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My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes!

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"Have you ever had one of those nights when you could swear in front of a court of law that you haven't had a wink of sleep, but the prosecutor would have a field day with details concerning your alarm clock going off after what seemed like only an hour and your lingering memories of mischievous lawn furniture?" Forget everything you know about life, the world, and all the "Have you ever had one of those nights when you could swear in front of a court of law that you haven't had a wink of sleep, but the prosecutor would have a field day with details concerning your alarm clock going off after what seemed like only an hour and your lingering memories of mischievous lawn furniture?" Forget everything you know about life, the world, and all the objects in it. Bradley Sands can bend them to his will with a frightening disregard for reality. You never know who, or what, is lying in wait behind the next comma. Whether it's Super Noxious Air Man and his sidekick, Kid Centrifugal Force, or the next episode of Teddy the Rottweiler Spayer, Sands keeps you off-balance with laughter and astonishment. These stories are crammed with the delightfully odd and the scurrilously silly. From moment to moment MY HEART SAID NO requires the most unexpected, perplexing, and hilarious leaps of faith. But you'll be glad you took this exhilarating jump into uncharted territory. Praise for the book: "There's a place past all reason, most possibility, and all the jokes I can think of. A place shaped kind of like the human heart. Bradley Sands doesn't write about this place, but he writes from it, pushing farther into the unguessable with each word, each scene." - Stephen Graham Jones, author of Demon Theory & It Came From Del Rio "There is a disorienting alchemy at work in Bradley Sands' fiction. Here phantasmagoria shifts into stand-up and the avant-garde saddles up besides the geek. Imagine: a hyper-palimpsest beneath which burbles a heady brew of surrealism, poetry, memoir, and horror all set to a DaDa soundtrack that sounds surprisingly like the End of the World." - Rayo Casablanca, author of 6 Sick Hipsters & Very Mercenary "Reading this collection is like ingesting a bag of fun-colored candy, removing your stomach, and then taking it to a party for use as a pinata. Some readers will love these stories, some readers will hate them but, displayed throughout, is a true love of language and a generous dose of creativity." - Andersen Prunty, author of The Beard The book's strength lies in the way irreverent images are juxtaposed, repeatedly, often rhythmically, creating a sensation that has no use for the traditional confines of literature." - Outsider Writers Collective Throughout, Sands displays an adept knack for twisting familiar words and phrases into new forms, altering their meaning while poking fun at the overused, the clichéd. - decomP


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"Have you ever had one of those nights when you could swear in front of a court of law that you haven't had a wink of sleep, but the prosecutor would have a field day with details concerning your alarm clock going off after what seemed like only an hour and your lingering memories of mischievous lawn furniture?" Forget everything you know about life, the world, and all the "Have you ever had one of those nights when you could swear in front of a court of law that you haven't had a wink of sleep, but the prosecutor would have a field day with details concerning your alarm clock going off after what seemed like only an hour and your lingering memories of mischievous lawn furniture?" Forget everything you know about life, the world, and all the objects in it. Bradley Sands can bend them to his will with a frightening disregard for reality. You never know who, or what, is lying in wait behind the next comma. Whether it's Super Noxious Air Man and his sidekick, Kid Centrifugal Force, or the next episode of Teddy the Rottweiler Spayer, Sands keeps you off-balance with laughter and astonishment. These stories are crammed with the delightfully odd and the scurrilously silly. From moment to moment MY HEART SAID NO requires the most unexpected, perplexing, and hilarious leaps of faith. But you'll be glad you took this exhilarating jump into uncharted territory. Praise for the book: "There's a place past all reason, most possibility, and all the jokes I can think of. A place shaped kind of like the human heart. Bradley Sands doesn't write about this place, but he writes from it, pushing farther into the unguessable with each word, each scene." - Stephen Graham Jones, author of Demon Theory & It Came From Del Rio "There is a disorienting alchemy at work in Bradley Sands' fiction. Here phantasmagoria shifts into stand-up and the avant-garde saddles up besides the geek. Imagine: a hyper-palimpsest beneath which burbles a heady brew of surrealism, poetry, memoir, and horror all set to a DaDa soundtrack that sounds surprisingly like the End of the World." - Rayo Casablanca, author of 6 Sick Hipsters & Very Mercenary "Reading this collection is like ingesting a bag of fun-colored candy, removing your stomach, and then taking it to a party for use as a pinata. Some readers will love these stories, some readers will hate them but, displayed throughout, is a true love of language and a generous dose of creativity." - Andersen Prunty, author of The Beard The book's strength lies in the way irreverent images are juxtaposed, repeatedly, often rhythmically, creating a sensation that has no use for the traditional confines of literature." - Outsider Writers Collective Throughout, Sands displays an adept knack for twisting familiar words and phrases into new forms, altering their meaning while poking fun at the overused, the clichéd. - decomP

