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Motion Leadership: The Skinny on Becoming Change Savvy

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Create positive motion in your organization by becoming savvy about change! Michael Fullan, working with effective change leaders, provides the skinny on motion leadership, or how to "move" individuals, institutions, and whole systems forward. Cycling from practice to theory and back again, this easy-to-read book offers examples from Fullan's global experience to help r Create positive motion in your organization by becoming savvy about change! Michael Fullan, working with effective change leaders, provides the skinny on motion leadership, or how to "move" individuals, institutions, and whole systems forward. Cycling from practice to theory and back again, this easy-to-read book offers examples from Fullan's global experience to help readers: Understand problems and work with change Mobilize peers to collaborate Specialize in capacity building Promote learning as the work of individuals and organizations Make progress and performance results transparent Earn trust by demonstrating integrity and competence Enable others to become motion leaders


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Create positive motion in your organization by becoming savvy about change! Michael Fullan, working with effective change leaders, provides the skinny on motion leadership, or how to "move" individuals, institutions, and whole systems forward. Cycling from practice to theory and back again, this easy-to-read book offers examples from Fullan's global experience to help r Create positive motion in your organization by becoming savvy about change! Michael Fullan, working with effective change leaders, provides the skinny on motion leadership, or how to "move" individuals, institutions, and whole systems forward. Cycling from practice to theory and back again, this easy-to-read book offers examples from Fullan's global experience to help readers: Understand problems and work with change Mobilize peers to collaborate Specialize in capacity building Promote learning as the work of individuals and organizations Make progress and performance results transparent Earn trust by demonstrating integrity and competence Enable others to become motion leaders

30 review for Motion Leadership: The Skinny on Becoming Change Savvy

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Doty

    This short book by Michael Fullan contains some nice guidance for successful change management in schools, but I found most of it to be formulaic and uninteresting. Fullan tries to break down complex leadership challenges and issues into "skinny," uncomplicated approaches, but fails to offer practical help for leaders who are stymied by political, cultural, financial, and organizational barriers. I did agree with his statement that "System reform will never be a success if only leaders are workin This short book by Michael Fullan contains some nice guidance for successful change management in schools, but I found most of it to be formulaic and uninteresting. Fullan tries to break down complex leadership challenges and issues into "skinny," uncomplicated approaches, but fails to offer practical help for leaders who are stymied by political, cultural, financial, and organizational barriers. I did agree with his statement that "System reform will never be a success if only leaders are working on it. There are not enough leaders to go around." Fullan is a respected scholar, and the book is worthy of a place on your shelf if you're interested in educational leadership. I just found his advice to be a little too "skinny," and would have liked a bit more meat on the bones.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Moynahan

    Love a sub 80 page book with quality, helpful tips for becoming more “skinny” (read as: flexible, but determined to get better) leader in a school setting. I appreciated the overlay of Jamie Oliver turning around English school lunch rooms to prove the point that Fullan was making throughout the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Josiah Aston

    Truly the skinny on change leadership Worth the read. Concise but powerful principles of effective change leadership. You can find this information in other books, but not so clearly laid out and backed up with stories of it in action.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Peter Atkinson

    Michael Fullan begins this, not coincidentally thin book, by defining the skinny on change – “the key insights that leaders need to know about understanding and working with change.” The first key insight that Fullan elaborates on is his answer to the “too-fast-too-slow” dilemma, which is think relationships first. A leader needs to attend first to new relationships with his staff – “careful entry”, listening, and fact finding before moving forward with a new initiative. This is simple but import Michael Fullan begins this, not coincidentally thin book, by defining the skinny on change – “the key insights that leaders need to know about understanding and working with change.” The first key insight that Fullan elaborates on is his answer to the “too-fast-too-slow” dilemma, which is think relationships first. A leader needs to attend first to new relationships with his staff – “careful entry”, listening, and fact finding before moving forward with a new initiative. This is simple but important advice, as it is too often the case that reform movements die a quick death because leaders fail to build confidence and trust with their staffs before launching a new initiative. So, a leader needs to first slow down and build relationships “in order to gain greater acceleration later.” Next, Fullan reminds leaders to “honour the implementation dip” that usually occurs early on in the change process. Respecting the dip means both empathizing with staff who struggle when the “cost-benefit ratio is out of whack” at the onset of the initiative and persevering resolutely with the plan. There is also advice to “beware the fat plan”, and instead, go with the one-page plan that evolves over time. Other advice offered by Fullan includes focusing on changing staff behaviour first before concentrating on changing their beliefs, constant communication during the implementation process, and encouraging risk-taking by staff. On the last point, I’m proud to say, Fullan uses as a case in point the transformational work of Jamie McCracken, past Director of Education with the Ottawa Catholic School Board: As soon as he became director, Jamie set out to change the culture. [of the board] He consulted widely and announced three priorities – success for students, success for staff, and stewardship of resources. These priorities have remained the same for the past seven years. To pursue the goals, Jamie made it clear that people should try new things and learn from their experiences. Risk taking as learning became the district’s modus operandi. ... there was a license to innovate and problem solve. Today, Ottawa [Catholic] is the highest performing large district in Ontario in literacy and numeracy.... (p. 30) Fullan devotes a chapter to the key change theory idea of connecting peers to purpose. He begins this chapter by acknowledging that “Top-down change doesn’t work – people resist when leaders try to tighten things up”, and that “The track record for bottom-up change is not any better.” Instead, he maintains that the best recipe for successful change is to “get peers to do it.” The leader’s role is to facilitate and cause peers to interact and also to participate him\herself as a co-learner in the process, respecting the expertise of others. The skinny here, states Fullan, is “that nothing succeeds like collective capacity.” Another point made is to load on the capacity building during the change process and go very easy on judgmentalism. To achieve this in education, Fullan recommends the instructional rounds concept of Harvard University’s Elizabeth City and Richard Elmore, which involves classroom observations focused on “description before analysis, analysis before prediction, and prediction before evaluation.” When it comes to learning, Fullan stresses that what really counts is what takes place between workshops, and that the only way to effectively build capacity is through learning in the regular workplace setting. Some final notes offered with respect to the skinny on change include: - Value transparency of results and practice; - Seek comparisons to statistical neighbours (in the case of education, schools with similar demographics); - Don’t take any one year’s results too literally; look instead at 3-year trends; and, - As a leader, “behave your way into trust” – that is, earn the trust and following of your staff through demonstrating integrity and competence.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Primm

