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Using new primary source material, Letham considers the Assembly's theology in context. At a time of claim and counterclaim, he sheds new light on the Reformers' intent in their documents. Using new primary source material, Letham considers the Assembly's theology in context. At a time of claim and counterclaim, he sheds new light on the Reformers' intent in their documents.


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Using new primary source material, Letham considers the Assembly's theology in context. At a time of claim and counterclaim, he sheds new light on the Reformers' intent in their documents. Using new primary source material, Letham considers the Assembly's theology in context. At a time of claim and counterclaim, he sheds new light on the Reformers' intent in their documents.

30 review for The Westminster Assembly: Reading Its Theology in Historical Context

  1. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    This book cannot be described without superlatives. Letham is fantastically learned, and his is the kind of learning that sheds light on his subject, instead of doing what massive amounts of learning often does -- which is to cover a subject in deep darkness for all but a handful of peers. Letham does wonderful work here. If anyone wants to get a real glimpse into the debates that formed the Westminster Confession, this is the book for it. I am a Westminster man, and this book describes the histo This book cannot be described without superlatives. Letham is fantastically learned, and his is the kind of learning that sheds light on his subject, instead of doing what massive amounts of learning often does -- which is to cover a subject in deep darkness for all but a handful of peers. Letham does wonderful work here. If anyone wants to get a real glimpse into the debates that formed the Westminster Confession, this is the book for it. I am a Westminster man, and this book describes the historic parameters of that description. My solitary complaint about the book would be a footnote on page 264. Other than that, this book was gold.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Letham is working on the achievements of Van Dixhoorn, taking the minutes of the Assembly (as newly discovered and edited) to interpret the Standards in context of what we now know about the debates. Letham also looks at the Assembly's work in the light of all we know about the wider historical and theological setting. The result is a major advance in our understanding of the Westminster documents. Letham is well placed to do this work. His knowledge of historical theology is wide, deep and up-t Letham is working on the achievements of Van Dixhoorn, taking the minutes of the Assembly (as newly discovered and edited) to interpret the Standards in context of what we now know about the debates. Letham also looks at the Assembly's work in the light of all we know about the wider historical and theological setting. The result is a major advance in our understanding of the Westminster documents. Letham is well placed to do this work. His knowledge of historical theology is wide, deep and up-to-date. His sympathies are squarely with the sacramentalism and ecclesiology of the divines. His reformed catholicity is such that he can defend the Assembly at every point but those very few places where some mild criticism is in order. The five stars were sealed for me by how often he approvingly quotes my good friend Dr Moore. The writing style is also readable and attractive. Loved it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    With this volume Letham has established himself as the leading English-speaking Reformed theologian. HOLY SCRIPTURE Letham gives the basic Reformed understanding of Scripture. Continuationism It’s there, albeit in a mild form. Letham notes that William Bridge, George Gillespie, and John Knox received (or claimed they did; or others claimed they did) prophetic revelation. Letham is quick to point out this is only “providential” illumination of Scripture (127). Letham is correct that the Assembly felt With this volume Letham has established himself as the leading English-speaking Reformed theologian. HOLY SCRIPTURE Letham gives the basic Reformed understanding of Scripture. Continuationism It’s there, albeit in a mild form. Letham notes that William Bridge, George Gillespie, and John Knox received (or claimed they did; or others claimed they did) prophetic revelation. Letham is quick to point out this is only “providential” illumination of Scripture (127). Letham is correct that the Assembly felt no need to deal with this issue (nor would they have affirmed it), but other studies clearly demonstrate that the Scottish Reformation (both in its First and Second phases) saw manifestation of prophetic gifts beyond that of simply “illuminating” Scripture. When Cargill and Cameron prophcied the deaths of certain (specific) wicked men, they weren't merely "applying" the general sense of Scripture. If “prophecy” means illumination, then every pastor is a prophet! In which case prophecy is still valid today, but nobody reasons that way. Part of the Reformed world's problem here is the presupposition that every prophetic utterance necessarily carries the full binding of God with it. In another place Wayne Grudem shows that is simply not the case. God the Holy Trinity Without passions… Letham is aware that a hard division on God’s not having passions must take into account the fact that the Incarnation brought into true union with humanity. Jesus experiences human thoughts, human emotions, etc (162). Letham is certainly on the correct path, but the problem is much deeper (and this isn’t a slam against Reformed Christology; all Christological traditions hailing from the Chalcedonian definition must face this problem: does our definition of what it means to be a person today include self-reflection? If it does, then we are on the road to Nestorianism. If it doesn’t, is it really coherent to speak of person anymore?) Letham gives a competent discussion on Creation, though one that will annoy many. He admits, contra many Klineans, that the divines likely held to six solar days, yet he points out that the more pertinent goal was to reject Augustine’s view of instantaneous creation. Further, what we must also admit, no matter where we land on this discussion, is that the divines did presuppose a geocentric cosmology which saw theology in spatial terms. Indeed, one wonders if George Walker even knew that the world is spherical (Letham 191 n.50). Christ and covenant “Condescension” Makes the Klinean meritorious reading strained. CoW, while perhaps the correct reading, is not necessary to maintain Reformed theology. It was developed over time and if Kline’s reading is correct, then huge swathes of Reformed theology would have proved defective before Westminster (233). Covenant of Redemption? Letham highlights a number of problems. While he doesn’t note the problem of person, if person does not include mind (which is usually subsumed under nature), then does it make sense to speak of three individuals who all share the same mind making an agreement? I’m not saying it is a wrong idea, and the CoR certainly preserves a few key values, but it does have problems. Assurance Great section on assurance and he places these (sometimes) painful discussions in their pastoral context, which context is often lost on critics of Reformed assurance. For the record, I agree with Goodwin pace Owen on the Spirit’s sealing. Law, Liberty, Church and Eschatology Great section on Law and Liberty--and he avoids getting involved in the painful theonomy disputes. Letham shows how the RPW should be read and interpreted in light of the Laudian imprisonment and persecution of Reformed believers. On another note, he points out how the Presbyterians really failed on clinching and continuing the “liberty of conscience” victory it justly won. I will elaborate: Did the Solemn League and Covenant bind the consciences of those who didn’t vow it? Said another way, was Cromwell later on obligated to establish Presbyterian government? If he was, how does this square with what (Covenanter) Samuel Rutherford said, “It is in our power to vow, but not in the church’s power to command us to vow” (quoted in Letham 299)? Maybe the two points don’t contradict each other, but the tension is certainly strained. And it appears the Presbyterians couldn’t maintain this tension. They chose to deal with the tyrant Charles I and supported (to their fatal regret later) the pervert Charles II. Cromwell’s victory at Dunbar is fully justified. Conclusion: This isn’t a commentary on the Confession. It is a theological exploration of the historical circumstances behind it. Letham’s scholarship is judicious, measured, and quite frankly awe-inspiring.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert Murphy

