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Memories and Adventures

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This autobiography of Arthur Conan Doyle describes the varied aspects of his professional life as a doctor, sportsman, adventurer, political campaigner and author. It recounts the many true adventures that befell him and his relationship with such figures as Oscar Wilde, Kipling and Arthur Balfour.


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This autobiography of Arthur Conan Doyle describes the varied aspects of his professional life as a doctor, sportsman, adventurer, political campaigner and author. It recounts the many true adventures that befell him and his relationship with such figures as Oscar Wilde, Kipling and Arthur Balfour.

30 review for Memories and Adventures

  1. 4 out of 5

    José Nebreda

    Siempre es un placer leer a Conan Doyle. Sus "Memorias y aventuras" nos hacen retroceder a esa época victoriana y post-vistoriana en la que se escribieron algunas de las mejores obras literarias, o al menos algunos de los relatos y novelas que más disfruto. La pena, que no se hable demasiado de nuestro querido Sherlock. En cuanto al tema psíquico y espiritista (ese último capítulo y breves atisbos durante todo el libro), ¡joder!, casi consigue convencerle a uno. La edición de Valdemar, como siem Siempre es un placer leer a Conan Doyle. Sus "Memorias y aventuras" nos hacen retroceder a esa época victoriana y post-vistoriana en la que se escribieron algunas de las mejores obras literarias, o al menos algunos de los relatos y novelas que más disfruto. La pena, que no se hable demasiado de nuestro querido Sherlock. En cuanto al tema psíquico y espiritista (ese último capítulo y breves atisbos durante todo el libro), ¡joder!, casi consigue convencerle a uno. La edición de Valdemar, como siempre, fantástica.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Iza Brekilien

    Reviewed for Books and livres It's going to be a incoherent review, the circumstances make it difficult for me to write something well-thought out these days, I hope it will get better soon. Plus, as I was reading Doyle's memories, I was often changing my mind about him : I alternately wanted to slap him and hug him ! - As a sportsman, he made me think of Captain Hastings (with more brains and less taste for pretty women) : eager to practice any sport, to risk danger, to travel all over the world Reviewed for Books and livres It's going to be a incoherent review, the circumstances make it difficult for me to write something well-thought out these days, I hope it will get better soon. Plus, as I was reading Doyle's memories, I was often changing my mind about him : I alternately wanted to slap him and hug him ! - As a sportsman, he made me think of Captain Hastings (with more brains and less taste for pretty women) : eager to practice any sport, to risk danger, to travel all over the world and experience new (action) things : the kind of man who can't remain sitting for long, he loves adrenaline ! - As a military, Victorian man, I found him sometimes stuffy, with very strict, colonial oriented, conservative opinions and a dreadful view on women (those awful gossips who are only useful at decorating dinner tables!) and it made me angry at him. Several times. - I found his passion and his quest for truth in spiritism touching. I know it was all the fashion back then, but he hardly seems like a man subject to fashion. He had doubts, questions and he looked for answers. Many people must have thought him a fool, he carried on anyway. - For a conservative, stuffy man, he had a deep admiration for the non-conservative, non-stuffy Oscar Wilde. - My opinions and his differ on many subjects, but I admire him for one thing : if he felt something was wrong, unjust, needed to be changed, he went for it, he fought. He wrote, he met important men, he travelled to meet people (more important men - women were merely decorative in dinners, in those days), he thought out plans, he acted. Do you know he's at the origin of the invention of the plastic buoy ?! To save drowning sailors. And that he was very much in favour of the Channel tunnel (for commerce and tourism, not for war). At a time when lots of people whine about what's wrong in the world and nobody lifts a finger, it feels good to see someone actually do something for what he believes in. - As he was writing about hunting as a sport and having begun the book with whale hunting, I was about to growl when he started talking about animals and their pain, how cruel hunting can be and how he practised it less and less, and he flipped me like a pancake... - When he spoke about war and what must be done (and I got a little bored and saw him again as a stuffy old boy), he suddenly shifted to all the accidents he experienced in his life and talks about them with such nonchalance, such good humour that you can't help but smile at his good mood. Of course, I'm going to keep reading Conan Doyle's books. I'm re-reading Sherlock Holmes, I'll then jump to professor Challenger, to Brigadier Gérard and everything I can lay my hands on. I adored him as a teenager, I still have a fondness for him in spite of many things. I think what got me what his wonderful sense of humour. He's like a stuffy old uncle who jumps everywhere, talks about all his adventures around the world and makes jokes with a spark in his eyes - you don't really agree with everything he says, but you can't help loving him. I think I'll always be partial to him !

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Ray

    I was in the 8th grade at the time and picked an autobiography at semi-random for an oral report. Little did I realize that this would turn out to be so long, yet also so fascinating. I ended up giving a 15min report to my class that got cut off at the 50minute mark as the class ended. Safe to say I've been a huge ACD fan ever since. He led an amazing life of adventure, in a very British way. I was in the 8th grade at the time and picked an autobiography at semi-random for an oral report. Little did I realize that this would turn out to be so long, yet also so fascinating. I ended up giving a 15min report to my class that got cut off at the 50minute mark as the class ended. Safe to say I've been a huge ACD fan ever since. He led an amazing life of adventure, in a very British way.

