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Rex Mundi, Vol. 1: The Guardian of the Temple

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A quest for the Holy Grail unlike any you've ever seen begins here - in a world where the American Civil War ended in a stalemate, the Catholic Church controls Europe, and sorcery determines political power." A quest for the Holy Grail unlike any you've ever seen begins here - in a world where the American Civil War ended in a stalemate, the Catholic Church controls Europe, and sorcery determines political power."


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A quest for the Holy Grail unlike any you've ever seen begins here - in a world where the American Civil War ended in a stalemate, the Catholic Church controls Europe, and sorcery determines political power." A quest for the Holy Grail unlike any you've ever seen begins here - in a world where the American Civil War ended in a stalemate, the Catholic Church controls Europe, and sorcery determines political power."

30 review for Rex Mundi, Vol. 1: The Guardian of the Temple

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Very interesting beginning...I just wish the rest of the series lived up to it. It had its moments, but never quite took off the way I hoped it would. Still, not a bad read by any means.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kylos

    wow. fuck the da vinci code. church conspiracies and murder mystery set in 1930s paris. except this 1930s paris is in a world where the church still holds power like they did in the middle ages, the ottomans, prussians and romans still have small empires, the american civil war ended in a stalemate (the Confederate States of America still practice slavery, despite political pressure from the world around them) AND some people practice sorcery. and somehow alot of the little mysteries and clues are wow. fuck the da vinci code. church conspiracies and murder mystery set in 1930s paris. except this 1930s paris is in a world where the church still holds power like they did in the middle ages, the ottomans, prussians and romans still have small empires, the american civil war ended in a stalemate (the Confederate States of America still practice slavery, despite political pressure from the world around them) AND some people practice sorcery. and somehow alot of the little mysteries and clues are wrapped up in historical and religious accuracy. i think that typist Dan Brown read this and thought 'how can i dilute this and make it simpler for housewives to digest?' THIS should be a movie. or a cable series. or a direct to DVD cartoon. and ron howard aint the guy to do it. why did it take me so long to pick this up? and why am i sitting here instead of going out and buying the other volumes?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    This story start in an alternate world where the U.S. Civil War ended in stalemate, and most of the European powers are still colonial powers, Europe is on the verge of war. And did we mention sorcery works and the Catholic Church has a strong grip on society? Yes, all that and more. The story is a quest to uncover the truth about a murder and a stolen scroll, which lead to what appears to be some secret society. For people who like alternate history stories, they will definitely enjoy this tale This story start in an alternate world where the U.S. Civil War ended in stalemate, and most of the European powers are still colonial powers, Europe is on the verge of war. And did we mention sorcery works and the Catholic Church has a strong grip on society? Yes, all that and more. The story is a quest to uncover the truth about a murder and a stolen scroll, which lead to what appears to be some secret society. For people who like alternate history stories, they will definitely enjoy this tale. There are conspiracies and secrets, so I suppose people who like things like The DaVinci Code may like this, though this is a lot better written and plotted than that piece of tripe. The art brings the story and the details of the Paris of this time to life. There is much close attention to detail. The details of the alternate world are very rich, and the intriguing story pulls you in. The only small detail, which may irk some readers, are some segments between chapters, in the form of newspapers, which on the one hand interrupt the flow of the story. On the other, this is where you get a lot of the glimpses of the alternate world as well as more connection to the story. So, I leave it to readers to decide if they like the technique or not. I thought it was ok, especially reading some of the small articles on the Confederate States. Overall, this is an excellent series. I will be looking for more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alger

