web site hit counter Kamikaze Girls - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Kamikaze Girls

Availability: Ready to download

Meet Momoko, a "Lolita" decked out to the nines in the finest (and frilliest) of Victorian haute couture. The only scion of a drunken interlude between a cowardly yakuza and an inebriated bar-hostess, Momoko's mom has since split the scene, and, after various ill-fated scams that involve imitation brand name merchandise, Momoko's dad relocates them to the boondocks of rura Meet Momoko, a "Lolita" decked out to the nines in the finest (and frilliest) of Victorian haute couture. The only scion of a drunken interlude between a cowardly yakuza and an inebriated bar-hostess, Momoko's mom has since split the scene, and, after various ill-fated scams that involve imitation brand name merchandise, Momoko's dad relocates them to the boondocks of rural Ibaraki prefecture. To escape her humdrum existence, Momoko fanaticizes about French rococo, dreams of living in the palace of Versailles, and buys all her extremely lacy clothes from an expensive Tokyo boutique. Meet Ichiko, a tough-talking motorcycle grrrl (on a tricked-out moped) who leads a ladies-only biker gang known as the Ponytails. Together, this unlikeliest of duos strike out on a quest to find a legendary embroiderer, a journey on which they encounter conniving pachinko parlor managers, legendary street-punks, and anemic costumers. Who knows, they might just make it big...if only Ichiko would stop head butting Momoko in the forehead. Novala Takemoto's break-though novel KAMIKAZE GIRLS, already a cult-classic in Japan, is more than a wry coming-of-age picaresque, it's a new way of life.


Compare

Meet Momoko, a "Lolita" decked out to the nines in the finest (and frilliest) of Victorian haute couture. The only scion of a drunken interlude between a cowardly yakuza and an inebriated bar-hostess, Momoko's mom has since split the scene, and, after various ill-fated scams that involve imitation brand name merchandise, Momoko's dad relocates them to the boondocks of rura Meet Momoko, a "Lolita" decked out to the nines in the finest (and frilliest) of Victorian haute couture. The only scion of a drunken interlude between a cowardly yakuza and an inebriated bar-hostess, Momoko's mom has since split the scene, and, after various ill-fated scams that involve imitation brand name merchandise, Momoko's dad relocates them to the boondocks of rural Ibaraki prefecture. To escape her humdrum existence, Momoko fanaticizes about French rococo, dreams of living in the palace of Versailles, and buys all her extremely lacy clothes from an expensive Tokyo boutique. Meet Ichiko, a tough-talking motorcycle grrrl (on a tricked-out moped) who leads a ladies-only biker gang known as the Ponytails. Together, this unlikeliest of duos strike out on a quest to find a legendary embroiderer, a journey on which they encounter conniving pachinko parlor managers, legendary street-punks, and anemic costumers. Who knows, they might just make it big...if only Ichiko would stop head butting Momoko in the forehead. Novala Takemoto's break-though novel KAMIKAZE GIRLS, already a cult-classic in Japan, is more than a wry coming-of-age picaresque, it's a new way of life.

30 review for Kamikaze Girls

  1. 5 out of 5

    scar

    4.75 stars. i adored the hell out of this

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hyalineaquas

    This is seriously one of the funniest books I have ever read in my life! I just remember laughing outloud at all the randomness, and feeling really happy. i was extremely impressed that this book is written by a guy, i didnt see that coming..I thought for sure it was a female writer til i noticed it wasnt halfway through the book. There a lot of rambling chatter that just goes on and on sometimes, but i didn't mind it really. Its told from the pov of a lolita that lies her way to get money for h This is seriously one of the funniest books I have ever read in my life! I just remember laughing outloud at all the randomness, and feeling really happy. i was extremely impressed that this book is written by a guy, i didnt see that coming..I thought for sure it was a female writer til i noticed it wasnt halfway through the book. There a lot of rambling chatter that just goes on and on sometimes, but i didn't mind it really. Its told from the pov of a lolita that lies her way to get money for her expensive fashion tastes. She has no friends and doesn't really care, nor if people think she's weird. SHe lives in her own little idealistic fantasy world that is until a yanki, biker gang chick, comes along...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lottie Eve

    I have to say that I like stories that feature a friendship between two people who are extremely different from each other. So when I found out about Kamikaze Girls, I just knew that I needed the book in my hands. And when I finally got a copy of the novel in my hands and started reading, I couldn't stop laughing! Kamikaze Girls is a playful and seriously funny book. It's not just the unlikely friendship between Momoko, a Lolita who is completely dedicated to Rococo, and Ichigo, a Yanki who is mo I have to say that I like stories that feature a friendship between two people who are extremely different from each other. So when I found out about Kamikaze Girls, I just knew that I needed the book in my hands. And when I finally got a copy of the novel in my hands and started reading, I couldn't stop laughing! Kamikaze Girls is a playful and seriously funny book. It's not just the unlikely friendship between Momoko, a Lolita who is completely dedicated to Rococo, and Ichigo, a Yanki who is more than a little in love with the biker gang known as the Ponytails that she happens to be part of, that made me laugh, but also the dialogue and Momoko's voice. I couldn't go a page without finding something I thought to be funny. Momoko, the Lolita and narrator of this story, is a thoroughly entertaining character. She is humorous, well-rounded, and girly. She goes by her own rules and really couldn't care less about what others think of her and the frilly dresses she wears. Her narrative, which is quite chatty, is engaging and full of wit, even when she is spouting out some lecture on the Rococo era and Lolita fashion, or her sort-of depressing childhood. Momoko is undeniably charming and had me stuck in my bed reading all day. Ichigo, the Yanki of this story, is also endearing. Yes, she is dim-witted but I never found her to be annoying or needy. Honestly, the things that she says and does are laugh out loud funny. She is full of life and, even though she is normally dim-witted, can be extremely tough and wise. She is loyal and has a strong sense of honor. And, like Momoko, Ichigo doesn't care about what other people think of her. I loved Ichigo and the laughs she brought. The friendship between the two girls is actually very subtle while it is developing. It is rarely, if not never, directly said that they are friends, until the end. The reader must pay attention to the (hilarious) interactions and conversations that happen between the two characters. I was fond of this fact, though others may not. I must warn people though that the beginning of the novel is slow. It takes a while for Momoko to meet Ichigo. Though I do think that the wait is well worth it, as Momoko and Ichigo's little adventures are fun and amusing, and that fight scene near the end was pretty exciting. I don't want to spoil so here are only six words: badass Yanki and Lolita kick butt. The prose is very good, straight to the point could be a way to describe it. But the real treat is the smart, witty dialogue. It really and truly made me feel smile and laugh. And there is quite a bit of dialogue, so there was quite a bit of smiling and laughing. Kamikaze Girls is a fun, charming coming-of-age tale that I loved a lot. Even if you feel like you have already read a story like this, I still recommend you read this novel. Because Kamikaze Girls is Kamikaze Girls and Kamikaze Girls is awesome. And funny.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ashlin

