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THE REMARKABLE AND INSPIRING TRUE STORY OF ONE GUY WHO TRANSFORMED HIS UNCERTAINTY ABOUT THE FUTURE INTO ACTION   A year and a half after he graduated from college, Sean Aiken found himself struggling to answer the question “What should I do with my life?” His mother suggested teaching. His older sister told him to apply for an entry-level corporate position. His father said THE REMARKABLE AND INSPIRING TRUE STORY OF ONE GUY WHO TRANSFORMED HIS UNCERTAINTY ABOUT THE FUTURE INTO ACTION   A year and a half after he graduated from college, Sean Aiken found himself struggling to answer the question “What should I do with my life?” His mother suggested teaching. His older sister told him to apply for an entry-level corporate position. His father said, “It doesn’t matter what you do, just make sure it’s something you’re passionate about.” Taking his father’s advice to heart, Sean created the One-Week Job Project and launched himself on an epic journey to find his passion. His goal: to work fifty-two jobs in fifty-two weeks. After the launch of his website, oneweekjob.com, the offers began pouring in. Sean’s first gig was—literally—jumping off a bridge, as a bungee operator in British Columbia. From there he traveled across Canada and the United States, reinventing himself as a firefighter, an aquarium host, a radio DJ, a martial arts instructor, an NHL mascot, and a snowshoe guide. During the course of his seven-day stints, from a Florida stock-trading floor to a cattle ranch in the wilds of Wyoming to a real estate office in Beverly Hills, Sean found time to make new friends and even fall in love. Whether choosing a spring fashion line, brewing beer, or milking a cow, Sean continued to ask himself and others about what success really means and how we find happiness—all while having the adventure of his life.   Inventive and empowering, witty and wise, The One-Week Job Project is a book that will give you the courage to follow your passion. Or, as Mark Twain said, “Explore. Dream. Discover.”  


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THE REMARKABLE AND INSPIRING TRUE STORY OF ONE GUY WHO TRANSFORMED HIS UNCERTAINTY ABOUT THE FUTURE INTO ACTION   A year and a half after he graduated from college, Sean Aiken found himself struggling to answer the question “What should I do with my life?” His mother suggested teaching. His older sister told him to apply for an entry-level corporate position. His father said THE REMARKABLE AND INSPIRING TRUE STORY OF ONE GUY WHO TRANSFORMED HIS UNCERTAINTY ABOUT THE FUTURE INTO ACTION   A year and a half after he graduated from college, Sean Aiken found himself struggling to answer the question “What should I do with my life?” His mother suggested teaching. His older sister told him to apply for an entry-level corporate position. His father said, “It doesn’t matter what you do, just make sure it’s something you’re passionate about.” Taking his father’s advice to heart, Sean created the One-Week Job Project and launched himself on an epic journey to find his passion. His goal: to work fifty-two jobs in fifty-two weeks. After the launch of his website, oneweekjob.com, the offers began pouring in. Sean’s first gig was—literally—jumping off a bridge, as a bungee operator in British Columbia. From there he traveled across Canada and the United States, reinventing himself as a firefighter, an aquarium host, a radio DJ, a martial arts instructor, an NHL mascot, and a snowshoe guide. During the course of his seven-day stints, from a Florida stock-trading floor to a cattle ranch in the wilds of Wyoming to a real estate office in Beverly Hills, Sean found time to make new friends and even fall in love. Whether choosing a spring fashion line, brewing beer, or milking a cow, Sean continued to ask himself and others about what success really means and how we find happiness—all while having the adventure of his life.   Inventive and empowering, witty and wise, The One-Week Job Project is a book that will give you the courage to follow your passion. Or, as Mark Twain said, “Explore. Dream. Discover.”  

30 review for The One-Week Job Project: One Man, One Year, 52 Jobs

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I did finish this book but it was struggle! I found this book more to be about the author's life rather than the actual jobs he worked. I would have loved to have read more about the jobs themselves and the type of people that worked them. Instead it was mainly about the author finding love at the start of his years of jobs and the will they/won't they manage to continue a long distance relationship. I did however love the little facts relating to each job at the start of each chapter, they were I did finish this book but it was struggle! I found this book more to be about the author's life rather than the actual jobs he worked. I would have loved to have read more about the jobs themselves and the type of people that worked them. Instead it was mainly about the author finding love at the start of his years of jobs and the will they/won't they manage to continue a long distance relationship. I did however love the little facts relating to each job at the start of each chapter, they were the saving grace for me with this book and perhaps the only reason I actually finished it. If you like this sort of book premise then try Danny Wallace 'Yes man'....it's much better and very very funny.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Chm

    Boring memoir of a spoiled 25 year old living in his parents' basement who doesn't know who he wants to be when he grows up. The author was unlikable, in my opinion, and the story was more about him finding a girlfriend and having a good time with his friend, Ian, than it was about the actual jobs he took. I was really hoping for insight into the jobs he worked at, but the more interesting jobs were only described in a brief blurb while his experiences with people who gave him a place to stay an Boring memoir of a spoiled 25 year old living in his parents' basement who doesn't know who he wants to be when he grows up. The author was unlikable, in my opinion, and the story was more about him finding a girlfriend and having a good time with his friend, Ian, than it was about the actual jobs he took. I was really hoping for insight into the jobs he worked at, but the more interesting jobs were only described in a brief blurb while his experiences with people who gave him a place to stay and his hitchhiking adventures made up most of the writing. No, I would not recommend this book. I'm very thankful that I did not pay any money for this book and received it as a trade.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terrie

