach customers trigger phrases that indicate someone needs you. Use PR to get buzz. Start relationships with journalists a la "7 steps to networking your way to A-listers fast." Subscribe to helpareporter.com or similar--reporters call for sources to interview. Suggest yourself when relevant; also suggest your clients and partners to help them, build that relationship. Speaking--good for building authority. Set up a joint event with two partners. You present a hot topic to their customers, all cross-promote. (Not a sales pitch, education.) At least one attendee will ask you to speak at an event of theirs, too. Make a deal to give some free stuff away in exchange for the contact info of the attendees who want it. (No selling.) Educate like crazy, provide max value. Gather contact info. End with a simple call to action. If agreed in advance, can present 3-step approach: 1. tell audience up front that you'll give them great info, then you'll talk about what you do at the end. 2. About halfway through, mention a paid workshop or program you have coming up, with price, and go on. 3. At the end, answer questions, do free stuff. Almost as an afterthought, agree to let them bring a friend to the event if they sign up today. This doubles value in their mind and turns them into recruiters. Ch 7 Use your website as the hub of communications; use lots of other spokes to direct people there. Put everything people need to know on your website. Get found: SEO, social media, face-to-face networking, real social events. SendPepper (sendpepper.com) allows you to use automated emails or postcards to send personalized URLs with individual message for each recipient. You get an alert if visited. Free ebook Let me ask ya This--great questions for starting conversation, getting to know people www.hellomynameisscott.com/lmayt.pdf Keyword tools: - Wordtracker (freekeywords.wordtracker.com) - SEO Book (tools.seobook.com) - Google keyword tool (www.google.com/sktool) --use to write keyword-rich headlines, blog posts eLunch -set meeting time for Skype, buy the other person lunch and have it delivered to them in time for the meeting Monitoring niche or brand Google alerts (google.com/alerts) search.twitter.com --advanced search lets you get specific. Can subscribe to results as RSS. tweetbeep.com -- like google alerts for twitter boardtracker.com -- bulletin boards backtype.com -- searches blog comments socialmention.com -- mash-up search engine for different types of content (video, etc.) --left off here, skimming rest-- Ch 8 What percentage of clients refer business? If low, you're doing something wrong--either not asking, not doing great work, or not being interesting. Your goal is 100%. Be easy to: - communicate with - understand - listen to - network with - trust - buy from - work with - refer Give new customers a kit with info about what to expect, how to contact you, how to get the most out of what they bought, all details. Also create owner's manual--getting started guide, video tutorials, automated email series with lessons and tips, webinars, phone consultation session. Make sure all customers know what else you do. Help people get what they most want. Ex. car dealer--a few most want a zoom-zoom, but most people most want to fall in love, get a new job, feel better, have more money, etc. Ex2. accountant--people most want to get more customers and get home earlier in the evening. --Help them solve these problems. Exceed expectations/overdeliver. Examples: - Tax guy also sets up handy record-keeping system. - E-book comes with a copy of favorite current bestseller from Amazon - Web site design bonus: set up a blog for them, too - Kitchen remodel bonus: get their windows cleaned - Install ceiling fan + change batteries in smoke detectors - Unbelievable return policy - Logo + 500 business cards with logo -- make it a surprise. Wrap it like a present if possible. Have a membership/loyalty club with rewards. Hold customers accountable--don't care more about the results than they do. Don't waste energy on the hopless. Provide status updates throughout process, follow up to make sure everything went well. Ask for bad news, too. Stay in contact after initial order is finished. Hand-written notes stand out. Reward your champions--include them in brainstorming and research, ask their opinions, introduce them to people, invite them to events, send them flowers, movie tickets, candy, discounts on your stuff. Give referrers tools: tracking so you can reward them, gift certificates they can hand out, exclusive trial offers, bring-a-friend opportunities, personalized web pages to use to educate prospects Best motivation: sense of community, desire to help. (Monetary rewards => less motivation.) Get people together: host lunch, hold focus groups with some current customers and some prospects, build a referral community with complementary businesses Ch 9 Build value network--only work with other businesses you would be 100% comfortable