    It was another movie that I had watched first and then discovered that it was a book. It seems to me that most movies I see now of days that interest me turn out to be an adaptation of a novel. I do not know if that is a particularly good or bad thing. As for the book itself, the movie follows it very well and does not stray from it all. It was a fast read, engrossing really, it is considered a light novel.Which I am assuming is equivalent to a young adult novel. But the thing that I do not thin It was another movie that I had watched first and then discovered that it was a book. It seems to me that most movies I see now of days that interest me turn out to be an adaptation of a novel. I do not know if that is a particularly good or bad thing. As for the book itself, the movie follows it very well and does not stray from it all. It was a fast read, engrossing really, it is considered a light novel.Which I am assuming is equivalent to a young adult novel. But the thing that I do not think the movie captured well was the character of Momoko. In the movie and book she is the narrator and is a Lolita. But what is lost is her tone of voice. It may just be a racial prejudice, but in the book her narration is more adult, in depth, humorous, and well rounded. Though the movie is good, I feel like the actress made her more of a caricature. Considering that this is written for a younger audience and has the usually themes of finding oneself and a bit of coming of age feel, I think that it hits the mark well. It does not dumb down adulthood or personality, but accurately portrays the moral it is striving for. In fact, I feel that the narrator is one of the few characters who has a strong grasp of self and her own morality, she does not have to compromise herself in order to add to the plot. In the end she adds to her already strong character in a beneficial way.

  5. 5 out of 5

    ⋆☆☽ Kriss ☾☆⋆

    Kamikaze Girls (titled “Shimotsuma Story: Yanki Girl and Lolita Girl” (下妻物語――ヤンキーちゃんとロリータちゃん Shimotsuma Monogatari-Yanki-chan to Rorita-chan) in Japan, which is a far more fitting title than Kamikaze Girls. To this day I have no idea where that name came from) is an absolutely fantastic tale of fashion, friendship, fake name-brand items, saying "f*ck off" to the world, finding yourself. It's narrated by a teenage lolita (as in someone who wears lolita fashion which is completely different fr Kamikaze Girls (titled “Shimotsuma Story: Yanki Girl and Lolita Girl” (下妻物語――ヤンキーちゃんとロリータちゃん Shimotsuma Monogatari-Yanki-chan to Rorita-chan) in Japan, which is a far more fitting title than Kamikaze Girls. To this day I have no idea where that name came from) is an absolutely fantastic tale of fashion, friendship, fake name-brand items, saying "f*ck off" to the world, finding yourself. It's narrated by a teenage lolita (as in someone who wears lolita fashion which is completely different from lolita in the western sense and has nothing to do with the novel; if you're unaware what lolita fashion is just google it and you'll quickly get an idea of the style) trapped in the unfashionable Japanese countryside with ample snark who I consider one of my favorite literary heroines. Momoko is smart, snarky, witty, sarcastic, unashamed, at times dramatic, unabashed, fiercely independent, stubbornly devoted, coolly aloof, impossibly elegant, sometimes vainly selfish, sometimes a spitfire who swears and could kick someone’s butt, and is completely unafraid to live life as she pleases in her lacy, frilly, absolutely decadent classic lolita fashion with her nonconforming “rococo” lifestyle (in other words, Momoko likes to live life like the French aristocracy right before the French Revolution; that sort of dreamy, decadent, sweetly cloying sort of lifestyle of aesthetic and hendoism). She’s a great narrator who's endlessly entertaining with her two-cents on everything and unique style of storytelling. Even though about 50 pages of the book are just Momoko’s backstory and her leading us up to the encounter with Ichigo, I personally never felt that any of it was dull just because Novala Takemoto created such a great character. Being in Momoko’s head is a blast! Even at her worst, she’s hard to hate and even harder to ignore, because she’s so bluntly honest and unflinching in her observations of the world and people. My favorite part of the book, however, is the depiction of Momoko’s growing friendship with a girl named Ichigo, whom she meets one day while selling her dad’s bootleg merchandise through a magazine ad. Ichigo (who wants to go by Ichiko since Ichigo is the word for strawberry and goes against her biker, yanki/delinquent image) is depicted as Momoko’s opposite—where Momoko is all elegance and cold, aloof behavior with a smart, snarky head on her shoulders, Ichigo is aggressive, expressive, emotional, often times not the brightest crayon in the box, and a teen delinquent who’s more likely to use violence and yelling to solve her problems—but we see through the book how ultimately suited they are for each other and the benefits of them being friends and all the adventures and mishaps they share along the way, which range from horribly silly to strangely emotional. Ichigo chases after Momoko, intent on friendship and not caring that Momoko rebuffs her, and eventually her perseverance wins over Momoko, whose friendship, once earned, is eternal. It’s a beautiful, hilarious, entertaining, unique, and above all deeply real depiction of friendship between two vastly different and wonderfully complex teen girls who have both given the world the middle finger in their own way. Although I’m sure the translation has changed some things from the original Japanese and some things were lost altogether because of the language gap, I ultimately feel like the style of the writing is amazing and that the translator did a fantastic job capturing the essence of Momoko’s personality and voice. It’s modern and isn’t afraid to let you know that this was set in the 2000s, but even reading it in 2017, it doesn’t feel dated. The writing is designed to explain things and do so in a way that any teen girl would—simply, directly, but with ample opinion. The characters are all well fleshed out and given a distinct style to them, making even the most unimportant card-board side character feel like a unique creation. The story, though simple when boiled to its essence, is still masterfully executed and bedazzled by the inner dialog of a narrating Momoko and the presence of Ichigo, who is always a pleasure to see on the page. Though this is such a simple little book that’s at times silly, I think it’s actually a pretty good little piece of literature that speaks volumes about our modern world and has an excellent portrayal of unconventional friendship. It stands out amongst other books tackling the same ideas in its unique details, setting, and its colorful characters. Kamikaze Girls has been a favorite of mine since I read it for the first time about six years ago and I give it every recommendation to people who enjoy stories about friendship and who love character driven plots that rely heavily on witty inner dialog to tell a tantalizing, entertaining story about a girl who just wants to live the way she wants and makes a friend along the way that she knows she’ll keep for the rest of her life. It’s the kind of book that’s easy to read and reread again and again without losing its charm. I even have a beat up copy I throw in my bag sometimes just to have in case I’m out somewhere and need something to do for a while. This book was also made into a great film starring the talented Kyoko Fukada and the talented Anna Tsuchiya as Momoko and Ichigo respectively. I own the DVD and watch the film frequently (thought I will also say that the translation for the film isn’t as good at it is for the book; a lot of stuff is ignored or cut down to its essence for western viewers, so you do miss some stuff if you don’t speak Japanese) and feel it captures the same aesthetic and essence of the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Speedtribes

