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Humorous, poignant, and honest, No Place Like Home is the story of one woman’s journey to feel settled without settling, and her realization that home is much more than an address.   Brooke Berman moved to New York as a wide-eyed eighteen-year-old eager to call the big city home. Candid, funny, and thoughtful, in No Place Like Home, we follow Brooke’s adventures as she cris Humorous, poignant, and honest, No Place Like Home is the story of one woman’s journey to feel settled without settling, and her realization that home is much more than an address.   Brooke Berman moved to New York as a wide-eyed eighteen-year-old eager to call the big city home. Candid, funny, and thoughtful, in No Place Like Home, we follow Brooke’s adventures as she crisscrosses town trying to make ends meet and make her dreams of a life in the theater come true. With each apartment, from the heavenly to the horrible, she learns more about how to heal the past, let go of excess, and keep a sense of humor while trying to stay flexible in the search for stability. No Place Like Home reminds everyone of the age-old struggle not just to find a house, but to build a true home.   From the Hardcover edition.


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Humorous, poignant, and honest, No Place Like Home is the story of one woman’s journey to feel settled without settling, and her realization that home is much more than an address.   Brooke Berman moved to New York as a wide-eyed eighteen-year-old eager to call the big city home. Candid, funny, and thoughtful, in No Place Like Home, we follow Brooke’s adventures as she cris Humorous, poignant, and honest, No Place Like Home is the story of one woman’s journey to feel settled without settling, and her realization that home is much more than an address.   Brooke Berman moved to New York as a wide-eyed eighteen-year-old eager to call the big city home. Candid, funny, and thoughtful, in No Place Like Home, we follow Brooke’s adventures as she crisscrosses town trying to make ends meet and make her dreams of a life in the theater come true. With each apartment, from the heavenly to the horrible, she learns more about how to heal the past, let go of excess, and keep a sense of humor while trying to stay flexible in the search for stability. No Place Like Home reminds everyone of the age-old struggle not just to find a house, but to build a true home.   From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I am obsessed with NYC and read this mainly because I wanted to read about the 39 apartments she lived in. By the end of the book I was completely annoyed with her and her "problems". I'm not the "creative" type, but is this really how "they" tend to view themselves and the world around them? I find it absurd and rather self-indulgent to pathologically insist on refusing work that doesn't speak to one's "spirit" and then to turn around and write a book about years spent searching for "centering" I am obsessed with NYC and read this mainly because I wanted to read about the 39 apartments she lived in. By the end of the book I was completely annoyed with her and her "problems". I'm not the "creative" type, but is this really how "they" tend to view themselves and the world around them? I find it absurd and rather self-indulgent to pathologically insist on refusing work that doesn't speak to one's "spirit" and then to turn around and write a book about years spent searching for "centering" and the "meaning of home". New age mumbo jumbo, bitching and moaning about things that would actually not be out of one's control if a sense of "home" was actually as important as one claimed, if I wasn't so irritated I could go on...Bleh.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Finally exactly the right time for this. I'm really happy that this exists. Brooke was a teacher of mine in college, my last year of playwriting, and I still think about things she said. Or sometimes just the way she says them. I also really enjoy her plays and the way she tells stories on her blog. Her language is just good for me and when I got this I felt like I needed to save it. The book is about New York, and the gimmick is the apartments (and/or the symbolism is the moving). But the real su Finally exactly the right time for this. I'm really happy that this exists. Brooke was a teacher of mine in college, my last year of playwriting, and I still think about things she said. Or sometimes just the way she says them. I also really enjoy her plays and the way she tells stories on her blog. Her language is just good for me and when I got this I felt like I needed to save it. The book is about New York, and the gimmick is the apartments (and/or the symbolism is the moving). But the real subject is piecing together what you are able to do, and it's no small thing that the book takes place over 20 years and these pieces are hard at work the entire time. The long, longness of the