30 review for My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Some books are so easy that you can devour them in an evening after drinking four or five Pabst Blue Ribbons for dinner. This isn't one of them. What do the following items have in common? * Entries from the Encyclopedia Orangutannicus * The Eiffel Tower wearing a feather boa * A reference to King Kong Bundy, the rightful winner of the main event at Wrestlemania II * A waitress dropping a tip jar, spilling such tips as "The clitoris is located between the labia and the top of the vulva" * A Hollywood Some books are so easy that you can devour them in an evening after drinking four or five Pabst Blue Ribbons for dinner. This isn't one of them. What do the following items have in common? * Entries from the Encyclopedia Orangutannicus * The Eiffel Tower wearing a feather boa * A reference to King Kong Bundy, the rightful winner of the main event at Wrestlemania II * A waitress dropping a tip jar, spilling such tips as "The clitoris is located between the labia and the top of the vulva" * A Hollywood producer named Jared Bruckheiny * Captain Koala * The instructions for writing a short story If you think it's just gibberish I made up, you're mostly wrong. All of these are just a sampling of the ideas jammed within the pages of My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes! Let's get down to brass tacks. I hate short story collections and I hate writing reviews for them even more. This one is a little different than most collections. Instead of a lot of teases with intriguing story ideas that peter out after a couple pages or two, MHSNBTCCS sandblasts you (Get it? the author's name is Bradley Sands? Sandblast? Get it?) with one absurd idea or situation after another. Wordplay takes center stage in this collection and if you're not paying attention or slightly impaired, it'll go right by you. Where else are you going to see a scat burglar beebopping into a building to rob it or an enema that gets grandmothers? "Nowhere!" is the correct answer. So, avoid this book if you can handle your neighbors laughing at you because they can handle it and you can't. Or pick it up now and show those jerks!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andersen Prunty

    I blurbed this. I said: "Reading this collection is like ingesting a bag of fun-colored candy, removing your stomach, and then taking it to a party for use as a pinata. Displayed throughout is a true love of language and a generous dose of creativity." Also, I really like the cover. I blurbed this. I said: "Reading this collection is like ingesting a bag of fun-colored candy, removing your stomach, and then taking it to a party for use as a pinata. Displayed throughout is a true love of language and a generous dose of creativity." Also, I really like the cover.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Holy crap, Bradley Sands! This book melded my mind like a Salvador Dali clock. I had to take this one slow because if I read it all at once I'd have been in the corner in the fetal position, twitching. However, these volitile emotional responses that I conjured up after reading this book, are what makes Bradley Sands a master of his stories. I certainly appreciated the level of craftmanship that went into this collection. Plus, the art work on the cover just rocks! So, readers if you're looking f Holy crap, Bradley Sands! This book melded my mind like a Salvador Dali clock. I had to take this one slow because if I read it all at once I'd have been in the corner in the fetal position, twitching. However, these volitile emotional responses that I conjured up after reading this book, are what makes Bradley Sands a master of his stories. I certainly appreciated the level of craftmanship that went into this collection. Plus, the art work on the cover just rocks! So, readers if you're looking for something that will explode your mind and maybe your guts in the process, look no further than this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Revert