    Go figure that, after years of being completely unable to relate to almost any female characters in the books I read, I find the perfect girlbonding story that features two clashing, western influenced and dying subcultures in Japan. For some perspective, as of the writing of this book, both the Yankii/Bosozoku subculture and Lolita subculture were on the fade. Though both have recently had a small resurgence, they are both pretty much the domain of those who are very invested in the lifestyle. A Go figure that, after years of being completely unable to relate to almost any female characters in the books I read, I find the perfect girlbonding story that features two clashing, western influenced and dying subcultures in Japan. For some perspective, as of the writing of this book, both the Yankii/Bosozoku subculture and Lolita subculture were on the fade. Though both have recently had a small resurgence, they are both pretty much the domain of those who are very invested in the lifestyle. Also, while not exactly unheard of, female yankii and bosozoku are much more rare. This is a story of two girls who find themselves in two completely opposite subcultures out in cabbage country. They find themselves with some extremely unlikely bonding which eventually works its way to true friendship. I saw the movie before reading the book-- they are both similar, but still different enough that I didn't mind reading it. Some of the male characters are far better looking in the book. *laugh* Firstly, this story is fun. Secondly, this story is about aggressive consumerism, misanthropy, fists of fury, love for your best friend. The determination to live your life the way YOU want to. Thirdly, this felt so real to me, that I almost cried at some points. Very touching, with a bit of kick and sarcasm. Also: For those who objected that the original title "Shimotsuma Monagatari" was changed to "Kamikaze Girls"-- this was not done by Viz. I'm pretty certain the title change happened before any Viz licensing-- and it isn't random Japanese-ism. Yankii often graduate into scooter gangs (bosozoku) and these scooter gangs were often known as Kamikaze Riders. So with that perspective, the title fits quite well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I liked this book, it was rather different. I must say it was a little hard getting into the book, perhaps because some of it didn't translate from Japanese so well. I also was unaccustomed to such great detail given to setting, and the fact that it would go from very little dialogue to pages and pages of nothing but dialogue. I saw the movie a few years back, and enjoyed that immensely. I am happy to report they keep key elements from the novel in the film, it also made me happy to read direct q I liked this book, it was rather different. I must say it was a little hard getting into the book, perhaps because some of it didn't translate from Japanese so well. I also was unaccustomed to such great detail given to setting, and the fact that it would go from very little dialogue to pages and pages of nothing but dialogue. I saw the movie a few years back, and enjoyed that immensely. I am happy to report they keep key elements from the novel in the film, it also made me happy to read direct quotations, including some of the voice overs in the movie that represented things the main character Momoko was thinking in the book. The book is a Japanese telling of unlikely friends, a Lolita, the ultimate in feminity and a Yanki, a hardcore biker. The Lolita Momoko is determined to not care for anyone and wishes to live out a fanciful, but lonesome life style. The Yanki is Ichiko (Ichigo, actually, which means strawberry but she finds the name too girlie) is a blunt, and brash character who cannot hide that beneath it she has a good heart, she also suffers from insecurity believing herself to be dumb. The two strike up a friendship, and each eventually warm up to one another over time, Ichigo becomes more confident and Momoko realizes it's not so bad to have a friend. If you're a fan of Japanese culture, especially pop culture, this is the book for you. I admit the first bit is rough to get through, but once you do you meet some pretty unforgettable characters, go on some heartwarming adventure, and even laugh a bit along the way.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anupa

    I will be scheduling appointments with anyone willing to listen to me lecture/yell at them about all the reasons why this is the best coming of age novel I've ever read!!!!! I will be scheduling appointments with anyone willing to listen to me lecture/yell at them about all the reasons why this is the best coming of age novel I've ever read!!!!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Kamikaze Girls is still one of my favourite books to date. A selfish lolita + a tough-but-not-too-tough biker girl + rice paddies, pachinko parlours, and gang fights = a ridiculous and heart-warming story of true friendship (covered head to foot in lacy frills and motor oil). While the relationship between these two girls is comically unlikely (and often unwanted), it stems from a need within both to belong somewhere other than where circumstance brings them. The lolita, Momoko, may be greedy, c Kamikaze Girls is still one of my favourite books to date. A selfish lolita + a tough-but-not-too-tough biker girl + rice paddies, pachinko parlours, and gang fights = a ridiculous and heart-warming story of true friendship (covered head to foot in lacy frills and motor oil). While the relationship between these two girls is comically unlikely (and often unwanted), it stems from a need within both to belong somewhere other than where circumstance brings them. The lolita, Momoko, may be greedy, conniving, and uncaring of others' feelings, motives, and - well, everything, really...but she is also brave and honest (sometimes brutally so), sharing with others her sincere perspective just when they need it most (ie. one of my favourite quotes from any book ever, “Snatching happiness takes a lot more courage than enduring unhappiness.” Simple, to the point, and lovely). In contrast, Ichigo the yanki, while loud, obnoxious, simple, and perhaps intimidating on first meeting, shows immediately a deep craving for companionship, acceptance, and constancy. This makes an unlikely pairing for Momoko, but it just might be what these two [anti]heroines really need.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    This book...wow. It's hard to describe. The main characters, Ichigo and Momoko are very in-your-face and very funny. They both take pride in their...ah...maturity, though Momoko is very calm and levelheaded (almost emotionless, really) but Ichigo is very brash and loud. However, despite their differences the girls manage to find common ground in the pachinko parlor and in matters of ordinary life. And throughout this novel, the author places his messages of defying authority and doing what you w This book...wow. It's hard to describe. The main characters, Ichigo and Momoko are very in-your-face and very funny. They both take pride in their...ah...maturity, though Momoko is very calm and levelheaded (almost emotionless, really) but Ichigo is very brash and loud. However, despite their differences the girls manage to find common ground in the pachinko parlor and in matters of ordinary life. And throughout this novel, the author places his messages of defying authority and doing what you want within reason...all in all, a great book though I wouldn't say it is for everyone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Xu

    so funny, sarcastic and just a good lighthearted read about owning ur life and respecting others who do the same :33

