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As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges. In this time of turmoil and discovery, an extraordinary new Star Wars saga begins.... While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new ord As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges. In this time of turmoil and discovery, an extraordinary new Star Wars saga begins.... While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new order of Jedi Knights, Han Solo and Chewbacca are taken prisoner on the planet Kessel and forced to work in the fathomless depths of a spice mine. But when Han and Chewie break away, they flee desperately to a secret Imperial research laboratory surrounded by a cluster of black holes--and go from one danger to a far greater one.... On Kessel, Luke picks up the trail of his two friends, only to come face-to-face with a weapon so awesome, it can wipe out an entire solar system. It is a death ship called the Sun Crusher, invented by a reclusive genius and piloted by none other than Han himself...


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As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges. In this time of turmoil and discovery, an extraordinary new Star Wars saga begins.... While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new ord As the war between the Republic and the scattered remnants of the Empire continues, two children--the Jedi twins--will come into their powers in a universe on the brink of vast changes and challenges. In this time of turmoil and discovery, an extraordinary new Star Wars saga begins.... While Luke Skywalker takes the first step toward setting up an academy to train a new order of Jedi Knights, Han Solo and Chewbacca are taken prisoner on the planet Kessel and forced to work in the fathomless depths of a spice mine. But when Han and Chewie break away, they flee desperately to a secret Imperial research laboratory surrounded by a cluster of black holes--and go from one danger to a far greater one.... On Kessel, Luke picks up the trail of his two friends, only to come face-to-face with a weapon so awesome, it can wipe out an entire solar system. It is a death ship called the Sun Crusher, invented by a reclusive genius and piloted by none other than Han himself...

30 review for Jedi Search

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This was the first Star Wars expanded universe book I ever read, and as mediocre as it is, it's primarily responsible for my obsession with Star Wars (and the EU) throughout my last two years of high school. Simply by existing, it was awesome back then. There was MORE STORY after the movies. More OFFICIAL STORY. Now, though, I have higher standards. It was fun to revisit this book that I liked when I was sixteen, again, mostly because it existed, but nostalgia was really the only reason I had an This was the first Star Wars expanded universe book I ever read, and as mediocre as it is, it's primarily responsible for my obsession with Star Wars (and the EU) throughout my last two years of high school. Simply by existing, it was awesome back then. There was MORE STORY after the movies. More OFFICIAL STORY. Now, though, I have higher standards. It was fun to revisit this book that I liked when I was sixteen, again, mostly because it existed, but nostalgia was really the only reason I had any fun reading it this second time around. Jedi Search is the first book by Kevin J. Anderson, professional fanfic writer, in his Jedi Academy trilogy, which picks up after Timothy Zahn's much much much much better Thrawn trilogy. Ostensibly, it's about Luke taking charge and forming a new Jedi Academy, recruiting and searching for new Jedi across the galaxy to come to his new school and reboot the Jedi order. Of course, the situation is also complicated by the presence of the obligatory frustrated Remnant of the Defeated Empire character, who is much better served in the Thrawn trilogy than here. Here we've got Admiral Daala, a prodigy who's been sequestered in a top secret black hole cluster for ten years doing research for the Empire, and she and her installation have no idea what's been going on in the outside world. Then there's a third plot with Han and Chewie and Kessel that seems designed solely to bring in a key character, but it ends up feeling shoehorned in and coincidental. (Cool that we finally get to visit Kessel, though.) Meanwhile all this is happening, Leia is busy having a mental breakdown about Han and her children, all the while stuff seems to be falling apart. My main frustration with KJA as a writer is that he's all ideas, no execution. He had all the bones of a fun Star Wars story here, but the way he writes it just ruins the whole thing. His dialogue is cheesy and not lifelike at all, his character work is disgraceful, and most of the time character actions occur because something needs to happen in the plot rather than because it's something that character would organically do. Many of the developments are insulting to me as a human person, as a Star Wars fan, and as a woman (most of these insults occur in the second two books). He also wastes SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES in his stories, and the way he develops his initially cool story falls flat, and yes, turns stupid. This book is the best of the series solely because all of that potential is still there, but by books two and three, it's piddled off, like a bad puppy on your favorite rug. But even by the end of this book, you can see the potential dying. Let's break it down by the four plot points I mentioned above: The supposed Jedi search: This book is supposed to feature Luke and Co. searching for Jedi, but there is basically none of that actually happening. Lando is wasted on the stupidest plot of all time, finding himself searching for a potential Jedi while attending Umgullian blob races. Yes, blob races. And the guy doesn't even turn out to be a Jedi. At least thirty pages full of a complete waste of time. Luke only finds three himself. And he doesn't even have to work very hard to do it. It's not satisfying on a story level at all. (Not to mention it's apparent while reading these scenes that KJA has no idea how to write Luke as a competent Jedi Master. His Luke can't even figure out how to sense life signs or take a quick walk across lava. It's horribly frustrating.) But bottom line: the book is called "Jedi Search," and approximately only 15% is spent doing that. But thanks for misleading me, I guess. Admiral Daala and the Empire: Admiral Daala could have been such a good character. A woman admiral in a notoriously sexist institution like the Empire . . . that could have been good. A leader who has been out of the loop for ten years and the universe has moved on without her . . . could have been good. A sudden influx of Imperial troops and power revives the efforts of the dying Empire . . . could have been good. But none of it was. Daala's characterization was almost exclusively focused on her obsession with Grand Moff Tarkin, who was her mentor, and as she notes almost every time she remembers him, "her lover" as well. Which is icky in the book, and icky on the part of the author. Also, for a supposed military genius, Daala is a moron. She is not good at her job. Lastly, the idea of Maw Installation being hidden in the black hole cluster is good if you don't think about it, but doesn't hold up even remotely if you do. The time dilation from being near one black hole, let alone a cluster of them, would make every event in this book impossible. Lazy science is lazy. Han/Chewie/Kessel: The Kessel stuff surprisingly delivers. We get Han and Chewie being captured by an old frenemy and forced to become slaves in the spice mines of Kessel, and upon escaping are forced into an even more terrifying situation in the black hole cluster. It's terrifying, and there be monsters down there. But it also seems like this entire story was developed solely so Han could meet Kyp Durron and bring him into the fold. It is HIGHLY coincidental that Han should meet one of the few Force-sensitive beings left in the universe just in time to bring him in to Luke's Jedi Academy. I suppose you could hand-wave that away by saying the Force works in mysterious ways, but Anderson doesn't even bother to do that! Lazy. (The bad guy at Kessel is gross, and not in a fun way, either. Like, raping women and eating his own children gross. Blurg.) Leia and the Jedi twins: As for Leia, she gets the worst from KJA. He doesn't get her. At all. KJA's Leia is a nagging worrywart, whose achievements as a statesman are completely undercut by her unreasonable anger at Han for not being there when their twins return from their two year exile. This is dumb for two reasons: 1) KJA's insistence that Jedi children be isolated for the first two years of their lives is BULLSHIT. He pulled it out of his bum for dramatic purposes. It makes zero sense in the Star Wars universe. And 2) Leia would NOT be mad at Han for not being there, and she wouldn't be making comments all the time about him being unreliable and off to sow his wild oats. Those shouldn't even be issues in their marriage. Leia trusts Han. Han is dependable. Her first assumption should have been that something was wrong and to go looking for him, but KJA needed her in Coruscant, not off on a rescue mission, so instead she acts like a moron. The stuff where she deals with all the diplomatic stuff was harmless, but not exactly thrilling. It's mostly set-up for the next two books. This first book was okay, but the second two devolve considerably, and aren't worth your time. Seriously, don't bother reading this series unless you are a EU completist. If you're reading it for nostalgia purposes, you'll just be disappointed. There are so many other books, so many other Star Wars books specifically, that you would do better to spend your time on. [First read, January 2001]