long-term work. It's a meaningful way to look at goals you've set. What else has lasted for 20 years? If you're lost for a handful of those can you turn back onto the road? Do you ever decide to give up? Is it really your decision? Brooke's work in the theater is a good glass for these questions because that's the nature of that work, but the feeling clearly affects lots of us. Personality is part of it, and what prevents this story from being outright advice (for me) is that hers is really different from mine. Reading this we hear about a lot of personal solutions from spiritual and New Age sources, which probably for most readers is more about her telling us that it works for her, than understanding that it could work for us. But sometimes her translation itself works, and is cute in its foreignness, and made me wonder decent things myself. There's a lot of nostalgia in the book, but you can tell how much she still cares for those paths that brought her out of crises. I guess for me the forms of those crises are what was most significant and relatable. It's often a crisis of choice, a lot of times when she needs to choose what she does, to try something and then choose to go back. Or choosing to say no to something, like her family. And of course, choosing places -- when your chosen homes supercede your given ones. We've all got to think about it. Her periods of transition are often articulated with a lot of grace and/or funniness that makes them just help. The most important to me was her extended problem in 2002, her Cordelia complex and deep sadness, shedding and change. "If only I could release more and judge the pain less." "The lie of isolation." I started corner-folding pages like crazy in the middle. In some parts there's a lot more recollection than reflection, and sometimes time moves too quickly and it wasn't super smooth. Maybe it was a problem of trying to skip through less important periods, but her memory and timeline is so prevalent she doesn't really let go of it. Also, Noah is clearly such a crappy dude that it's sort of hard to read about their long relationship. And I got a little uncomfortable the more upwardly mobile and dissatisfied she became, which is ironic in her story but present nonetheless. (Some people are really glad to get $20 an hour in 2010, let alone 2001.) And btw, whoever titled this book, come on for real. An extra star for my sentiment, perhaps. But it just never hurts to think these things through. Especially when you need to hear them. Sidebar on that*: One thing is that reading this inspired me to make a list of every address I've lived in. Because I was impressed that she can do that and I knew that one day if I couldn't remember someplace I would be upset about it. I made it up to 12. 7 in NYC. I can remember all the buildings except one or two from childhood, and I'm missing about three from infancy altogether. Also, I found that the house I lived in longest as a kid now seems to have a pool in the backyard. That backyard is sloped, how does that even work. And there were four trees back there. I mean, what the heck. * (Learned that from Brooke.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    A great memoir about transience and permanence, and about the need for people and the need for a refuge from people. It also ends up being about the Manhattan of the last twenty years, and about the idea of New York, written by someone whose "idea of New York" in some ways closely resembles mine but in others vastly differs. I give the book an extra star for Berman's ability to familiarize me with, if not completely endear me to, ideas and behaviors of which I would previously have been, shall w A great memoir about transience and permanence, and about the need for people and the need for a refuge from people. It also ends up being about the Manhattan of the last twenty years, and about the idea of New York, written by someone whose "idea of New York" in some ways closely resembles mine but in others vastly differs. I give the book an extra star for Berman's ability to familiarize me with, if not completely endear me to, ideas and behaviors of which I would previously have been, shall we say, dismissive (e.g. spiritual advisement from a self-proclaimed healer, artist, author and business consultant). Indirectly the book has set me on the long path of freeing myself from certain stereotypes/categories into which I have grouped some of the people I know. Caveat: Though I have never lived in New York, as a bridge-and-tunneler my concept of home has for some time been connected conceptually to New York (as a place and/or an idea). This (not to mention Berman's creative pursuits) also helped endear me to No Place Like Home. All of which is to say I'm not sure it's for everyone everywhere, but it was definitely for me. I read this on the strength of Meg's review. Meg has good taste in books, y'all (as if you didn't know).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miko Lee