    Normally I love books like this, but this one didn't do it for me. I had a problem with his basic thesis - I don't know what I want to do after college so I'm going to do a bunch of different things. Who cares? It's not like the first job you get out of college defines your career. Most people I know didn't even have majors that are remotely related to their current career. It was also irritating how he did not describe many of the jobs fully - just a paragraph or so - while instead spent numerou Normally I love books like this, but this one didn't do it for me. I had a problem with his basic thesis - I don't know what I want to do after college so I'm going to do a bunch of different things. Who cares? It's not like the first job you get out of college defines your career. Most people I know didn't even have majors that are remotely related to their current career. It was also irritating how he did not describe many of the jobs fully - just a paragraph or so - while instead spent numerous pages upon his new girlfriend. In the end, it was neither interesting nor informative.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Drew Rudman

    I enjoyed following along Sean's journey quite a bit, because I resonated deeply with many of the messages he (and those he worked for) tried to convey. It seems to be clear following your passion is the key to unlocking a fulfilling career, but how do you go about finding your passion? Or what if you seem to have a lot of passions? As Sean discovers throughout the course of the book, once you find your passion there's more at play to discovering happiness and satisfaction. Despite the book bein I enjoyed following along Sean's journey quite a bit, because I resonated deeply with many of the messages he (and those he worked for) tried to convey. It seems to be clear following your passion is the key to unlocking a fulfilling career, but how do you go about finding your passion? Or what if you seem to have a lot of passions? As Sean discovers throughout the course of the book, once you find your passion there's more at play to discovering happiness and satisfaction. Despite the book being more or less a diary of his year-long adventure, I found it to be extremely relatable. To my own search in life, the types of experiences I'm drawn to, and the adventures I have already had and lessons I have taken with me. For example, at the very end of the book in his last job, Sean notes the audience couldn't know possible how much the moment meant to him. The all-to-real, half arrogant half lonely feeling I felt firsthand arriving to the Capitol Lawn in D.C. in August of 2016. "They couldn't possibly understand the feeling that I had. What this meant to me." I loved the way Sean shared the stories of others to emphasize how he was growing. He focussed on highlighting how those he interacted with were working to find their own happiness and purpose, in all kinds of different situations and scenarios. At times, it was an extremely entertaining read. Especially the scene he described in Toronto with Wyclef Jean turning to him to ask, "Yo, what-chu think about Al Gore's Inconvenient Truth? Man, Al Gore's a hustler." (page 124). Or his introduction to the movie produced in L.A. on page 213, "You're an animal! I love it, I just love it!" At other times though, I found myself to be a little bored reading through Sean's thoughts as he traveled throughout North America. He added in quite a bit of fluff that distracted from the overall theme and messages he set out to portray to the reader. Overall, I enjoyed the read and will take away a few of the major lessons learned. Above all, I really hope him and Danna made it... Other favorite passages and quotes: "Often, activities are merely a pretext for being together." (page 142) "...I wish I would have acted without the fear of what others thought." (page 223) "As the lights in the theater dim, I turn to Danna. I want to acknowledge the once-in-a-lifetime occasion with a witty remark. But I stop. Danna smiles knowingly. The curtain rises, and we proceed to watch the most violent movie ever created." (page 227) "Death scares me. Gone, finished, no more. Forever. For-ev-er. I wish I could always keep the thought close with me, but not too close. Close enough so that I'm continually reminded of the fragility of life and how I must make the most of it. That my time here is finite. With the knowledge comes a certain sense of urgency. Things are quickly put into perspective, I have more energy, am more willing to say yes. It becomes easier to be the person I want to be." (page 247). There it is, best line of the book. And lastly after being away for the bulk of a year, "I stood, appreciating the familiar scent of the house I grew up in. No longer my home. But always a part of me." (page 287)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carin

