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Essential Fantastic Four, Vol. 8

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Our heroes battle alternate versions of themselves across the dimensions, fight alongside the Invaders and the Liberty Legion during World War II, and team up with multiple allies to aid in their adventures including Power Man, the Impossible Man, the Hulk, Thundra and Tigra! Collecting FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #160-179 & #181-183, FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #11, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE Our heroes battle alternate versions of themselves across the dimensions, fight alongside the Invaders and the Liberty Legion during World War II, and team up with multiple allies to aid in their adventures including Power Man, the Impossible Man, the Hulk, Thundra and Tigra! Collecting FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #160-179 & #181-183, FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #11, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #20 AND MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE ANNUAL #1.


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Our heroes battle alternate versions of themselves across the dimensions, fight alongside the Invaders and the Liberty Legion during World War II, and team up with multiple allies to aid in their adventures including Power Man, the Impossible Man, the Hulk, Thundra and Tigra! Collecting FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #160-179 & #181-183, FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #11, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE Our heroes battle alternate versions of themselves across the dimensions, fight alongside the Invaders and the Liberty Legion during World War II, and team up with multiple allies to aid in their adventures including Power Man, the Impossible Man, the Hulk, Thundra and Tigra! Collecting FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #160-179 & #181-183, FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #11, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #20 AND MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE ANNUAL #1.

30 review for Essential Fantastic Four, Vol. 8

  1. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    A pretty uninspiring phase post-Stan Lee, but we do get a temporary African American member of the team. There's even an issue where the Impossible Man comes to the Marvel Bullpen! It feels like Roy Thomas is on filler duty! I read the Fantastic Four and Marvel Team-Up books and annuals covered by this volume. 5 out of 12, makes this the weakest phase so far. A pretty uninspiring phase post-Stan Lee, but we do get a temporary African American member of the team. There's even an issue where the Impossible Man comes to the Marvel Bullpen! It feels like Roy Thomas is on filler duty! I read the Fantastic Four and Marvel Team-Up books and annuals covered by this volume. 5 out of 12, makes this the weakest phase so far.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    Roy Thomas is great. He slid into Marvel Comics in the mid-sixties and after an interesting stint on ‘The Uncanny X-Men’ brought new vitality to ‘The Mighty Avengers’, aided mightily by the gorgeous art of John Buscema. He was well read in pulp fiction, literary fiction and, most importantly, comics. Finally, in the mid-seventies, he got an extended run on Marvel’s top team, ‘The Fantastic Four’, and showed what he can do in a series of multi-part stories that are gathered together in this black Roy Thomas is great. He slid into Marvel Comics in the mid-sixties and after an interesting stint on ‘The Uncanny X-Men’ brought new vitality to ‘The Mighty Avengers’, aided mightily by the gorgeous art of John Buscema. He was well read in pulp fiction, literary fiction and, most importantly, comics. Finally, in the mid-seventies, he got an extended run on Marvel’s top team, ‘The Fantastic Four’, and showed what he can do in a series of multi-part stories that are gathered together in this black and white reprint edition. First, he did Arkon, an old Avengers villain, in a clever multi-dimensional story with a complex plot. Pretty good, though I’ve never been crazy about Arkon. Next, Roy demonstrated his love of Golden Age heroes by reviving an old one as the Crusader, a powerful and vengeful youth. The Golden Age, for those of you not familiar with comic geek terminology, was the forties, when super-heroes first exploded into popular culture. The Crusader story was illustrated by ‘guest artist’ George Perez who does fine pencils. The lovely work of John Buscema and the stylised art of Rich Buckler also feature in this volume. They’re all easy on the eye. Next, there is a two-part story in which the Thing teams up with the Hulk. George Perez is labelled ‘guest artist’ again and his work is inked in the first episode by Vince Colletta, an old pro frequently maligned but whose fine line style lends to some work, as here, a certain je ne sais quoi, though I don‘t know what it is. As a consequence of the encounter with the Hulk, Luke Cage, Power Man is hired by the FF for a while and helps them against the Wrecker, an old Thor villain, and I’m-not -going-to-say-who, a very old FF villain. At around this time in the seventies, Roy Thomas was re-introducing more Golden Age heroes to the Marvel line of comics, namely the Invaders and the Liberty Legion, in stories set during World War Two. The Invaders were big stars: Captain America and Bucky, the Sub-Mariner and the Human Torch of old, the Android version. The Liberty Legion are lesser lights. Inspired by his fondness for these oldies, and perhaps by the Mighty Marvel Marketing Division, Roy forged a cunning plot to have them guest-star in the company’s flagship team magazine. An accident involving Doc Doom’s time machine leads to a pair of King-Size Annuals involving a large array of super-types. The Invaders adventure was pretty good but the follow-up story teaming the Thing with the Liberty Legion was stretching the idea a bit thin. It’s said that a rival comic company frequently used to put gorillas on its covers because that seemed to improve sales. FF # 171 had a golden gorilla called Gorr. ‘Mightier than Kong’, says the caption on a Kirby/Romita cover that harks back to the Lee/Kirby monster books of the late fifties. There are a few Kirby covers scattered through this volume and if the old man was past his best, he was still pretty darn good. Indeed, his cover for the Impossible Man story, a romp set in the Marvel offices, inspired Roy Thomas to make changes to the interior art and write a generous article inside praising Kirby. Clearly, he was not too upset by the spoof/satire done of him in Mister Miracle # 6. Kirby also gets to redraw his old creations the Destroyer and Galactus on later covers. Galactus is too big a villain to be over-used but Thomas manages an original twist here and an original solution to the problem of having your Earth eaten. This hefty volume concludes with the aforementioned Impossible Man romp and the return of the simply Frightful Four, again with an original twist. Roy Thomas is clever. He introduced really long stories to comics with the Kree-Skrull epic in ‘The Mighty Avengers’ and the solutions to problems he comes up with on this long run of stories show that he plans ahead. The last couple of issues are scripted by Bill Mantlo, to give credit where it’s due. Great stuff and nice stuff, too, from the days before nastiness and gore came to comics. Read it! Its positive vibe may well keep you out of the Negative Zone. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  3. 5 out of 5