  2. 4 out of 5

    TheTick

    Painful, painful, painful. I was smack in the middle of a revival of my love of Star Wars thanks to Timothy Zahn's Thrawn Trilogy. I wanted more, had to have it, so I quickly snapped up these from my local bookseller. The smile on my face soon faded as I waded through the first book. None of the characters sounded like I imagined them...they said things they wouldn't say, did things that I KNEW they wouldn't do. The worst offenses were against characters that Zahn had created...KJA's interpretat Painful, painful, painful. I was smack in the middle of a revival of my love of Star Wars thanks to Timothy Zahn's Thrawn Trilogy. I wanted more, had to have it, so I quickly snapped up these from my local bookseller. The smile on my face soon faded as I waded through the first book. None of the characters sounded like I imagined them...they said things they wouldn't say, did things that I KNEW they wouldn't do. The worst offenses were against characters that Zahn had created...KJA's interpretation of Senator Bel Iblis was horrid, and Mara Jade with Lando? Lame. The added subplots were, well lame. Lame is probably the best word to describe every original though KJA tried to shoehorn in.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    The Good: An old-school entry in the Star Wars Expanded Universe, this novel brings the action and heroism you've come to expect from the franchise. Kevin J. Anderson's writing is fabulous, and the story really took me to a galaxy far, far away. Though the ending wasn't a cliffhanger, I can't wait to see where the trilogy goes from here. The Bad: Minor complaints: one or two profanities, too much advertising in the back, etc. All small potatoes when you consider how good this book was. Conclusion: The Good: An old-school entry in the Star Wars Expanded Universe, this novel brings the action and heroism you've come to expect from the franchise. Kevin J. Anderson's writing is fabulous, and the story really took me to a galaxy far, far away. Though the ending wasn't a cliffhanger, I can't wait to see where the trilogy goes from here. The Bad: Minor complaints: one or two profanities, too much advertising in the back, etc. All small potatoes when you consider how good this book was. Conclusion: I was officially introduced to the Expanded Universe when I bought I, Jedi by Michael A. Stackpole at a local garage sale. Not only did it inspire me to read more Star Wars novels, it rejuvenated my love for reading, which I had lost years ago to television, movies, and video games. Though I've read the entire Jedi Academy trilogy at least twice before, I felt it deserved at least one more go...and I'm glad I gave it one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Kevin J Anderson is given the chance to contribute to one of the biggest and most beloved science fiction universes ever created, and he comes up with blob races. A significant portion of the book is dedicated to blobs. Racing. More impressively, the entire blob subplot ends up amounting to nothing more than Lando Calrissian on vacation. The entire section could be removed without affecting the plot of the novel. This is probably the worst of several uninspired decisions made in this book. Despit Kevin J Anderson is given the chance to contribute to one of the biggest and most beloved science fiction universes ever created, and he comes up with blob races. A significant portion of the book is dedicated to blobs. Racing. More impressively, the entire blob subplot ends up amounting to nothing more than Lando Calrissian on vacation. The entire section could be removed without affecting the plot of the novel. This is probably the worst of several uninspired decisions made in this book. Despite this, several important characters are introduced in this novel, along with the Maw Installation, the most interesting plotline of the story. Hopefully this is only a poor introduction and the rest of the trilogy will be more entertaining.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Han and Chewie are out to Kessell to win its support for the New Republic after the events of Dark Empire I (Star Wars) (I haven't actually read that comic, but I've heard a lot about it). Unfortunately, Moruth Doole has no intentions of joining and sends Han and Chewie into the spice mines, where they meet the Force sensitive, Kyp Durron. Meanwhile, Leia holds things together on Coruscant, worrying for her husband, and Luke begins his Jedi Search, finding two candidates, Gantoris and Streen. I L Han and Chewie are out to Kessell to win its support for the New Republic after the events of Dark Empire I (Star Wars) (I haven't actually read that comic, but I've heard a lot about it). Unfortunately, Moruth Doole has no intentions of joining and sends Han and Chewie into the spice mines, where they meet the Force sensitive, Kyp Durron. Meanwhile, Leia holds things together on Coruscant, worrying for her husband, and Luke begins his Jedi Search, finding two candidates, Gantoris and Streen. I Liked: Kevin J. Anderson is often castigated for his Star Wars entries, but I honestly don't see why. No, his books aren't like Zahn's, but they are still "Star Wars". Unlike my experience with Star Wars: The Truce at Bakura v. 4, I felt Anderson really got the feel of Star Wars down. The settings feel right, the characters are pretty good, and the events as well. While the mission is kinda goofy, it is interesting to see Kessell and its place in the universe. Also, I enjoyed seeing Luke go out to find new Jedi candidates. It's really cool to see the rise of the new Jedi (especially with the knowledge of the prequels, something I didn't have when I read the book many years ago). And I can sorta stretch my imagination to believe that a Maw Installation would have been created for the super-secret construction that occurs. The main characters are done well enough that I don't question them. Han and Chewie play a large role, and they are done well. Luke is, likewise, well done. As for minor characters, Kyp Durron is really interesting. I can see how he is almost a Luke/Han clone. It's neat, particularly knowing where he ends up in the New Jedi Order. Admiral Daala is also interesting. I Didn't Like: I am not sure why Kessell is such a big deal. It almost seems like a place that the New Republic would want to break down, like a drug lab, instead of ally with. And the sleazy alien who runs it...and the "scarecrow" (not a big Batman fan, but all I could think of was Crane!). Uh huh, let's ally with seedy characters. Really gives the New Republic legitimacy, eh? The Maw Installation was interesting, but I still have no idea WHY they had to keep so quiet for so long. Weren't they wondering after a year or two why Tarkin hadn't called? Would it have been so hard to peek out and transmit a "Hey, what's up?" And the Maw Installation being so secretive that even Palpatine didn't know? Ha, got me laughing in stitches over that one. Leia doesn't do much of anything other than wangst at home about Han being gone. She vacillates between worry and being mad (that he is "off" gambling). Then, she is shy about asking Lando and Luke to look into it. Out. Of. Character. Leia from the trilogy or from the Thrawn Trilogy would have no problem with it. In fact, she'd probably be leading the expedition. Since her kids are dumped off with Winter on the "hidden planet" and she can conveniently leave her job when the plot requires it... Luke Skywalker is too powerful. There is a difference between a Jedi who can hold his own and a Jedi that can do everything. Look at Yoda. The guy walked around with a cane (or on a hoverchair). He wasn't perfect. He didn't smash everyone to bits. But if Luke were him, he would be using the Force to walk upside down or something crazy. And then, his complete ignorance of Gantoris' Dark Side. For someone as powerful as Luke, he should be like, "Uh, warning! Warning!" But no, that would get rid of the story before it had even begun. Qui Xux is the. Worst. Character. Ever. I despise her. I can't believe she exists. She is too stupid to live. Every single myth about scientists or doctors or people with intelligence is exploited in her. She is gorgeous, but also naive beyond belief. The Death Star was a mining tool? Uh, take a look at the name, girlfriend. That should be a clue. The World Devastators a roving mining colony? Girl, you need to get out more. I hadn't really liked her the first time I read, and time has definitely NOT made me more sympathetic to her. Lock her up and throw away the key. Stereotypes like "sleazy" Twi'Leks that are only involved in crime crop up. That really torques me. Lando's mission with the blob races is completely irrelevant and tossed in to make sure all the big guys from the movie appear. Yawn. As for the audiobook, large chunks of Daala's history disappear (such as her affair with Tarkin) and Leia's contribution disappear (I believe there were more parts with her on Coruscant besides whining about Han). Also, the reader pronounces words incorrectly. "Bes-pin" not "Bee-spin" and "Cor-u-sant" not "Cor-u-skant". It was grating after a while. Dialog/Sexual Situations/Violence: A few stray d*** and h***. Qui Xux is goregous. Of. Course. Han, Chewie, and Kyp fight their way out of the spice mines of Kessell. The people of Eol Sha have to be moved because their planet is destroying itself. Overall: I know I complained a lot, but the story actually isn't too bad. It's a nice Star Wars romp. I liked Han and Chewie in the spice mines (well, not being there, but their adventure there) and Luke's "Jedi Search" was pretty darn cool. No, it's not brilliant, but it was enjoyable. Read it if you are bored or have to complete the whole series.