  12. 5 out of 5

    M

    This is one of my favorite books ever. As a Lolita I feel inspired by Takemoto’s words. I believe that reading it is fundamental in this fashion. It carries the Lolita spirit gracefully and inspires you to keep going and follow you passions. It is so well written and the translation by Miss Akemi Wegmüller is perfect

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Reuter

    Loved it. The chick lit, YA book for people who hate chick lit and YA.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Raisa Alexis

    Well. Time to cry again. This book will have a review soon!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Vermeers

    It is very likely that English-speakers will come to this light novel after having seen the film adaptation. There are some significant differences between the two, so knowledge of one doesn't affect the surprises (much) of the other. Still, the novel adds much of depth and interest to the film, so if you've enjoyed Fukada and Tsuchiya as Momoko and Ichigo, please be sure to read Takemoto's version of the story. I should add here that this may be the first book I have ever read that I literally It is very likely that English-speakers will come to this light novel after having seen the film adaptation. There are some significant differences between the two, so knowledge of one doesn't affect the surprises (much) of the other. Still, the novel adds much of depth and interest to the film, so if you've enjoyed Fukada and Tsuchiya as Momoko and Ichigo, please be sure to read Takemoto's version of the story. I should add here that this may be the first book I have ever read that I literally could not bring myself to put down. I kept wanting to read more and ended up finishing it in one sitting. I have seen the film before reading the book, myself, and enjoyed the adaptation greatly, so I was perhaps predisposed toward this one, but I haven't had the same experience with any other book where I'd seen the film first. To summarize the story without giving away too much, in rural Japan two young women who seemingly could not be more opposite meet by chance and become fast friends. As they grow to know and bond with each other, they face the same problems of uncertainty and awkward tentativeness that have been the hallmark of young people since the beginning of time. Obviously, this summary doesn't give a real sense of the specific events in the story, and it doesn't even touch on the techniques brought to bear by the author which tie the narrative into a thematic whole (watch for things that are doubles, for the repeated idea of collaboration between two as a bulwark against the multitude, and the providential role of accident especially). Now, with that aside, spoilers follow. SPOILER-HEAVY EXTENDED SYNOPSIS Momoko is a young, disaffected woman who is (similar to Chihiro at the beginning of Miyazaki's film Spirited Away) unable to participate fully in the flow of life. This is presented by her unwillingness and inability to form friendships, her disinterest at witnessing animals dying, her indifference to her parents' divorce, and so on. In Middle School, Momoko develops some interest in embroidery as a result of her fascination with the French Rococo period, the decadence of which she sees as a perfect fulfillment of her alienation. More importantly, she develops a love for the street fashion style called "Lolita", which is focused on extravagant decoration, frills, and lace (and, by the way, is entirely unrelated to the novel by Nabokov, a misperception that has led some Western critics to fundamentally misunderstand it). Her father, whom she calls The Loser, is a man who wants to do the best he can, but who is fundamentally lazy and so unable to do anything well. He tries to rise in the ranks of the organized crime families of Amagasaki, but when one of his schemes, involving using two brands together in counterfeit fashion items (an idea that he got from one of Momoko's fashion magazines) draws the ire of international corporations, he is forced to leave with Momoko to live in Shimotsuma, in rural Ibaraki prefecture, with his mother at her farm. With this change of residence, Momoko finds that it is more difficult to get money from her father, now that he is not making as much selling counterfeit fashion items, so she casts about for new sources of income. She realizes that, if she is open about the items being counterfeits, she could probably get away with selling small amounts of the remaining stock that her father had brought with them and places an ad, specifying the fake nature of the items, in a local advertising circular. She gets a few responses, but dismisses most of them due to her fear of communicating with male strangers. One of the responses, though, seems to be from a young girl, whose sloppy handwriting and poor grammar point to her being no more than 13 or so. Because the girl lives nearby, Momoko invites her to come examine the goods. When she arrives, though, it turns out that she is a young woman of Momoko's age who is also a motorcycle-riding, hard-fighting Yanki (or biker-gang chick). In the first of many parallels between the girls, just as Momoko mistook Ichiko, the biker, for being a child due to her letter, so Ichiko mistakes Momoko for being younger than she is due to the frilly dress Momoko is wearing when they meet. After this chance meeting, Ichiko continues to come over and visit, ostensibly to act as a go-between for the rest of her girl gang in buying counterfeit fashion items, which the Yankis go wild for, and the two girls spend more time together. Momoko isn't sure why, but she's never really understood the interactions of people well. Her only real connection in life has been with the Lolita dresses and accessories with which she surrounds herself. In a second parallel between the girls, we are shown how both Momoko and Ichiko externalize their developing sense of self, Momoko into clothing, Ichiko into her tricked out 50cc scooter. Another parallel drawn is between the girls' names. Each feels that they have been given a name that doesn't reflect their inner self: Momoko's name (which means "Peach Girl", and is related to one of Japan's greatest mythic/folklore heroes, Momotarō the Peach Boy) was used for a character in a famous biker manga, and so everyone expects her to be a tough, hard-riding, gangster chick. Meanwhile, it turns out that Ichiko is really Ichigo "Strawberry" (and her family name, Shiroyuri, means "white lily"), which is all Momoko will call her after she learns the truth. After a while of getting to know each other, Ichigo learns that Momoko buys her clothing in Tokyo, and asks if she knows of a legendary embroiderer called "Emma". Ichigo wants to have her biker coat embroidered with a tribute to her biker gang leader, Akimi, the woman who treated her well when she had run away from home once. Akimi is planning to retire from the gang soon, and they are planning to have a special "parade", where the bikers ride around the town as a way of celebrating. Momoko doesn't know the embroiderer, and suspects that the business doesn't exist, but agrees to look for it. In the course of this conversation, Ichigo also explains about another legendary figure among girl bikers (as Momoko notes, the bikers seem to be surrounded by "legendary" figures), Himiko, who purged the gangs of exploitive