    I heard about The One-Week Job Project: One Man, One Year, 52 Jobs by Sean Aiken on NPR many months ago. I love books where people do something crazy for a year (My Jesus Year, The Urban Hermit, Not Buying It). I also am a mentor at my college through the career center for young and future alumni in my industry. (I encourage everyone to do this actually - it's been really rewarding, and involved surprisingly little effort. Really, the biggest effort is that I give them advice and occasionally do I heard about The One-Week Job Project: One Man, One Year, 52 Jobs by Sean Aiken on NPR many months ago. I love books where people do something crazy for a year (My Jesus Year, The Urban Hermit, Not Buying It). I also am a mentor at my college through the career center for young and future alumni in my industry. (I encourage everyone to do this actually - it's been really rewarding, and involved surprisingly little effort. Really, the biggest effort is that I give them advice and occasionally do a resume critique.) My little brother graduated from college last year and has only been marginally employed since then. So this book, about a 25-year-old who doesn't know what to do with his life so decides to try 52 different jobs in a year, appealed to me on a whole bunch of levels. It's a very readable memoir, and Sean is a relatable guy. He's not doing this because of any kind of failure or lack of effort - he was valedictorian in college after all. But young adults get a lot of well-intentioned but useless advice that just stresses them out. In particular, they're frequently told that they have to make career decisions RIGHT NOW and those decisions will affect The Rest Of Their Lives. I'm here to tell you, that's so not true. And Sean discovered that too. There was no big plan here. Basically, Sean came up with the idea, his friend Ian helped him build the website, and then he mostly just winged it. He didn't take every job offer that came his way, but he did always manage to have a new job every week. A few were jobs he was very interested in, like advertising and stock trading, and others were just really random like cowboy and cattail picker. This isn't a business or self-help book, and so he doesn't give a 2-3 page recap of every job. In fact, he rarely talks about the jobs at all. Because one of the things he eventually learns is that despite the fact that one does spend at least 40 hours a week in their job, one's job isn't necessarily one's life. He learns that life happens regardless of plans, both good (meeting a girl) and bad (an illness in the family.) And he learns that one difference is being a "grown-up" is that one keeps to their commitments. The final lesson he learns is one that's been around for a long, long time: the path is the goal. As much as people kept asking him what he thought he'd do after the 52 weeks were over, the more it seemed like this project was going to be that. Not continuing to do one-week jobs, but talking to students about their lives and careers. Emphasizing that while it's important to do something you're passionate about, you can change your mind later, and money isn't everything. Sean was fairly sure of some of these things going in, but they were just theories, whereas at the end, he was sure he'd proven what was important. At first I found it a little strange that he kept using American statistics when he was in Canada, but about half-way through the project, he started working a lot in the U.S. so then it made sense. A lot of this project came together through serendipity, but that's often true in the real world (that's how I got my first "real" job.) He travelled all over North America, even to Hawaii! He learned a lot of valuable lessons - how to motivate people (and how not to), the importance of communication, and what was important to him. This experience is going to stay with him for many,many years. I found his story inspiring, and reassuring. I think a lot of 21-to-25-year-olds would find Sean's story very valuable. In fact, I intend to send this copy to my brother, and mention it to a couple of my mentees. I appreciate that Mr. Aiken went to so much trouble to really find his life's calling, and I hope others will be inspired by his experiment, to not be pressured into doing what their parents think they should do, and instead refuse to settle. There is no easy answer that will tell a recent grad exactly what they should do in life, but I hope this book tells them that's okay. Speaking as a former bartender, research assistant, receptionist, mortgage typist, retailer, telemarketer, box office assistant manager, babysitter, and library assistant, I agree with Mr. Aiken that you can really do anything, and you can also change if that doesn't work out. It's frustrating when you're in the "I don't know what I want to do!" stage, but it won't last forever, and you will find something to do. Hopefully it'll also be rewarding and satisfying, but figuring out what you want to do is part of the goal itself. I wish Mr. Aiken much luck in his future endeavors.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    4.5/5 Stars It's not often that I read non-fiction, but I'm glad I did with this one. The first few pages resonated with me, and got me hooked right away. Sean spoke about being a 25 year old, living in his parents' basement, and I immediately thought back to my own life less than a year ago. The book made me re-think some of the important decisions I've made. Am I doing what I love? Should I be doing something else? I thought about myself, and my life. I think Sean made a good point when he spok 4.5/5 Stars It's not often that I read non-fiction, but I'm glad I did with this one. The first few pages resonated with me, and got me hooked right away. Sean spoke about being a 25 year old, living in his parents' basement, and I immediately thought back to my own life less than a year ago. The book made me re-think some of the important decisions I've made. Am I doing what I love? Should I be doing something else? I thought about myself, and my life. I think Sean made a good point when he spoke about not being required to do something forever. We can grow and change, and take on different roles as we feel we need to. What became quite clear to me, is that we should never measure someone's success on their material wealth, rather, their personal wealth, story, and experiences are what define us. Sean is relatable, and the message does not come off as preachy at all. I also thought a lot about what he said about growing old, and talking about regrets, and how we don't have to be that person. We can change that today, take risks and do what we want now, so that those stories we will tell won't be regrets. In the last year, I think I've moved closer to seeking out experiences, moving to a new place, trying different thing. This book has reminded me that we should never settle for anything, we can choose to change our path at any point, and that we may make mistakes along the way, but we are human, and can start fresh at any moment in time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thalia

    How cool is it to gain a sampling of one's 52 jobs over a 52-week period? How bizarre when someone's outlandish idea catches on and makes a living for him? How interesting is it to learn what motivates various people? I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. I say "pssht" to the reviewer who criticized the lack of job descriptions. The point of anybody's time at a job is experience gained and relationships made, not your tasklist. No one cares what you know how to do on a resume. They care about how y How cool is it to gain a sampling of one's 52 jobs over a 52-week period? How bizarre when someone's outlandish idea catches on and makes a living for him? How interesting is it to learn what motivates various people? I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. I say "pssht" to the reviewer who criticized the lack of job descriptions. The point of anybody's time at a job is experience gained and relationships made, not your tasklist. No one cares what you know how to do on a resume. They care about how you contributed to a quantifiable goal and they need to know that you have the know-how to be able to do it again as is applicable to the hiring company. Reading this allowed me as close to the full experience as possible. I had moments of wishing I could high-five the triumphs or empathize the pitfalls. Alas, it is a book. But hey, it is a book that you can read, and I imagine it is still relevant if you are to read it again in ten years in pursuit of your work passion, or even just as entertainment. It's all good!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Spoiler Alert! Sean was graduated at the top of his class in college and spoke at graduation. He is a very likable and smart guy. He still wasn't sure what he wanted to do so he got the idea to try 52 jobs, each lasting one week. The crazy thing is that he didn't have a budget and got sponsors and people donated stuff to him too. The other crazy thing is that a lot of companies really wanted him to work for them and sometimes even paid for his plane ticket to get there, etc. The thing that kept Spoiler Alert! Sean was graduated at the top of his class in college and spoke at graduation. He is a very likable and smart guy. He still wasn't sure what he wanted to do so he got the idea to try 52 jobs, each lasting one week. The crazy thing is that he didn't have a budget and got sponsors and people donated stuff to him too. The other crazy thing is that a lot of companies really wanted him to work for them and sometimes even paid for his plane ticket to get there, etc. The thing that kept me reading is that I was very curious as to what he learned from his journely. Here's the spoiler: He tried all different kinds of jobs and he found that the common theme that came with people liking their jobs was 1.They liked the people the worked with. 2.They felt like they were making a difference, contributing or needed in some way. I love the people I work with and I feel like I'm making a big difference. :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Enjoyed this book. There are so many gimmicky things around lately, but this was a gimmick I was interested in. It does bother me that he mentions his friends are the people of red paperclip fame, which makes me feel like they sit around plotting on how to make money and get their 15 min of fame, which makes me feel kind of duped But, whatever. Onward! Writing is decent for a book of this sort. Stories are interesting. I would have been okay with hearing less about his love life and more about so Enjoyed this book. There are so many gimmicky things around lately, but this was a gimmick I was interested in. It does bother me that he mentions his friends are the people of red paperclip fame, which makes me feel like they sit around plotting on how to make money and get their 15 min of fame, which makes me feel kind of duped But, whatever. Onward! Writing is decent for a book of this sort. Stories are interesting. I would have been okay with hearing less about his love life and more about some of the jobs. If you are reading this to hear a summary of 52 different jobs, don't. Some jobs he explains, others he doesn't. If you are reading this to see what he thinks is the best job, don't. He doesn't pick one. If you are reading this to see what he thinks is important in a job and factors that bring happiness, do.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