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't. The whole time I was reading Timothy Zahn's excellent Thrawn Trilogy, I kept finding myself being pleasantly surprised at how much I was enjoying the storyline and at how well Zahn conjured the spirit of those familiar characters while rendering new characters who flow seamlessly into the already well-established storyline from the films. Zahn's dialogue made me feel As is the case with any genre of writing, there are some authors who can really get it done for their readers and some who can't. The whole time I was reading Timothy Zahn's excellent Thrawn Trilogy, I kept finding myself being pleasantly surprised at how much I was enjoying the storyline and at how well Zahn conjured the spirit of those familiar characters while rendering new characters who flow seamlessly into the already well-established storyline from the films. Zahn's dialogue made me feel that Harrison Ford himself was delivering Han Solo's lines, and the intrigue with both the smugglers and the newly revamped Imperial Fleet, headed by Grand Admiral Thrawn, kept me turning pages long into the night. I was so into the Thrawn Trilogy, in fact, that when it ended I immediately decided to continue geeking out and dive into the next trilogy on the EU timeline. The next trilogy, unfortunately, is this piece of shit, written by Kevin J. Anderson. I would not call into question Anderson's love of the Star Wars universe or his ability to keep events in line with the EU timeline established by Zahn a few years prior to this trilogy's publication. However, being a fan does not make one a good writer, and despite the fact that Anderson has penned some twenty sci-fi novels (including other Star Wars titles), it became apparent in the first twenty pages the difference in writing ability of the Hugo Award winning Zahn and this guy. The dialogue is painful. In particular, C-3PO is so badly rendered that he comes off less as a petulant protocol droid and more like a bitchy queen at some New york party who just can't have a good time and must whine about something constantly. I could probably look past the clunky dialogue too, if it weren't for the fact that the story itself just sucks. I kept reading on, hoping to get to some good action a la Thrawn, but instead I eventually ended up with Lando, 3PO and R2 on a distant planet trying to locate a potential Jedi candidate who had shown a knack for betting big money the right blob race. Yeah, I just typed the words "blob race" in reference to a major plot point of a book I was reading on my own limited time. This was after Han and Chewie, and Luke, on separate planets, found themselves at the mercy of captors who were either so inept or so badly written (or both) that they made the most lame stormtrooper seem like MacArthur in strategic ability. I got about four pages into the blob race arena, smelled the stupidest pod raceing scene ever shaping up, and dove into an escape pod. I have acquaintances who have read all, or almost all, of the novels in the EU, and I'll admit that for a brief moment after finishing Thrawn that thought had occurred to me. However, as I already mentioned, Kevin J. Anderson had penned several of those other novels as well, and I'll not be reading any of his any time in the near future, and likely at all. Maybe if I get caught in a cell with a Rancor and a copy of his stand alone novel Darksaber, but that's the only case I can conjure up that would drive me to pick up any of Anderson's cringeworthy writing again. I hope the next Star Wars book I pick up will help cleanse the taste of this bantha dung from my mouth, but it will have to wait, because after opting out of this trilogy, I think I'm going to stop geeking out for the time being and just rest on the Star Wars-y enjoyment I got from reading the Thrawn Trilogy and not try to "Force" the feeling again for a while.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    It was on page 15 of this book that I realized that this simply would not be a book I enjoyed reading: "During the previous year of violent strife, Luke had been whisked away to the resurrected Emperor's stronghold in the galactic core, and there he had allowed himself to learn the dark side. He had become the Emperor's chief lieutenant, just like his father, Darth Vader." You see I really enjoyed the Star Wars movies of my childhood, and also really enjoyed Timothy Zahn's Trilogy of books that b It was on page 15 of this book that I realized that this simply would not be a book I enjoyed reading: "During the previous year of violent strife, Luke had been whisked away to the resurrected Emperor's stronghold in the galactic core, and there he had allowed himself to learn the dark side. He had become the Emperor's chief lieutenant, just like his father, Darth Vader." You see I really enjoyed the Star Wars movies of my childhood, and also really enjoyed Timothy Zahn's Trilogy of books that began with Heir to the Empire. I wanted an expansion of that Universe, and I thought Zahn delivered because he crafted a trilogy of books that was true to the movies and true to the characters. What I did not want was a series of books that took the characters in a direction I did not wish to see them go, and Luke joining a resurrected Emperor was just to hokey for me. I kept reading for awhile, but eventually had to put this book down, and made the realization that The Jedi Academy Trilogy would simply not be more me. When it comes to further reading in the Star Wars expanded Universe, I believe I'll read the rest of Zahn's output and call it a day.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    FIRST THOUGHTS: 3.5 stars. While JEDI SEARCH and I had a rocky start (due mostly to the abrupt character POV switches and me personally not being used to reading sci-fi), it mellowed out into an excellent story in the end. I loved being reunited with some of my favorite people in the Star Wars universe, and getting to witness their adventures after everything that's happened in the films. I think, of all the stories, I was most interested in Han's individual arc, but it all works together to bri FIRST THOUGHTS: 3.5 stars. While JEDI SEARCH and I had a rocky start (due mostly to the abrupt character POV switches and me personally not being used to reading sci-fi), it mellowed out into an excellent story in the end. I loved being reunited with some of my favorite people in the Star Wars universe, and getting to witness their adventures after everything that's happened in the films. I think, of all the stories, I was most interested in Han's individual arc, but it all works together to bring it to a solid ending. Pretty good series starter, and I'm looking forward to reading the rest!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    I really liked this book and am looking forward to reading the next one in the series! I thought the writing was good and the storyline is really interesting. I would definitely recommend this book to any Star Wars Fan. The only thing I noticed that was funny was the author focuses a LOT on Admiral Daala's hair. Every scene with her, something is mentioned about her hair. I just found that a little odd but funny. Anyone else notice that? Overall, this is a good book! I really liked this book and am looking forward to reading the next one in the series! I thought the writing was good and the storyline is really interesting. I would definitely recommend this book to any Star Wars Fan. The only thing I noticed that was funny was the author focuses a LOT on Admiral Daala's hair. Every scene with her, something is mentioned about her hair. I just found that a little odd but funny. Anyone else notice that? Overall, this is a good book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jared Mayes