    tony dillard jr

    There's about 30 issues reprinted in this volume. The main theme seems to be alternate Earths. An alien warlord seeks to destroy 3 worlds and 3 versions of the FF, in order to become the ultimate power in all existence. Then the High Evolutionary seeks help on his counter-earth from the threat of Galactus. Though the planet killer has a vow not to eat our earth, he's got no qualms devouring that other world. Lastly we have a mystery villain. I don't want to give up too much. But it explains ques There's about 30 issues reprinted in this volume. The main theme seems to be alternate Earths. An alien warlord seeks to destroy 3 worlds and 3 versions of the FF, in order to become the ultimate power in all existence. Then the High Evolutionary seeks help on his counter-earth from the threat of Galactus. Though the planet killer has a vow not to eat our earth, he's got no qualms devouring that other world. Lastly we have a mystery villain. I don't want to give up too much. But it explains questions I've had since I was a child attempting to read and collect FF issues. Throw in the Frightful, uh- Three, a time travelling caper with the Invaders and the Liberty Legion, and help from the Impossible Man, Tigra and Thundra and it appears that the Baxter Building is getting more crowded than a Peter Davison TARDIS. The 70s are by far my favorite Fantastic Four time period. This series is chop full of wild tales by Roy Thomas with art by a host of greats. The biggest treat are the George Perez penned issues. And in true Marvel Bullpen fashion, there's a delightfully meta story involving many of your favorite Marvel talent! Oddly enough, there's absolutely no Doctor Doom in this collection! That's actually kinda refreshing!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Luna

    A pretty good continuation of what basically works for the Fantastic Four in the mid-1970s. What this basically means is a lot of space travel and adventuring, brought on by Reed Richards being really smart and having a strong reputation as a superhero, having a lot of powerful villains come onto him. Solid artwork by George Perez and John/Sal Buscema. Roy Thomas, who is probably the biggest comic book nerd amongst writers I've ever read, does a good albeit sometimes abstractly not helpful job of A pretty good continuation of what basically works for the Fantastic Four in the mid-1970s. What this basically means is a lot of space travel and adventuring, brought on by Reed Richards being really smart and having a strong reputation as a superhero, having a lot of powerful villains come onto him. Solid artwork by George Perez and John/Sal Buscema. Roy Thomas, who is probably the biggest comic book nerd amongst writers I've ever read, does a good albeit sometimes abstractly not helpful job of looking up obscure FF and Marvel heroes (Marvel Boy anyone?). The best example is a prolonged cameo by the unbeatable but wackily inclined Impossible Man. The best storyline was the High Evolutionary vs. Galactus, with side trips to a planet with sentient robots and a planet with evil Arthurian knights. A good example of the sometimes arbritrary imagination that is thrown admirably at these stories. I think this is probably the best example of the FF ethos, certainly well drawn with unique combinations of FF membership and baddies. 5/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devero

    In questo numero, tornando per lo più Roy Thomas ai testi, le storie del quartetto ripigliano in volo con diverse ottime sequenze e alcune solo buone, nessuna scarsa o solo sufficiente. George Perez fa la parte del leone, insieme a John Buscema. Ottime le sequenze che coinvolgono la sfida tra Galactus e l'Alto Evoluzionario, e l'attacco dei Terribili Quattro alla ricerca del loro quarto socio. La storia dell'avventura Newyorkese dell'Uomo Impossibile alle prese con tutto il bullpen Marvel e Stan In questo numero, tornando per lo più Roy Thomas ai testi, le storie del quartetto ripigliano in volo con diverse ottime sequenze e alcune solo buone, nessuna scarsa o solo sufficiente. George Perez fa la parte del leone, insieme a John Buscema. Ottime le sequenze che coinvolgono la sfida tra Galactus e l'Alto Evoluzionario, e l'attacco dei Terribili Quattro alla ricerca del loro quarto socio. La storia dell'avventura Newyorkese dell'Uomo Impossibile alle prese con tutto il bullpen Marvel e Stan Lee in persona è comicissima. "Stan? Che cos'è uno Stan?" si chiede Impy. Veramente divertente e ben scritta.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lars-håkan Persson

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jefferson Holbrook

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

  9. 4 out of 5

    ComicNerdSam

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hancock

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becca

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael E.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Mae

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Bacon

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Pardoe

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allen L. Anderson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  18. 4 out of 5

    S

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alberto Martín de Hijas

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steven Wilson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tero Kaukonen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wt

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ilmari Henttinen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Charles Etgen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rexhurne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Gallagher

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Desmarais

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sean Brennan

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