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Driving Fear Out of the Workplace: Creating the High-Trust, High-Performance Organization

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Restore Creativity and Trust to Your Workplace Much has changed since Driving Fear Out of the Workplace first made the undiscussable discussable back in 1991. Advances in technology, new employee/employer relations, and the corporate push to optimize intellectual capital have introduced a host of new workplace anxieties that, left unaddressed, can seriously inhibit individ Restore Creativity and Trust to Your Workplace Much has changed since Driving Fear Out of the Workplace first made the undiscussable discussable back in 1991. Advances in technology, new employee/employer relations, and the corporate push to optimize intellectual capital have introduced a host of new workplace anxieties that, left unaddressed, can seriously inhibit individual performance and cripple a company's ability to compete. Which is why, in this revised edition, authors Ryan and Oestreich revisit their original, best-selling work to confront the fears that permeate today's organizations--so that they can become the high-trust, high-performance organizations of tomorrow. This insightful book digs deeply into the root causes of fear and the pervasive 'flu of mistrust' that weakens motivation and commitment. --Terrence E. Deal and M. K. Key, authors of Corporate Celebration: Play, Purpose, and Passion at Work You'll discover: * How fear prevents people from doing their best * How fear operates in organizations How to build business relationships without fear...and much more! This work is a timely antidote to the insecurities of workers faced with the pervasive push toward leaner, meaner organizations.


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Restore Creativity and Trust to Your Workplace Much has changed since Driving Fear Out of the Workplace first made the undiscussable discussable back in 1991. Advances in technology, new employee/employer relations, and the corporate push to optimize intellectual capital have introduced a host of new workplace anxieties that, left unaddressed, can seriously inhibit individ Restore Creativity and Trust to Your Workplace Much has changed since Driving Fear Out of the Workplace first made the undiscussable discussable back in 1991. Advances in technology, new employee/employer relations, and the corporate push to optimize intellectual capital have introduced a host of new workplace anxieties that, left unaddressed, can seriously inhibit individual performance and cripple a company's ability to compete. Which is why, in this revised edition, authors Ryan and Oestreich revisit their original, best-selling work to confront the fears that permeate today's organizations--so that they can become the high-trust, high-performance organizations of tomorrow. This insightful book digs deeply into the root causes of fear and the pervasive 'flu of mistrust' that weakens motivation and commitment. --Terrence E. Deal and M. K. Key, authors of Corporate Celebration: Play, Purpose, and Passion at Work You'll discover: * How fear prevents people from doing their best * How fear operates in organizations How to build business relationships without fear...and much more! This work is a timely antidote to the insecurities of workers faced with the pervasive push toward leaner, meaner organizations.

39 review for Driving Fear Out of the Workplace: Creating the High-Trust, High-Performance Organization

  1. 5 out of 5

    NancyJ

    This is an excellent book for anyone who wants to build trust, manage conflict, or improve relationships with others. I highly recommend it to leaders, trainers, facilitators, and anyone interested in teambuilding or organization development. I read this book many years ago, and I still refer to it from time to time to refresh my skills and mindset. The Cycle of Mistrust is one of the most useful concepts I've encountered (in 20+ years in this field), and I frequently teach it to others. It's pa This is an excellent book for anyone who wants to build trust, manage conflict, or improve relationships with others. I highly recommend it to leaders, trainers, facilitators, and anyone interested in teambuilding or organization development. I read this book many years ago, and I still refer to it from time to time to refresh my skills and mindset. The Cycle of Mistrust is one of the most useful concepts I've encountered (in 20+ years in this field), and I frequently teach it to others. It's particularly useful when you have an impossible colleague that you MUST work with (or when someone considers YOU the untrustworthy colleague). Crucial point - you won't change the other person (or your relationship) without making some changes in your own perceptions and assumptions first. You can go through the motions to build trust, and say all the right things, but if you don't really mean it, your facial expressions and non-verbal behavior will give you away. The skills in this book take some practice and a willingness to be open, but it's worth it to make your work life more collegial and productive. (It might be easier than finding a better job, and let's face it, there are jerks everywhere.) You might not learn enough to transform a whole organization (not without leadership changes anyway), but you will learn some techniques that could help you to build trust and effect change in your own sphere of influences. I love the concept of discussing "undiscussables" and some groups take to it easily. It's really hard to accomplish this in toxic organizations with poor leadership and an entrenched culture of fear and competition. There are some organizations and leaders that bring out the worst in people, and you often see good people leaving in droves. (As I write this on 3/17/18, the current White House is a great example of a toxic, fear-based organization, with high profile terminations and defections every week.) In my perfect world, every company founder would read this book and work to create a high-trust organization right from the beginning. And we would all select (or elect) leaders who can lead by building trust not fear.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carina