    It's hard for me to evaluate the Jedi Academy Trilogy objectively; my lens is tinted with nostalgia. Seminal to the post-ROTJ Legends timeline, Jedi Search kicks off a vastly important trilogy in terms of Legends worldbuilding. While not remotely comparable to the masterpiece that is the Thrawn Trilogy, Kevin J. Anderson develops a number of entertaining characters such as Kyp Durron and Admiral Daala. Plus he establishes Luke's Jedi Academy on Yavin IV—my favorite Legends locale. Ultimately, I It's hard for me to evaluate the Jedi Academy Trilogy objectively; my lens is tinted with nostalgia. Seminal to the post-ROTJ Legends timeline, Jedi Search kicks off a vastly important trilogy in terms of Legends worldbuilding. While not remotely comparable to the masterpiece that is the Thrawn Trilogy, Kevin J. Anderson develops a number of entertaining characters such as Kyp Durron and Admiral Daala. Plus he establishes Luke's Jedi Academy on Yavin IV—my favorite Legends locale. Ultimately, I think of the Jedi Academy books as not critically and objectively well-told, but as a ton of fun regardless.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    There really isn't much I can say about this, other than the fact that I am simultaneously amused and appalled that my twelve-year-old self liked this book so much. In fairness, it's not that Anderson is a bad writer, though his characterisation makes me want to smack him frequently; it's just that I could only contain my laughter up to the time he describes one of the characters looking out at the city of Coruscant bathed in starlight. You know. Coruscant. The planet the entire surface of which There really isn't much I can say about this, other than the fact that I am simultaneously amused and appalled that my twelve-year-old self liked this book so much. In fairness, it's not that Anderson is a bad writer, though his characterisation makes me want to smack him frequently; it's just that I could only contain my laughter up to the time he describes one of the characters looking out at the city of Coruscant bathed in starlight. You know. Coruscant. The planet the entire surface of which is covered in buildings. And that was about ten pages in.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: Jedi Search by Kevin J. Anderson. SOME HISTORY: All of the previous 90s Star Wars books were originally hardcover releases, but the Jedi Academy Trilogy was the start of something new: books released solely in paperback. Beginning in 1994, Bantam released a number of pape For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: Jedi Search by Kevin J. Anderson. SOME HISTORY: All of the previous 90s Star Wars books were originally hardcover releases, but the Jedi Academy Trilogy was the start of something new: books released solely in paperback. Beginning in 1994, Bantam released a number of paperback books plus one or two hardcovers each year. The trilogy also relies heavily on the Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy comic, which is both a blessing and a curse. If you’ve read the comic, it’s nice to see the repercussions of the Reborn Emperor still affecting the galaxy a year later. If you haven’t read the comic, though, you’re afloat in a sea of foreign information that isn’t extensively explained. Jedi Search did better than the previous release, The Truce at Bakura; the book made it to #4 on the New York Times paperback bestseller list for two separate weeks--the week of February 27 and the week of March 13--and ultimately stayed on the NYT list for 8 weeks. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: I had conflated events from the next two books with Jedi Search, so reading it led to me constantly shaking my head and going “that happened here?” I remembered Luke's Jedi search, and that Daala shows up, but was very hazy where other plot events fell in the trilogy’s timeline. I had somehow completely forgotten Lando’s trip to the Umgul blob races, but perhaps that was my own protective amnesia... PRINCESS LEIA COSTUME CHANGE COUNT: Leia changes out of her “diplomatic clothes” in the beginning, but we don’t get any sense of what they look like. When she shows Gantoris the images of Dantooine, she’s wearing a robe. This is clearly insufficient wardrobe descriptions! A BRIEF SUMMARY: Newly-proclaimed Jedi Master Luke Skywalker wants to restart the Jedi Order, and asks the Senate for permission to find Jedi acolytes and form a new Jedi Academy. At the same time, Han Solo and Chewbacca are sent to Kessel on a diplomatic mission that goes horribly awry. And hidden nearby in the Maw Cluster, Admiral Daala waits for word from Grand Moff Tarkin to unleash the Imperial’s newest superweapon on the unsuspecting galaxy... THE CHARACTERS: It’s hard for me to approach this book objectively, because KJA introduced so many characters and elements I hate into the SW universe. Still, I tried very hard during this reread. Han and Chewbacca have an interesting plot line (even if the logistics of their mission didn’t make complete sense to me), and I felt that their portrayals were closest to the SW baseline. Han provokes the bad guys, and even when it looks like they’ll never escape, he’s still plotting and scheming. I appreciated, too, that Chewie is with him the whole time--thus far, some of the SW authors have felt the need to send Chewie off somewhere else, but it makes sense to me that Han and he would undertake this mission together. Luke behaves weirdly in this book. I understand that he’s working through a lot of guilt and trauma from the events of Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy, but he comes across as humorless and remote. There are very few glimpses of the kind, pleasant man that we saw in the Thrawn trilogy or even The Truce at Bakura. Similarly, his Force powers are so far beyond anything we have seen him do up to this point, which I assume is in keeping with how he behaved in Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy. He jumps out of a volcano hole! He walks on lava! Why KJA? It leads to this feeling that, combined with his new personality, I’m reading about a pod person who has taken the place of the original Luke. I didn’t like it. Leia is singularly useless in this book. She’s Minister of State, but the only glimpses we get into her job revolve around Ambassador Furgan from Carida, and then one instance where she’s frustrated and overworked and takes out her annoyance on a subordinate. Han doesn’t report back in from his mission, and she sulks and worries that he’s fallen back into his old smuggler ways. She’s not particularly necessary to the plot; once she decides they need to check on Han, it’s Luke and Lando who head off to Kessel to check things out. Poor Lando. We get an explanation that he lost Nkllon in a card game and is now down on his luck--really?? Lando has a particularly ridiculous plot line, in which he heads to the Umgul blob races to investigate one of Luke’s potential Jedi. Of course, he takes C-3P0 and R2-D2 with him; of course, he returns empty-handed. I understand that KJA needed something for Lando to do, but surely anything would be better than the blob races! Of Luke’s potential Jedi: Gantoris is so obviously bad news, oh my word. A dark man has appeared to him in his dreams? His inevitable betrayal will not surprise me one bit. Streen is sweet, I guess. Kyp Durron is interesting, and I enjoyed his developing friendship with Han. Leia and Han’s twins appear in this book, after two years (??--I’ll get into that) on a hidden planet. They are two years old. Plot lines involve Threepio trying to keep track of them. I absolutely hate this part of the book. Now to the baddies. Moruth Doole is a space frog. (Haha, he’s a Rybet, I see what you did there KJA.) His second-in-command has the atrocious name of Skynxnex. Qwi Xux is so naive that it completely ruins my suspension of disbelief. Admiral Daala strikes me as a Mary Sue with an horrifyingly undelved backstory. Of course she was the youngest Admiral ever, and the best at the Imperial Academy, and she has oft-described long thick auburn hair. But the fact that she was Tarkin’s mistress at such a young age, and was pretty much groomed for her current position, is both awful and never actually addressed. ISSUES: Whoah do I have so many issues with this book. First, it’s surprisingly easy to put down. Up to this point, I was averaging one SW book a week, but Jedi Search took me weeeeks to finish. There’s action scenes, but they don’t reach the same level of gripping excitement that Zahn achieved in the Thrawn trilogy. There are also numerous references or callbacks to Star Wars: Dark Empire Trilogy, which only works if you’re familiar with the comic. If not, you’re left wondering why Coruscant needs to be rebuilt, or who is Vima-Da-Boda, or why Luke is struggling with Dark Side stuff. It’s a good chunk of setup that most readers probably never got. And that’s not even taking into consideration all the new stuff KJA just drops on the reader. Apparently Force-sensitive children are most vulnerable during their first two years, which is why Jaina and Jacen were kept on a hidden planet (?) found by Luke and Admiral Ackbar (??) for the past two years? Where is any of this coming from? What is the source for this?? I find the reintroduction of superweapons into the SW universe disappointing at best. Even worse, superweapons are not simply reintroduced, but rather continually bulked up and increased in power. Sure, the Death Star is scary, but Daala had a Sun Crusher, which could destroy entire solar systems! There’s no strategy involved with superweapons, not when you can blow up entire worlds. I am also unclear on why exactly the New Republic wanted good relations with Kessel. They use slave labor to produce an addictive drug. Why would you want any part of that? For me, Han’s plotline on Kessel falls apart the more I think about the ethics of his mission. IN CONCLUSION: Jedi Search introduces a lot of characters and concepts to the GFFA, some of which endured all the way to the end of the Legends era. It’s pivotal to the development of the Expanded Universe. It’s a pity then that it’s just not very good. Next up: The Courtship of Princess Leia by Dave Wolverton. My YouTube review: https://youtu.be/7HASsSmbYzk