  4. 4 out of 5

    BookTheReader

    The Memories of Conan Doyle are one of the best pieces of this genre that I have ever read. In the book, Doyle analyzes his life in detail - lineage (Irish descent), family (life with his first and second wives, death of his brother and only son in World War), literature career (Sherlock Holmes stories and historical novels), sports interests (golf, boxing, cricket, football, billyard) ,travels (North pole, Egypt, America, etc), influences on the masterpieces that he wrote (Voltaire Scott, Edgar The Memories of Conan Doyle are one of the best pieces of this genre that I have ever read. In the book, Doyle analyzes his life in detail - lineage (Irish descent), family (life with his first and second wives, death of his brother and only son in World War), literature career (Sherlock Holmes stories and historical novels), sports interests (golf, boxing, cricket, football, billyard) ,travels (North pole, Egypt, America, etc), influences on the masterpieces that he wrote (Voltaire Scott, Edgar Poe,Macolaulay, and others), indirect participation in the Great Boer War (he served as a doctor in the British hospital for injured soldiers in South Africa) and the First World War (it was Doyle who first created a volunteer army during the war),and one of the main aspects of his life - spiritualism, which he believed and tried to prove is a veritable science that is not quiet observed and explored by the scientists yet. The book is very informative from the historical point of view. In addition to that, it is full of humour and wit. Therefore, it deserves a place among the world's best autobiographies.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sabina

    These memoirs are written in ACD’s signature style: clear, fun, and easy to read. His life was as adventurous as his short stories and novels. Something was embellished, something glossed over, and something omitted, but on the whole it was a candid account. - For example, he is graphic and shockingly straightforward, writing about the severe corporal punishment he suffered as a boy at Stonyhurst, a Jesuit school he attended, and which made him cast off his Roman-Catholic faith. - However, he glos These memoirs are written in ACD’s signature style: clear, fun, and easy to read. His life was as adventurous as his short stories and novels. Something was embellished, something glossed over, and something omitted, but on the whole it was a candid account. - For example, he is graphic and shockingly straightforward, writing about the severe corporal punishment he suffered as a boy at Stonyhurst, a Jesuit school he attended, and which made him cast off his Roman-Catholic faith. - However, he glosses over the fact of his father’s alcoholism and how terribly it affected the Doyle family. Mary Doyle had to raise seven children single-handedly in poverty while caring after her incapable husband. But ACD writes of his father sympathetically and doesn’t go into detail regarding Charles Doyle’s affliction. - He creates myths which mislead his readers and biographers, like his abandoning medicine because ‘not one single patient had ever crossed the threshold of my room’ when in fact he was exhausted by treating patients during daytime and writing at night and eventually had to choose. - While giving quite a lot of details about his first marriage and children born in it, he is practically silent about his second wife whom he adored and his younger offspring whom he doted on. He is a story-teller, so his recounting is better be taken with a grain of salt. I found his youthful experiences especially relatable. One can see him as a real living person, interrupting his studies to work as a doctor’s apprentice, and later as a ship’s surgeon on an Arctic expedition which nearly cost him his life due to his own recklessness. His struggles while setting his first practice in a new town are familiar to many of us in the 21st century, when you’re perpetually broke and in a desperate need of a job which doesn’t come your way. The latter part of the memoirs covering the period after he received recognition and fame was disappointing. The real man disappears; instead there’s a larger-than-life public figure and name-dropping, as if he deliberately retreats behind that veneer to protect his privacy. Anyways, the book is definitely worth reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol Palmer

    Very good memoirs of one of the most famous authors. Interestingly, there is very little in this book that relates to his famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, or any of his other fictional novels. I enjoy reading Doyle -- he has a fluid, easy-going style that is very descriptive. And he certainly had an exciting and adventurous life!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nanci Svensson

    It's depressing to realize that the creator of one's favorite, rational and unsentimental fictional character (Sherlock, Sherlock!) believed in ghost, fairies and the Empire. This in addition (deduced from this autobiography) to apparently having been an utter bore. Sigh. It's depressing to realize that the creator of one's favorite, rational and unsentimental fictional character (Sherlock, Sherlock!) believed in ghost, fairies and the Empire. This in addition (deduced from this autobiography) to apparently having been an utter bore. Sigh.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Threadgill

    Too much about how wonderful the Brits are. "The good Tommy soldier". The "dirty" Hun (& Kaffa's & Fuzzy-wazzies). So arrogant and elitist. :-( Maybe a sign of the times? Didn't realise Doyle was so much into the occult & mediums. Too much about how wonderful the Brits are. "The good Tommy soldier". The "dirty" Hun (& Kaffa's & Fuzzy-wazzies). So arrogant and elitist. :-( Maybe a sign of the times? Didn't realise Doyle was so much into the occult & mediums.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    yes, Sherlock Holmes stories are fascinating, but the autobiography of the author himself is just as interesting! Could use better pictures tho... (and Sherlock related pics eat up something like 20 pages!)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Xio

    Sherlock Holmes is a must-have for every library

  11. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

  12. 4 out of 5

    Forked Radish

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elle

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emre Bulut

  15. 5 out of 5

    Max Bo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Gonzalez

  19. 5 out of 5

    peter

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean Robinson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dani Morell

  22. 5 out of 5

    T. Rick Jones

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Barber

  24. 5 out of 5

    Voon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marco

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rambler

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kt Lean

  30. 5 out of 5

    John Seriot

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