referring your best customer to. List: businesses/people you already know or work with, others based on reputation, get suggestions for others from your strategic partners, vendors, staff, and customers. Consider competitors, too. For each one on the list, invite them to join by saying you have customers who may need to know about their products/services and you want to know how to best introduce them. --write a letter, explaining that and including: - How would I spot your ideal customer? - How would I best describe your unique benefits, approach, products, services, or value propositions? - What might prospects say to trigger me to know they need to be referred to you? - What is your marketing process once you receive a referral? Get to know each other. Then work together: - Write small info products/reports on something their customers care about and share--co-brand. This gives the other party a reason to introduce you to their customers. - Workshops (co-branded or other collaborative arrangement) - co-create content - joint marketing (ex. electrician gives customers free A/C checkup and drain cleaning, accountaint gives customers free IT and computer network audit, marketing consultant offers free product-trademark review with IP attorney, store gives 10-minute massages to weary customers) Oddball partnerships very strong for joint marketing because creates buzz. (Ex. coffee shop offers free fly-casting lessons in the stream behind the store, IT firm provided massages) Teach everyone in your network how to generate referrals well. Call make-a-referral Monday--every Monday, everyone tries to refer someone to another business in the network. (Twitter hashtag #marmon) Ch 10 Frame referral request as a benefit. Think about how referring your business makes the client's life better, then ask from that standpoint. You're helping them get more of what they want. When to ask: when you get positive feedback from them, when they refer someone, when you complete a project, when a strategic partner tells you about joining a new association Ask referrers what makes them want to refer you? --either find out your strengths, or find out they don't know your strengths and fix that. Tools for nurturing leads: - BatchBook (www.batchblue.com) -- add prospects' social media profiles, follow what they talk about on twitter and blog to find out what they're most interested in - lots of others not interesting - hand-written notes: do a dozen a week Make special "know, like, trust" segment for referred leads to make sure they learn what they need to know. Let them know they're special to you and give them an exclusive treat of some sort--info product, box of chocolate, whatever. To the referrer, thank them, send token of appreciation. If leads not appropriate, help them understand your ideal customers better. Acknowledge referral when sent and again when converts. (Be careful not to make them feel like you're paying them.) Thank them publicly when appropriate. Ch 11 Do referral-specific campaigns (ex. Omaha Steaks sends extra burgers if you invite your friends to try, gift certificates/coupons to referrer when those friends buy stuff) Exchange services for advertising ex. give t-shirt with your logo along with product Partner with someone else ex. review copy of book sent with samples of popcorn and popcorn company gift catalog Ask all clients for testimonials. Clip a powerful sentence or paragraph, print a dozen postcards with that, ask client to send them with handwritten note to folks who might benefit from your offer. (You pay postage, duh.) -- process clarifies in original client's mind what's great about you, plus referrals Set up landing pages for referrals. Consider special page for clients referred by each of your biggest referral sources. Feature their logo if they have one. Do follow-up ex. mailing invoice with several business cards, then mailing hand-written thank you card with more business cards and big "Thank you! We appreciate your referrals!" sticker on envelope, then mailing small gift package of mouse pad, pens, pocket knife, whatever, with logos, plus more business cards. Ch 12 8 million examples, including: Business coach had referral cards printed with types of issues, challenges, frustrations he helps with. When people ask how it's going, he says, "business is very good, but I am always looking for more clients who need this..." and hands them a card. Marketing consultant--free seminar on hot topic. Offered another free seminar on hotter topic next week to anyone bringing 2 other business owners. Insurance agent put together info/video--interviewed highest-profile clients and other important people. Interviewees eventually bought insurance from him, promoted him by giving away or selling set of videos they were in. Financial plannner had his customers' cars detailed while they were in their annual review with him PR firm gives everyone homemade cherry pie at first meeting ... Recommended by Jonathan Mead