    A.J. Jacob's said it best, "I can't say wether Sean was a good aquarium host or tattoo artist, but I do think he is very good at one job: writing." In this book, Sean takes you on a journey. When you first pick it up, you may only be expecting a detailed list of each job, what he learned from the job, and whether or not he liked it, But there is SO much more. Sean takes you through a journey. One that involves love, pain, difficult truths, wisdom, and self discovery. Every page left me wanting mo A.J. Jacob's said it best, "I can't say wether Sean was a good aquarium host or tattoo artist, but I do think he is very good at one job: writing." In this book, Sean takes you on a journey. When you first pick it up, you may only be expecting a detailed list of each job, what he learned from the job, and whether or not he liked it, But there is SO much more. Sean takes you through a journey. One that involves love, pain, difficult truths, wisdom, and self discovery. Every page left me wanting more. Simply said, I loved this book. I purchased it from Amazon before I even finished it. I love that I got a peek inside of various jobs, a chance to discover what he was REALLY searching for, and a little down-to-earth real life grit. Sean can write. And, it's true.. I wish I too could go on such an awesome quest.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I enjoyed this book, albeit it was difficult to pin down what this book was about. It is best to start with what this book is not. It is not a how to guide on determining one's penultimate career, nor is not an in depth look into 52 jobs. Rather, the book chronicles one individual's journey in answering the question "what do I want to do with my life?" This is intertwined with his personal and familial relationships, handling his 15 minutes of fame, and travel stories. Overall, the book was an e I enjoyed this book, albeit it was difficult to pin down what this book was about. It is best to start with what this book is not. It is not a how to guide on determining one's penultimate career, nor is not an in depth look into 52 jobs. Rather, the book chronicles one individual's journey in answering the question "what do I want to do with my life?" This is intertwined with his personal and familial relationships, handling his 15 minutes of fame, and travel stories. Overall, the book was an entertaining, easy read that does a great job getting the read to ask themselves the same question: what do you want to do with your life? No book will solve this riddle, but getting people to recognize that there is not one definitive answer is a success in itself.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    SPOILER ALERT: Cool idea for a project (and now a book) but I was so disappointed that after trying out 52 different jobs he didn't choose one of these jobs to be his career! Lame. It appears (from reading the epilogue; but it wasn't fully clear) his career is promoting 'one week job' mini versions for teens and does talks at high schools. - I didn't love all the '15 min of fame' discussed in the book (eg I was on Rachel Ray's show! Good Morning America called!). - I did love how positive Sean is! SPOILER ALERT: Cool idea for a project (and now a book) but I was so disappointed that after trying out 52 different jobs he didn't choose one of these jobs to be his career! Lame. It appears (from reading the epilogue; but it wasn't fully clear) his career is promoting 'one week job' mini versions for teens and does talks at high schools. - I didn't love all the '15 min of fame' discussed in the book (eg I was on Rachel Ray's show! Good Morning America called!). - I did love how positive Sean is! He sounds like such a happy, upbeat guy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    What is a young man who graduates college at the top of his class but has no idea what he wants to do for his “career” upon graduating do? Try out a different job each week for a year to explore the possibilities, of course! “I admit, my idea was a little wacky, especially when compared with the traditional route: Go to school, get a job, buy stuff, start a family, buy more stuff, retire, die. But far more wacky is the number of people who get out of bed in the morning and absolutely dread going What is a young man who graduates college at the top of his class but has no idea what he wants to do for his “career” upon graduating do? Try out a different job each week for a year to explore the possibilities, of course! “I admit, my idea was a little wacky, especially when compared with the traditional route: Go to school, get a job, buy stuff, start a family, buy more stuff, retire, die. But far more wacky is the number of people who get out of bed in the morning and absolutely dread going to work because they hate their jobs. I was trying to avoid that fate. I wanted to find something I’d love. Something that I’d gladly spend forty hours of my life during each week and that would allow me to pay the bills. Whether this was possible or simply the unrealistic hope of an inexperienced, idealistic twenty something, I wasn’t sure. But I worried this same hope could easily become regret if I didn’t find out for myself.” The book follows his journey over the next year doing exactly what he set out to do. He developed a website and arranged a different job for each week, sometimes not knowing until a day or two before what he would be doing the following week or where. Some of the jobs seem far-fetched in that you would need specific and detailed skills and/or education to do them (firefighter, tattoo artist, stock trader). As the year progressed, some unexpected things happened: he fell in love, his mother became ill, the project took on a life of its own and at times became unmanageable. I enjoyed reading the summation at the end of the book: the oddest jobs he was offered, how far he traveled, etc. While the concept of the book was very interesting, the writing was not always as interesting as I had hoped. For some jobs, he describes them in detail but for others, he just skims the surface. But, this was a unique book and a positive one. I, of course, checked out his website after finishing the book to see if I could find out where he is now (not going to tell you and spoil it) and if he still has his dreads (also not going to tell you). Had hoped to find out if he was still with Danna and how his mother is doing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Valentin

