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Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 1

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The North American Cambridge Latin Course is a well-established four-part Latin program whose approach combines a stimulating, continuous storyline with grammatical development, work on derivatives, and cultural information. There is also a complete Language Information section, plus numerous color photographs illustrating life in the Roman world. The Course has now been f The North American Cambridge Latin Course is a well-established four-part Latin program whose approach combines a stimulating, continuous storyline with grammatical development, work on derivatives, and cultural information. There is also a complete Language Information section, plus numerous color photographs illustrating life in the Roman world. The Course has now been fully revised and updated in the light of feedback from user schools, and includes the very best in new research. The Fourth Edition continues to offer teachers and students alike a stimulating, reading-based approach to the study of Latin.


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The North American Cambridge Latin Course is a well-established four-part Latin program whose approach combines a stimulating, continuous storyline with grammatical development, work on derivatives, and cultural information. There is also a complete Language Information section, plus numerous color photographs illustrating life in the Roman world. The Course has now been f The North American Cambridge Latin Course is a well-established four-part Latin program whose approach combines a stimulating, continuous storyline with grammatical development, work on derivatives, and cultural information. There is also a complete Language Information section, plus numerous color photographs illustrating life in the Roman world. The Course has now been fully revised and updated in the light of feedback from user schools, and includes the very best in new research. The Fourth Edition continues to offer teachers and students alike a stimulating, reading-based approach to the study of Latin.

30 review for Cambridge Latin Course, Unit 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Paulsen

    CAECILIUS EST IN HORTO

  2. 4 out of 5

    max

    in hoc libro est familia Pompeiana, cuius servi sunt Grumio, Clemens, et Melissa, quam Caecilius a venalicio emit. Paterfamilias, vir magni dignitatis (et pecuniae), Caecilius est. Mater est Metella, quae saepe in atrio sedet aut Grumionem laudat (quod ille cenam optimam coquit) aut servos vituperat. Filius eorum est Quintus, iuvenis comis, studiosus, liberalis et benignus. multae fabulae narrantur in hoc libro pertinantes ad vias, forum, thermas, amphiteatrum (ubi gladiatores sunt), theatrum (u in hoc libro est familia Pompeiana, cuius servi sunt Grumio, Clemens, et Melissa, quam Caecilius a venalicio emit. Paterfamilias, vir magni dignitatis (et pecuniae), Caecilius est. Mater est Metella, quae saepe in atrio sedet aut Grumionem laudat (quod ille cenam optimam coquit) aut servos vituperat. Filius eorum est Quintus, iuvenis comis, studiosus, liberalis et benignus. multae fabulae narrantur in hoc libro pertinantes ad vias, forum, thermas, amphiteatrum (ubi gladiatores sunt), theatrum (ubi actores fabulas agunt), ludum (ubi Quintus et alii iuvenes Linguam Latinam et Graecam a Graeco magistro discunt). Sunt multae personae per totum librum: venalicius (Syphax), ancilla (amica Grumionis nomine Poppaea), tonsor (nomine Pantagathus), pictor (Celer), candidati et eorum fautores et divisores, poeta (qui versus scurriles recitat), libertus (Felix), argentarius (Caecilius ipse), caupo (id est tabernarius), avarus (cuius serpens duos fures terret), iudex, mercator Graecus, nuntii, murmillones, bestiarii, funambulus, actores, rhetor, pastores et agricolae, pistores (sed non lanii), senes, iuvenes, pueri et puellae, etiam centurio qui se in versipellem mutat! In capitulo duodecimo, multi homines tremores sensunt et sonos magnos audiunt. nubes atra (et mirabilis) ad terram descendit, et cinis densissimus de Monte Vesuvio incidere incipit. Multi Pompeiani in hac clade interficiuntur. Caecilius moritur; Cerberus (canis qui cum familia habitat), Grumio, Melissa et Metella periunt (putandum nobis est). Quintus tamen et Clemens supersunt.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Baelor