criminal elements such as drugs and prostitution, but who vanished after demolishing the local yakuza. Ichigo convinces Momoko to come play pachinko as a way to make money, in part to pay for the embroidery. Momoko grudgingly agrees to come watch, but when she gets bored watching Ichigo lose, she puts a few yen into a machine she chooses because it is cute and accidentally learns that she has a natural talent for the game, winning big. For a few weeks, the two go around pachinko parlors, Momoko winning enough that the parlor operators start to suspect that the two are cheating. At this point, they meet an up-and-coming yakuza tough who gives them advice on how not to be suspected. Ichigo notes that he happens to have the same design of a god riding a tiger (Momoko points out in her narrative that this particular god normally rides a cloud, not a tiger, and finds the whole thing terribly vulgar) on the back of his jacket as Akimi has on the front of hers, and takes that as an omen. Furthermore, Ichigo is smitten by the young man, but is too afraid to do anything about it. After searching for Emma's online, Momoko runs into nothing but dead ends, so they decide to go to Tokyo to search the streets (and, not incidentally, to visit Momoko's favorite boutique, Baby, the Stars Shine Bright). Momoko notices that the back of Ichigo's jacket is strange, and asks what it is supposed to mean. Ichigo responds that it is go-iken-muyo "no use for your opinion", but Momoko informs her that the last character is actually buzama "shabby", making it a weird way to say "shabby opinion". When they arrive at Baby, the Stars Shine Bright, the saleswoman notices that Momoko has added embroidery to the bonnet she'd bought from there. Momoko explains that she had to repair it after moths or mice had chewed it. The saleswoman calls the bonnet to the attention of a man who Momoko first takes for a delivery boy, but then realizes is actually Akinori Isobe, the chief designer for Baby, the Stars Shine Bright. She finds herself tongue-tied because he is the man who defined her life, as it were, through his fashion designs. He looks appreciatively at her embroidery work and gives her some free merchandise, but leaves after a polite farewell (a somewhat different scene than portrayed in the film). Energized by this encounter, Momoko resumes the search for "Emma", and finds it when she remembers to check a phone book instead of just online. Hurrying there, the girls find out that it is the address of an embroidery teacher, not an embroiderer, but the teacher notes that there was once an embroiderer by that name who worked on biker regalia in a different area, but he died 15 years ago. She figures that the similarity of names caused bikers to think that he had moved, since she has had to inform a large number of them who show up on occasion looking for the legendary embroiderer. Disappointed, Ichigo gives up on the idea of embroidering her coat, but Momoko offers to do it instead. There follows a detailed description of her search for the right font and stitching to use. She then loses herself in the work, stitching without break from the evening of Monday through the morning of Wednesday. Because she is Momoko, she adds a small strawberry to the work (which you can see if you look carefully in the movie). When she presents the coat to Ichigo, the biker is not entirely pleased by the addition of the berry, but is so impressed by the amazing (one might even say legendary) quality that she decides to overlook it. She says, "I didn't even know embroidery could be this beautiful." The day after the parade, Ichigo calls Momoko and asks her to meet her by the river. There, she tells Momoko all about it, and then reveals that Akimi's reason for retiring was that she was engaged to the young yakuza tough that Ichigo had fallen for, and that she was pregnant with his child. Momoko refuses to offer platitudes and just stands by with a handkerchief while Ichigo cries the pain of unrequited love away. A few days later, Momoko gets an email from Akinori Isobe of Baby, the Stars Shine Bright, asking her to please contact him about an urgent matter and giving a phone number. When she does, he tells her that he needs her to do some embroidery work for him, as the factory has made a mistake and shipped some of the samples without the designs. He needs them for a photo shoot that is happening soon. She agrees, and spends three days finishing the work, in plenty of time. Ichigo comes with her to present the finished items to Isobe. He recognizes Momoko's work on the front of Ichigo's coat right away, and is duly impressed with her work on his jumpers. Unfortunately, the model who was to wear the clothes in the photo shoot is injured, accidentally, by her manager (he gives her wart remover instead of eye drops, forcing her to go to the hospital). Looking around, Isobe notices Ichigo and asks her to be the model for the shoot. Ichigo has a natural talent for modeling, and after the photo spread is published gets offers for more work, which she takes on, but only when it doesn't interfere with her biker activities, work, school, or anything else in her life. The ad also generates a lot of demand for the jumper with Momoko's embroidery, and Isobe asks if she'd be willing to take on a limited-edition line of them (say, 30 jumpers). Meanwhile, Ichigo's biker gang starts to change, become more "political", as the new leader, Miko, wants to unify with other local girl-gangs and become bigger. Ichigo isn't thrilled with this, nor with the increased discipline under Anna, their fight squad leader. Because of her attitude toward the new order and her work modeling, Ichigo says that she is being asked to "draw the line", but doesn't explain what that means. Momoko asks The Loser, and he informs her that, in the yakuza, it would be having your pinky finger chopped, and in biker gangs it varied, but could range from being burned by lit cigarettes to being dragged behind a motorcycle at speed. Momoko borrows her grandmother's Viva You scooter (a collaboration from back in the '80s between Honda and the Viva You fashion brand, like if it were a Swatch scooter) and races to be by her friend's side at the Ushika Buddha, a giant statue of the Buddha. She finds Ichigo surrounded by around 30 biker girls armed with chains, bats, and the like. She hits the brakes too hard and the scooter spills her, the engine cracking and smoking. Ichigo explains that she is going to go it alone, like Momoko, not following orders or obeying rules, and accuses the bikers of being sheep. Miko claims that she and the leader of another gang were told by Himiko, the legendary biker, to unify the gangs, and that Ichigo is stabbing them in the back by trying to leave. For those who have seen the film, the fight plays out quite differently, with the balloons of water that Momoko's father was making being of some importance. There's also no speech about being Himiko and Emma's daughter. After the fight, as they are riding away, Ichigo tells Momoko about how she had accidentally invented Himiko. She offers to have her mechanic friend pick up the damaged Viva You scooter. As they ride away, Momoko thinks about how, if Baby, the Stars Shine Bright were to make a scooter like Viva You did, she'd be happy to get a license to ride it, then lays her head against Ichigo's back "the way I might with a lover".