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    The events of Kevin Anderson's "Jedi Search" take place many years after the events of "Return of the Jedi". Princess Leia is married to Han Solo, and they have three children. What used to be the Rebel Alliance is now the New Republic, a fledgling democracy of many united worlds that has replaced the Empire. Remnants of the Empire still linger throughout the galaxy, however, in the form of rogue Imperial Star Destroyers and hidden Imperial outposts, so the New Republic still finds itself occasi The events of Kevin Anderson's "Jedi Search" take place many years after the events of "Return of the Jedi". Princess Leia is married to Han Solo, and they have three children. What used to be the Rebel Alliance is now the New Republic, a fledgling democracy of many united worlds that has replaced the Empire. Remnants of the Empire still linger throughout the galaxy, however, in the form of rogue Imperial Star Destroyers and hidden Imperial outposts, so the New Republic still finds itself occasionally involved in skirmishes and interplanetary warfare. Luke Skywalker is a Jedi Master (after having fallen to the Dark Side and being rescued by Han and Leia, apparently in another series prior to this novel) with a single-minded goal of training new Jedis. Thus, "Jedi Search". Sci-fi author Anderson has written a pretty exciting novel in the post-"ROTJ" Star Wars universe, part one of his Jedi Academy trilogy. He pays tribute and reference to the previous novels, most notably Timothy Zahn's excellent "Thrawn" trilogy, Kathy Tyers's "Truce at Bakura", as well as some other books that I somehow missed reading (a serious oversight that I will correct the next time I make it to the book store). I thoroughly enjoyed Anderson's novel, which is as suspenseful and entertaining as one would expect from a Star Wars novel. There are several parallel storylines going on in the novel, the main one involving the capture of Han Solo and Chewbacca by thugs from Han's smuggling days. He and Chewie manage to escape only to find themselves captured by a rogue Imperial fleet, led by the ruthless Admiral Daala, which for the past decade has been stationed near a black hole, unaware that the Empire has fallen, until Han tells them. They have been secretly developing a new super-weapon called the Sun Crusher. (Three guesses as to what it does...) Needless to say, the gang's all here and ready to kick some more Imperial ass. And if you've read this far into my review, I commend you on your geekiness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Better than what I've come expect from Anderson. oh, the usual cliques and short cuts are there, but there's also a real story. Every reader understands the significance of the red in Kyp's aura. Why doesn't Luke? Trying to increase the drama, authors often dumb down their characters to the point of silliness. Cover art sucks. Were these Star Wars book covers done by competing grade schoolers? Better than what I've come expect from Anderson. oh, the usual cliques and short cuts are there, but there's also a real story. Every reader understands the significance of the red in Kyp's aura. Why doesn't Luke? Trying to increase the drama, authors often dumb down their characters to the point of silliness. Cover art sucks. Were these Star Wars book covers done by competing grade schoolers?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    A really awful book. There are charcoal smudges all over the pages. The corners of the covers are bent and there are some deep scratches on the cover. Kevin j anderson is written on the cover and seeing that is always a bad thing. I must admit that the shiny bronze color is nice. The only really worthwhile thing about the book though is the Lando Calrissian portrait on spine. Overall I give it 1 Suncrusher out of 5