    Bradley Sands is unlike most authors you’ve probably read. It’s not really suitable to label his work “Bizarro” or “Absurd”, even though it certainly is Bizarre and absurd. His work is more like a very carefully crafted patchwork quilt of sheer oddity and confusion. His stories are a leaning tower of mind-melting scenarios that bleed into each other, forming a thread by virtue of their placement. Saying this may give you the impression that Sands is a chaotic randomist, however, this isn’t true Bradley Sands is unlike most authors you’ve probably read. It’s not really suitable to label his work “Bizarro” or “Absurd”, even though it certainly is Bizarre and absurd. His work is more like a very carefully crafted patchwork quilt of sheer oddity and confusion. His stories are a leaning tower of mind-melting scenarios that bleed into each other, forming a thread by virtue of their placement. Saying this may give you the impression that Sands is a chaotic randomist, however, this isn’t true either. Reading the stories in ‘My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said YES!” reveals the care and craftsmanship involved. Consider the following passage from the story, ‘Terror in the Haunted House’: “An Eiffel Tower struts down the hallway in a sexy maid’s uniform, blitzkrieging the high ceiling with its feather boa duster. The canvas of Lord Remarkably Stiff For His Age bubbles over its frame like a pan of stovetop popcorn. Then the painting extracts itself from the wall, uncovering a crevice and the backside of the painting’s true ally against gravity. Super Noxious Air Man and his sidekick, Kid Centrifugal Force, fight to make the world safe for Dermatology – one incurable skin condition at a time – and the face of the brittle portrait putrefies.” In isolation, it’s almost like an ultra dense piece of nano fiction. Now, pile these pieces of nano fiction together, following something akin to narrative in the process, and you have a Bradley Sands story. Depending on the sort of person you are, this either a great thing or a terrible thing. I fall firmly in the ‘great’ camp. I love how well-crafted this insanity is, and the imagery these stories provoke is quite unique. In my mind, there are two ways to enjoy this book: you can let it all wash over you, or you can dive into each sentence and drink every word. I’m a drinker and found a lot of enjoyment slowly working through each sentence and tying them all together. This also leads to exhaustion (at least it did for me). I couldn’t read this book in large chunks. After each story, I felt like taking a little nap. During my down time, this book kept calling to me, asking me with subversive politeness to pick it up again. As I started each new story, I had a sense that this one wouldn’t hurt as bad – of course, I was always left trying to absorb the same chaos. You’ll notice that I’m not really telling you what this book is about. This is very deliberate, because I feel it would belittle the content. It would be pointless for me to go into more detail than the blurb provides. It’s enough to say that it’s a chronicle of oddity – a cluster of confusion. Bradley Sands is a fascinating author. His work is both uncompromising and delightfully playful. It can also be very funny and crass in the most unexpected ways. If you really take the time to imagine what he is describing, you brain will turn itself inside out in divine delirium. There were several points throughout that I was in complete hysterics. There are even moments where he touches upon what I’d classify ‘perfect nonsense’. This is nonsense so unapologetically nonsensical that all it can really do is make sense. I’m led to believe that Sands’ style has changed somewhat since this book, so it will be very interesting to read his upcoming books. There’s nothing left to do but wholeheartedly recommend this book. Even by Bizarro standards you have to be an adventurous reader, but if you give yourself in to Sands’ world, there is ample reward in store. If you wind up throwing this book against a wall, well, it certainly says something about the power of the writing within. I love that writing like this exists and finds publication. The world needs it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Hackle

    Brain-wringing, Dada for the early 21st century? Yeah, sure. But that doesn’t really tell you much. And I believe this collection of absurdist short stories defies any sort of “It’s like so-and-so on crack” descriptor so I won’t even bother. On second thought, I will. Here goes. Imagine if William S. Burroughs, Franz Kafka, and Larry David were fraternal triplets, and they engaged in a session of tripletcest that resulted in the miraculous birth of a precocious crack baby who decided to write an in Brain-wringing, Dada for the early 21st century? Yeah, sure. But that doesn’t really tell you much. And I believe this collection of absurdist short stories defies any sort of “It’s like so-and-so on crack” descriptor so I won’t even bother. On second thought, I will. Here goes. Imagine if William S. Burroughs, Franz Kafka, and Larry David were fraternal triplets, and they engaged in a session of tripletcest that resulted in the miraculous birth of a precocious crack baby who decided to write an instructional manual about.... Nah, scratch that. False start. Lemme try again. Envision a parallel universe, one identical to our own but for the absence of both crack cocaine and Brad Pitt. With me so far? One day in this universe, Brad Pitt wakes up, smokes a bunch of crack, and decides to add “-ley” to his first name. To make the name alteration legal, Brad Pitt purchases a cheap Brad Pitt mask from a Halloween store, the kind of mask with a rubber band stapled around the back. He writes “ley” on the mask’s forehead and puts it on. Finally satisfied with his many lifetime achievements, Brad Pitt walks to WalMart and purchases a revolver, loads a single bullet into the cylinder, presses the end of the barrel against his temple, and pulls the trigger with the express intention of blowing his brains out. The moment he pulls that trigger, however, Brad Pitt finds himself flying out from the gun’s barrel like a human cannonball and blasting through the leaden head of a gigantic, sentient bullet named Megan who happened to be playing Russian roulette with her gigantic, giggling, sentient-bullet girlfriends. Megan loses the game. This book is sorta like that.