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Lolita fashion and Yanki life. What a combo. It works well though, as there is a real passion evident for the authenticity of the fashion and commitment to the lifestyles. The Roccoco fashioned Momoko meets Ichigo (Ichiko as she prefers) after sending an add out offering cheap knock-off Versace gear in order to raise funds to purchase more of her coveted Lolita fashion items. Their hi-jinks arrive fast and their friendship, or whatever Momoko might call it, grows rapidly, forcing them both out o Lolita fashion and Yanki life. What a combo. It works well though, as there is a real passion evident for the authenticity of the fashion and commitment to the lifestyles. The Roccoco fashioned Momoko meets Ichigo (Ichiko as she prefers) after sending an add out offering cheap knock-off Versace gear in order to raise funds to purchase more of her coveted Lolita fashion items. Their hi-jinks arrive fast and their friendship, or whatever Momoko might call it, grows rapidly, forcing them both out of their comfort zones. 4.12 outta 5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    Well, this is certainly the best novel about embroidery I've ever read. Okay, it's the only one I've ever read. In fact, it might be a genre unto itself. Momoko is from Amagasaki, which seems to be the Japanese answer to the Jersey Shore. Everyone in town is a wannabe gangsta who thinks track suits are haute couture. Momoko's dad is himself a small-time hustler who peddles fake Versace, which the white trash (or Japanese equivalent thereto) snaps up. He's actually quite a genius at marketing thes Well, this is certainly the best novel about embroidery I've ever read. Okay, it's the only one I've ever read. In fact, it might be a genre unto itself. Momoko is from Amagasaki, which seems to be the Japanese answer to the Jersey Shore. Everyone in town is a wannabe gangsta who thinks track suits are haute couture. Momoko's dad is himself a small-time hustler who peddles fake Versace, which the white trash (or Japanese equivalent thereto) snaps up. He's actually quite a genius at marketing these counterfeits, having long since figured out that his customers aren't after nice shirts or designer dresses -- they'll take any piece of crap as long as it says "Versace" on the label. It doesn't even have to be clothing -- he sells Versace pencil cases and mouse pads to teenage girls who believe such things are the height of cool. If anything, Momoko's dad is too good at his business, and he eventually attracts the attention of lawyers and has to get out of town before they can track him down. So Momoko and dad move to his mother's place in Shimotsuma. In theory, Shimotsuma is within the Tokyo suburbs, but by a quirk of geography and urban planning, it takes two and a half hours to reach the city with public transport, leaving the area a rural hinterland. Which really annoys Momoko, who fancies herself a high fashion Lolita. Now in the English speaking world, "Lolita" would refer to a young, sexually precocious girl, or a girl who dresses in a hypersexualized manner inappropriate for her age. In Japan it means the inverse -- it refers to older teenagers and young women who adopt china doll-style fashions as though they're little girls from the 18th or 19th Century. There are many sub-types of Loli fashion, ranging from Alice in Wonderland types to goths without the Sisters of Mercy soundtrack. Momoko is a Rococo loli, meaning she embraces the style of pre-revolutionary France in all its gaudy glory. (The book actually opens with a hilarious discourse on the history of Rococo fashion and design, and how totally unfair it is that people dismiss it as nothing but frills.) Of course walking around Hicksville, JP. with freakin' panniers in your dress is a good way to become known as a freak. Not taht things were better in Amagasaki, but at least there people had some idea what Loli fashion was; in Shimotsuma they think she's gotten separated from the circus. When Momoko tries to sell some of her dad's leftover "Versace" merchandise, she meets Ichigo, a yanki biker her own age ("yanki" being the Japanese term for teenage gangs that often serve as a breeding ground for yakuza). Ichigo is, make no mistakes, an idiot. Not the amusing, comic kind. No, she's genuinely slow-witted. Momoko has to explain in excruciating detail that her "Versace" stuff is fake, and even then Ichigo doesn't fully comprehend what this means or why anyone would care -- as long as it says "Versace" on the label, it's Versace. Now, I said Ichigo is a biker, but that's only half true. She's yet to pass her licensing exam for a motorcycle, so she gets around on a cheap-ass scooter that's so tricked out with bling that it can barely hit 30mph. Seriously, a Vespa would be a step up for her. Nonetheless she's a member of the Ponytails (Po-ni-tei-ru), biggest gang in town (they have seven members!). Momoko and Ichigo's relationship starts out as purely business, with Momoko selling fake Versace clothes to the Ponytails, but they soon become friends, with Ichigo taking Momoko to pachinko parlors and Momoko helping Ichigo find a legendary embroiderer who specializes in yanki kamikaze jackets. And while it's never spelled out, there's a strong les-yay mood to the book, particularly the ending which has a very distinct romantic feeling to it. We aren't talking Strawberry Panic here, and you could certainly read things as, "They're just friends" if the yuri thing turns out off, but the clues are definitely there. Along the way, Momoko and Ichigo get involved with Baby, the Stars Shine Bright, which Momoko assures us is the bestest brand of Lolita fashions ev-AR! It also happens to be the company Takemoto worked for as a designer while writing the book, and at times Momoko's gushing sounds like an advertisement for the company. It doesn't help that Akinori Isobe, BTSSB's founder, shows up and hires Momoko as an embroiderer and Ichigo as a model. These sections of the story almost derail the book as Momoko seems dangerously close to becoming a Mary Sue. Ultimately it doesn't take up enough of the plot to do serious damage, but if Goodreads allowed half-stars, the book would be 3.5 instead of 4.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cara M