    Interesting memoir by playwright Brooke Berman as she moves from apartment to housesit to studio in her development as a writer. Her journey toward home is impeded by her need to conquer her issues with her gravely I'll mother in far away Detroit. Along the way she is raped and has a long term (14 year) tumultuous relationship with a guy who takes her for granted. Her plays gain a bit of success but she seems racked with insecurities that are so deep she takes to constantly quoting her therapist Interesting memoir by playwright Brooke Berman as she moves from apartment to housesit to studio in her development as a writer. Her journey toward home is impeded by her need to conquer her issues with her gravely I'll mother in far away Detroit. Along the way she is raped and has a long term (14 year) tumultuous relationship with a guy who takes her for granted. Her plays gain a bit of success but she seems racked with insecurities that are so deep she takes to constantly quoting her therapist. She makes note of her cancer ridden friend who comments on her narcissism but actually it doesn't feel like she gets it. Clearly she has had hardships but much of the book felt like whining. Why did I finish this book I wonder. Then I know that there were moments of the story that were described with a trained playwrights precision. Moments when the walk on Mott street felt so real that it brought me back to my time in NYC. I just wish the whole book overflowed with those few moments of wonder.

  5. 4 out of 5

    ModCloth

    I was not planning to read No Place Like Home while moving across the country. But like so much else in life, as playwright and author Brooke Berman explores in her memoir, sometimes things don’t always go according to plan. Berman is looking for that place where she fits into the world — a situation so many other young women face in their twenties. For Berman, she is sure the answer is New York City. Raised in Michigan by a single mother who ingrained in her that Manhattan is the epicenter of al I was not planning to read No Place Like Home while moving across the country. But like so much else in life, as playwright and author Brooke Berman explores in her memoir, sometimes things don’t always go according to plan. Berman is looking for that place where she fits into the world — a situation so many other young women face in their twenties. For Berman, she is sure the answer is New York City. Raised in Michigan by a single mother who ingrained in her that Manhattan is the epicenter of all things important, Berman leaves the Midwest for Columbia University at age 18 and never looks back. What follows is a series of cramped apartments, vegan roommates, and a series of boyfriends — one of whom swears he’s “this close to Enlightenment.” Segmented into sections by the various addresses she kept on the island of Manhattan and beyond, No Place Like Home explores what it’s like to face the actualities of trying to realize your dreams. Berman’s best moments are those personal ones that she makes universal — when you can relate to how ridiculous her situation is or how overtly crazy she is acting. During a particularly tough stretch, she finds solace in going to St. John’s each morning to weep in its garden, and admits, “I know, it’s dramatic, but it helps.” She puts a story behind the cliched term of “starving artist” — and shows us how much of our growing up actually occurs after the age of 20— until we can come to the point where we can say, “I know where I need to be, doing the work I need to do, and finally after years of living this way, I know it’s going to be okay.” While at times the cynical reader will roll her eyes at Berman’s fancy for the New Age, the author seems aware of this, stating at one point, “I am a massive pain.” Despite the spiritual healers and macrobiotics, No Place Like Home will make you smile and shake your head as you remember where you’ve been and what might lie ahead — whether it’s turning thrifted clothes into “Salvation Armani” or finally buying a bed after ten years of moving a futon mattress between apartments. Oh, and did I mention that Rainn Wilson makes an appearance? - Sarah, Fashion Writer

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    Playwright Brooke Berman is a wonderful writer, but I didn't find her to be particularly likeable. While she achieves some personal growth by the end of the book, she still displays a real sense of entitlement. The majority of the 39 apartments she documents in this memoir belong to other people who she often expects to provide her with shelter, albeit temporarily, so she can focus on her art. I suspect only those with a similar "artistic temperament" will appreciate her plight. For example, alt Playwright Brooke Berman is a wonderful writer, but I didn't find her to be particularly likeable. While she achieves some personal growth by the end of the book, she still displays a real sense of entitlement. The majority of the 39 apartments she documents in this memoir belong to other people who she often expects to provide her with shelter, albeit temporarily, so she can focus on her art. I suspect only those with a similar "artistic temperament" will appreciate her plight. For example, although she is perpetually distraught over her meager finances, she always manages to see her therapist and psychic healer. (This isn't entirely suprising since Berman herself writes about moments where she can see white light emitting from certain people around her.) Should you make it through the entire book, she does reference an actress who options one of her plays and then bails, changing her email address and phone number. A quick internet search reveals this to be Natalie Portman.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Brooke Berman lived in 39 different apartments and lived to write about it. Of course, writing is what she does. She doesn't just consider herself an expert on "finding cheap places to live...and then moving there," she is a successful playwright who cobbled together a career by working in food service, teaching anywhere that needed a teacher, writing plays, and living wherever she could unpack her "home kit," from a free room upstairs over a theater to a friend's velvet couch. Brooke Berman lived in 39 different apartments and lived to write about it. Of course, writing is what she does. She doesn't just consider herself an expert on "finding cheap places to live...and then moving there," she is a successful playwright who cobbled together a career by working in food service, teaching anywhere that needed a teacher, writing plays, and living wherever she could unpack her "home kit," from a free room upstairs over a theater to a friend's velvet couch.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Esme