    A must read for anyone who works with others! I suggest looking at this book more expansively by imagining fear can occur between any two people who work together, rather than fear to only occurring between employees and managers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Posits that employees whose work is motivated by fear are less useful than employees who are driven by a sense of being valued by their employer. Doesn’t spend a lot of time proving that thesis, which I really want to be true. Lists a lot of pretty obvious ways cultures of fear are created. One I hadn’t really thought of – “poorly managed personnel systems.” (72, 81). I’ve seen one of those help push a lot of folks out of the door, but I don’t know that it was about fear so much as frustration. Posits that employees whose work is motivated by fear are less useful than employees who are driven by a sense of being valued by their employer. Doesn’t spend a lot of time proving that thesis, which I really want to be true. Lists a lot of pretty obvious ways cultures of fear are created. One I hadn’t really thought of – “poorly managed personnel systems.” (72, 81). I’ve seen one of those help push a lot of folks out of the door, but I don’t know that it was about fear so much as frustration. Does a nice job of breaking down self reinforcing cycles of dysfunctions – one that hit me: employees’ project negative opinions on each other and then respond accordingly, escalating the dysfunction at every pass. Suggests to defuse it, give credit, take responsibility for mistakes, share information, collaborate, focus on the group, focus on the big picture, respect the structure, value each other, encourage open communication, don’t voice cynicism. (109-10) Had some good advice on leading meetings where you really want the group’s thoughts. Hold your comments until several others have spoken; listen; paraphrase what others say, especially if you disagree, hang a lantern on it when you’re shifting from participant to manger (“let me put on my department manager hat for a minute”); ask for feedback at the end. (214). Also suggested asking specifically what could go wrong. (225). A lot of the advice was obvious and some wasn’t helpful. One that jumped out at me – the authors say again and again not to be defensive and not to trigger defensiveness. Gives no real advice how to avoid being defense or triggering defensiveness. A little too self-helpy for my tastes, but worth the time.

  4. 5 out of 5

    JoAnn

    Speaks to the art of leadership; I consider it a forerunner to the current healthy discussions on emotional intelligence. Like many other books, speaks more to what people and organizations can do as opposed to what they can be.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Todd Cheng

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

  7. 4 out of 5

    CHANGSOO KIM

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  9. 4 out of 5

    margaret e. vinton

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tony Fortner

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chaz Braman

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donald Pedersen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lauri

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nichole

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rocky

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Juliet

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Minnick

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Wheeler

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thad

  22. 4 out of 5

    Henrik

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt Jans

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  25. 5 out of 5

    D.w.dean.jr

  26. 4 out of 5

    Judith E.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    RG

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 5 out of 5

    Monem

  31. 5 out of 5

    Avdhesh Vaid

  32. 5 out of 5

    E

  33. 5 out of 5

    Getachew

  34. 4 out of 5

    Steve Woods

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kartik Subbarao

  36. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  37. 5 out of 5

    S. Harris

  38. 4 out of 5

    Bill Williams

  39. 4 out of 5

    David

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