    This series is phenomenal. I will review it as a whole as it encompasses four books and more on the way. It is a well thought out, well researched book that follows in the vein of 'Da Vinci Code', but takes it on a whole new level. First of all, I feel odd saying "follows in the vein", because it actually was written before the 'Da Vinci Code', but has all the hallmarks of that work: Templar secret societies, Jesus's descendents forming the Merovingian line of Kings, Catholic conspiracy, etc. This series is phenomenal. I will review it as a whole as it encompasses four books and more on the way. It is a well thought out, well researched book that follows in the vein of 'Da Vinci Code', but takes it on a whole new level. First of all, I feel odd saying "follows in the vein", because it actually was written before the 'Da Vinci Code', but has all the hallmarks of that work: Templar secret societies, Jesus's descendents forming the Merovingian line of Kings, Catholic conspiracy, etc. It can be presumed that these topics in 'Rex Mundi' and 'Da Vinci Code' come from the authors of both having read the book 'Holy Blood, Holy Grail'. What makes Rex Mundi so different is that it takes place in the 1930's in a 'Golden Compass-esque' alternate reality where the Catholic religion has not given way to Protestantism, Spain is still Islamic, sorcery exists on the street, as well as the use of Golems, and the Civil War of the United States ended in the creation of the Federal States of America, the Confederate States of America, and the independent city-state of New York. The books promise everything that the 'Golden Compass' offers in the arena of fascinating alternate reality and historical remixes, and everything that 'Da Vinci Code' offers in the arena of relgious conspiracies and artwork leading to the Holy Grail itself. Plus what exactly is meant by the title Rex Mundi? Who or what is the King of the World? The books are great as long as you are not a fundamentalist christian and you can suspend your disbelief for a beautiful, breathtaking look at religion and human politics set in a truly innovative world.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Wow this exceeded my expectations. It's basically the Da Vinci Code set in an alternate timeline, although that is an oversimplification. It's 1933 and the Inquisition is still in power in France, and the political climate in the rest of the world is very different as well. Then we get put into the middle of a murder mystery where the murders are only part of the story. Magic exists in this world as well, and different guilds wield all the power (sort of like worker's unions taken to extremes.) T Wow this exceeded my expectations. It's basically the Da Vinci Code set in an alternate timeline, although that is an oversimplification. It's 1933 and the Inquisition is still in power in France, and the political climate in the rest of the world is very different as well. Then we get put into the middle of a murder mystery where the murders are only part of the story. Magic exists in this world as well, and different guilds wield all the power (sort of like worker's unions taken to extremes.) The art was very good and fit the story perfectly. I will have to get back to this series eventually to see how things end up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Rex Mundi is sort of a noir crime alternate history religious suspense story, told in graphic novel form. Yes, that's a lot of genres interwoven, and no, this isn't a quick read. Do NOT skip over the newspaper interludes, which further develop the rich world of the story, as well as containing plot points. In fact, everything in the book contains plot points. Mysterious messages lead to museum paintings which lead to who knows what? This is a version of the world in which the Catholic Church was Rex Mundi is sort of a noir crime alternate history religious suspense story, told in graphic novel form. Yes, that's a lot of genres interwoven, and no, this isn't a quick read. Do NOT skip over the newspaper interludes, which further develop the rich world of the story, as well as containing plot points. In fact, everything in the book contains plot points. Mysterious messages lead to museum paintings which lead to who knows what? This is a version of the world in which the Catholic Church was challenged by Martin Luther, but unsuccessfully. The reconquest of Spain from the Moors never happened, and neither did what we think of as World War I. The Inquisitors of the church rule with an iron hand, and possessing an image of Martin Luther is rank heresy. Anyone who has read books like "The Da Vinci Code" or "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" will recognize clues as to where the story might be heading, but it's still a heck of a trip. Nelson's writing is top notch, and the artwork of Eric J was a pleasant surprise, convincingly grim in this setting.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susanne Waller

    I first saw this book at Chamblin's and passed it by. Then I bought it and sort of circled it for awhile. When I picked it up and started I could not stop devouring it - and the whole series until it was done. Then I was sad it was over. Arvid Nelson has done something unusual: written a series so unique, it has no precedents, taking place on a pre-WWII or alternate Earth where the Inquisition never ended and the balances of power are not what we know, he weaves suspense, mystery, a love story an I first saw this book at Chamblin's and passed it by. Then I bought it and sort of circled it for awhile. When I picked it up and started I could not stop devouring it - and the whole series until it was done. Then I was sad it was over. Arvid Nelson has done something unusual: written a series so unique, it has no precedents, taking place on a pre-WWII or alternate Earth where the Inquisition never ended and the balances of power are not what we know, he weaves suspense, mystery, a love story and the supernatural with a narrative that never lost my intense interest.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Haupt

