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An exciting grouping of classic science fiction short stories by various award-winning authors. Stories include: The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells, A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum, Victory by Lester Del Rey, The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber, The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz, The Defenders by Philip K. Dick, Missing Link by Frank Herbert, and All Cats are G An exciting grouping of classic science fiction short stories by various award-winning authors. Stories include: The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells, A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum, Victory by Lester Del Rey, The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber, The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz, The Defenders by Philip K. Dick, Missing Link by Frank Herbert, and All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton.


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An exciting grouping of classic science fiction short stories by various award-winning authors. Stories include: The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells, A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum, Victory by Lester Del Rey, The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber, The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz, The Defenders by Philip K. Dick, Missing Link by Frank Herbert, and All Cats are G An exciting grouping of classic science fiction short stories by various award-winning authors. Stories include: The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells, A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum, Victory by Lester Del Rey, The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber, The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz, The Defenders by Philip K. Dick, Missing Link by Frank Herbert, and All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton.

30 review for Great Classic Science Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    In this case, emphasis on "classic" more than on "great." That's not to say I can't see why they were each included, and they are mostly representative of that "classic" sf era of either rocket jockeys or post-apocalyptic-obvious-moralizing-about-war. But with the sole exception of H. G. Wells -- who re-impressed me as a strikingly unique talent -- these stories all feel too much a product of their time. Intriguing stories had simplistic fable-like morals or disturbingly colonial assumptions, go In this case, emphasis on "classic" more than on "great." That's not to say I can't see why they were each included, and they are mostly representative of that "classic" sf era of either rocket jockeys or post-apocalyptic-obvious-moralizing-about-war. But with the sole exception of H. G. Wells -- who re-impressed me as a strikingly unique talent -- these stories all feel too much a product of their time. Intriguing stories had simplistic fable-like morals or disturbingly colonial assumptions, good action set-pieces had women solely to be saved and explained to, and Andre Norton's potentially good setup with a loner spaceport woman and her cat didn't end up really having any story to go with it, more of a brief anecdote really. So this book is worth it mainly just for the Wells story, "The Door in the Wall." A man recalls his blissful dreamlike experience going beyond a mysterious door as a young child, and wistfully recounts its repeated re-appearances throughout his life when he has always been too absorbed in other, too immediate concerns to go through it again. It sounds simple, even silly, but is saved by its telling -- which is quite inventive and convincing -- and by the fact that how this story ends up took me startlingly unawares.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rasheed

    The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells 3/5 All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton 3/5 A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum 5/5 Victory by Lester Del Rey 5/5 The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber 4/5 The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz 5/5 The Defenders by Philip K. Dick 5/5 Missing Link by Frank Herbert 4/5 Narrators' performances 5/5 The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells 3/5 All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton 3/5 A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum 5/5 Victory by Lester Del Rey 5/5 The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber 4/5 The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz 5/5 The Defenders by Philip K. Dick 5/5 Missing Link by Frank Herbert 4/5 Narrators' performances 5/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I found that this collection of unabridged science fiction stories was very good, and great to listen to on long vacation drives. The stories in this collection are “The Door in the Wall” by H. G. Wells, “All Cats are Gray” by Andre Norton, “A Martian Odyssey” by Stanley G. Weinbaum, “Victory” by Lester Del Rey, “The Moon is Green” by Fritz Leiber, “The Winds of Time” by James H. Schmitz, “The Defenders” by Philip K. Dick, and “Missing Link” by Frank Herbert, I enjoyed all of the stories, especia I found that this collection of unabridged science fiction stories was very good, and great to listen to on long vacation drives. The stories in this collection are “The Door in the Wall” by H. G. Wells, “All Cats are Gray” by Andre Norton, “A Martian Odyssey” by Stanley G. Weinbaum, “Victory” by Lester Del Rey, “The Moon is Green” by Fritz Leiber, “The Winds of Time” by James H. Schmitz, “The Defenders” by Philip K. Dick, and “Missing Link” by Frank Herbert, I enjoyed all of the stories, especially the ones by H. G. Wells and Andre Norton. This was a great audiobook to have on hand, and the fact that the stories were unabridged, in my opinion, improved the quality of the stories.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Lozano

