web site hit counter To 'joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

To 'joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War

Availability: Ready to download

Tera Hunter follows African-American working women from their newfound optimism and hope at the end of the Civil War to their struggles as free domestic laborers in the homes of their former master. We witness their drive as they build neighborhoods and networks and their energy as they enjoy leisure hours in dance halls and clubs. We learn of their militance and the way t Tera Hunter follows African-American working women from their newfound optimism and hope at the end of the Civil War to their struggles as free domestic laborers in the homes of their former master. We witness their drive as they build neighborhoods and networks and their energy as they enjoy leisure hours in dance halls and clubs. We learn of their militance and the way they resisted efforts to keep them economically depressed and medically victimized. Finally, we see the despair and defeat provoked by Jim Crow laws and segregation and how they spurred large numbers of black laboring women to migrate north. Recommended by the Association of Black Women Historians.


Compare

Tera Hunter follows African-American working women from their newfound optimism and hope at the end of the Civil War to their struggles as free domestic laborers in the homes of their former master. We witness their drive as they build neighborhoods and networks and their energy as they enjoy leisure hours in dance halls and clubs. We learn of their militance and the way t Tera Hunter follows African-American working women from their newfound optimism and hope at the end of the Civil War to their struggles as free domestic laborers in the homes of their former master. We witness their drive as they build neighborhoods and networks and their energy as they enjoy leisure hours in dance halls and clubs. We learn of their militance and the way they resisted efforts to keep them economically depressed and medically victimized. Finally, we see the despair and defeat provoked by Jim Crow laws and segregation and how they spurred large numbers of black laboring women to migrate north. Recommended by the Association of Black Women Historians.

30 review for To 'joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Jaffe

    Every time someone makes a simplistic assumption about women and work, love and work, racism and work, I want the sky to open up and rain copies of this book on their head. So good. (Also a great follow-up to this spring's reading of Black Reconstruction if you're so inclined.) Every time someone makes a simplistic assumption about women and work, love and work, racism and work, I want the sky to open up and rain copies of this book on their head. So good. (Also a great follow-up to this spring's reading of Black Reconstruction if you're so inclined.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    "To 'Joy My Freedom" was certainly an informative read and contained a lot of information that usually isn't well known regarding African American women after the Civil War, but the book just wasn't that interesting or exciting of a read to recommend it any higher. Once you start to get into the heart of it, "To 'Joy My Freedom" just sort of gets boring and begins to read like a history textbook. It would have been nice if some of the events were elaborated on more thoroughly or detailed better t "To 'Joy My Freedom" was certainly an informative read and contained a lot of information that usually isn't well known regarding African American women after the Civil War, but the book just wasn't that interesting or exciting of a read to recommend it any higher. Once you start to get into the heart of it, "To 'Joy My Freedom" just sort of gets boring and begins to read like a history textbook. It would have been nice if some of the events were elaborated on more thoroughly or detailed better to grab the reader's attention on a deeper level, but that didn't happen often enough and the book became a bit disappointing and slow. I did like how Hunter included many firsthand accounts of black women who endured the hardships of the South though; in my opinion, those moments were where the book shines the brightest but they were often only a couple sentences long, and dispersed unevenly throughout. It'll be a decent read for those interested in the post-Civil War United States or in the lives of African American women during that time, but for everyone else, there's not much here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Hunter examines the lives of southern black women, particularly southern domestic workers, by narrowing her focus in on the development of the city of Atlanta after the Civil War. Since many ex-slaves moved to Atlanta and then migrated again north during the Great Migration decades later, this makes for an excellent focal point for the topic. By examining black women's lives in Atlanta both in and out of their employer's homes, she is able to dissect the roles of race, class, and gender in the e Hunter examines the lives of southern black women, particularly southern domestic workers, by narrowing her focus in on the development of the city of Atlanta after the Civil War. Since many ex-slaves moved to Atlanta and then migrated again north during the Great Migration decades later, this makes for an excellent focal point for the topic. By examining black women's lives in Atlanta both in and out of their employer's homes, she is able to dissect the roles of race, class, and gender in the elite's attempts to maintain dominance in America. A stunning examination of the intersections of race, class, and gender in southern Americans' lives. It is impossible to read this book and not be enraged, moved, and inspired. Read it. Check out my full review. (Link will be live on January 14, 2012).