    From Publishers Weekly After graduating from college with a business administration degree—and very uncertain about his career path—Aiken embarked on a yearlong journey throughout Canada and the U.S., trying out new jobs for one week at a time and donating all his wages to a charity. It's a bit contrived and by now familiar (A.J. Jacobs has written a shelf of such books), but Aiken is an appealing guinea pig. Readers expecting a meditation on work (or working at all during a recession, let alon From Publishers Weekly After graduating from college with a business administration degree—and very uncertain about his career path—Aiken embarked on a yearlong journey throughout Canada and the U.S., trying out new jobs for one week at a time and donating all his wages to a charity. It's a bit contrived and by now familiar (A.J. Jacobs has written a shelf of such books), but Aiken is an appealing guinea pig. Readers expecting a meditation on work (or working at all during a recession, let alone finding 52 jobs) should look elsewhere; this is a lark and Aiken tests a variety of unusual jobs (NHL mascot, snowshoe guide, tattooist/piercer, bungee jumping instructor, cattail picker) and more traditional career paths (research assistant, park ranger, and mayor). The takeaway isn't particularly profound (Traveling taught me a lot about myself. I experienced new cultures, met all sorts of people, and was forced outside my comfort zone on a daily basis), but it's a lighthearted read and a pleasant—if unmemorable—vicarious journey to take. (May) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Review "It started as a simple idea: work a different job every week for a year.  But as Sean put his plan into action, it quickly became a life-changing, cross-continental, action-packed adventure.  After reading The One-Week Job Project, you'll know how to bring the most extraordinary things out of life, and how to score some choice jobs along the way!"—Kyle MacDonald, author of One Red Paperclip "With 52 jobs, 52 experiences and 52 lessons learned, Sean Aiken has done all the dirty work for young individuals who are looking to embark on their own career journey.  The One-Week Job Project is eye-opening, entertaining and will help answer the question on any young individual’s mind: what do I do when I graduate?  Sean has done it all in less time than it takes to graduate from college and has pulled all of his knowledge into one book that can and will change your life for the better."—Dan Schawbel, author of Me 2.0: Build a Powerful Brand to Achieve Career Success "The One-Week Job Project_ _is a terrific read for young people wondering what to do with their lives, and for anyone looking to change his or her life for the better. Sean Aiken’s audacious, inspiring book packs a good dose of humor and reminds us that the only thing standing between you and your dreams is yourself!" —Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone and Who’s Got Your Back "At a time when the traditional path to success is fading from view, Sean Aiken has emerged as a role model for making the best of the inherently unstable life of today's workforce. Most people will likely work a number of different jobs in a variety of different fields over the course of their lifetimes, and most people will feel uneasy during transition. Aiken’s book shows 52 transitions, and they add up to a vital message that job hopping is productive and can help you find a better career, and build a better life."—Penelope Trunk, nationally syndicated career columnist and author of _Brazen Careerist: The New Rules for Success _ "Who says job hopping is a bad thing? Sean Aiken worked 52 jobs in one very busy year and documented the life-changing experience in his wonderful new book, The One-Week Job Project. Sean takes you on a rollicking journey across the U.S. and Canada to gigs as an astronomer, brewmaster, cowboy, and deejay (among many others).  He shares hilarious stories and valuable advice from mentors in pubs and tattoo parlors, on dairy farms and movie sets, and in kitchens and cubicles. I loved the opportunity to tag along on Sean's year of career enlightenment without having to sleep on 55 couches and trek more than 46,000 miles. I think you will too. The One-Week Job Project is a great read and a terrific resource for anyone looking for inspiration on the job."—Pamela Skillings, career coach and author of _Escape from Corporate America: A Practical Guide to Creating the Career of Your Dreams _ "The One-Week Job Project is a remarkably original idea that will inspire a new generation of young people to stay true to themselves, shed the noise around them, and set out to define their own roads in life. This book will help you to take a critical look at your own future, and all the possibilities that lie waiting."—Mike Marriner, co-founder, Roadtrip Nation and author of _Roadtrip Nation: A Guide to Discovering Your Path in Life _"The long-held idea of ‘trying on’ jobs before you ‘buy’ them now gets a fresh approach, as the author ‘tries on’ fifty-two jobs within the space of fifty-two weeks."—Richard N. Bolles, author of What Color Is Your Parachute  "I can't say whether Sean Aiken was a good aquarium host or tattoo artist, but I do think he's very good at one job: Writing."—A. J. Jacobs, author of _The Year of Living Biblically _"What is it like to work 52 jobs in as many weeks?  Sean Aiken took it upon himself to find out, and he shares his discoveries with us in The One Week Job Project.  A fantastic concept, and a fascinating book!"—Marshall Goldsmith, New York Times bestselling author of Mojo and What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jowenne

    Light read but provides some nice messages. Sean Aiken's joy to explore is infectious. Although some people commented that they felt this book was endless or pointless... I feel like they missed the point! I took this book as it is. And Sean tells it as it is. No hyped up storytelling about the 'normal' jobs that he got to experience. After every job, he puts some thought into his best takeaway from his experience. He weaves his personal life into the whole experience including stories about his Light read but provides some nice messages. Sean Aiken's joy to explore is infectious. Although some people commented that they felt this book was endless or pointless... I feel like they missed the point! I took this book as it is. And Sean tells it as it is. No hyped up storytelling about the 'normal' jobs that he got to experience. After every job, he puts some thought into his best takeaway from his experience. He weaves his personal life into the whole experience including stories about his girlfriend, mom, and best friend Ian, which grounded the story and put it into perspective.