    Took me forever to read this because the binding fell apart as soon as I bought it. I glued it back together, but not very well, and was so frustrated that I put it in my 'to-read' pile for a few years. Yep, years. So I finally read it, quite liked it, and will be picking up the next. It's alt-history religious-conspiracy noir. What's not to love? Took me forever to read this because the binding fell apart as soon as I bought it. I glued it back together, but not very well, and was so frustrated that I put it in my 'to-read' pile for a few years. Yep, years. So I finally read it, quite liked it, and will be picking up the next. It's alt-history religious-conspiracy noir. What's not to love?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Don

    I read this series when the monthly comics came out, but I fell behind about halfway through the series. I decided to finish the series, starting from the beginning. I thought this was the best comic series being published at the time. Reading it a second time, the book is even better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Alternate history with little history, terrible writing, laughable art.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Werner

    I’ve had this series sitting on the shelf for about a decade after a friend gifted me an extra set he had. I finally cracked open the first trade and kind of wish I hadn’t lugged this stack of books around for the past ten years! I skipped all the newspaper shit in between the comics. I’m not here for that. I hated it in Powers, especially, and I’m sure I’d hate it now. It’s always exposition with bad writing and either fluff (in which case, leave it out) or a too crucial part of the story (in wh I’ve had this series sitting on the shelf for about a decade after a friend gifted me an extra set he had. I finally cracked open the first trade and kind of wish I hadn’t lugged this stack of books around for the past ten years! I skipped all the newspaper shit in between the comics. I’m not here for that. I hated it in Powers, especially, and I’m sure I’d hate it now. It’s always exposition with bad writing and either fluff (in which case, leave it out) or a too crucial part of the story (in which case, put it in the actual form of a comic). The plot seems like an alternate-history noir involving Jesus and the Holy Grail, which is a pretty dope idea. I just couldn’t follow it very well. There was some good action towards the end, and when the spreads got big throughout, it delivered fairly well. I just think those builds to the end of the issues weren’t drastic enough or exciting enough. Every two issues could have been one issue. The art rubbed me the wrong way, and had the characteristics of early Sandman and stuff like Battle Pope that drive me nuts: ill-defined features, weak backgrounds, and repetitive frames. The wonderful Tone Rodriguez (in a style that reminded me of Steve Dillon) cover at the back of the book drilled the point home even further: this could be better.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This book is a fine example of decompression done wrong. Six issues reprinted, one book into the series, and if it weren't for a blurb on the back cover ("Quest for Holy Grail told as Murder Mystery"), I'd still have no clue what Rex Mundi is even about. The plot twists are interesting, and the characters show promise, but it's taking a little too long to meander toward some sort of objective. EricJ's art is very promising. His faces are sometimes pinched and Liefeldian (fortunately, Eric's anato This book is a fine example of decompression done wrong. Six issues reprinted, one book into the series, and if it weren't for a blurb on the back cover ("Quest for Holy Grail told as Murder Mystery"), I'd still have no clue what Rex Mundi is even about. The plot twists are interesting, and the characters show promise, but it's taking a little too long to meander toward some sort of objective. EricJ's art is very promising. His faces are sometimes pinched and Liefeldian (fortunately, Eric's anatomy is MUCH better than Rob's!), but he usually does a good job of moving the camera around to keep what is essentially a talking heads book interesting, visually speaking - although he sometimes relies on too many straight-on, face shots. Eric does some great moody pages, and he illustrates beautiful architecture. There is promise here, but at some point some of that promise needs to be realized.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Volume 1 of an amazing series, that is a cross between Sherlock Holmes meets the Da Vinci Code. Clearly influenced by the mystery of Rennes-Le-Chateau and the Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, this alternate 1930’s setting seems perfect for a story of such depth and revelations of biblical secrets. The well structured narrative and fantastic plot twists keep you gripped through the dark streets of Paris. I particularly enjoyed the writers twists on the investigation into an old mystery. Being only Volume 1 of an amazing series, that is a cross between Sherlock Holmes meets the Da Vinci Code. Clearly influenced by the mystery of Rennes-Le-Chateau and the Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, this alternate 1930’s setting seems perfect for a story of such depth and revelations of biblical secrets. The well structured narrative and fantastic plot twists keep you gripped through the dark streets of Paris. I particularly enjoyed the writers twists on the investigation into an old mystery. Being only volume 1 this is very much a setting up of the world and putting plots into play that will pay off in later volumes. The newspaper articles at the end of each part are a nice touch. If read they expand on the story and perhaps foreshadow what is to come. If you like mysteries, adventure and surprises then I would urge you to pick up volume 1 and begin your journey. Vitam impendere vero.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erin Britton