  4. 5 out of 5

    Samson Sunny

    Good business book. Author talks about how to market your product or business. He suggest word of mouth marketing is very important compare to any other types of marketing strategies. First find out your ideal customer group and build trust between you and customers then they will refer the product to his friends and family. Content, connection and community are the 3Cs in referral marketing. Create lot of content such as blog post, youtube videos, podcast, email marketing, surveys, publishing jo Good business book. Author talks about how to market your product or business. He suggest word of mouth marketing is very important compare to any other types of marketing strategies. First find out your ideal customer group and build trust between you and customers then they will refer the product to his friends and family. Content, connection and community are the 3Cs in referral marketing. Create lot of content such as blog post, youtube videos, podcast, email marketing, surveys, publishing journals. Also ask the customer to refer the product by giving some reward points or by giving some gifts. Innovation is not building something very unique but innovation is just improving some small improvement and finding new way to market the same product. Also giving so many insights on lead generation, open book management, customer teaching. It would be very helpful to those who run business. I have to reread it once again in future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Denis

    Great resource for people looking for ways to increase their business with lots of amazing tips and tricks. It contains a bunch of spelling and grammar errors, so you will have to stomach those.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Gamble

    After so many books like this they all start to look the same. This one stands out because it's full of ideas and resources! I'm probably going to revisit this one from time to time just to see how else we can move the company forward.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Omar

    I am really puzzled how did this book get such good reviews. The book is very shallow and lacks insights. He just keeps repeating lots of info about tools and tips of marketing your business, most of them are only doable for an online or tech-based business. Moreover, it is in most of the times very unrealistic and assumes that the business can afford to run unprofitably for a long time just to build a base of loyal customers! In short, skip it! There are lots of better books on the same topic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Some books are better as an audio book than others. I listened to this book but have it on order from Amazon because it has so many great ideas that I need a hard copy of the material to highlight and reference. I really enjoyed listening to all the ideas. But now that I am done I really want to go through slowly and really digest the information.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I've been so "proud" of not presenting myself as an expert in my field. This book without saying so- truly presents why referrals are as natural to human beings as breathing. Please read this book.It may wake you up.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Oleh Myroshnichenko

    This book gives a lot of practical things for business promotion. Recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashlyn

    I appreciated that actionable ideas. I'm going to revisit and incorporate into my business.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Claus Mossbeck

    A good read with tips on how to create referrals, however, the author/ publisher promises a bit more than it delivers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Goncalves

    Great read for developing a brand and marketing a business, or yourself!‬

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Holmes

    Good advice here for small business owners on how to create a mindset of doing business worthy of referral and actively seeking those referrals. As a solopreneur, I connected with some chapters (like the one on creating content) more than others.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Garin

    Love this book! So many concrete and actionable examples for different types of companies in different industries. The book covers different areas of the business wherein referral systems can be established. They all make sense and I do think they can work in my business. Highly recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anas Talaat

    Couldn't get past Chapter 6. It doesn't discuss the academic point of view, but more of a street-talk about getting more referrals. Good read if you are new to marketing or an owner of a small business.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Riden

    Helped to inspire my marketing book. Jantsch's books demystify marketing and make it workable and achievable for non-marketers. De-mystifies the pseudo-mysterious field of marketing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    Good reminder read. The best part is the tips used by various industries in the last part of the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mandi Ehman

    There is much to like about this book, as my detailed notes show. However, it's an older book and some "best practices" are fairly outdated. I'd love to see an updated version!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Tons of good advices Very good and practical advices. Finally a book that includes all you need as a professional to build referral and happy clients

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stan Skrabut

    What if you created a business that automatically referred business to itself? What if we could get current customers to send new clients to our business? John Jantsch believes that this is not only possible but very much doable. In his book, The Referral Engine: Teaching Your Business to Market Itself*, he provided guidance for creating a referral process within the business process. "Human beings are physiologically wired to make referrals" (Jantsch, 2012, p. 3). While I was reading this book, I What if you created a business that automatically referred business to itself? What if we could get current customers to send new clients to our business? John Jantsch believes that this is not only possible but very much doable. In his book, The Referral Engine: Teaching Your Business to Market Itself*, he provided guidance for creating a referral process within the business process. "Human beings are physiologically wired to make referrals" (Jantsch, 2012, p. 3). While I was reading this book, I thought that this book was highly appropriate to Extension educators and programs. We need to harness our repeat customers to gain new customers. We need to create such buzz that they are all but happy to refer others to use our services. Read more

