web site hit counter Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary and the Classical Tradition - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary and the Classical Tradition

Availability: Ready to download

The "Analects" is a compendium of the sayings of Confucius (551--479 b.c.e.), transcribed and passed down by his disciples. How it came to be transformed by Zhu Xi (1130--1200) into one of the most philosophically significant texts in the Confucian tradition is the subject of this book. Scholarly attention in China had long been devoted to the "Analects." By the time of Zhu The "Analects" is a compendium of the sayings of Confucius (551--479 b.c.e.), transcribed and passed down by his disciples. How it came to be transformed by Zhu Xi (1130--1200) into one of the most philosophically significant texts in the Confucian tradition is the subject of this book. Scholarly attention in China had long been devoted to the "Analects." By the time of Zhu Xi, a rich history of commentary had grown up around it. But Zhu, claiming that the "Analects" was one of the authoritative texts in the canon and should be read before all others, gave it a still more privileged status in the tradition. He spent decades preparing an extended interlinear commentary on it. Sustained by a newer, more elaborate language of metaphysics, Zhu's commentary on the "Analects" marked a significant shift in the philosophical orientation of Confucianism -- a shift that redefined the Confucian tradition for the next eight centuries, not only in China, but in Japan and Korea well. Gardner's translations and analysis of Zhu Xi's commentary on the "Analects" show one of China's great thinkers in an interesting and complex act of philosophical negotiation. Through an interlinear, line-by-line "dialogue" with Confucius, Zhu effected a reconciliation of the teachings of the Master, commentary by later exegetes, and contemporary philosophical concerns of Song-dynasty scholars. By comparing Zhu's reading of the "Analects" with the earlier standard reading by He Yan (190--249), Gardner illuminates what is dramatically new in Zhu Xi's interpretation of the "Analects." A pioneering study of Zhu Xi's reading of the "Analects, " this book demonstrates how commentary is both informed by a text and informs future readings, and highlights the importance of interlinear commentary as a genre in Chinese philosophy.


Compare

The "Analects" is a compendium of the sayings of Confucius (551--479 b.c.e.), transcribed and passed down by his disciples. How it came to be transformed by Zhu Xi (1130--1200) into one of the most philosophically significant texts in the Confucian tradition is the subject of this book. Scholarly attention in China had long been devoted to the "Analects." By the time of Zhu The "Analects" is a compendium of the sayings of Confucius (551--479 b.c.e.), transcribed and passed down by his disciples. How it came to be transformed by Zhu Xi (1130--1200) into one of the most philosophically significant texts in the Confucian tradition is the subject of this book. Scholarly attention in China had long been devoted to the "Analects." By the time of Zhu Xi, a rich history of commentary had grown up around it. But Zhu, claiming that the "Analects" was one of the authoritative texts in the canon and should be read before all others, gave it a still more privileged status in the tradition. He spent decades preparing an extended interlinear commentary on it. Sustained by a newer, more elaborate language of metaphysics, Zhu's commentary on the "Analects" marked a significant shift in the philosophical orientation of Confucianism -- a shift that redefined the Confucian tradition for the next eight centuries, not only in China, but in Japan and Korea well. Gardner's translations and analysis of Zhu Xi's commentary on the "Analects" show one of China's great thinkers in an interesting and complex act of philosophical negotiation. Through an interlinear, line-by-line "dialogue" with Confucius, Zhu effected a reconciliation of the teachings of the Master, commentary by later exegetes, and contemporary philosophical concerns of Song-dynasty scholars. By comparing Zhu's reading of the "Analects" with the earlier standard reading by He Yan (190--249), Gardner illuminates what is dramatically new in Zhu Xi's interpretation of the "Analects." A pioneering study of Zhu Xi's reading of the "Analects, " this book demonstrates how commentary is both informed by a text and informs future readings, and highlights the importance of interlinear commentary as a genre in Chinese philosophy.

32 review for Zhu Xi's Reading of the Analects: Canon, Commentary and the Classical Tradition

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

  2. 5 out of 5

    骆驼

  3. 4 out of 5

    J

  4. 5 out of 5

    Plokool

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick Kuzmick

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  8. 4 out of 5

    Corey

  9. 4 out of 5

    Huia

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charles. S

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Swartz

  13. 4 out of 5

    hoffnarr

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lue-Yee

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Zimmermann

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dave Sammath

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  20. 5 out of 5

    no

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charles Kennedy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meng Tsun

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nick Capo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kaerber

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daphne Vogel

  27. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  28. 5 out of 5

    Júlio

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Derrick Connell

  31. 4 out of 5

    Riccardo Sina

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joseph McGuire

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.