    I lost interest in this book about halfway through. I don't know New York neighborhoods so I couldn't really picture the areas that she talked about. I was also amazed that she had such a vast network of people to...uh...sponge off of, or so it seemed at times. I also think she "buried the lead." She has two major life experiences and they are told like afterthoughts. This book is mostly about her eating ice cream and feeling sorry for herself. I lost interest in this book about halfway through. I don't know New York neighborhoods so I couldn't really picture the areas that she talked about. I was also amazed that she had such a vast network of people to...uh...sponge off of, or so it seemed at times. I also think she "buried the lead." She has two major life experiences and they are told like afterthoughts. This book is mostly about her eating ice cream and feeling sorry for herself.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I'm a sucker for picking up New York-y memoirs from the library and dismissing them once the quirky, haphazard stories wear off. But this book was inspiring the whole way through! Berman manages to land on her feet time and time again after a series of setbacks without being disheartening. She tells her story honestly and succinctly. I dug it. I'm a sucker for picking up New York-y memoirs from the library and dismissing them once the quirky, haphazard stories wear off. But this book was inspiring the whole way through! Berman manages to land on her feet time and time again after a series of setbacks without being disheartening. She tells her story honestly and succinctly. I dug it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christy Moyer

    Good, not great. Anyone who's lived in more than one apartment in New York (and who hasn't?) can relate to the uncertainties and insecurities of being a sometimes nomad in this city. Unfortunately, it wasn't enough to make this a standout. With a book that did much more "telling than showing", Berman should stick to her play-writing and leave this type of non-fiction to the memoirists. Good, not great. Anyone who's lived in more than one apartment in New York (and who hasn't?) can relate to the uncertainties and insecurities of being a sometimes nomad in this city. Unfortunately, it wasn't enough to make this a standout. With a book that did much more "telling than showing", Berman should stick to her play-writing and leave this type of non-fiction to the memoirists.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Great idea for a book, I think, but this fell just an inch short. At times it was a bit like Sex and the City (which I loathe) and Bridget Jones (which I also loathe), which is a shame, because she had a voice and a message. An easy read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark Prussian

    Book is about people I knew personally when I was a child (actually, the author's grandmother, Ida). Great memories. Extremely well written. Good gift for millennials just starting out in New York, or for students at Barnard or Julliard. Book is about people I knew personally when I was a child (actually, the author's grandmother, Ida). Great memories. Extremely well written. Good gift for millennials just starting out in New York, or for students at Barnard or Julliard.

  13. 5 out of 5

    E

    Oddly, for a successful writer, this book was way too much tell and not show. The events went by so fast the book almost felt like simply a long breathless list or confession of an entire decade or more. Stunning events do occur- and yet only take up a half a page! At one point Berman even lists a few juicy events, saying "things happened." What,in detail, though? Can we please rest in a scene?? And what is the main problem? The mother-relationship? We the readers should know. The central questi Oddly, for a successful writer, this book was way too much tell and not show. The events went by so fast the book almost felt like simply a long breathless list or confession of an entire decade or more. Stunning events do occur- and yet only take up a half a page! At one point Berman even lists a few juicy events, saying "things happened." What,in detail, though? Can we please rest in a scene?? And what is the main problem? The mother-relationship? We the readers should know. The central question is Why Can She Not Find A Home. I start to become annoyed and confused: she's successful, she has friends, she's where she wants to be... what is the problem? Is it really that you can't afford your own one bedroom? Because sometimes she can... and obviously she could if that were her main goal. So what IS her main goal? The point is lost among the moves... I am not sure if the author even is sure about the point. Very rarely the author, more insightful than the younger subject, herself a decade or so before, seems to have knowledge that she didn't know then. But mostly she seems to be completely on par with her old self- and still upset about some little thing. I read until the end to find the point. Amazingly, it was that she had found love-- with a guy who wanted her to move in after a couple of months. What?! SO wait-- all of that-- success and psych-healers and desert wanderings and etc.-- and the real lack was simply a man to live with, the right relationship?? Still, as any life, it could have made a compelling story. But I feel the author did not know what the main point was. Was it the search for success? The lack of support? Freeing from mother-relationship (about which we did not hear enough to know?) Or the yearning for a family... I actually think that last one is it, since her finding a man with whom to make a family is the end point, and also because, she mentioned trying to make family out of friends before, and-- rather astoundingly, in a playwright's autobiography-- she barely mentions working on plays, the process, her hopes, dreams, sweat, joys in career aspirations (those all seem very taken for granted and to the side of the point.) Yes, I think this book was about a lack of family and finding one. But damn I could barely tell from the book itself.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lit Fest Magazine