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    I really enjoyed this book, especially as I made it towards the end. There were so many creative ideas on how to stand out with your customers and strategic partners. For instance, it suggests how to increase your company's referrals, by helping your customers increase their referrals. There are many examples of tools you can use to manage referrals and track strong referrals vs. weak referrals. Ironically, this book quotes The Go-Giver by Bob Burg and John David Mann which I just read. It also I really enjoyed this book, especially as I made it towards the end. There were so many creative ideas on how to stand out with your customers and strategic partners. For instance, it suggests how to increase your company's referrals, by helping your customers increase their referrals. There are many examples of tools you can use to manage referrals and track strong referrals vs. weak referrals. Ironically, this book quotes The Go-Giver by Bob Burg and John David Mann which I just read. It also quotes Predictably Irrational which I read last year. I would suggest reading this if you want to be exposed to thoughts on how to make referrals instead of just leads.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lanre Dahunsi

    Referrals are about trust and relationship building, and nothing does that faster than showing someone that you are committed to finding ways to help them get what they need to succeed. The Seven stages of referral development • Know • Like • Trust • Try • Buy • Repeat • Refer •There are three ingredients necessary for a rewarding and successful business experience: You must enjoy what you do and feel a sense of purpose; you must be good at what you do; and you must be able to convince other people to p Referrals are about trust and relationship building, and nothing does that faster than showing someone that you are committed to finding ways to help them get what they need to succeed. The Seven stages of referral development • Know • Like • Trust • Try • Buy • Repeat • Refer •There are three ingredients necessary for a rewarding and successful business experience: You must enjoy what you do and feel a sense of purpose; you must be good at what you do; and you must be able to convince other people to pay you for what you do. Very Good Book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Whether you own a business, run a business, are thinking of starting a business, or work within a business (I think that covers it) this book is a must-read. By the time I finished the book my brain was bursting with ways to turn a business into a lean, mean, referral machine. No joke, John talks about implementing referral marketing into every facet of your business and gives a ton of real-life examples of the strategies in action. I'll be reading it several times.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sunshine Moore

    I am not going to give this one stars. We listened to the audiobook. Jake is getting quite a bit of inspiration out of it - maybe I should have him review it. For me, there isn't really much in it. Neither of us have backgrounds in business or marketing, so it seems like all of the suggestions are good ones. One thing that would be better, for us, is if it had more suggestions for our type of business. It seems very geared toward business that sell things.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cory Huff

    When I started reading this I had just barely crossed the threshold of a business betsy's regular repeat customers and generate more revenue than actually need for my family. I took two pages of notes that were sparked by this book. I feel like this book would be a handy reference book for any business book library. There so many ideas on how to generate referrals, you can't possibly implement all of them after one reading of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Evie Burke

    11/2013: Didn't like. Focused on online methods mostly - what to have set up. Was looking for more off line, in person suggestions. Skimmed it. No notes taken 6/22/2014: Liked it better the second time around. Gets better from chapter 8 on. Not my favorite, but a good read and way to pop ideas. Also, probably written by an extrovert for extrovert. I don't think I would be comfortable with some of the methods, they're not bad, just not for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Zach Brown

    Referral Engine is a good follow up to Duct Tape marketing. I have used Duct Tape Marketing a TON in developing my marketing strategy and have used Referral Engine to refine it. The book was good, not great only because I think that Duct Tape Marketing covered most of what RE did and in more of an overview fashion, which is what I need at this point in time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hussain Al-essa

    You think you're a social butterfly? Why not leverage it in your own business? The Referral Engine books help you find better clients and narrow the cloud of potential anybodies down 'who would buy from you and what are they like' plus how to reach them. Word of mouth has always been the stronger medium due to power of context, John Jantsh is the person to go to in utilizing this medium.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Burke

    A very worthwhile business book. Marketing, including advertising, PR & promotion all have their places in selling products or services. But Jantsch gets to the core that it's really 'word of mouth' that drives business. We do business with who we trust and like -- so if you are a business, work on being liked and trusted! A very worthwhile business book. Marketing, including advertising, PR & promotion all have their places in selling products or services. But Jantsch gets to the core that it's really 'word of mouth' that drives business. We do business with who we trust and like -- so if you are a business, work on being liked and trusted!

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