    Although at first glance the story sounds worryingly similar to that of The Da Vinci Code, Rex Mundi is in fact set in an alternate 1930s Europe where the Reformation never happened and the Catholic Church dominates all areas of political and social life. Against the backdrop of secret societies, government plots and religious conspiracies, Doctor Julien Sauniere sets out to find a stolen scroll concerning the Merovingians, a royal family of France who, it has been claimed, are descended from Je Although at first glance the story sounds worryingly similar to that of The Da Vinci Code, Rex Mundi is in fact set in an alternate 1930s Europe where the Reformation never happened and the Catholic Church dominates all areas of political and social life. Against the backdrop of secret societies, government plots and religious conspiracies, Doctor Julien Sauniere sets out to find a stolen scroll concerning the Merovingians, a royal family of France who, it has been claimed, are descended from Jesus. This is a fast paced story coupled with wonderful art that will have you wishing you'd purchased volume 2 at the same time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cesar

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fans of Holy Blood, Holy Grail and The Da Vinci Code would enjoy this noir tale.

  16. 4 out of 5

    East Bay J

    I’d been wanting to read Rex Mundi for some time and was pretty stoked when my friend, Erik, loaned it to me. I kept seeing this one compared to The Da Vinci Code, which I have no intention of reading based on all the negative reviews I’ve read. That sort of turned me off but, considering I’ve had to pay nothing to check out Rex Mundi, why not? It’s good. I think so, anyway. I think the writing is quite good and the concept as a whole is pretty ambitious. Dr. Julien Sauniere is a sympathetic char I’d been wanting to read Rex Mundi for some time and was pretty stoked when my friend, Erik, loaned it to me. I kept seeing this one compared to The Da Vinci Code, which I have no intention of reading based on all the negative reviews I’ve read. That sort of turned me off but, considering I’ve had to pay nothing to check out Rex Mundi, why not? It’s good. I think so, anyway. I think the writing is quite good and the concept as a whole is pretty ambitious. Dr. Julien Sauniere is a sympathetic character, especially as you know he’s being manipulated by darn near everyone around him. The story is laid out like a mystery and it’s fun to get the little clues and occasional answers as you go along. It certainly puts you in the story with Dr. Sauniere, which is just what you want from a book. The art is okay but I guess I’m losing it with all the hyper realistic art I’ve seen in the comics I’ve been reading lately. I’ve gotten more used to it but something in the faces and postures seems unnatural. I wouldn’t go so far as to say it distracts from the story, however. I understand the artist changes later in the series, anyway, so I'll have to see how that goes. Not quite the powerhouse I’d hoped for but I will read more of Rex Mundi.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    I'd actually give this 1.5 stars if I could because I liked the one shot at the end. I was pretty excited about this but it turned out that it just didn't do anything for me. 75% of the frames didn't have any words but then in between chapters there were these "newspapers" that I came to dread. The art was nice but the style of straight on face shots was repeated so much that it became annoying. The writing for the newspaper articles seemed to slip into modern verbiage a lot. I'm not sure if the I'd actually give this 1.5 stars if I could because I liked the one shot at the end. I was pretty excited about this but it turned out that it just didn't do anything for me. 75% of the frames didn't have any words but then in between chapters there were these "newspapers" that I came to dread. The art was nice but the style of straight on face shots was repeated so much that it became annoying. The writing for the newspaper articles seemed to slip into modern verbiage a lot. I'm not sure if the word "terrorist" was in use in 1933 and that along with words like "press conference" kind of took me out of the setting and into the modern day. Maybe it's because I mistakenly thought the time period was even earlier until I was almost done with the book. Overall it just went too slow and the parts with the most writing were rather boring.