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    Oh gosh I had a blast with this! I can't give it 5 stars because it has plenty of problems (I see why some don't like it), but it's weird as heck, super fun, and a really easy and fast paced read for me! I adored the scene early on with Luke training Leia, I love all of Luke's journey (even if I wasn't the biggest fan of the characterization) SO MUCH it was so much fun. Kyp and Qwi are wonderful new additions, even if we don't get too much actual character with Kyp. There's a lot of dumb and pre Oh gosh I had a blast with this! I can't give it 5 stars because it has plenty of problems (I see why some don't like it), but it's weird as heck, super fun, and a really easy and fast paced read for me! I adored the scene early on with Luke training Leia, I love all of Luke's journey (even if I wasn't the biggest fan of the characterization) SO MUCH it was so much fun. Kyp and Qwi are wonderful new additions, even if we don't get too much actual character with Kyp. There's a lot of dumb and preposterous aspects here, and I'm not a huge fan of needing to specify the attractiveness and sexual-ness of the new female characters when that doesn't happen with the male characters, but really I did have a blast with this book. I can't wait for Dark Apprentice!

  17. 5 out of 5

    RumBelle

    The second major trilogy in the EU of books, this one centered on several things. First and foremost, Luke's search for new Jedi, and his determination to rebuild a Jedi Academy. We also have the harrowing adventures of Han and Chewie and their rather unpleasant detour to Kessel. There though, they will encounter someone who will play a huge, life changing role in the EU for years to come. As Luke looks not only for new Jedi, but also his friends, he learns about the Sun Crusher, another one of t The second major trilogy in the EU of books, this one centered on several things. First and foremost, Luke's search for new Jedi, and his determination to rebuild a Jedi Academy. We also have the harrowing adventures of Han and Chewie and their rather unpleasant detour to Kessel. There though, they will encounter someone who will play a huge, life changing role in the EU for years to come. As Luke looks not only for new Jedi, but also his friends, he learns about the Sun Crusher, another one of those horrible superweapons that can destroy everything in their path. Add to this contentious mix, a long missing Imperial Admiral, deception against Ackbar, and Jaina and Jacen coming into their powers, and you have the makings of a fantastic trilogy. Non-stop action from beginning to end, this book in and of itself takes you all over the galaxy. We get introduced to a wide range of new characters, one of my favorites was Qwi Xux, and get to see never before explored locales. Leaves you ready for book two!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe Xtarr

    This was a good start to a fun story with some new interesting characters, but with more and more eye-rolling moments as the book went on. We get a whole chapter on a blobstacle course race, some insight into Rybet mating rituals, and unnecessary sexual descriptions of one of the few woman characters in the story (Daala deserves a much better writer). I was hoping that some of the potential Jedi trainees would have been more memorable, from different alien races, or with stronger back stories, b This was a good start to a fun story with some new interesting characters, but with more and more eye-rolling moments as the book went on. We get a whole chapter on a blobstacle course race, some insight into Rybet mating rituals, and unnecessary sexual descriptions of one of the few woman characters in the story (Daala deserves a much better writer). I was hoping that some of the potential Jedi trainees would have been more memorable, from different alien races, or with stronger back stories, but I'm still invested in their new futures. If you can get past all that, it's a pretty good adventure story. I'm excited to see what happens next.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erik Tanouye

    Got this at Wonder Book at Christmas time in 2019.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Levi Azinger

    Pacing in the beginning was slow, but quickly ramped up to a crescendo of action and intrigue. What an ending to the first novel in the trilogy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    Really enjoyed this book. Their adventures on Kessel and Maw...the beginnings of the establishment of the Jedi Academy... and even parenting the twins. Can't wait for the next Really enjoyed this book. Their adventures on Kessel and Maw...the beginnings of the establishment of the Jedi Academy... and even parenting the twins. Can't wait for the next

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Galdamez

    Honestly, I was surprised! Jedi Search (even though I think Search for the Jedi sounds more Star Warsy in my mind) was far more engaging and fun than I expected! Full review to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Not the first time I’ve read this. Probably won’t be the last. Anderson isn’t quite up to Zahn in my eyes but he definitely spins a good yarn. I still love these early extended universe books, brings back some nice memories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Mobley