    A generally excellent Latin textbook. I am a Latin teachers who teaches both high- and middle-school Latin (emphasis on the former). My colleagues and I examined every Latin textbook written since 1900 in English in order to determine which would be most suitable for a streamlined 5-12 curriculum. The CLC came out on top easily. The material is spread over enough chapters to make the content manageable to young and old students alike. More importantly, the CLC has the following strengths: 1) A focu A generally excellent Latin textbook. I am a Latin teachers who teaches both high- and middle-school Latin (emphasis on the former). My colleagues and I examined every Latin textbook written since 1900 in English in order to determine which would be most suitable for a streamlined 5-12 curriculum. The CLC came out on top easily. The material is spread over enough chapters to make the content manageable to young and old students alike. More importantly, the CLC has the following strengths: 1) A focus on reading rather than translating/decoding Latin, although translation can be used to assess knowledge of the language in various ways. The books follow a narrative until partway through Unit 4 (which would be the third-year textbook). While the CLC stresses the importance of making the story interesting, older students will likely not find acting out characters, etc. to be intellectually stimulating enough. As a result, we breeze through the material relatively quickly -- about a unit a week. 2) A clear and detailed, but not overwhelming, treatment of history and culture. The first book takes place in Pompeii, but the scene switches to Britain in Unit 2, which obviously most relevant to UK students. Still, the material is complemented by drawings and photographs of Roman art, architecture, and artifacts and is impressively thorough. 3) Work with English derivatives. We probably spend 10-15 minutes weekly on English derivates, and thus involves an absurdly high ROI, if only in providing the students with habits of inquisitive examination of roots and semantics. 4) Massive support in the form of Teacher's Guides, activities, worksheets, Audio recordings, and tests. While most of these are not useful, there are enough nuggets (all carefully and centrally planned) to make a teacher's life easier. The weakness lies in the grammar. We are switching over from Wheelock's, which provides an unrivalled technical knowledge of grammar. Only teachers with great facility with Latin grammar should commit to the CLC, since only by supplementing the curriculum substantially with independent grammatical instruction will the students receive adequate Latin instruction. In brief, my colleagues and I are using the CLC as a framework which we bolster with Wheelock's grammar. There are superior texts for the intellectual, viz. Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, but for any aspiring Latinists who wish to read rather than decode and translate the language, the CLC is a good start.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    The phrase 'Caecilius est in horto' popped into my head the other day, and memories came flooding back of being twelve in a humid after-hours classroom with rain lashing against the school windows.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dorito

    EHEU MONTEM IRATUM FLOCCI NON FACIO

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I have been using the Cambridge series for years. Pros: -Engaging story line (book 1) -personable characters -Scaffolded expectations on word lists -never too much and most words don't pop out of no-where -It is very easy to use this book as a jumping off point for other aspects of Latin (derivatives, culture, etc.) Cons: Grammar is just not there and what is there is not organized well. You get some chapters like ch. 6 which have multiple grammar ideas jammed in one i.e. imperfect and perfect and I have been using the Cambridge series for years. Pros: -Engaging story line (book 1) -personable characters -Scaffolded expectations on word lists -never too much and most words don't pop out of no-where -It is very easy to use this book as a jumping off point for other aspects of Latin (derivatives, culture, etc.) Cons: Grammar is just not there and what is there is not organized well. You get some chapters like ch. 6 which have multiple grammar ideas jammed in one i.e. imperfect and perfect and then many chapters (esp. in book 2) are fluff. Even with all of those cons Cambridge is still the best book out there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Huff

    a great, engaging text that teaches grammar and vocabulary without hours spent memorizing declension and conjugation tables through rote. it teaches you how to read Latin, not to decode it. However! this should not, in my opinion, be studied on its own. As boring as pure grammar is, it is still important. It is just as dangerous, intellectually, to exclude reading focused works like these as it is to exclude grammar books like Wheelock. They go hand in hand. optime!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susanna - Censored by GoodReads

    Certainly much better than any Latin book I had in school, back in the dark ages. The immersive approach and "just enough grammar to be helpful" are a good combination for me. edit: I have ordered the second volume from Amazon. Hopefully it will be as good as the first.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Kowalski

    mihi valde placet quod totam rem intellego.

  10. 4 out of 5

    D'Lija Brown

    Latin- Sum es est sumus estis sunt. Difficult and sometimes fun. I've been reading this book since 7th grade. Temper fugit

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I'm trying to learn Latin, mostly on my own, and I'm very glad that this book exists. It has interesting, fun stories in easy Latin that does not intimidate. However, I'm also thankful that this isn't the only Latin text out there, because it is very lacking in grammar explanations, which are important right from the beginning, I believe. Used in conjunction with a more traditional Latin text, Cambridge is very helpful in motivating one to read Latin. Now I'm on to Unit 2.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Icundus

    Grumio vivit

  13. 5 out of 5

    A

    The best language course I have encountered. It has the student begin READING in latin from the first page onwards, which leaves the student with a sense of accomplishment at being able to understand a passage from the first chapter on (known as the direct method of language acquisition). Grammar points are introduced slowly. The grammar is presented gradually and slowly, and gives the student the tools to have a strong understanding of language in general, as the grammar points will not really The best language course I have encountered. It has the student begin READING in latin from the first page onwards, which leaves the student with a sense of accomplishment at being able to understand a passage from the first chapter on (known as the direct method of language acquisition). Grammar points are introduced slowly. The grammar is presented gradually and slowly, and gives the student the tools to have a strong understanding of language in general, as the grammar points will not really be more complicated if the student chooses to later pick up another language. The material is entertaining, and well presented. Passages vibrantly offer creative glimpses into the life of an ancient Pompeian. It is so lively that the term ancient hardly seems to apply, and one almost forgets that such a city and people no longer exist in the flesh. Not used in many universities since does not accomplish the presumably desirable act shoving lots of information down a student's throat in one semester that is so popular in academia these days.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kamal

    The series of Latin textbooks is a favourite among both teachers and students alike. It has lots of charming features such as a continuous narrative, historical discussions and a comprehensive look at the Roman world outside of Rome itself. However, the historical data upon which this is all based is out-of-date. THis is particularly true regarding gender roles within Roman society. The female characters in this series of books are all negative stereotypes --nagging wives, village beauties and d The series of Latin textbooks is a favourite among both teachers and students alike. It has lots of charming features such as a continuous narrative, historical discussions and a comprehensive look at the Roman world outside of Rome itself. However, the historical data upon which this is all based is out-of-date. THis is particularly true regarding gender roles within Roman society. The female characters in this series of books are all negative stereotypes --nagging wives, village beauties and dutiful mothers-- however the archeological evidence suggests that while aristocratic women had very circumscribed lives, lower class women had more freedoms, such as owning their own businesses, etc. These books do show women doing things. They are always just props for the actions of the male characters and this simply isn't the way that Roman women lived their lives. In short, the books say a lot more about 1950s British attitudes about women than they do about ancient Roman gender roles.