  16. 4 out of 5

    JoAnna

    Three-line review: I met Aiken shortly after he completed this project and really wanted to love this book but it fell flat in so many ways. This story is very much about him and his relationships rather than about the 52 jobs he worked over the course of a year. It would have been much more interesting, insightful and readable if it had wider applications beyond Aiken's personal opinions and growth, which often didn't relate to the one-week job project at all. Three-line review: I met Aiken shortly after he completed this project and really wanted to love this book but it fell flat in so many ways. This story is very much about him and his relationships rather than about the 52 jobs he worked over the course of a year. It would have been much more interesting, insightful and readable if it had wider applications beyond Aiken's personal opinions and growth, which often didn't relate to the one-week job project at all.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    I enjoyed reading the journey. I take away that it’s not so much about the job, as there are many jobs I would enjoy. But finding something where I can apply the things I enjoy: Creativity, details, completing projects, and a balance between working on my own and with others. This book helped me to appreciate the job I have, but also brought the comfort that trying something would not be the end of the world, but the beginning of something potentially greater.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Kayden

    The concept of this is great but the book was a little disappointing. I wanted to hear less of Aiken's inner journey and back patting (a little bit is fine, but he beats it to death) and more about the actual jobs he did and how he managed doing so many different things. Great concept, but the delivery in book form left something to be desired. The concept of this is great but the book was a little disappointing. I wanted to hear less of Aiken's inner journey and back patting (a little bit is fine, but he beats it to death) and more about the actual jobs he did and how he managed doing so many different things. Great concept, but the delivery in book form left something to be desired.

  19. 5 out of 5

    T

    The premise behind this book -- a guy working a different job every day for a year -- was interesting, but there was too much focus on his relationship with his girlfriend and it detracted from the opportunity he had to share why some jobs were unusual or unexpectedly interesting. That said, it was still a light read that can easily be sped through.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Philippe Fleury

    I was not expecting anything and was surprised by the book. I liked that there is some kind of narrative intertwined in the project in the form of romance, friendship and sadly, disease. Many good thoughts from the author and his encounters.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela L

    A fun book but didn't make me feel the urge to keep reading. It took me a long time to finish this book. A fun book but didn't make me feel the urge to keep reading. It took me a long time to finish this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stanley Lee

    has a few good pages but I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend it. has a few good pages but I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    dameolga

    Watch me give out five star ratings! What's unprecedented about this particular five star book (for me) is that it's NON-FICTION. Yes, I know! Shocking. You might glean from reading other reviews that this book would be perfect for somebody, perhaps around college age, trying to answer that age-old-question "What do I want to be when I grow up?" Indeed, this book would be perfect for anybody with vague expectations of the future and a blurry concept of "the real world," wondering how to find th Watch me give out five star ratings! What's unprecedented about this particular five star book (for me) is that it's NON-FICTION. Yes, I know! Shocking. You might glean from reading other reviews that this book would be perfect for somebody, perhaps around college age, trying to answer that age-old-question "What do I want to be when I grow up?" Indeed, this book would be perfect for anybody with vague expectations of the future and a blurry concept of "the real world," wondering how to find that one passion that would make life fulfilling. Well, ding ding ding I just described myself. Like the typical college graduate, Sean Aiken had these same questions and uncertainties about his future. However, unlike the typical person, Aiken decided to try out 52 different jobs in 52 weeks. One job per week. I truly admire Aiken's initiative to start this project, his spontaneity, his faith in the general goodness of people, and his willingness to discover himself. However, what I find to be the most inspiring are Aiken's various employers and the words of wisdom they had to impart. These people have been through the career search phase of their lives, and most seem fulfilled with their work. Through this project, not only was Aiken able to experience first hand 52 different career paths, but he was also able to learn from the history of his employers and their various experiences. There are several messages here, but perhaps the most important one is that self-discovery doesn't suddenly come while sitting around, wondering who to be and what to do. The best way to discover your passion is to do something. To try different things and get as much experience as possible to determine for yourself who you want to be and what you want to do. After that, just go for your passion, and the happiness, the money, and the sense of fulfillment will most likely follow. There is nothing worse than slogging through the weekday doing something you hate. Like many of Aiken's employers, I think I, too, would rather find a job I find meaningful even if the pay sucks rather than a well paying one that I find to be a waste of time. Overall, this book came at the right time for me. I can totally understand where Sean's coming from. While his personality is way more outgoing than mine, his words feel real and genuine. Perhaps, this book is not for everybody, but I would definitely recommend it to all my friends in college right now who have no idea what they want to do with their major. My personal favorite quotes from the book: "His definition of success—‘doing what you want to do.'" "His" being Ian the trade show salesperson (week 29) "Money don't matter, unless ya don't got none." Chet the Cowboy (week 40). Exchange between Aiken and tattooist/piercer Jonny (week 20): "What's the weirdest thing you've pierced?" "Earlobes," he plainly stated. "Earlobes?" "Yeah," he said. "Once you've held a couple dozen penises in your hand, earlobes are just weird."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Connie N.