  4. 5 out of 5

    April

    A detailed look at urban Atlanta slaves and antebellum Atlanta - Urban life is often overlooked in discussions of the slavery south. Interesting, but rather dry historical writing at times.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Signoree

    An amazing look into the lives of black women during reconstruction in the South. This book explains the hardships that most had to face in order to survive after slavery.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I picked up this book after I made it a goal to work through the readings and lectures of an Open Yale course from Emancipation to Present. ( https://oyc.yale.edu/african-american... ) I've read the entire book and feel much more knowledgeable about the lives of southern Black women in the late 19th and early 20th century because of it. It focuses specifically on Atlanta, but includes a lot of information about the general history of the time, and is full of details about the lives, work, and su I picked up this book after I made it a goal to work through the readings and lectures of an Open Yale course from Emancipation to Present. ( https://oyc.yale.edu/african-american... ) I've read the entire book and feel much more knowledgeable about the lives of southern Black women in the late 19th and early 20th century because of it. It focuses specifically on Atlanta, but includes a lot of information about the general history of the time, and is full of details about the lives, work, and successes of Black women, as well as the many ways in which they had to face racism and the difficulties of making their place in a white dominated world. The author clearly did a ton of research, and many many primary sources are directly cited. It was very readable, and though sometimes a bit repetitive, I honestly needed the repetition to help me keep track of all the new information i was processing. It was refreshing to read a non white-centric history of an American place.

  7. 5 out of 5

    A Wagner

    This book was highly informative and further opened my eyes to the perpetual struggle of black women in the South. The book begins at the Civil War and continues chronologically to the early 20th century – and despite the focus on one demographic, it provided a great overview of general American history from a Southern viewpoint. It was a slow read, due to the immense detail that Hunter provides on many aspects of Southern black womanhood; but the detail was much appreciated in formulating a cle This book was highly informative and further opened my eyes to the perpetual struggle of black women in the South. The book begins at the Civil War and continues chronologically to the early 20th century – and despite the focus on one demographic, it provided a great overview of general American history from a Southern viewpoint. It was a slow read, due to the immense detail that Hunter provides on many aspects of Southern black womanhood; but the detail was much appreciated in formulating a clear view of American history. I loved this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    Very thorough look at race, gender, and class during Reconstruction. Very eye opening. We’ve come so far on race and gender issues in the USA and yet not far at all. We have the SAME recurring issues regarding police brutality, disenfranchisement, cultural policing of sexuality, the revered white woman trope, and class divisions that continue to plague our country. I especially enjoyed the sections outlining the development of blues and black dance as a form of rebellion and reclaiming physical Very thorough look at race, gender, and class during Reconstruction. Very eye opening. We’ve come so far on race and gender issues in the USA and yet not far at all. We have the SAME recurring issues regarding police brutality, disenfranchisement, cultural policing of sexuality, the revered white woman trope, and class divisions that continue to plague our country. I especially enjoyed the sections outlining the development of blues and black dance as a form of rebellion and reclaiming physical autonomy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Skowronek

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Really struggled to enjoy the end as it became repetitive. However, coming away from this book feels as if I just stepped out of another world that I haven’t had a good glimpse of yet, and this is why I enjoy this book so much in some areas. Worth the read, especially Chapter 9 and the attitudes of society towards pathologies (white women with tuberculosis were considered beautiful ands CHIC!!!?)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Cox