    It has been so long since I read this the first time, but it is still such a brilliant book! Definitely it has a be-your-self-as-hard-as-you-can message, which is one that can't be beat. Also, be young as hard as you can, because disillusionment isn't any better than dreaming big. It has been so long since I read this the first time, but it is still such a brilliant book! Definitely it has a be-your-self-as-hard-as-you-can message, which is one that can't be beat. Also, be young as hard as you can, because disillusionment isn't any better than dreaming big.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Saz

    What an odd, sweet little book. I say odd because firstly the summary of this book, to me, is a little misleading. Particularly this bit: Together, this unlikeliest of duos strike out on a quest to find a legendary embroiderer, a journey on which they encounter conniving pachinko parlor managers, legendary street-punks, and anemic costumers. Who knows, they might just make it big...if only Ichiko would stop head butting Momoko in the forehead. It gives the impression that this "quest" is the main What an odd, sweet little book. I say odd because firstly the summary of this book, to me, is a little misleading. Particularly this bit: Together, this unlikeliest of duos strike out on a quest to find a legendary embroiderer, a journey on which they encounter conniving pachinko parlor managers, legendary street-punks, and anemic costumers. Who knows, they might just make it big...if only Ichiko would stop head butting Momoko in the forehead. It gives the impression that this "quest" is the main plot of the novel and pachinko parlor managers and legendary street-punks are foes or allies they meet along the way, while really though all those things are present in the story, it's not as adventurous as that blurb makes it sound. This book is really simply about two girls, both misfits in their own right, coming together to form an unlikely and hilarious and heart-warming friendship. That's it. And it was truly adorable. I'm really, really into stories about people becoming unlikely friends, I pretty much live for it. Especially when it's between two females. Those types of stories just really get me. So, if you like that sort of thing, this book will not disappoint as it flawlessly depicts the journey of two characters who appear outwardly to be opposites when they actually are very similar. We've got our narrator, Momoko, who strives to uphold the Rococo and Lolita lifestyle with every fiber of her being. And we've got Ichigo, who strives to uphold the Yanki (roughly: a punk) biker lifestyle with every fiber of her being. As they grow closer their philosophies begin to blend together in a lovely but predictable way. Momoko's character was incredible. From the first page it is clear that she's going to be absolutely insufferable. She is totally absorbed in her own little world and in herself and it's amazing. Her inner monologue is hilarious. She refers to her father only as "The Loser", with good reason of course, and when Ichigo comments on how shitty her personality is, Momoko simply responds with "I know." And her little asides to herself whenever Ichigo would say something ridiculous, or really whenever Ichigo would say anything at all, had me in stitches. With lines like: "Shit, girl. You look even dumber than usual." Allow me to return those words verbatim to your good self. I was giggling constantly. Ichigo was too perfect for words. Oblivious and somewhat naive, her child-like logic captures the reader's heart instantly. Even with her filthy mouth and fiery temper, she comes across as this adorable little thing that just wants to belong somewhere. She's constantly threatening to kick Momoko's ass, and I think there's hardly a sentence directed from her to Momoko without the word bitch in it, but it's clear from the beginning the admiration she has for her. The growth of their friendship made my teeth ache, expecially being told from the ever refined and utterly blasé Momoko's point of view. Her love for Ichigo creeps up on her as well as the reader, and her dedication to her by the end of book surprised even me. Now, aside from the supreme cuteness of Ichigo and Momoko's relationship, the story overall leaves something to be desired. There's quite a big introduction about Momoko's father and their past together, which I really loved, but then after that he just disappears for the meat of the book, and shows up conveniently again at the end. It wasn't hugely annoying but it did bother me a little bit. And I'm probably just a little too accustomed to the action-adventurey stories that are all over the place right now but the whole time I was reading this book I just kept waiting for something exciting to happen. Spoiler: it doesn't. There's quite a tense scene toward the end but there was no lead up to it, it literally came out of nowhere, but it is a pretty great ending. The first 80% of the book is really just all about Momoko's past, a little look into Ichigo's past, and the two of them going to random places and arguing with each other. Boring as that sounds, somehow this book was a very engaging and funny(though very light)read. Also, the author's afterword was really lovely. I was always fascinated by Lolita fashion when I was younger and it's nice to feel like I have a deeper insight on it after reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Princess Em

    I can't stress how much I LOVE this book. It's funny but also very deep. I have loved Lolita Fashion and just kawaii style for several years now and that is what brought me to this book. Wen I got in to this I did not know what I was getting in to it is much deeper than I thought it would be. I am not a big fan of this genre but I loved this book. 💟If you can read this book . if you do not like it well at least it is short. I can't stress how much I LOVE this book. It's funny but also very deep. I have loved Lolita Fashion and just kawaii style for several years now and that is what brought me to this book. Wen I got in to this I did not know what I was getting in to it is much deeper than I thought it would be. I am not a big fan of this genre but I loved this book. 💟If you can read this book . if you do not like it well at least it is short.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I chose to read "Kamikaze Girls" because I'm very interested in Japanese literature, and I was familiar with the author, Novala Takemoto. This modern novel gives the reader a glimpse into Japanese street fashion and trends, but it also has plenty of substance and humor. It is considered a cult classic in Japan, in fact. I like analyzing multilingual texts or translated novels to better understand how an author's native language influences how their writing is perceived. I enjoyed the glossary of I chose to read "Kamikaze Girls" because I'm very interested in Japanese literature, and I was familiar with the author, Novala Takemoto. This modern novel gives the reader a glimpse into Japanese street fashion and trends, but it also has plenty of substance and humor. It is considered a cult classic in Japan, in fact. I like analyzing multilingual texts or translated novels to better understand how an author's native language influences how their writing is perceived. I enjoyed the glossary of Japanese terms in the back of the novel, like "Yanki" meaning "very scary because of insolence, hair-trigger tempers, quickness to fight, and appearance" (218). It assured full comprehension on the part of the reader. I have difficulty using humor in my writing, but I actually really enjoyed the Takemoto's humor in this novel. For my own writing, I would focus on how Takemoto crafted the dialogue, which adds largely to the humor of the novel. Dialogue is something I struggle with writing, especially humorous dialogue. This novel is a good model for crafting better dialogue between characters.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Libra Frills

    I'm into Lolita fashion, and of course I watched the movie some time ago - so when this book was gifted to me, I was so excited to read it. It starts a bit slow, but before I knew it, I couldn't stop reading. I adore Momoko's narration (even if she's pretty rude!) and the book is just as fun and zany as the movie. I even started to cry a little at the end of it, half because of the story itself, half because it was over and I just felt so much emotion in my little frill-covered heart. I hope mor I'm into Lolita fashion, and of course I watched the movie some time ago - so when this book was gifted to me, I was so excited to read it. It starts a bit slow, but before I knew it, I couldn't stop reading. I adore Momoko's narration (even if she's pretty rude!) and the book is just as fun and zany as the movie. I even started to cry a little at the end of it, half because of the story itself, half because it was over and I just felt so much emotion in my little frill-covered heart. I hope more of Takemoto's novels are translated for the US market.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    I actually bought and read this one in English because I was very interested in how it was translated. The book, being by my beloved Novala, of course deserves 5 stars, but the translation, while accurate enough and not distractingly bad, was far from artistic. Still, immensely interesting to me, since eventually one day I do want to finish Happiness.....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Kamikaze Girls is a wonderful story of an unlikely friendship between a lolita and a "yankii". I enjoyed the heartfelt story line. I would, and have, recommended this book to a friend. Kamikaze Girls is a wonderful story of an unlikely friendship between a lolita and a "yankii". I enjoyed the heartfelt story line. I would, and have, recommended this book to a friend.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Zara Mcaspurren