    Most of the stories are pretty dreadful. But “A Martian Odyssey” by Stanley Weinbaum was fantastic. It’s a real shame he didn’t live long enough to write more sci fi! Read his story and skip the rest. Oh, and “A Door in the Wall” reminded me a little of “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe”. Very imaginative tale from Wells, but it just scratches the surface. I feel like Wells was amazing with coming up with a great premise - the execution tends to be less stellar (but who cares?).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    *Listened to audiobook* Quite a few good stories!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Eight science fiction tales from the pulp era of science fiction, where stories popped from the pages of magazines such as Astounding Tales. Each of the tales provides a different view of of science fiction, some of the stories more satisfying than others, but ultimately enjoyable. The most enjoyable story, Stanley G. Weinbum's "Martian Odessey", involves aliens doing alien things for alien reasons, a concept not investigated by most contemporary writers. Each story in the audiobook is competentl Eight science fiction tales from the pulp era of science fiction, where stories popped from the pages of magazines such as Astounding Tales. Each of the tales provides a different view of of science fiction, some of the stories more satisfying than others, but ultimately enjoyable. The most enjoyable story, Stanley G. Weinbum's "Martian Odessey", involves aliens doing alien things for alien reasons, a concept not investigated by most contemporary writers. Each story in the audiobook is competently narrated by a different person.

  7. 5 out of 5

    pseudostudent

    I don't know that I'd call these short stories "great." Many of them were overly heavy-handed, or had themes or other bits and pieces that were treated better in other works. Only mediocre examples of the listed authors' works - even the H.G. Wells short story felt a bit like a watered-down Time Machine variant. I don't know that I'd call these short stories "great." Many of them were overly heavy-handed, or had themes or other bits and pieces that were treated better in other works. Only mediocre examples of the listed authors' works - even the H.G. Wells short story felt a bit like a watered-down Time Machine variant.

  8. 4 out of 5

    West Hartford Public Library

    Some great stories by the heavyweights of 20th century sci-fi. Highlights include H.G. Wells' The Door in the Wall, Frank Herbert's The Missing Link, and James Schmitz's The Winds of Time. Andre Norton's All Cats are Grey is the most obviously dated, yet still so much fun. Some great stories by the heavyweights of 20th century sci-fi. Highlights include H.G. Wells' The Door in the Wall, Frank Herbert's The Missing Link, and James Schmitz's The Winds of Time. Andre Norton's All Cats are Grey is the most obviously dated, yet still so much fun.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Latoya

    I liked it great works, read by talented performers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    "The Door in the Wall" and "A Martian Odyssey" are both absolutely brilliant, well-written and creative stories helped by genius narration. In Door, the narrator is earnest yet conspiratorial, makes you feel like he really is telling you the story. It's intimate. In Odyssey, the 1930s American accent and diction are spot-on and have the same effect of completely drawing you in to a great story. "The Moon is Green" also surprised me and was good. The rest were mostly so-so, some interesting ideas "The Door in the Wall" and "A Martian Odyssey" are both absolutely brilliant, well-written and creative stories helped by genius narration. In Door, the narrator is earnest yet conspiratorial, makes you feel like he really is telling you the story. It's intimate. In Odyssey, the 1930s American accent and diction are spot-on and have the same effect of completely drawing you in to a great story. "The Moon is Green" also surprised me and was good. The rest were mostly so-so, some interesting ideas but not blow-you-away stories. My notes as I went along: "The Door in the Wall" by H.G. Wells - Brilliant. Basically an earlier formulation of Every Heart a Doorway and very affecting. The narrator is perfect, combining with the structure to make it seem very intimate and almost conspiratorial. "All Cats Are Grey" by Andre Norton - Very short and didn't have the kind of plot impact I expected, the "twist" about the character's minor disability was very minor indeed. "A Martian Odyssey" by Stanley G. Weinbaum - OMG I LOVE IT. The tone, the aliens that are completely alien, the turn at the end that doesn't really explain anything but made me laugh in surprise and made it somehow feel complete and satisfying. The narrator was perfect too, a perfect 1930s American accent and tone. "Victory" by Lester del Rey - Interesting military space opera, but it's a novella, not a short story, and it should've just been a novel. It reads like a novel with huge chunks of narrative cut out of it. And in an audio collection of short stories it's just SO LONG. "The Moon is Green" by Fritz Leiber - I wasn't impressed at first, but it gradually won me over with lovely imagery and good pacing and an impactful twist. "The Winds of Time" by J.H. Schmitz - Vaguely sexist, but found it strangely like a twisted Doctor Who story and found it mesmerizing for that reason. "The Defenders" by Philip K. Dick - Cool idea, but predictable, and I didn't like how human-centric it was. I was envisioning a majestic robot culture and I got weird baseless "everything will be fine for humans" assurances. "The Missing Link" by Frank Herbert - Didn't get this one at all. What happened that's supposed to be noteworthy?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Ducote