  6. 5 out of 5

    FabulousRaye

    At this time, I unfortunately have nothing new or creative to add in my every growing adoration Of Bradley Sands. We can blame the Paxil for that. It forbids me from drinking alcoholic beverages while reading.I write much better reviews while under the influence. My copy is super special cause Bradley predicted how I would die. It is as follows: "Your cats will turn you into a human bomb and force you to walk into Dave's Pet Food and Soda City" Also for some odd reason, this book smells really go At this time, I unfortunately have nothing new or creative to add in my every growing adoration Of Bradley Sands. We can blame the Paxil for that. It forbids me from drinking alcoholic beverages while reading.I write much better reviews while under the influence. My copy is super special cause Bradley predicted how I would die. It is as follows: "Your cats will turn you into a human bomb and force you to walk into Dave's Pet Food and Soda City" Also for some odd reason, this book smells really good.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Five stars because I care.

  8. 5 out of 5

    tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE

    I 1st encountered Bradley Sands when we friended each other here on GoodReads. I had little or no impression of him. His picture seemed somewhat nondescript. Then I met him in Boulder when I was there to guest lecture & perform at Naropa University. I didn't get much of a chance to meet him there b/c I was so distracted but we did get a chance to talk a little & he seemed enthusiastic & friendly. I still had no idea of what his writing was like. THEN he sent me this bk c/o my friend Amy Catanzan I 1st encountered Bradley Sands when we friended each other here on GoodReads. I had little or no impression of him. His picture seemed somewhat nondescript. Then I met him in Boulder when I was there to guest lecture & perform at Naropa University. I didn't get much of a chance to meet him there b/c I was so distracted but we did get a chance to talk a little & he seemed enthusiastic & friendly. I still had no idea of what his writing was like. THEN he sent me this bk c/o my friend Amy Catanzano. I get a fair amt of bks given to me, I don't necessarily expect to like them all. Sometimes I'm a bit worried I won't like them at all & that then I'll be faced w/ writing a negative review since I review every bk I read here on GoodReads & try to always review them honestly. SO, imagine my relief when I started reading this & not only liked it but liked it more & more the more I read it. It's funny, surprising, fairly original (or, at least, I'm unaware of its milieu), & well-written. & he's not a one-trick pony: he explores a variety of techniques. There're puns galore - such as "peanutbutterfly net". There're lively similes: "His body vibrates like a caffeinated poodle humping its favorite chew toy." Wonderful pun-based plot twists: "He sits on the floor of his bedroom, trying to balance his budget so he can afford a mattress. The window opens and a woman in a scat burglar suit ski-do-be-bops through it. Lost in the realm of her impeccable scatting abilities, she doesn't notice that someone in the room is hyperventilating. She steals the floor and is halfway to the pawnshop before she discovers she's committed a kidnapping. Their eyes meet, go out for dinner and a movie, and REALLY hit it off." All this & more in just the 1st story: "Abridged Version". The author makes appearances throughout - such as in "Terror in the Haunted House": "Bradley waits until Crispin's skull is one crunch away from shattering before briefing you on his condition" & in "Jared Bruckheiny": "He responds by yelling, "Bradley Sands fall down - take one" and slams his head between the black and white agony of a clapboard." Other recurrences include things like No Girls Allowed - vodka, a corporation, & a magazine. There're locations like the Humperdumper Yogurtarium and Toilet Paper Boutique; Cheesequake & Moonsylvania. The Encyclopedia Orangutannicas makes at least 2 appearances. All of these contribute to establishing Bradley's alternate universe. Sands' world is a rollicking grotesquerie full of cartoon violence & what I like to call schizophrenic humor - where the figurative is turned literal & vice-versa. There're probably other writers out there like him, maybe even a whole underground scene, but if there're any better than him at this I'd like to have them called to my attn so I can read their work. The closest writer I can think of at the moment is Rupert Wondlowski, whose work I also like, but I think of Rupert's work as more 'poetic' & Bradley's as more fictional. Sands' world is like a ghost bus that you had to take home from yr job at the fast food restaurant for kiddies where you had to clean up more puke than you'd ever imagined possible. It was late at nite, you'd fallen asleep on the bus, it'd crashed in a freak accident w/ the entire replacement shift for people going into a similar job. You'd woken up, not realized that you were dead & everyone around you was Bradley Sands in a different form of drag. You wondered where the party was & asked everyone what yr name was but they only laughed at you. I liked this bk so much that when I was recently fotoed in bed for a "secretly famous" section of a nascent magazine I made sure to be fotoed reading "My Heart Said No, But The Camera Crew Said YES!" May that contribute to a steady stream of new readers for Sands. & may I read more by him. Amen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Ross