    What an interesting book. This young man graduated at valedictorian from his college but really had no idea of what he wanted to do with his life. His father's advice was to choose something that you are passionate about. Since he just couldn't make up his mind, despite his degree in business, he came up with the idea of trying many different jobs. As a matter of fact, he decided to try a job a week for the next year, searching for the career that would make him happy. He set up a website/blog a What an interesting book. This young man graduated at valedictorian from his college but really had no idea of what he wanted to do with his life. His father's advice was to choose something that you are passionate about. Since he just couldn't make up his mind, despite his degree in business, he came up with the idea of trying many different jobs. As a matter of fact, he decided to try a job a week for the next year, searching for the career that would make him happy. He set up a website/blog and sent out a bunch of emails to friends and family in order to set up the first few jobs. He got a few responses and decided to go with his soccer coach's suggestion--to be a bungee jump master. Then he was off and running. The media picked up the story and brought the website to the public's attention. Soon he was getting lots of choices of jobs. As a matter of fact, he ended up getting 204 offers (and only took 52, of course). The jobs he chose were usually something he was interested in trying, and somewhere he could get to. He got a sponsor who provided living expenses in return for a banner on the website. And many places offered travel expenses and places to stay while he was there. He tried jobs ranging from Hawaii to eastern Canada to Florida. He was a vet assistant, exterminator, preschool teacher, firefighter, air force recruit, cowboy, NHL mascot, tattoo artist, innkeeper, recruiter, pizza maker, and many other jobs. The book was fascinating and very readable. Aiken sounds like a very outgoing fellow who is confident in himself and interested in everyone around him. He was open to new ideas and spent a lot of time talking to his mentors about themselves and their choices, while learning about the jobs they do. Some insightful quotes include: (from the snowshoe guide) "Life's about chances. It's too short not to take those chances...I don't want to be sixty-five thinking, Ah, I wish I'd done that. It I do it and it doesn't work out, then fine, it didn't work, try something different." (from the florist) "In school, my teachers always claimed they were teaching me skills that would prepare me for the "real world." That they made a point of distinguishing it from whatever world I was in at the time made this so-called real world a bit intimidating to me." (from the brewmaster) "My advice is to get into the workforce, no matter what job you have to take or what you have to do. Because the day you start working is the day you start building usable real-world experience. If you can be positive about whatever job it is you're doing--even though it may not be your passion or what you want to do for your life--but if you can learn to be positive, then you're in a position where you're soaking up the experience." (from the park ranger) "I see life as if it were one continuous trail, he said. There's no use thinking about what you should have done or what would have happened if you had chosen another trail. The best you can do is cope with the conditions in front of you. And if you're lucky, you've come well enough prepared."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Georgia

    For someone like me who is changing careers, this was probably a really great book to pick up and read. Obviously this is a book that many young people either near the end of the high school career or college career should read. We are no longer bound by the idea that we get one job and continue doing that same career for the rest of our lives. The way of business and careers has changed and we aren't bound by the old rules anymore. But what holds most of us back is fear of change and fear of fa For someone like me who is changing careers, this was probably a really great book to pick up and read. Obviously this is a book that many young people either near the end of the high school career or college career should read. We are no longer bound by the idea that we get one job and continue doing that same career for the rest of our lives. The way of business and careers has changed and we aren't bound by the old rules anymore. But what holds most of us back is fear of change and fear of failure. While Sean Aiken is young and just starting out as an adult, the lessons he learns from the different employers and co-workers are ones that carry over to anyone of any age. Finding our paths and careers don't have to be a one stop shop type of experience. We can choose to try something then change our minds when it doesn't work out or we aren't happy. There are many people in the book who had been making a lot of money in high powered careers, but realized that they were unhappy. They found another path and ended up doing something they enjoyed and were ten times happier. The employers' advice was the same over and over; follow your heart, find what you love and do it and the rest will fall into place. Sean's journey is not just about his career and finding the job he will love, but also about growth. He writes about his work experiences, but also about his personal life, his life, his friends and his family. He doesn't shy away from the personal hardships or some realizations about himself. I found that he did, sugarcoat many things, though I believe that stems from not wanting to burn any bridges with his temporary employers. Also, Sean is a kind and polite young man and writing anything nasty about anyone doesn't seem to be part of his make-up. I did find personal frustration hearing about how some people spoke of just up and changing their lives and moving to start new lives and work. Most of them were either well off from their high powered previous jobs or had significant others who could probably support them, so personally, it felt like 'Well, that's great for you to just up and start over.' But that's nothing against Sean or the book. It is inspiring to read and definitely interesting to go through this experiment with Sean Aiken. It helps you to realize that we aren't bound by our careers and we don't have to be defined by those careers either.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Maybe for once, since I need to process this, I'll write a proper review. This book was really interesting. I guess I went into reading about Sean's project hoping against hope that there would be an answer for me in it with respect to hunting for my own job. His preface was a very articulate expression of what I'm feeling right now and I'm even the same age he was when he started. I didn't get out of it what I was hoping to in much the same way that Sean didn't get out of doing it what he expect Maybe for once, since I need to process this, I'll write a proper review. This book was really interesting. I guess I went into reading about Sean's project hoping against hope that there would be an answer for me in it with respect to hunting for my own job. His preface was a very articulate expression of what I'm feeling right now and I'm even the same age he was when he started. I didn't get out of it what I was hoping to in much the same way that Sean didn't get out of doing it what he expected. The part where he got to the point where the girl wrote an expose on him saying that his passion, whether he knew it or not, was the very project he was working on was immediately evident and my first indication that the book was not going to contain my answers since my adventurous spirit does not extend quite as far as his. I also had trouble with the lessons learned with respect to his girlfriend even though I understand their importance to his journey. What did I take away from this book? There are a million jobs out there. I need to be less concerned with getting one I'm passionate about right away; you can always leave the job you have to get the one you're passionate about once you find it, but not if you have no skills or experience anywhere. My attitude and actions have ripple effects (fake it 'til you make it comes into play here wrt positive attitude. Sean has this in abundance and I need to learn to emulate it). Meet people. Don't be scared of location changes if it will get you somewhere. Get involved - never pass up an opportunity to try something new. Let go of societal perception of 'success' even if it makes others disappointed in you; you're only beholden to yourself. Finally, don't be a mascot.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I don't even know why I checked this out at the library. I was sure that it was going to be dumb, cuz really...52 jobs in one year is preposterous! Why would I waste my time on a book that I was sure would be stupid? Perhaps I am stupid myself. But once in a while my stupidity works out! Yay! I loved this book. More precisely, I loved the author. He was just an awesome dude. Or maybe he is a jerk, but has an awesome way of writing. Either way, this book was actually inspiring. I give myself a hi I don't even know why I checked this out at the library. I was sure that it was going to be dumb, cuz really...52 jobs in one year is preposterous! Why would I waste my time on a book that I was sure would be stupid? Perhaps I am stupid myself. But once in a while my stupidity works out! Yay! I loved this book. More precisely, I loved the author. He was just an awesome dude. Or maybe he is a jerk, but has an awesome way of writing. Either way, this book was actually inspiring. I give myself a high-five for being brave a couple years ago and quiting a job that had good benefits but made me utterly miserable. Why do we stay at jobs that are blah or depressing? Because we need health insurance. Ok, maybe that is not everyone's reason, but it is definitely something I seriously consider when ever a job change or potential change comes up. What if we can't find a job with good insurance? What if we have to change doctors? What if there is some time between when the old insurance lapses and the new polocy takes effect? AHHHHH!!! So, I can see where the government healthcare thing would be handy. But even better...why isn't it like any other insurance? Why is it so closely tied to our jobs? I don't have to worry about auto or home-owners insurance when I change jobs! I can pick whichever company I want to use and all is well. If we could buy health insurance on the open market, we could all pursue our dreams. Instead, the majority of us stick to what is safe. To those of you who strike out on your own: You are really brave!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allison Renner