    Great Narration. Awesome read for a long drive. Some of the stories didn't hold up, but there are some real gems in here. "A Martian Odyssey" was one of the best pieces of sci fi I have ever read. The protagonist's entertaining account of befriending and trying to understand an alien named Tweel is amazing and hilarious. At one point they stubble across a silicon based life form, and it's incredibly imaginative writing. The narrator smashes some of the light spores the creature emits, thinking th Great Narration. Awesome read for a long drive. Some of the stories didn't hold up, but there are some real gems in here. "A Martian Odyssey" was one of the best pieces of sci fi I have ever read. The protagonist's entertaining account of befriending and trying to understand an alien named Tweel is amazing and hilarious. At one point they stubble across a silicon based life form, and it's incredibly imaginative writing. The narrator smashes some of the light spores the creature emits, thinking that's how it reproduces. "I smashed a couple in the sand. Would you like to come back in about 10,000 years to see if I planted some pyramid monsters?" The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells 2/5 All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton 5/5 - Haunted ship in space. Cool. A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum 5/5 Victory by Lester Del Rey 3/5 Victory wasn't my favorite, but worth the read just to hear the name "Queeth, Prince of Sugfarth," and when the wife said "What does a soldier know of war?" The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber 4/5 - Not a fan of how ridiculous the woman was portrayed but I really enjoyed the writing and many elements of this one. "You've killed it. You've killed it in me. You've both killed everything that's beautiful, but you're worse! Because he only killed beauty once, but you've brought it to life so you can kill it again!" Poetic response to a douche bag that crushes your only dreams. You The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz 1/5 The Defenders by Philip K. Dick 3/5 - Cool idea. Missing Link by Frank Herbert 2/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    Average 4 stars. Overall, I enjoyed this collection. • The Door in the Wall, by H.G. Wells - 4 stars - A melancholy tale of success and regret • All Cats are Grey, by Andre Norton - 2.5 stars - The cat was the best part • A Martian Odyssey, by Stanley G. Weinbaum - 4.5 stars - Brilliant story, with great worldbuilding (I loved the steampunk pistol!) • Victory, by Lester del Rey - 5 stars - Beautifully written. A poignant story of human nature and the horrors of war • The Moon is Green, by Fritz Leibe Average 4 stars. Overall, I enjoyed this collection. • The Door in the Wall, by H.G. Wells - 4 stars - A melancholy tale of success and regret • All Cats are Grey, by Andre Norton - 2.5 stars - The cat was the best part • A Martian Odyssey, by Stanley G. Weinbaum - 4.5 stars - Brilliant story, with great worldbuilding (I loved the steampunk pistol!) • Victory, by Lester del Rey - 5 stars - Beautifully written. A poignant story of human nature and the horrors of war • The Moon is Green, by Fritz Leiber - 3 stars - A little weird, but still an interesting story • The Winds of Time, by James H. Schmitz - 5 stars - I found this one to be very interesting--a good mix of fun and intensity! Great classic sci-fi • The Defenders, by Philip K. Dick - 5 stars - A fascinating take on war and peace, in sharp contrast to that in "Victory" • The Missing Link, by Frank Herbert - 4 stars - A little dry at times, but still very interesting