    “No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments” by Brooke Berman A refreshing and inspiring memoir, “No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments” by Brook Berman, reminds readers that not all memoirs need to be filled with rants, sadness and betrayal. In Brooke Berman’s memoir, we see a woman fighting for success in New York City, even if it means moving from apartment to apartment thirty-nine times, as she tries against all odds to make it in American theatre. Berman writes her story beautifull “No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments” by Brooke Berman A refreshing and inspiring memoir, “No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments” by Brook Berman, reminds readers that not all memoirs need to be filled with rants, sadness and betrayal. In Brooke Berman’s memoir, we see a woman fighting for success in New York City, even if it means moving from apartment to apartment thirty-nine times, as she tries against all odds to make it in American theatre. Berman writes her story beautifully. As a young woman in New York City, she discovers finding an apartment and her niche is more difficult than she imagined. Never sulking in her misfortune or desperation, Brooke Berman shows great strength as she grows from a “couch surfer” working odd jobs to one of the only playwrights accepted to Juilliard in 1997. Her grace under pressure, stunning honesty, and endearing personality make this a book worth reading, not to mention her experiences with a young Rainn Wilson and her unconceivable strength at times of true tragedy. At a time when depressing memoirs fill book store shelves and stories of overabundance and greed in NYC fascinate young women, I am thrilled to see a tale of a smart, determined young woman taking on the Big City and winning the greatest prize of all, seeing her dreams come true. “No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments” is admirable, enjoyable, and quite simply, good.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I seem to just have a thing for books (fiction and non) about the New York experiences of young woman. I had my own New York experiences as a young woman trying to do theater, so there was plenty to relate to in this book. We started out in New York around the same time. I lived in some of the same neighborhoods, interacted with some of the same groups, and understood the whole New York apartment experience. Berman's life was the one I expected for myself - struggling artist, living with roommat I seem to just have a thing for books (fiction and non) about the New York experiences of young woman. I had my own New York experiences as a young woman trying to do theater, so there was plenty to relate to in this book. We started out in New York around the same time. I lived in some of the same neighborhoods, interacted with some of the same groups, and understood the whole New York apartment experience. Berman's life was the one I expected for myself - struggling artist, living with roommates in different parts of the city, pursuing a dream. She and I both shared a desire to find some stability and to make a home, that much was similar. But I had to leave New York and the theater world to make that happen for myself. I applaud Berman for sticking it out and making a home for herself under the trying experiences that kind of life creates. It takes a lot of strength to be able to do that. An especially fun thing I did while reading this book was using Google maps to see a street view photo and map for each of Berman's apartments. It was awesome to have the actual addresses to look up, and it really gave me a feel for her experience. If you pick up this book, be sure and try that out - it's really cool. Anyway, enjoyed reading this a lot and wish Ms. Berman the best in continuing to follow her dreams!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    I liked this book - while Berman's experience of living in New York is different from my own, I could relate to many of the struggles she faced on her journey through 39 apartments. I would recommend this to anyone who is considering moving to New York to show that, yes, is can be difficult to find and sustain a place to live here, but it is so incredibly worth it. Even through several life-altering events, Berman is resilient and eager to understand why she approaches her own happiness in the w I liked this book - while Berman's experience of living in New York is different from my own, I could relate to many of the struggles she faced on her journey through 39 apartments. I would recommend this to anyone who is considering moving to New York to show that, yes, is can be difficult to find and sustain a place to live here, but it is so incredibly worth it. Even through several life-altering events, Berman is resilient and eager to understand why she approaches her own happiness in the way that she does. The one critique is that I think the book could have benefited from a bit of editing. Certain sections could have been broken up more, especially after a crucial moment in her life happened. Without these breaks to differentiate one period of her life from the next, everything had a tendency to feel a bit flat, instead of having certain turning points create dramatic peaks within her story. Needed structural breaks aside, Berman's story is incredibly interesting, and I would urge anyone in New York, especially women, to check it out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    For readers that love a good memoir, nothing can compare to the unique style and layout of Brooke Berman’s No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments (256 pages, Harmony Books, $23). This memoir explores Berman’s life through the places that she lived, with the majority of the book taking place in and around addresses in New York City. Like any other person that’s ever had a dream of making it somewhere, Berman chose New York as the place to be in order to make it happen. She attends Barnard For readers that love a good memoir, nothing can compare to the unique style and layout of Brooke Berman’s No Place Like Home: A Memoir in 39 Apartments (256 pages, Harmony Books, $23). This memoir explores Berman’s life through the places that she lived, with the majority of the book taking place in and around addresses in New York City. Like any other person that’s ever had a dream of making it somewhere, Berman chose New York as the place to be in order to make it happen. She attends Barnard College for awhile, then puts all of her efforts into her future as a playwright. She is also spends a lot of time making sure she has a place to go home to at night, working her way through roommates, sublets, and couch surfing. Read more: http://trifter.com/usa-canada/new-yor...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Glamzilla

