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Rome in America: Transnational Catholic Ideology from the Risorgimento to Fascism

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For years, historians have argued that Catholicism in the United States stood decisively apart from papal politics in European society. The Church in America, historians insist, forged an American Catholicism, a national faith responsive to domestic concerns, disengaged from the disruptive ideological conflicts of the Old World. Drawing on previously unexamined documents f For years, historians have argued that Catholicism in the United States stood decisively apart from papal politics in European society. The Church in America, historians insist, forged an American Catholicism, a national faith responsive to domestic concerns, disengaged from the disruptive ideological conflicts of the Old World. Drawing on previously unexamined documents from Italian state collections and newly opened Vatican archives, Peter D'Agostino paints a starkly different portrait. In his narrative, Catholicism in the United States emerges as a powerful outpost within an international church that struggled for three generations to vindicate the temporal claims of the papacy within European society. Even as they assimilated into American society, Catholics of all ethnicities participated in a vital, international culture of myths, rituals, and symbols that glorified papal Rome and demonized its liberal, Protestant, and Jewish opponents. From the 1848 attack on the Papal States that culminated in the creation of the Kingdom of Italy to the Lateran Treaties in 1929 between Fascist Italy and the Vatican that established Vatican City, American Catholics consistently rose up to support their Holy Father. At every turn American liberals, Protestants, and Jews resisted Catholics, whose support for the papacy revealed social boundaries that separated them from their American neighbors.


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For years, historians have argued that Catholicism in the United States stood decisively apart from papal politics in European society. The Church in America, historians insist, forged an American Catholicism, a national faith responsive to domestic concerns, disengaged from the disruptive ideological conflicts of the Old World. Drawing on previously unexamined documents f For years, historians have argued that Catholicism in the United States stood decisively apart from papal politics in European society. The Church in America, historians insist, forged an American Catholicism, a national faith responsive to domestic concerns, disengaged from the disruptive ideological conflicts of the Old World. Drawing on previously unexamined documents from Italian state collections and newly opened Vatican archives, Peter D'Agostino paints a starkly different portrait. In his narrative, Catholicism in the United States emerges as a powerful outpost within an international church that struggled for three generations to vindicate the temporal claims of the papacy within European society. Even as they assimilated into American society, Catholics of all ethnicities participated in a vital, international culture of myths, rituals, and symbols that glorified papal Rome and demonized its liberal, Protestant, and Jewish opponents. From the 1848 attack on the Papal States that culminated in the creation of the Kingdom of Italy to the Lateran Treaties in 1929 between Fascist Italy and the Vatican that established Vatican City, American Catholics consistently rose up to support their Holy Father. At every turn American liberals, Protestants, and Jews resisted Catholics, whose support for the papacy revealed social boundaries that separated them from their American neighbors.

31 review for Rome in America: Transnational Catholic Ideology from the Risorgimento to Fascism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan McCollum

    I recently read this as part of my PhD research into the history of the Catholic Church in the United States. I was taken by the transnational character of the work and how the author's challanging of the previous historiography which stressed the independence of the American Church and its seperation from the events in Europe. Very well researched and written, this is one of the best works I've read on American Catholicism over the past year. It should be noted that D'Agostino does not why away I recently read this as part of my PhD research into the history of the Catholic Church in the United States. I was taken by the transnational character of the work and how the author's challanging of the previous historiography which stressed the independence of the American Church and its seperation from the events in Europe. Very well researched and written, this is one of the best works I've read on American Catholicism over the past year. It should be noted that D'Agostino does not why away from the more negative aspects of Church history, including the strange alliance that the heirarchy made with Fascist Italy in the years leadign up to the Second World War.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  3. 5 out of 5

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  5. 5 out of 5

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  6. 5 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 5 out of 5

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  13. 4 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

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  15. 4 out of 5

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  17. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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    BookDB

  22. 5 out of 5

    pplofgod

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ethan Chitty

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  27. 5 out of 5

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