  13. 5 out of 5

    Morten

    Martian Odyssee was playful, Moon is green was thought provoking (and relevant of it's time), Defenders confirmed (once again) that Philip K Dick strikes something between realism and far future with a story that focus more on the hypothetical consequences and following that through (whereas fx Winds of Time used a hypothetical setting to tell an ordinary story). I liked Missing Link as well.. the rest of the stories were mediocre at best. Victory could something but was not quite there. Perhaps Martian Odyssee was playful, Moon is green was thought provoking (and relevant of it's time), Defenders confirmed (once again) that Philip K Dick strikes something between realism and far future with a story that focus more on the hypothetical consequences and following that through (whereas fx Winds of Time used a hypothetical setting to tell an ordinary story). I liked Missing Link as well.. the rest of the stories were mediocre at best. Victory could something but was not quite there. Perhaps it just had an awkward length; long enough to introduced character building but not enough to see it through (and the point could have been told with fewer 'scenes' it seemed). Average rating based on both superior and inferior short stories.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles H Berlemann Jr

    Okay this is composed of eight different stories. In order 1. The Door in the Wall by H.G. Wells 2. All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton 3. A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weintraub 4. Victory by Lester Del Ray 5. The Moon Is Green by Fritz Leiber 6. The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitt 7. The Defenders by Philip K. Dick 8. Missing Link by Frank Herbert The only one that doesn't really fit is the story by H.G. Wells since, IMHO, its more fantasy story about a man wanting to return to some garden. Its probab Okay this is composed of eight different stories. In order 1. The Door in the Wall by H.G. Wells 2. All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton 3. A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weintraub 4. Victory by Lester Del Ray 5. The Moon Is Green by Fritz Leiber 6. The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitt 7. The Defenders by Philip K. Dick 8. Missing Link by Frank Herbert The only one that doesn't really fit is the story by H.G. Wells since, IMHO, its more fantasy story about a man wanting to return to some garden. Its probably here because it is H.G. Wells. An interesting over view of some of the Golden Sci-Fi pulps styles 6of the 1890s till the 1950s.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I don't often read sci-fi, so if I sound awe inspired or look twinkly eyed you know why. The H.G. Wells story was a great start and helped ease me into the heavier, more jargon filled stories that followed. Some of them started out slow but they were all worth the time. I especially liked "The Moon Is Green" by Fritz Leiber, "The Winds of Time" by James H. Schmitz, and "The Defenders" by Philip K. Dick. The Defenders had a great ending, even though it felt a bit predictable. After reading these, I don't often read sci-fi, so if I sound awe inspired or look twinkly eyed you know why. The H.G. Wells story was a great start and helped ease me into the heavier, more jargon filled stories that followed. Some of them started out slow but they were all worth the time. I especially liked "The Moon Is Green" by Fritz Leiber, "The Winds of Time" by James H. Schmitz, and "The Defenders" by Philip K. Dick. The Defenders had a great ending, even though it felt a bit predictable. After reading these, I'm wondering why I've waited so long to plunge head first into the sci-fi genre. It seems like a great collection for someone looking to sample what the sci-fi genre has to offer.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ean

    Following 5 hours of reading this sci-fi I fell asleep in my sunroom. I woke at 3 a.m. under the large windows to the idea that I was being watched. As I groggily rose up from my place of rest my eyes caught terror. The reflection of 3 light fixtures in a triangular formation in the night sky sent my heart such a fright that it made a singular attempt to jump straight out my chest ! As I froze in place affixed upon that sight, reason eventually stepped in to proved my folly.... Surely 3 stars is Following 5 hours of reading this sci-fi I fell asleep in my sunroom. I woke at 3 a.m. under the large windows to the idea that I was being watched. As I groggily rose up from my place of rest my eyes caught terror. The reflection of 3 light fixtures in a triangular formation in the night sky sent my heart such a fright that it made a singular attempt to jump straight out my chest ! As I froze in place affixed upon that sight, reason eventually stepped in to proved my folly.... Surely 3 stars is much too high for this read... but I have an active enough imagination to make it so!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Overall this was an interesting selection of sci-fi stories. I hadn’t read any of them before. There were a couple I really liked. The PKD, and Wells stories were ones I expected to like and enjoyed them. I surprised that I liked the Martian odyssey, but It won me over by the end. There are a couple of stories that were either too long, just boring, or not for me. Most however were worth the read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked it overall and it’s been a while since I read sci-fi, so it was a welcome variation. However, i was disappointed that so much of it followed a very similar plotline- stuff to do with atomic warfare that destroys earth and makes it uninhabitable forcing humans to live underground or go to space. Is this all sci-fi writers could imagine in the mid-20th century? Nevertheless, some details were interesting.