    For the most part this is the whiney type of book which gives memoirs by non-celebrities a bad wrap. Berman was able to take advantage of a "Rent" (the time the play is set, not the duration of its Broadway run) era New York real estate market and was able to often pay less than $600 a month in rent [admittedly often with a roommate or two] and even in retrospect, now that she has her Happy Ending, seems in capable of understanding how fortunate she was to have been a young artist who could supp For the most part this is the whiney type of book which gives memoirs by non-celebrities a bad wrap. Berman was able to take advantage of a "Rent" (the time the play is set, not the duration of its Broadway run) era New York real estate market and was able to often pay less than $600 a month in rent [admittedly often with a roommate or two] and even in retrospect, now that she has her Happy Ending, seems in capable of understanding how fortunate she was to have been a young artist who could support herself by waitressing. Oh, wait, until she decided she didn't want to waitress anymore either and for some reason thought it would be possible to survive without some semblance of steady work. Yeesh. Lastly, I feel sad that the women's mother had to die before she realized that really, parents are human and flawed and do their best with what they have.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristie Helms

    I hated this book I loved it so much. Primarily because I could have written it. I mean. Seriously. The author's big moment was living in an apartment at 252 Mott Street. Well, that's great. MY big moment was living in an apartment at 221 Mott Street. I knew picking up a titled "No Place Like Home" about living in NYC, which I consider one of my all-time magical experiences... while I was waaaaay far from home in Hong Kong and Sydney was going to be a recipe for emotion. Little did I know how cl I hated this book I loved it so much. Primarily because I could have written it. I mean. Seriously. The author's big moment was living in an apartment at 252 Mott Street. Well, that's great. MY big moment was living in an apartment at 221 Mott Street. I knew picking up a titled "No Place Like Home" about living in NYC, which I consider one of my all-time magical experiences... while I was waaaaay far from home in Hong Kong and Sydney was going to be a recipe for emotion. Little did I know how close to home it was going to hit! The way the author interacted with NYC was so incredibly similar to how I interacted with NYC when I lived there. I was glad to find out someone else loves the city in the same way I do. Thank you Brooke.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    I liked this book in a "train wreck" type of way. The Memoir follows Brooke Berman through 39 different apartments in NYC while she was in and out of school, working various, random jobs and trying to launch her writing career. Interwoven into all of that is Berman's tumultuous relationship with her mother. The book has many parts where I wondered where the author's next meal is gong to come from and how someone could stand to live in such an unstable way for so many years. I do admire Berman's I liked this book in a "train wreck" type of way. The Memoir follows Brooke Berman through 39 different apartments in NYC while she was in and out of school, working various, random jobs and trying to launch her writing career. Interwoven into all of that is Berman's tumultuous relationship with her mother. The book has many parts where I wondered where the author's next meal is gong to come from and how someone could stand to live in such an unstable way for so many years. I do admire Berman's dedication to her craft and her sacrifices made as she worked toward success.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sunny Purdin

    Quit after about seventy pages, it got a little new-agey for my taste. It also seemed like for someone who was supposed to be desperate for housing, she would often become really picky. I think this is a book for people who are obsessed with New York and have romanticized it. The book bounces around a lot and lacks focus, just what you would expect from someone who has lived in 39 different apartments.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amie