  15. 5 out of 5

    DrosoPHila

    There are two problems with Latin instruction. The first, fundamentally, is that it is such little practical use that it is essentially indistinguishable from being useless. This problem is unconquerable - in a congested curriculum, Latin is a complete waste of time, and schools which require their pupils to take it do them a disservice. The second problem, and where the Cambridge Latin Course is particularly loathsome, is that it uses the outdated and ineffective grammar-translation method. That There are two problems with Latin instruction. The first, fundamentally, is that it is such little practical use that it is essentially indistinguishable from being useless. This problem is unconquerable - in a congested curriculum, Latin is a complete waste of time, and schools which require their pupils to take it do them a disservice. The second problem, and where the Cambridge Latin Course is particularly loathsome, is that it uses the outdated and ineffective grammar-translation method. That is, one must translate passages from Latin to English and vice-versa. It is grammar-led; one must rote learn verb endings. Nearly everyone dies in the end; unfortunately not everyone for there is a second book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sammy

    This is a great course for beginners and amateurs in Latin. As someone who was quite skilled at the language in school, I've just returned to this series to try and recover my skills, and it's nice to see how much I still remember! By using a narrative approach, combined with information about the culture, the Cambridge Latin Course allows you to pass easily through the workload. Obviously, it is only an introductory program and as such, the first book doesn't go into great detail in areas of ei This is a great course for beginners and amateurs in Latin. As someone who was quite skilled at the language in school, I've just returned to this series to try and recover my skills, and it's nice to see how much I still remember! By using a narrative approach, combined with information about the culture, the Cambridge Latin Course allows you to pass easily through the workload. Obviously, it is only an introductory program and as such, the first book doesn't go into great detail in areas of either vocab or grammar. As someone mentioned below, the two biggest flaws are 1) lack of pronunciation guides, although a simple Google search and understanding of the accents used will help this; and 2) that the end-of-chapter word lists are never comprehensive.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    So far of the Latin Books I've seen, this one is one of the better ones for beginners. It gives you the language in a historic context with vocabulary lists, beautiful photographs of artifacts, and a story of a merchant family to help readers associate what they are learning with something that they can relate to: family and life. The only two cons that I can think of: 1) No audio track for correct pronunciation 2) Not all words used in the text are in the vocabulary lists. Item 1 might be solved by So far of the Latin Books I've seen, this one is one of the better ones for beginners. It gives you the language in a historic context with vocabulary lists, beautiful photographs of artifacts, and a story of a merchant family to help readers associate what they are learning with something that they can relate to: family and life. The only two cons that I can think of: 1) No audio track for correct pronunciation 2) Not all words used in the text are in the vocabulary lists. Item 1 might be solved by picking up the North American audio CD.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mika

    pretty damn good for keeping language textbook character lines interesting and readable. my 12-year-old self was shocked (and amused) that several readings discussed the slave Grumio's sexy adventures with fellow servant Poppea in the culina. is this where R. Kelly got the inspiration for his song "Sex In The Kitchen"??? anyway, go Cambridge.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    By far the best language-learning series I've seen. I was able to use the book and the online exercises as a self-contained course without a classroom or teacher. As a beginner, it was so encouraging to be reading entire pages in Latin.

  20. 4 out of 5

    William Herbst

    A good introductory Latin book for this reading course. The material might be presented too easily at first lulling the students into the impression that one can read without intense grammatical study.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Fort

    There are good things and bad things about this textbook. We are moving away from the Cambridge series the next school year, so... yeah, fun times that will be, reforming an entire curriculum because of textbook adoption.

  22. 5 out of 5

    J

    CLC is a fun Latin course for students jr. high age and up. But, if you plan on learning Latin on your own, either combine it with some grammar based work or use something like Latina Christiana first.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kira

    Latin becomes fun in this wonderful book... Ok, so basically, you follow a family in Pompeii (the city that got covered in volcanic ash) up until they die... Happy ending!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Olly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. eheu! caecilius est mortuus.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chance

    It was ok, my teacher taught it fairly well

  26. 4 out of 5

    Juliana

    I love this book! It's so awesome....

  27. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Ahhh.... The good old days of "Cerberus est canis. Metella est mater." I suppose also "Grumio est furcifer!"

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chung Chung

    Good old Caecilius. Forever in the garden.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    LAtin basic words

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Liber magistram delectat!

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