    This book was just as inspirational (for me) as The Mailroom. Sean was 25, a college graduate, and had spent a year traveling post-graduation. He still had no clue what he wanted to do for a career. He got an idea to try a job a week for a year, hoping one of them would stick. He set up a website for employers to find him and started working in Canada, though he eventually came into the US to work as well. Any wages the employers would typically pay for the position were donated to charity - he This book was just as inspirational (for me) as The Mailroom. Sean was 25, a college graduate, and had spent a year traveling post-graduation. He still had no clue what he wanted to do for a career. He got an idea to try a job a week for a year, hoping one of them would stick. He set up a website for employers to find him and started working in Canada, though he eventually came into the US to work as well. Any wages the employers would typically pay for the position were donated to charity - he raised over $20,000! Jobs included innkeeper, research assistant, tattooist, radio DJ, mayor, bartender, and more. Some jobs had just a write-up, outlining the salary, duties, and what Sean learned. Others had more in-depth stories, profiles of those he worked with, or lessons. He also treated it like a diary, addressing relationships family, friends, and girlfriends and how they were affected by the project. There are so many great quotes that had me nodding and taking notes. A lot of blurbs and reviews said this book is great for kids as they graduate, but I think it's great for any age. There's a lot of inspiration to be found here, including the idea that you don't have to have a career in life - you can have many, you can jump around and find what you life - just be happy and have passion.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    A good read for enforcing the idea of doing what you love. The places that Aiken visited that provided this kind of environment for their employees, by creating a culture where passion and creativity could thrive, fairly vibrated off the pages. I've never had an inkling to work for a beer-brewing company, yet after that chapter was completed, I believed it might be a brilliant choice. Then there were the jobs that were clearly just jobs and the owners had little sense of vision other than just g A good read for enforcing the idea of doing what you love. The places that Aiken visited that provided this kind of environment for their employees, by creating a culture where passion and creativity could thrive, fairly vibrated off the pages. I've never had an inkling to work for a beer-brewing company, yet after that chapter was completed, I believed it might be a brilliant choice. Then there were the jobs that were clearly just jobs and the owners had little sense of vision other than just getting the job done - and perhaps the bottom line. The story itself was interesting. Aiken has an engaging story to tell and because of that it doesn't matter so much that I don't think he's THAT great of a writer. He's not bad, but there were a few too many endings of chapters that felt a bit cliched. Kind of like: "It was time for a new beginning," or "Little did I know how it was all going to change." After making it about two-thirds of the way through the book, I skipped to the end to see where he ended up and his thoughts on the process, since his goal was to set out to find out what he wanted to do with his future. He did come up with an interesting direction; his time was well spent and I'm sure he'll remember it for the rest of his life. But the last sentence of the book was just like the examples I wrote above. And I knew it was time to return it to the library.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    This book is perfect for anyone that is looking for a job because it give and inside look on what different jobs are like. It is about one man looking for a job in North America and doing each job for one week. Which means fifty-two jobs in fifty-two weeks. I really enjoyed this book because of the way it was formated. It clearly shows what jobs he is doing and the highlights of what he learned in a bullet pointed way. Another reason why I liked it because in between each job description, he wri This book is perfect for anyone that is looking for a job because it give and inside look on what different jobs are like. It is about one man looking for a job in North America and doing each job for one week. Which means fifty-two jobs in fifty-two weeks. I really enjoyed this book because of the way it was formated. It clearly shows what jobs he is doing and the highlights of what he learned in a bullet pointed way. Another reason why I liked it because in between each job description, he writes about his own personal life. It's not just about the jobs, he writes about his own thoughts. It's like a diary. It has the perfect mixture of his job and his own life. I believe that this author will inspire millions of young people looking for a job and tell them to follow your passion and do whatever they want the most. I would recommend this book to anyone that is either looking for a job or anyone that likes reading! I believe that anyone will like this book because there haven't been a lot of books like this. I wouldn't not recommend this book to anyone.

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