    I do love me a good memoir. I also love when the person's story has references to Michigan & the Midwest. This book had both :) Also, lots of talk about NY, where many of Berman's homes were located. I liked her story. It wasn't always happy, but it was hers and it was real. Makes me want to travel even more than I already want to. :/ Also, I was very close to tears when reading the last few pages, but happy tears. I do love me a good memoir. I also love when the person's story has references to Michigan & the Midwest. This book had both :) Also, lots of talk about NY, where many of Berman's homes were located. I liked her story. It wasn't always happy, but it was hers and it was real. Makes me want to travel even more than I already want to. :/ Also, I was very close to tears when reading the last few pages, but happy tears.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Brannon

    Light reading about a woman's struggles with self discovery while trying to make it on her own in New York. I didn't expect to be inspired by it, but her sheer determination after being repeatedly kicked around on the mean streets of the Big City was just that--inspirational. She is a funny, witty memoirist which, in these times of dime-a-dozen autobiographies, is refreshing. FYI: I learned of this book when the writer was being interviewed on NPR. I'll trust NPR recommendations any day! Light reading about a woman's struggles with self discovery while trying to make it on her own in New York. I didn't expect to be inspired by it, but her sheer determination after being repeatedly kicked around on the mean streets of the Big City was just that--inspirational. She is a funny, witty memoirist which, in these times of dime-a-dozen autobiographies, is refreshing. FYI: I learned of this book when the writer was being interviewed on NPR. I'll trust NPR recommendations any day!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Read

    I was initially turned on to this book for its premise of transience while in pursuit of stability. I relate to Brooke as she sought to make ends meet while never losing sight of her goal. The time came for me to finally read this book (long on my TBR list) as I can now look back and reflect on my finished chapter of "the pursuit." The book is well-written (appropriate for a playwright) and the plot engaging. Thank you Brooke, for sharing your story. I was initially turned on to this book for its premise of transience while in pursuit of stability. I relate to Brooke as she sought to make ends meet while never losing sight of her goal. The time came for me to finally read this book (long on my TBR list) as I can now look back and reflect on my finished chapter of "the pursuit." The book is well-written (appropriate for a playwright) and the plot engaging. Thank you Brooke, for sharing your story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anny

    This was such a great read. As a compulsive nester, I found it really fascinating to read about the nomadic lifestyle (though not necessarily by choice) of this young student/artist in New York city. I also found her writing style really fresh. The whole thing is written in the first person and the present tense which is strange, yet exciting for a memoir as you feel like you are right there with her. It was wonderful and I ate it all up!

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Cohen

    I own a moving company in NYC ( http://www.divinemoving.com ) so during the course of my job I hear a lot of stories why people are moving, some sad, some are funny... but I really liked this book. it's written well and talks directly to the NYC market.. I may buy a few copies to give to my clients that complain that they move 5 times in 5 years or something like that... I own a moving company in NYC ( http://www.divinemoving.com ) so during the course of my job I hear a lot of stories why people are moving, some sad, some are funny... but I really liked this book. it's written well and talks directly to the NYC market.. I may buy a few copies to give to my clients that complain that they move 5 times in 5 years or something like that...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I love this book. However it bugged me that the author never took enough responsibility to try to find her own home. I can't imagine depending on other people to live on their couches or sublet their apartments for brief periods of time because I wasn't responsible enough to get my own place. Other than that her story was good. I love this book. However it bugged me that the author never took enough responsibility to try to find her own home. I can't imagine depending on other people to live on their couches or sublet their apartments for brief periods of time because I wasn't responsible enough to get my own place. Other than that her story was good.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    I really, really enjoyed this book, and didn't want it to end. Guess I can relate after all my moving in the past 3 years. It did make me kind of wish I could have led a parallel life and moved to NY after college and gotten a nice rent-controlled flat on the Lower East Side... I really, really enjoyed this book, and didn't want it to end. Guess I can relate after all my moving in the past 3 years. It did make me kind of wish I could have led a parallel life and moved to NY after college and gotten a nice rent-controlled flat on the Lower East Side...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    If you are fascinated and in love with New York. as I am, this is the perfect book for you. Loved getting the inside perspective on the different neighborhoods and Brooke's evolution as an artist and story is totally compelling. If you are fascinated and in love with New York. as I am, this is the perfect book for you. Loved getting the inside perspective on the different neighborhoods and Brooke's evolution as an artist and story is totally compelling.

  30. 5 out of 5

    caroline

    I really wanted to like this book because I liked its idea of following one girl through her various NYC apartments. However, her aimlessness in terms of her career and future was more frustrating than her aimlessness in terms of her apartment search.

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