    A Bradley Sands story is not like any story you’ve read before. Though his work carries a noticeable Steve Aylett influence, Sands dismisses even the implied logic of his own creation, opting not to utilize his and Aylett’s stylistic contradictions for the sake of full narrative, instead insisting on delivering at the line-by-line level. Sands, with is second book, a collection of stories called My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes, discounts reality in a way that renders it obsolete. T A Bradley Sands story is not like any story you’ve read before. Though his work carries a noticeable Steve Aylett influence, Sands dismisses even the implied logic of his own creation, opting not to utilize his and Aylett’s stylistic contradictions for the sake of full narrative, instead insisting on delivering at the line-by-line level. Sands, with is second book, a collection of stories called My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes, discounts reality in a way that renders it obsolete. The book’s strength lies in the way irreverent images are juxtaposed, repeatedly, often rhythmically, creating a sensation that has no use for the traditional confines of literature. As these stories progress, we are acclimated into Sands’ own reality. I could literally pull a random line from a random page and have my point exemplified. So I will: “The four walls of a washing machine ambush him from all sides. It completes a wash cycle, rendering him as pruny as an archetypal witch after spending a relaxing afternoon in her cauldron” (pg. 10). Again? Okay: “Upward [a character’s name:] agreed to meet me under the stipulation that I inhale a substance that simulated death by releasing a pheromone that attracted fiendish lumberjacks with no qualms about misusing their chainsaws” (pg. 65). This style lends itself best to pieces that are themselves intentionally mocking reality. In the piece, “Gen Papa-Georgio,” Sands illuminates the inherent absurdities of a commercially manicured pop band-cum-intellectuals, using literal depictions: “The fact that their shows were well attended, even though the stage was always obstructed behind a wall of ashamed serpents, is proof of their greatness” (pg. 34). The two Encyclopedia Orangutannicas pieces (“Croatan” and “The Two-Toed Sapsucker”) work because their form, mock encyclopedia articles, doesn’t rely on arc or character as part of its makeup. By intention, these pieces have no character development, rarely a story arc, and no emotional investment. They aren’t stories. They aren’t really vignettes, either, as these characters cannot be said to have a life of which to slice. Perhaps “explorations” is a better term. To be honest, I don’t know what they hell they are. And it’s that aversion to classification that makes every single page so much fucking fun. Sands’ last book, a novel, was perhaps too long for this anything goes style. The long form necessitates a solid storyline, which when clouded by Sands’ unpredictable humor and wit, leaves the reader hunting for resolution. But the short form, the way Sands works it, assures the reader that it’s okay to not seek a storyline. Stories are about manufacturing a reality. To Bradley Sands, reality just gets in the way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Sit back, be ready, think of things that glow and spit. In the right mood Mr Sands will lift you leaving your brain somewhere else to get molested.