    This was a quick read for the instructional coaching workshop that I'm participarting in this year. I really enjoyed the author's insights into what it takes to bring change to large organizations (particularly schools and school districts). The focus on trust and communication appealed to my instincts, and I think that the concept of "competitive collaboration" (p. 40) between schools is applicable to the students in my classroom as well. In fact, everything I've learned about coaching adults i This was a quick read for the instructional coaching workshop that I'm participarting in this year. I really enjoyed the author's insights into what it takes to bring change to large organizations (particularly schools and school districts). The focus on trust and communication appealed to my instincts, and I think that the concept of "competitive collaboration" (p. 40) between schools is applicable to the students in my classroom as well. In fact, everything I've learned about coaching adults is absolutely applicable to my work with students. Adults and teenagers are all just human beings, governed by the same cognitive processes and driven by the same wants and needs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    This was required reading for a coaching workshop I'm being sent to by my district. It was published five years ago and much of the data and case studies are at least another five years old. It is a quick, easy read if you need something short and simple to refresh or reflect for current leaders. Or, if you need a starting point in a coaching or leadership course, this would work in that sense as well. As a twenty year educator, I didn't get much new from this text, but it served as a good remin This was required reading for a coaching workshop I'm being sent to by my district. It was published five years ago and much of the data and case studies are at least another five years old. It is a quick, easy read if you need something short and simple to refresh or reflect for current leaders. Or, if you need a starting point in a coaching or leadership course, this would work in that sense as well. As a twenty year educator, I didn't get much new from this text, but it served as a good reminder of actions as I am a part of new coaching and curriculum initiatives.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tara Brabazon

    Oh dear. The challenge with many books on leadership is that they are too simple and basic. Motion Leadership is one of those books. There is no understanding of organizational culture, communication systems and protocols. Change is celebrated as the panacea for failing organizations. The mode of progress celebrated in this book is more in keeping with the industrial revolution than the information age.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marguerite

    I'm not a fan of the genre, but this is quick and mostly painless. There's a lot of repetition; someone with less tolerance could read only the text in the gray boxes and still get the gist of it. I like the focus on education, but could envision using the principles in other settings. The author's use of the word "simplexity" made me a little batty. I'm not a fan of the genre, but this is quick and mostly painless. There's a lot of repetition; someone with less tolerance could read only the text in the gray boxes and still get the gist of it. I like the focus on education, but could envision using the principles in other settings. The author's use of the word "simplexity" made me a little batty.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Broderick

    A great reminder of some key things about undoing some of the messiness of implementation. Love the concept of Ready, Fire, Aim and the role of refinement. Appreciated that sometimes we need to change behavior first, before we change belief. As usual, Fullan didn't disappoint. A great reminder of some key things about undoing some of the messiness of implementation. Love the concept of Ready, Fire, Aim and the role of refinement. Appreciated that sometimes we need to change behavior first, before we change belief. As usual, Fullan didn't disappoint.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    A skinny book on the skinny of change. If I could get over the price of the book, I'd probably give it a higher rating. Dunno, 'cuz I haven't. All that aside, the writing is clear and accessible, and the examples are compelling. A skinny book on the skinny of change. If I could get over the price of the book, I'd probably give it a higher rating. Dunno, 'cuz I haven't. All that aside, the writing is clear and accessible, and the examples are compelling.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Moyer

    A synopsis of much of Fullan's recent work, this book gets to the bare essence of some of the key principles of change leadership. A synopsis of much of Fullan's recent work, this book gets to the bare essence of some of the key principles of change leadership.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tony Roehrick

    A survey of "Six Secrets" designed for thos with short attention spans. I have to wonder why this was published since no new ground is covered. A survey of "Six Secrets" designed for thos with short attention spans. I have to wonder why this was published since no new ground is covered.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    9: Excellent advice for leaders in every sector, not just education.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Every leadership book has its own jargon, but it's a bit heavy here; enough good points and take-home messages to be worthwhile; did not realize this was the companion piece to a leadership movie Every leadership book has its own jargon, but it's a bit heavy here; enough good points and take-home messages to be worthwhile; did not realize this was the companion piece to a leadership movie

  15. 4 out of 5

    John Bartlett

    Leadership during change is a difficult thing. That is one of the reasons the average tenure of the school leader is very short.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Dyer

    quick, easy, insightful

  17. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Veldhuizen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

  20. 4 out of 5

    A. Espinoza Olazaba

  21. 5 out of 5

    Middlethought

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Dalziel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alec

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Carns

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kari Waltz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  29. 4 out of 5

    Profesora Rosa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

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