    Kamikaze Girls is one of my favourite movies, and I was really pleased to find out that the original novel of it was available in English. I do know about the manga, but I had heard mixed reviews on that, and I really wanted to read the novel if I could. The novel is by author Novala Takemoto who is apparently well known for being into the Lolita subculture in Japan. From what I can tell, this is the only one of his novels available in English. I also discovered - through Google - that there Kamikaze Girls is one of my favourite movies, and I was really pleased to find out that the original novel of it was available in English. I do know about the manga, but I had heard mixed reviews on that, and I really wanted to read the novel if I could. The novel is by author Novala Takemoto who is apparently well known for being into the Lolita subculture in Japan. From what I can tell, this is the only one of his novels available in English. I also discovered - through Google - that there is apparently a sequel to Kamikaze Girls but I haven't found out any details about it. What did I think of the novel? I think it makes a great movie. Okay, so that's not very fair. I did really enjoy my experience reading this. Momoko's refreshingly blunt way of stating everything around her, and then going into quite lyrical language when describing Rocco, or Lolita, or the process of embroidery; well, it makes for a very interesting contrast. She's so detached from the wider world by her own choice, that to see that she does have passions and interests saves her from becoming one of those characters who is too blunt to really like. The growing friendship with Ichigo, someone who is the complete opposite of this rather closed off person, is really touching to read about and... Yeah, okay, I kind of don't want to find out anything about the sequel because I'd rather stay in a world where these two stay in each others lives and nothing complicates that. Ichigo is actually my favourite of the two girls. I really love this tough as nails Yanki biker girl who has this very soft side and extreme loyalty to her friends. Her sense of morals, or maybe code of conduct would work better, provides another good contrast to Momoko, who would happily sell her own family if it meant she would be able to afford more from Baby, The Stars Shine Bright. (I was quite pleased to learn this is a real brand, and have to admit some of their stuff is very nice. Not particularly my taste, but nice all the same.) While she initally seems to just force her friendship on Momoko, I can see it from her point of view: she sees this isolated girl, who seems to respond well when she talks to her. Maybe she's just quite shy and needs help making friends. Okay, I'll be her friend. There is a logic to Ichigo's thoughts, even if she does seem to jump around them a lot. It's a coming of age story that's decked out in flouncy frills and kamikaze jackets. I enjoyed the focus being on the shared friendship of the girls, and how that goes from barely knowing to willing to rescue the other. You don't at any point feel like this is an act by either of the two, which is refreshing and there's no real love story involved. Implied feelings that are ignored for the sake of friendship, but there's no guy getting in the way as there might be in others stories. It moves along at its own pace, and does its own thing, and I respect that. So yes, I did enjoy this book. I just... enjoy the movie more. It's one of those stories that suits a visual style a lot more, in my opinion. That being said? I'd likely recommend this to other people, and I will probably end up re-reading it at some point. It's a fun read, and a nice way to just relax. Perhaps I'll do it decked out in frills. ... Nah, I wouldn't suit that flouncy stuff. Best leave it to Momoko.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    This book was decent. It has a lot of exposition and run-on information rather than descriptive story or dialogue, which made this short novel hard to read. Once I made it past page 35 or so, it started to get good. The story is told from the perspective of a Lolita, Momoko, who describes her move to a new area as well as her love of Lolita. When she finds she needs more money to buy more Lolita stuff, she puts an advertisement in a magazine to sell knockoff Versace clothing and accessories, stat This book was decent. It has a lot of exposition and run-on information rather than descriptive story or dialogue, which made this short novel hard to read. Once I made it past page 35 or so, it started to get good. The story is told from the perspective of a Lolita, Momoko, who describes her move to a new area as well as her love of Lolita. When she finds she needs more money to buy more Lolita stuff, she puts an advertisement in a magazine to sell knockoff Versace clothing and accessories, stating they are fake. When a Yanki girl shows up at her door, she cannot believe it. Interestingly enough, the two become friends and make quite the scene to be stared at, especially when Momoko continuously wins at Pachinko. Who knew a Yanki and a Loli could hit it off so well? This is a slow-starting, yet fun and comical story about friendship and one of the forms friendship can take. I would recommend it to people interested in female-based novels or Japanese culture, but it is a fairly selective audience, to be sure.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crossroads Library

    Well, the opening twenty or thirty pages are rather informative and gives you just about everything you need to understand Lolita fashion and Yanki life which is important to actually getting the story at all I think. If you can get through that, if it isn't your thing to be bogged down with information, you get a really interesting story about a rather cynical and solitary girl (the Lolita) developing a "friendship" with her exact opposite (the Yanki). Fashion is important to the story as is wo Well, the opening twenty or thirty pages are rather informative and gives you just about everything you need to understand Lolita fashion and Yanki life which is important to actually getting the story at all I think. If you can get through that, if it isn't your thing to be bogged down with information, you get a really interesting story about a rather cynical and solitary girl (the Lolita) developing a "friendship" with her exact opposite (the Yanki). Fashion is important to the story as is world views and human relations. It's a fairly quick read, but it is a good one. 4.1 fake Versace jackets outta 5 - Matthew

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I kept liking the story more and more as it progressed. While I knew this book would be about Lolita culture, my eyes were also opened to an aspect of Japanese counter culture that I had never even heard of: Yanki culture. It was so interesting learning about all of the teenage biker gangs in addition to the Rococo spirit of Lolita fashion and ideology. Sometimes, things leaned a little too heavily into history/exposition, but, overall, this was a very compelling story, and I loved Momoko and Ic I kept liking the story more and more as it progressed. While I knew this book would be about Lolita culture, my eyes were also opened to an aspect of Japanese counter culture that I had never even heard of: Yanki culture. It was so interesting learning about all of the teenage biker gangs in addition to the Rococo spirit of Lolita fashion and ideology. Sometimes, things leaned a little too heavily into history/exposition, but, overall, this was a very compelling story, and I loved Momoko and Ichigo. They are often hilarious without meaning to be, and I found myself cracking up in several places.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    I honestly loved this book. Not just because it was funny and entertaining, but because when I read YA, I read it for the heart and Kamikaze Girls has plenty of that ingredient. You may disagree with Momoko and yet you are going to be rooting for her and her new friend, and I loved the teenage voice of Momoko's words - that confident that she has got it all figured out! Loved seeing her friendship evolve, loved reading their mishaps! I am so glad I randomly picked this book, it was one lovely su I honestly loved this book. Not just because it was funny and entertaining, but because when I read YA, I read it for the heart and Kamikaze Girls has plenty of that ingredient. You may disagree with Momoko and yet you are going to be rooting for her and her new friend, and I loved the teenage voice of Momoko's words - that confident that she has got it all figured out! Loved seeing her friendship evolve, loved reading their mishaps! I am so glad I randomly picked this book, it was one lovely surprise.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Giles

    It’s rare for me to give a book five stars, but I think this is the perfect young adult novel. I wish I’d read this as a teen! My mum bought me Japanese Schoolgirl Inferno at age 14, which is when I learned about Lolitas, Sukeban and also Kogals. I’ve been obsessed with the 1990s-mid 00s Japanese subcultures ever since. I absolutely adore how heavily Baby The Stars Shine Bright features in this book, and also Momoko as our stubborn protagonist. Novala Takemoto captures the true campiness of this It’s rare for me to give a book five stars, but I think this is the perfect young adult novel. I wish I’d read this as a teen! My mum bought me Japanese Schoolgirl Inferno at age 14, which is when I learned about Lolitas, Sukeban and also Kogals. I’ve been obsessed with the 1990s-mid 00s Japanese subcultures ever since. I absolutely adore how heavily Baby The Stars Shine Bright features in this book, and also Momoko as our stubborn protagonist. Novala Takemoto captures the true campiness of this subcultural collision, and this book is an absolute delight.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.