    Jedi Search is the first book in The Jedi Academy series by Kevin J. Anderson. Taking place seven years after Return of the Jedi, and two after the Thrawn series, the story primarily follows Luke Skywalker’s quest to seek out candidates for a new Jedi Academy, while Leia balances her obligations to the New Republic, and to her young twin children. Meanwhile, Han and Chewbacca have taken too long to return from what was supposed to be a simple diplomatic mission to the prison world of Kessel… The Jedi Search is the first book in The Jedi Academy series by Kevin J. Anderson. Taking place seven years after Return of the Jedi, and two after the Thrawn series, the story primarily follows Luke Skywalker’s quest to seek out candidates for a new Jedi Academy, while Leia balances her obligations to the New Republic, and to her young twin children. Meanwhile, Han and Chewbacca have taken too long to return from what was supposed to be a simple diplomatic mission to the prison world of Kessel… The premise, frankly, is very interesting. On one hand, we see SuperMom Leia, now married to Han, dealing with the realities of her Sophie’s Choice; to be a good mother or to be a good leader to the fragile New Republic. That’s pretty heavy. On the other hand, we have Luke Skywalker, trying to piece together the Jedi Order. This holds up pretty well in our Post-Prequel Legends knowledge of the Jedi; when this book came out, there was a dearth of material about how the Jedi Order functioned before Episode IV so the early Expanded Universe authors had about as much to work with as Luke himself to figure out how a candidate should train to become a Jedi. Watching Luke struggle to figure out how to build this order, and struggle with his deeper fear that he would fail and have one of his students turn to the Dark Side, is a great concept. Finally, we see Han and Chewbacca head off to Kessel (the planet which holds the distinction of being the first actually mentioned in dialogue in any Star Wars movie), where a crime lord (Morunth Doole) has taken over the spice mines mentioned several times in A New Hope. Han’s past comes back to haunt him when he discovers Doole blames Han for a physical disfiguration our old buddy Jabba the Hutt inflicted upon him. Han and Chewie end up in the eponymous mines, while on the surface, Doole tries to cover up Han’s disappearance when Lando Calrissian shows up to investigate. While in the mines, Han discovers a young, force sensitive prisoner who was (as we are repeatedly told throughout the series) exiled to this planet with his family by the Empire for political reasons. In the hands of a better author (or even a more-experienced Anderson, as this trilogy was only his second set of published novels), this story would have been great. What I laid out in the above paragraph is (mostly) a great concept and, played out differently, could have been much more than it is. Jedi Search, as it stands, is really not that good a book. From a “Star Wars” standpoint, it actually fares well. Unlike the other two books in this trilogy, it doesn’t stretch the Star Wars lore beyond reason and actually brings us to some interesting and evocative locals. The in-depth look at the Kessel mines is pretty interesting and some of the ideas that crop up when Han stumbles upon the secret facility where the Death Star was designed are really cool. The usual cast and fan favorite characters pepper the story, and for the most part stick to their roots. The biggest outlier is Leia, who apparently doesn’t care about her husband; when Han doesn’t come back on time, rather than even send a message his way to check in on him, she starts yapping off to anyone who will listen about how irresponsible he is for “running off with his old friends.” From a literary standpoint, the book is mediocre at best. Anderson doesn’t seem to trust that his readers can remember information, as he will mention the same point over and over. For example, he reiterates three separate times the story of how Kyp’s parents were political dissidents, and how stormtroopers invaded their family home and dragged them out into the night, conscripting his older brother and sending Kyp and his parents to Kessel (this story will be repeated 10 times total over the trilogy. If that sounds like a lot, it is). I found some of the new characters Anderson introduced to be fairly interesting (though inconsistent). We meet a hermit who’s lived on an abandoned mining facility on Bespin who has fled society because his penchant for hearing other people’s thoughts (his manifestation of the Force) was driving him crazy. We meet Gantoris, who has had premonitions of a “Dark Man,” whom he believes is Luke, who will take him off his homeworld and to his ultimate death, Morunth Doole, the Kessel crime lord, certainly has his devious side, and Qwi, a designer of the Death Star, certainly comes off as a tragic victim (though her story, like most other characters’ in the series, is stretched beyond its logical limits). These characters all shine the most in Jedi Search, but lose their luster as the trilogy unfolds. My biggest issue with this book is the ridiculous amount of glaring plot holes that start coming to light when an ounce of logic is applied to the story. Take Qwi, for example. She’s painted as an unwitting designer of the Death Star, forced by Grand Moff Tarkin to work on his project under pain of carpet bombing her civilization. She tells Han that Tarkin duped her into thinking the Death Star would be used as a mining tool. It seems Anderson himself realized just how stupid this plot point was, because he has Han yell immediately after this revelation, “Listen to their names! Death Star, World Devastator—that doesn’t sound like something for peacetime economic development, does it?” I’m sorry, but pointing out problems in your own story doesn’t really help your case. There are a flurry of other holes. At one point, Han and Chewie are flying through a cluster of black holes (the Kessel Run) in the Millennium Falcon, and Anderson points out multiple times that safe course was so miniscule and precise, that if they deviated fractions of an inch off to the side in any direction, they would plunge into the event horizon. And yet, throughout the book, ships hundreds of times bigger than the Millennium Falcon (like Star Destroyers and a prototype Death Star) make it through with no problem. How could they do it if the passage was so tight the Falcon could barely fit? Why does Leia not care her husband hasn’t come back? How does Kyp Durron, who has been stuck on Kessel most of his life with barely any contact with outsiders, have such command over the Force? And if he’s as strong as Luke says he is, why wasn’t he exterminated when the Emperor did his thang at the end of the Clone Wars? Sure, Luke survived, but that was only because Obi-Wan and Yoda were protecting him. There is no indication that Kyp had any such luxury, and if the Empire was already targeting his family for their politics…eh, it’s not worth trying to reason out. The story also tries lamely to secretly foreshadow events in book II and III, but they are so obvious that, when they play out later in the trilogy, you saw them coming from miles away. There’s also the problem of the Sun Crusher. This thing shouldn’t exist. The Sun Crusher was a superweapon built by the folks who brought you the Death Star, but this one can destroy a whole solar system, not just one planet. Not implausible enough for you? Well, why don’t we make it indestructible? Yep. Not even the Death Star’s laser, heck not even the torpedoes the Sun Crusher itself uses to start off supernova light-years in size can break it, let alone dent the armor. And this whole thing was designed in the Maw Instillation, which has not had contact with the outside world (or shipments of the materials they would need to logically develop such a weapon) since before the events of Episode IV. Yeah right. I know in the new trilogy, Starkiller Base can destroy multiple planets and systems, but that instillation takes up an entire planet. This is just a normal ship. For its faults, Jedi Search did have some good moments. Besides the locales and some of the new characters, some of the scenes really do evoke emotion. Some of the scenes in the spice mines are downright chilling and have you flipping the pages to see just what the heck is going on down there. But the repetition to the point of eye-rolling and the absolutely ridiculous plot points pull this book into mediocrity. Anderson makes fairly juvenile mistakes and his style comes off as little more than bad fan-fiction. I can only guess that he’s improved, as he continues to write books in the 2010’s. To his credit, I’ll even admit that some of his other Star Wars works aren’t so bad; his entries in the Tales From… series are not my favorite, but his IG-88 story isn’t horrible. Should you read it? I’m not gonna stop you. I’ll put it this way; if you’ve read the Thrawn trilogy and a smattering of other Star Wars Expanded Universe books, and you’re just looking for some new stories, go for it. They’re a decent time-killer and you’ll have the pleasure of being able to rant to your “normie” friends about it. But if you’re new to the Expanded Universe, look elsewhere first. Start with Heir to the Empire and work your way through the Thrawn series, or check out X-Wing, but don’t start here. In the end, Jedi Search simply exists. It’s not bad, it’s not good. It’s not a tough read, to be sure, and I was never “angry” at it or offended enough as a Star Wars nerd to put it down and walk away. I won’t be reading it again, though. Out of the three Jedi Academy books, it is easily the best. Check out my review for the next book in the trilogy here. here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John_H92