    I think that this book is very well-researched and well-written. It was hard for me to focus on such an academic book because my mind has been all over the piece, so I wouldn't really say that I "enjoyed" reading it, but I am thankful that I did. I am reading this book as part of the coursework for a free Yale class that I am taking online. I am glad to be reading it as part of a class because it means that we will learn about the same topics in lecture. I think that this book is very well-researched and well-written. It was hard for me to focus on such an academic book because my mind has been all over the piece, so I wouldn't really say that I "enjoyed" reading it, but I am thankful that I did. I am reading this book as part of the coursework for a free Yale class that I am taking online. I am glad to be reading it as part of a class because it means that we will learn about the same topics in lecture.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ly

    An well-written and detailed book about the Black women’s resilient struggles to claim their bodies, femininity, freedom, and political roles in the Urban South, especially Atlanta, from the Civil War to the First World War. The book reveals a recurring theme of Southerners’ fright of Black women’s agency, a fright that droves them to debase their position by any means possible, such as the enact of Jim Crow and support of Ku Klax Klan. However, Black female, and Black society in general, were p An well-written and detailed book about the Black women’s resilient struggles to claim their bodies, femininity, freedom, and political roles in the Urban South, especially Atlanta, from the Civil War to the First World War. The book reveals a recurring theme of Southerners’ fright of Black women’s agency, a fright that droves them to debase their position by any means possible, such as the enact of Jim Crow and support of Ku Klax Klan. However, Black female, and Black society in general, were persistent and creative in their effort to chase for their dreamed freedom in Atlanta. Stories about African American societies, organizations, jobs, and night dancing parties interestingly manifest various means for such effort.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This was assigned for the "Black Women in America" class that I am CAing for. I really enjoyed the book a great deal. Hunter's prose is very accessible, and I think she does a fantastic job of making the history of black women after the Civil War accessible and interesting to an undergraduate audience while still maintaining scholarly rigor. That said, I am left wanting to know more after many of her anecdotes and, while I understand that she couldn't possible give us all the details on every en This was assigned for the "Black Women in America" class that I am CAing for. I really enjoyed the book a great deal. Hunter's prose is very accessible, and I think she does a fantastic job of making the history of black women after the Civil War accessible and interesting to an undergraduate audience while still maintaining scholarly rigor. That said, I am left wanting to know more after many of her anecdotes and, while I understand that she couldn't possible give us all the details on every encounter, both for spatial limitations and absences in the record, it could be frustrating at times.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna Scoggins

    Enlightened me about life for Black domestic workers in the South during and particularly after slavery. Main focus was the Atlanta area. Educational institutions, neighborhoods, and streets mentioned are thriving communities today. Provided an appreciation for what our female domestic workers went through to get us where we are today.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Excellent overview of the lives of Southern black women during the Reconstruction period and the early part of the twentieth century. Well written and covers most of the major historiographical issues in African-American women's history for the period. Excellent overview of the lives of Southern black women during the Reconstruction period and the early part of the twentieth century. Well written and covers most of the major historiographical issues in African-American women's history for the period.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Fun drinking game for the book: take a shot every time the author uses the phrase "African American Women" when referring to experiences that were commonplace to all African Americans. Just a weirdly paced book that can't make up its mind on what its trying to say or what it wants to be about. Fun drinking game for the book: take a shot every time the author uses the phrase "African American Women" when referring to experiences that were commonplace to all African Americans. Just a weirdly paced book that can't make up its mind on what its trying to say or what it wants to be about.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This is a really great work about the history of Southern Black Women. It's great for people interested in women's history, American history, or Africana studies. This is a really great work about the history of Southern Black Women. It's great for people interested in women's history, American history, or Africana studies.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paula Hartman

    To clarify, I didn't complete this book. It is well researched and the topic is fascinating but I'm just not into reading it at this time. To clarify, I didn't complete this book. It is well researched and the topic is fascinating but I'm just not into reading it at this time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Excellent, well-research, and innovative study of women in the post-bellum South.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Rose

    This book was almost all new information for me. A very informative read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    William

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tress

  23. 4 out of 5

    مينا رؤوف

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jade Jones

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erika Ramos

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adina

  28. 5 out of 5

    Camryn Moore

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christiana salako

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Thompson Burns, PhD

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.