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Prosperity, Peace, Respect: How Presidents Have Managed The People's Agenda

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This book reveals the vast changes that have occurred in American society and government in the Twentieth Century. Those changes propelled new ideas about the economy, about the nation's place in the world, and about our own internal struggles with racism. The book discusses the position and policies of each President, how they coped with economic downturns and crises, how This book reveals the vast changes that have occurred in American society and government in the Twentieth Century. Those changes propelled new ideas about the economy, about the nation's place in the world, and about our own internal struggles with racism. The book discusses the position and policies of each President, how they coped with economic downturns and crises, how they dealt with threats to the United States by other countries, and how they tried or did not try to ameliorate the conditions in which black people lived.


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This book reveals the vast changes that have occurred in American society and government in the Twentieth Century. Those changes propelled new ideas about the economy, about the nation's place in the world, and about our own internal struggles with racism. The book discusses the position and policies of each President, how they coped with economic downturns and crises, how This book reveals the vast changes that have occurred in American society and government in the Twentieth Century. Those changes propelled new ideas about the economy, about the nation's place in the world, and about our own internal struggles with racism. The book discusses the position and policies of each President, how they coped with economic downturns and crises, how they dealt with threats to the United States by other countries, and how they tried or did not try to ameliorate the conditions in which black people lived.

41 review for Prosperity, Peace, Respect: How Presidents Have Managed The People's Agenda

  1. 5 out of 5

    Book

    Prosperity, Peace and Respect: How Presidents Manage the People’s Agenda by Elizabeth Warren “Prosperity, Peace and Respect” is an uneven book that discusses 20th-century presidential politics around three issues: the economy, foreign policy, and social stresses. Former Harvard Law Professor, and senior Senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren provides the masses with an easy to follow reference on 20th-century politics. This broad 202-page book includes the political issues from every presid Prosperity, Peace and Respect: How Presidents Manage the People’s Agenda by Elizabeth Warren “Prosperity, Peace and Respect” is an uneven book that discusses 20th-century presidential politics around three issues: the economy, foreign policy, and social stresses. Former Harvard Law Professor, and senior Senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren provides the masses with an easy to follow reference on 20th-century politics. This broad 202-page book includes the political issues from every president beginning with Theodore Roosevelt and up to George W. Bush. Positives: 1. A well-written book. It’s brief and very easy to read. 2. Respectful and fair throughout. It’s a professional, professorial treatment. 3. Always an interesting topic, presidential history. 4. A very good format. Each chapter goes over each one of the three political issues for each president: the economy, foreign policy, and social stresses. 5. A good quick reference on where the 20th century presidents stood on the aforementioned three key issues. 6. Covers in general the main accomplishments of each presidential term. “Theodore Roosevelt’s work to balance the forces in the economy that appeared threatening to the public peace as well as the health and safety of the people were probably his greatest accomplishments as President.” 7. Curious tidbits provided. “William Taft had a serious physical problem: he was obese.” 8. Presidential philosophy provided. “He (Woodrow Wilson) understood that serving as President involved the exercise of power, but he thought of this as the power not to coerce but to persuade.” 9. Memorable quotes. “The lesson of 20th Century American history seems to suggest that no one theory is applicable to the economy all of the time.” 10. Overcoming challenges. “Franklin Roosevelt, taking office in 1933, sought legislation to advance the program of his illustrious fifth cousin whom FDR revered. Burdened by the Great Depression, with its 25% unemployment condition and the apparent resistance of the Supreme Court to rule against big business, Roosevelt fought for legislation to deal with the condition of the laboring man, the farmer’s need for a living income, fair labor standards and the right of workers to form unions to bargain collectively with business.” 11. Presidential goals. “One of Hoover’s aspirations was to virtually eliminate poverty in the United States. He worried about the 1920-22 depression which, fortunately, was short-lived.” 12. Warren provides her opinion but it’s done so in a measured manner. “By any measure, Herbert Hoover was a very good President of the United States. He coped as well as he could given the understandings of the American people and the economic system of his time. It was a great injustice that he was associated with the Depression for a generation after he served.” 13. Covers as you would expect noteworthy events in American history. “President Truman had the awesome responsibility to consider and decide whether to drop an atomic bomb on Japan in order to bring about the surrender of that country to the United States.” 14. Insight into the Kennedys never gets old. “Americans became excited about the trip to the moon when it was announced in 1969 that the first Apollo mission to land on the moon would occur during the summer.” 15. The incredible presidency of Lyndon Johnson. 16. Interesting look into Nixon. “In spite of the wrongs committed by Richard Nixon, hurting himself and others in the White House, he also served the country’s best interests in his five years as President, making progress in key foreign policy initiatives.” 17. The underappreciated presidency of Carter. “Jimmy Carter’s proudest achievement was the Camp David Accords between Egypt and Israel.” 18. What made Reagan a great president. “What Reagan did superbly well was to give Americans confidence in themselves and the nation.” 19. Clinton’s globalization and the Bushes. 20. Bibliography and notes included. 21. A great Kindle value at time of this review. Negatives: 1. Uneven book. It’s understandable that presidents that served for more than one term would get more ink but it’s still uneven. 2. Perhaps unreasonable to expect much depth in 200 pages. 3. A bit on the dry side. 4. Too basic. I know it’s intended for the masses but dare I say this book was “dumbed down” to a fault. 5. Lack of charts and diagrams to complement the narrative. 6. Some presidents got the short end of the stick in this book: Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Gerald Ford come to mind. 7. Hard to put my finger on it but quite frankly I was expecting more. I would have liked to have seen more passion and Warren’s personality come out more. In summary, it’s challenging to condense the presidential history of the 20th century in such a brief book. The book can serve as a good brief reference but it doesn’t flow smoothly and lacks depth. The book lacks Warren’s personality and charisma. An average book from a great Senator, read as a quick reference. Further recommendations: “A Fighting Chance” and “The Two-Income Trap” by the same author, “The Price of Inequality” and “Globalization and its Discontents” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, “Beyond Outrage” by Robert B. Reich, “The Divide” by Matt Taibbi, “Republic, Lost” by Lawrence Lessig, “Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality” by David Cay Johnston, “ECONned” by Yves Smith, “The Great Divergence” by Timothy Noah, and “Bailout” by Neil Barofsky.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    Fun brief stories about the Presidents and their effect on the country. I learned a lot. This would be really good for an elementary school class as an ongoing civics lesson.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ken newell

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vernon Moore

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike Quiggle

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christiaan

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jozy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Simons

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda Baker ward

  15. 4 out of 5

    LPenting

  16. 4 out of 5

    BunnyDumpling

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike Garrity

  20. 4 out of 5

    Delford

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jen Hurst

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karina

  24. 5 out of 5

    KT

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stefano

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    Michael Strode

  27. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marla

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Maurer

  31. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joa

  33. 4 out of 5

    Foxglove Zayuri

  34. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  35. 5 out of 5

    Gina

  36. 5 out of 5

    sheilabeta

  37. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  38. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kymberli

  40. 5 out of 5

    Shane

  41. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Singer

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