  11. 4 out of 5

    R.A. Harris

    I finally plucked up the courage to return to this demon-in-book-form after having to take a break for fear of going mad. I'm glad I did because reading this book is exactly like riding a rollercoaster. One that shoots you out at top speed and keeps such a relentless pace you can't even scream as adrenaline sears your brain and you can't tell if you're enjoying it or slowly dying from sensory overload, and where you don't even know if you're on a track anymore because you lose all sense of geogr I finally plucked up the courage to return to this demon-in-book-form after having to take a break for fear of going mad. I'm glad I did because reading this book is exactly like riding a rollercoaster. One that shoots you out at top speed and keeps such a relentless pace you can't even scream as adrenaline sears your brain and you can't tell if you're enjoying it or slowly dying from sensory overload, and where you don't even know if you're on a track anymore because you lose all sense of geography, proprioception and general coherent 'sense', and you know those safety features are only for show and you get the unyielding sense that you are about to be flung sky high by yet another corkscrew in the track that probably isn't there anyway. It has its jerky moments where you bang your head against a railing, where you slip from your harness and cling on for dear life, but those obtuse moments become mere memory in the wake of the overpowering sense of awe you get at the kind of insanity Bradley Sands stores in his mind bucket. It would probably be called the Mind Melter and children wouldn't be allowed to ride because the very real danger the title would become literal. Be sure to check out Bradley's other collection, "Sorry I Ruined Your Orgy". It's slightly less bonkers. Slightly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hatchet Mouth

    I firmly believe this is Bradley Sands' magnum opus. You can see his eye for detail in every sentence. I could actually believe he spent hours crafting every single sentence to his liking, given that each sentence adds something dramatically different to either the plot, scenery or identity of the character. This book exists somewhere between the pocket realms of hyperbole, prop comedy, satire and stream of consciousness. Everything is invented. McNugget Mansion, D.T. The Delirium Tremens, a Venu I firmly believe this is Bradley Sands' magnum opus. You can see his eye for detail in every sentence. I could actually believe he spent hours crafting every single sentence to his liking, given that each sentence adds something dramatically different to either the plot, scenery or identity of the character. This book exists somewhere between the pocket realms of hyperbole, prop comedy, satire and stream of consciousness. Everything is invented. McNugget Mansion, D.T. The Delirium Tremens, a Venus Hippopotamustrap, kitchen tables on roller skates, bedroom doors that take up martial arts in the name of revenge, Encyclopedia Orangutannica, Humper Dumper Yogurtarium and Toilet Paper Boutique, nurses that physically resemble the Eiffel Tower. There is no end to Bradley Sands' inventive turns of phrase. I can see why it is so exhausting for him when he works on a full length novel/novella if he cares so much for each sentence. The final chapter, entitled 'How To Write a Short Story' is, I believe, the one chapter where he is being completely honest without being over the top. Although he might be playing with metaphor on the wrist slitting part.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason Jordan

    "Known for his novel It Came from Below the Belt (Afterbirth Books, 2006) and his publication Bust Down the Door and Eat All the Chickens, Bizarro author Bradley Sands is now offering My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes! (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2010), a collection that is wholeheartedly rooted in Sands’s chosen aesthetic. Then again, perhaps Sands’s aesthetic chose him. In either case, cast aside predictability, because these stories are anything but commonplace...." Read the full re "Known for his novel It Came from Below the Belt (Afterbirth Books, 2006) and his publication Bust Down the Door and Eat All the Chickens, Bizarro author Bradley Sands is now offering My Heart Said No, But the Camera Crew Said Yes! (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2010), a collection that is wholeheartedly rooted in Sands’s chosen aesthetic. Then again, perhaps Sands’s aesthetic chose him. In either case, cast aside predictability, because these stories are anything but commonplace...." Read the full review in decomP .

  14. 5 out of 5

    J. A.

    What I think is most important about this collection of humorous bizarro tales, is that Bradley Sands understands how to write genre fiction (bizarro, new absurdist, splatterpunk, et cetera) while not forgetting that genre literature is still literature – these stories are not simple plot hacked open with violence but instead adjective stuffed phrases that twist in milked description. ...[ read the rest of this review in BigOther: http://bigother.com/2010/06/08/a-brie...] What I think is most important about this collection of humorous bizarro tales, is that Bradley Sands understands how to write genre fiction (bizarro, new absurdist, splatterpunk, et cetera) while not forgetting that genre literature is still literature – these stories are not simple plot hacked open with violence but instead adjective stuffed phrases that twist in milked description. ...[ read the rest of this review in BigOther: http://bigother.com/2010/06/08/a-brie...]

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zack

    http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-83... http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-83...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bowsman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Oe Nj

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bob Freville

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Scott

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Ervin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jay Slayton-Joslin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Deathraceking

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Glen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mervyn Peake

  28. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aakash

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Cole

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