  18. 4 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    This volume collects issues #0-5 plus the webcomic "Brother Matthew, Blessed Are the Meek" by writer Arvid Nelson and artist Eric J, and starts the Rex Mundi series, which I have incidentally been interested in reading for some time now. The basic premise is that a theft and a murder sets off a noir story set in an alternative historical France in the 1930s, where the Catholic Church is still big, Guilds are central, France remains a monarchy, the Civil War in America led to a stalemate resulting This volume collects issues #0-5 plus the webcomic "Brother Matthew, Blessed Are the Meek" by writer Arvid Nelson and artist Eric J, and starts the Rex Mundi series, which I have incidentally been interested in reading for some time now. The basic premise is that a theft and a murder sets off a noir story set in an alternative historical France in the 1930s, where the Catholic Church is still big, Guilds are central, France remains a monarchy, the Civil War in America led to a stalemate resulting in the Federal Republic of America (FRA) and the Confederate States of America (CSA), and oh, magic exists. In short, the premise is quite ingenious, and the execution, with additional background supplied at each chapter's ending through fictional newspaper pages. All in all, the narrative thus far has its hooks in me and I will definitely be looking into the continued story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    I enjoyed this first volume of religious-conspiracy noir. Story keeps moving at a nice pace of action and intrigue. I can use a little more character development time, but I assume there will be more of that in the next volumes. I find the world building to be interesting, as I always do (part of the reason why I enjoyed Rucka's LAZARUS). Art is not to my liking, but I think it still does the job for the type of story. I would prefer someone along the line of Alex Maleev, Sean Phillips (obvious I enjoyed this first volume of religious-conspiracy noir. Story keeps moving at a nice pace of action and intrigue. I can use a little more character development time, but I assume there will be more of that in the next volumes. I find the world building to be interesting, as I always do (part of the reason why I enjoyed Rucka's LAZARUS). Art is not to my liking, but I think it still does the job for the type of story. I would prefer someone along the line of Alex Maleev, Sean Phillips (obvious preference for noir/crime), Lark, or Azaceta.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    !933, Paris, under the rule of King Louis and the iron fist of The Inquisition, a priest comes to Dr. Saunier's late at night. A parchment has been stolen, can the doctor look into it? A dark noir tale set against an alternative world where the Prussian, Ottoman, British, and French empire vie for power, and the U.S. civil war was a stalemate producing two countries. An intriguing start set in an inventive world with eeire parallels to our times. Looking forward to continuing the story. !933, Paris, under the rule of King Louis and the iron fist of The Inquisition, a priest comes to Dr. Saunier's late at night. A parchment has been stolen, can the doctor look into it? A dark noir tale set against an alternative world where the Prussian, Ottoman, British, and French empire vie for power, and the U.S. civil war was a stalemate producing two countries. An intriguing start set in an inventive world with eeire parallels to our times. Looking forward to continuing the story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    Nice work, although the art's a little washed out color-wise and too soft and rounded, too vaguely cartoony for my tastes. The writing's good though, and the concept--what we all come to comics for--is great: alt-history Europe ca. the 1930s, with the Inquisition running wild through France while a French surgeon tracks the Holy Grail. France runs up to war with the Holy Roman Empire and perhaps the Ottoman Empire, as well. There's a sorcerers guild. You get the idea. Nice work, although the art's a little washed out color-wise and too soft and rounded, too vaguely cartoony for my tastes. The writing's good though, and the concept--what we all come to comics for--is great: alt-history Europe ca. the 1930s, with the Inquisition running wild through France while a French surgeon tracks the Holy Grail. France runs up to war with the Holy Roman Empire and perhaps the Ottoman Empire, as well. There's a sorcerers guild. You get the idea.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ubalstecha