    One of the best Star Wars novels I've read thus far. The only thing that holds it back for me is a side quest around the middle of the book involving a certain Lando. Other than that it was a thrill to read. Can't wait to finish the trilogy. One of the best Star Wars novels I've read thus far. The only thing that holds it back for me is a side quest around the middle of the book involving a certain Lando. Other than that it was a thrill to read. Can't wait to finish the trilogy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Austin Bartel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Personal Response I loved this book. It was definitely a change from the previous trilogy that I was reading. I liked how it gave us background information on what was going on in the universe. It was helpful because there are different series in the Star Wars universe with different authors and most of these book intertwine and share the same background. I have a feeling that this is one of the first books on the timeline because Leia's twins are still young. Plot Summary It starts off with Han an Personal Response I loved this book. It was definitely a change from the previous trilogy that I was reading. I liked how it gave us background information on what was going on in the universe. It was helpful because there are different series in the Star Wars universe with different authors and most of these book intertwine and share the same background. I have a feeling that this is one of the first books on the timeline because Leia's twins are still young. Plot Summary It starts off with Han and Chewbacca going to Kessel to gain the trust of the smugglers for the New Republic. They are shot down and captured by Moruth Doole and his assistant. They are then sent to the spice mines and meet Kyp Durron. Luke is finding Force-users for his new order of Jedi Knights. He recruits the help of R2-D2 and C-3PO to search through the old Imperial database for known Force-users while he goes in search of a couple he has leads on. He finds them and brings them back to Imperial City. Leia and Han's twins are coming home after two years on a secret planet. Leia is happy, but she is upset that Han has not yet returned home. Lando goes in search of a Force-user that R2-D2 and C-3PO found. He has to go to the Umugllan blob races to find this person. It turns out that the person was just cheating and was not able to use the Force. He is also a Duchesses husband and left her. She put out a wanted poster to get him back and Lando was paid a million credits. When Luke and Lando get back they learn that Han was supposed to be back two weeks ago. They go to Kessel to try and find him. Han, Chewbacca, and Kyp manage to escape the mines and steal a ship. In their escape attempt, they stumble into a lone Imperial fleet. After convincing a scientist that her inventions are being used to destroy worlds, Han, Chewbacca, Kyp, and Qwi Xux (the scientist) escape in the Sun Crusher. Recommended Audience I would recommend this book to anyone in their teens and above. In this book there are weird words that are hard to understand. People would have to have a well developed vocabulary to understand the technologies in this book. Also, this is a good book for any Star Wars fan. It has the main characters from the original trilogy, except for the ones that died.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    This book was great. The part I liked best was when (view spoiler)[ Han and Chewie got captured and forced to work in a spice mine and tried to escape with a giant man eating spider trying to kill them with a new friend named Kyp. (hide spoiler)] . I also like that Lando was his old self and not some politician now. Like he was still a man of action rather than debating what to do. Han could never change and Luke has gotten more Jedi like. This took me a week to read since I wanted every little d This book was great. The part I liked best was when (view spoiler)[ Han and Chewie got captured and forced to work in a spice mine and tried to escape with a giant man eating spider trying to kill them with a new friend named Kyp. (hide spoiler)] . I also like that Lando was his old self and not some politician now. Like he was still a man of action rather than debating what to do. Han could never change and Luke has gotten more Jedi like. This took me a week to read since I wanted every little detail from this book. The person I like most is Luke since he saves people from things that their people might make them do. Like he saved a man named Gantoris from dying on a volcano planet with lots of people depending on him, he saved a Hermit named Streen from dying alone since he couldn't stop hearing people's thoughts, and saved a person from Dathomir from making her create horrible things like another Darth Maul. Leia was busy trying to save the new republic from dying, and Ackbar is in self exile on his home planet Calamari. There were just so many cliffhangers, suspense, and action. I would recommend this book for any person who like the following, star wars, action, suspense, the feeling of not wanting to put a book down, and absolutely wanting to read the next book but don't want the series to end.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darryl Dobbs

    The first book of the Jedi Academy trilogy, Luke Skywalker begins his search for Force-sensitive beings in the galaxy so that he can re-launch a Jedi training school. He and Leia select Yavin 4 as the base (where the Rebels were based in A New Hope). While Luke travels in search of future Jedi, Han Solo and Chewbacca are captured on Kessel and put to work in the spice mines. While Han and Chewie of course escape, along with Kyp Durron (a Force-sensitive human who was in the mines), they are forc The first book of the Jedi Academy trilogy, Luke Skywalker begins his search for Force-sensitive beings in the galaxy so that he can re-launch a Jedi training school. He and Leia select Yavin 4 as the base (where the Rebels were based in A New Hope). While Luke travels in search of future Jedi, Han Solo and Chewbacca are captured on Kessel and put to work in the spice mines. While Han and Chewie of course escape, along with Kyp Durron (a Force-sensitive human who was in the mines), they are forced to enter the "Maw". This is some kind of maze of black holes and almost impossible to navigate, but inside the Maw is an old Imperial installation complete with an admiral (Daala), an army, some secret weapons and other Imperial vessels. I found this an entertaining book, with new characters that are both interesting and easy to like. I didn't like the idea of all these secret weapons. I just read through thousands of years of Jedi and Sith history. And 10,000 years ago they had star ships and blasters and lightsabers. Nothing had improved on those things until about 20 years ago? And then you can build lasers that will destroy a planet, or a "sun crusher" that can make a star go supernova and is impervious to attacks? I think with a few tweaks this story could have worked better. I also found the story to be lengthier than was necessary.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leah Webber

    Better than I thought it was going to be. Of course, I have just finished the Courtship of Princess Leia, and really anything could have topped that one. A fun jaunt through the Kessel system, home of the famous Kessel Run for Han Solo. He's kind of the star of this book, and he goes through a lot. The villians he faces are sufficiently bad, although I found Admiral Dalla a little wanting. She might redeem herself in the next two books, though, since this is a trilogy and she's obviously the main Better than I thought it was going to be. Of course, I have just finished the Courtship of Princess Leia, and really anything could have topped that one. A fun jaunt through the Kessel system, home of the famous Kessel Run for Han Solo. He's kind of the star of this book, and he goes through a lot. The villians he faces are sufficiently bad, although I found Admiral Dalla a little wanting. She might redeem herself in the next two books, though, since this is a trilogy and she's obviously the main villain here. The sun crusher is an interesting idea, although a bit overkill (it's over 9000!!). I hope the New Republic uses the brain of the scientist that helped them escape and designed the sun crusher, the world destroyer, and the death star. Meanwhile, Luke Skywalker is on the hunt for candidates for the Jedi Academy he wants to set up. He finds some interesting characters, and we can already tell that some of them are going to go to the dark side. The most interesting one is Kyp, a kid Han rescues from the spice mines of Kessel. I bet we're going to see a lot of him in the next books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the first Kevin Anderson novel I have read and I enjoyed it. He seems unafraid of adding new elements and characters to the Star Wars universe, which I think is an asset. He takes us to several interesting new worlds and also explores places mentioned in the original trilogy but never visited (Spice Mines of Kessel anyone?). Anderson also works hard to fit this book into the EU timeline, referencing the Thrawn Trilogy, the Dark Empire comic series and more. At its best this attention to d This is the first Kevin Anderson novel I have read and I enjoyed it. He seems unafraid of adding new elements and characters to the Star Wars universe, which I think is an asset. He takes us to several interesting new worlds and also explores places mentioned in the original trilogy but never visited (Spice Mines of Kessel anyone?). Anderson also works hard to fit this book into the EU timeline, referencing the Thrawn Trilogy, the Dark Empire comic series and more. At its best this attention to detail can make the book feel like it is written as part of a rich tapestry and against the backdrop of a much larger universe. At its worst, this technique just makes it feel like Anderson is trying too hard and writing only for the fanboys. The novel is at its best when Anderson branches out to completely new places with new characters. The scenes of Han and Chewbacca escaping the spice mines with newfound friend Kyp or of Lando Calrissian busting someone who is cheating on "blob races" are quite good and remind me of the best of Brian Daley's classic Han Solo trilogy.

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