  19. 5 out of 5

    G.A.

    Some great classic SF, ending with Frank Herbert’s “Missing Link,” a typical, white man good story, that out and out disses, First Nations peoples. Ughh! Philip K Dick’s “The Defenders” offers an interesting take on ending war forever. Nice!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaine

    I have to agree with most of the reviewers that this is not a collection of great sci-fi. A couple stories are notable (“The Door in the Wall”, “Victory”, maybe “Missing Link”), but some of the others were painful. Classic authors, sure, but not their best work.

  21. 4 out of 5

    So-Cal Reader

    OK collection of short stories. Audiobook quality varies from story to story as each is read by a different person.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

    Some are okay, some really?/

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Great science fiction stories!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Professor

    Mostly fantastic short stories from the turn of the 20th century to the post war period. Well produced and worth a listen.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tuesdayschild

    Abandoned. Listened to 40% Some great narration, not all the stories were great. (My 2020 inability to preserve with various books helped to annex this BBC collection.)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ace McGee

    H. G. Wells holds up surprisingly well.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debby Dietrich

    Very dated science fiction stories from noted early authors in the genre.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Clean, interesting, and exciting - well worth reading. Not my usual genre (nmg) but an engrossing and enjoyable read. Well narrated by a different performer for each story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Blythe

    Just as the title says, this audio book included eight unabridged science fiction stories, all of which were rather fantastic. In "The Door in the Wall" by H. G. Wells, a gentleman relates the story of his friend, who wandered through a strange door in a wall as a child and discovered a magical garden and he spent the rest of his life desiring to go back. Not really scifi, but it was an enjoyable story. "All Cats Are Gray" by Andre Norton, is about a woman known for always having the inside scoo Just as the title says, this audio book included eight unabridged science fiction stories, all of which were rather fantastic. In "The Door in the Wall" by H. G. Wells, a gentleman relates the story of his friend, who wandered through a strange door in a wall as a child and discovered a magical garden and he spent the rest of his life desiring to go back. Not really scifi, but it was an enjoyable story. "All Cats Are Gray" by Andre Norton, is about a woman known for always having the inside scoop. She tells a spacer at a bar one evening that she knows where a spaceship, thought to be haunted or cursed, is going to be. The two go to investigate. This story was by far my favorite in the set. I loved the tone and the main character, who is very catlike in manner herself, is rather awesome. "Victory" by Lester del Rey presents a disturbing look at interplanetary war, showing just how ugly and how brutal war can be. It's very dark with not much light at the end of the tunnel. Even so, the way the story was told and the way the characters evolved in such a small space put this at the top of my list, too. "A Martian Odyssey" by Stanley G. Weinbaum is about a spacer's adventures in the martian landscape after his ship crashes. The aliens in this are very alien to the point of being incomprehensible, and I like that the language barriers are an integral part of the story. "The Moon Is Green" by Fritz Leiber is a strange and haunting tale about a post-apocalyptic world. A woman is trapped behind lead shutters with the rest of humanity, due to the radioactive fallout from nuclear war. I loved it, even though I hated the voice of the actress who read the story, who would go from talking very soft (forcing me to turn up the volume), to suddenly being very loud (and thus blowing out my ears). "The Winds of Time" by James H. Schmitz is an adventure about a spaceship that is knocked out of regular space into the time stream. Lots of stereotypes abound -- mad scientist, strange and plucky and clever hero, woman who is only there to have someone for the hero to save and explain things to -- so not a great story, but was fun enough to keep me entertained. In "The Defenders" by Philip K. Dick, the people of earth are stuck beneath the surface, hiding from the radiation as their robotic servants work above ground to continue the war. Still a good story about the harmful nature of war, despite the more obvious moralizing tone. "Missing Link" by Frank Herbert was my least favorite of the collection. It involves the discovery of an alien race and how the humans approach them and tried to pull them into their federation. It annoyed me in the way humans come off as superior and how everyone interacts and all that. Only shrug-worthy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I like the story the Martian in this but otherwise did not like them very much. Too soldier space war mentality.

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