    Clever alternate history cloaked in a murder mystery. In a France still ruled by the Burgundians and where the Catholic Church enjoys absolute authority, Doctor Julien Sauniere stumbles across a mystery of disappearing documents and magical, ritual murder. A very interesting story weaving the Catholic Religion, Victorian era Paris, magic and murder mystery. A cute little, and much lighter, story at the end of the book rounds this volume out nicely. Good read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Billcorcoran

    It's a difficult book to describe. It takes place in an alternate history. Magic is real. There is a shocking secret going back to the origin of Christianity that could destroy the Church. It is a murder mystery, a grail quest, and a political thriller. It didn't blow me away but I like genre mixing books and this book delivered in that regard. This is a review of the entire series not just this book. It's a difficult book to describe. It takes place in an alternate history. Magic is real. There is a shocking secret going back to the origin of Christianity that could destroy the Church. It is a murder mystery, a grail quest, and a political thriller. It didn't blow me away but I like genre mixing books and this book delivered in that regard. This is a review of the entire series not just this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    I'm a sucker for anything that involves the Knights Templar [with the exception of The Da Vinci Code]. I like the intersection of film noir, alternative history and Catholic conspiracy but I felt that when all of the issues are collected into a volume the newspaper pieces broke up the story flow too much. Anyways, I'm really intersted to see where this is going. I'm a sucker for anything that involves the Knights Templar [with the exception of The Da Vinci Code]. I like the intersection of film noir, alternative history and Catholic conspiracy but I felt that when all of the issues are collected into a volume the newspaper pieces broke up the story flow too much. Anyways, I'm really intersted to see where this is going.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    No compelling need to pick up the next one in this series, but I did really like the story printed at the end. It was originally a webcomic, then printed in this special Vol 1 edition about a priest who solves a murder at a circus; it reminded me a lot of the Cadfael TV series in which a cleric in the 12th century solves murders.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt Buchholz

    This must be what reading Dan Brown feels like, which is to say mildly more satisfying than sitting on a plane and not reading anything. If this had taken the time it usually takes to read a big boy book, I'd be mad but it came with pictures and gave me a reason to not watch some basketball movie starring Common & Queen Latifah so why the fuck not? This must be what reading Dan Brown feels like, which is to say mildly more satisfying than sitting on a plane and not reading anything. If this had taken the time it usually takes to read a big boy book, I'd be mad but it came with pictures and gave me a reason to not watch some basketball movie starring Common & Queen Latifah so why the fuck not?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Magnus Criwall

    The Da vinci code done right. A lot more interesting mystery and without the worst Mary Sue in recent history of the written word. The penciling is what drags this down a little, the art is sloopy and goes from decent to bad between panels on the same page. The fact that wizardy exist does work in the context of the story and does not feel out of place.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Yet another investigation into Templar secrets, not rendered any more interesting by being relocated to a rather slipshod alternate timeline where the Bourbon monarch was restored and the Inquisition handles all policework in 1930s France, because these two changes apparently sit coherently together rather than just being a half-arsed wishlist of historical components.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Muireann

    Apparently I already read this back in 2013! No recollection. Which, for a murder mystery in an alternate 1930s Paris where Holy Blood Holy Grail is real and the Inquisition is still going strong is not such a good sign. I'd give it an extra star now, obviously mellowing in my old age. But then dock it again for all the misspellings and terrible hyphenations. Apparently I already read this back in 2013! No recollection. Which, for a murder mystery in an alternate 1930s Paris where Holy Blood Holy Grail is real and the Inquisition is still going strong is not such a good sign. I'd give it an extra star now, obviously mellowing in my old age. But then dock it again for all the misspellings and terrible hyphenations.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tiamatty

    Just finished. Pretty good. The mystery's intriguing. Some nice wheels-within-wheels stuff going on. The protagonist felt a bit flat, though. It makes it a bit tougher to really invest in what's going on. The art was nice. It's a pretty art style. It's a good book, and if you like mystery stories, it's definitely worth checking it out. Just finished. Pretty good. The mystery's intriguing. Some nice wheels-within-wheels stuff going on. The protagonist felt a bit flat, though. It makes it a bit tougher to really invest in what's going on. The art was nice. It's a pretty art style. It's a good book, and if you like mystery stories, it's definitely worth checking it out.

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