    I would just about COMMAND anyone proposing to stand for ordination in a presbyterian denomination read this book. For those of you who have been spared the cantankerous rancor of our internecine debates, the Westminster Standards have been co-opted as a hammar with which to crush those who are not as Reformed in their theology as they ought to be. Letham destroys this usage. First, the credentials of Robert Letham are perfectly suited. He is a graduate of Westminster Theological Seminary in Phil I would just about COMMAND anyone proposing to stand for ordination in a presbyterian denomination read this book. For those of you who have been spared the cantankerous rancor of our internecine debates, the Westminster Standards have been co-opted as a hammar with which to crush those who are not as Reformed in their theology as they ought to be. Letham destroys this usage. First, the credentials of Robert Letham are perfectly suited. He is a graduate of Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and can in no way of being a sympathizer or undercover agent of the "bad guys" (Theonomists, Federal Visionists, Norman Shepherdists, etc.). Second, he has done a thorough reading of Warfield, Hodge, Torrence, and everyone else who has ever critiqued the Westminster Assembly. Third, the publication of Chad VanDixhorn's infinitely detailed minutes of the Assembly are referenced throughout. Letham did all his homework and comes from the right breeding. So it is, that when he comes to smash the sacred cows of the Crotchety Reformed, they will stay smashed. The Westminster Assembly was not about establishing THE right way, but instead casting as big a net as possible. The "big tent" approach may make for more roadbumps and disagreeable run-ins with people we don't like, but it has the official pedigree. Personally, I have deleted several bits of minutiae I formerly thought were exceptions. Over and over again, Letham shows things were worded in such a way as to be as inclusive as possible while remaining biblical. I don't always agree with every word, but this book is invaluable to a right understanding of the history of Reformed theology.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Outstanding read, chronicling the process of writing the Westminster Confession of Faith. Great insight into the debates of the time, and how it effected the WCF. I think all pastors and theologians should have this as a "must read"! Outstanding read, chronicling the process of writing the Westminster Confession of Faith. Great insight into the debates of the time, and how it effected the WCF. I think all pastors and theologians should have this as a "must read"!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    An excellent and comprehensive review of the Westminster Assembly in historical and theological context.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter Bringe

    This book by Letham seeks to shed light on the assembly itself that produced the Westminster Confession and Catechisms and to explain the theology of the standards in their historical context. He does not seek to apply it to current issues, nor does he write it as an exposition of his own theology (though his own theology is not much different). "I cannot emphasize too strongly that this is not a discussion of the theology of the Westminster Assembly as amended by North American Presbyterianism This book by Letham seeks to shed light on the assembly itself that produced the Westminster Confession and Catechisms and to explain the theology of the standards in their historical context. He does not seek to apply it to current issues, nor does he write it as an exposition of his own theology (though his own theology is not much different). "I cannot emphasize too strongly that this is not a discussion of the theology of the Westminster Assembly as amended by North American Presbyterianism from the eighteenth century onwards" (p. 3). "By focusing on the Assembly in context and refraining from addressing contemporary concerns, I expect that its theology may appear in greater relief and so be able to address contemporary concerns better than if they were intruded anachronistically into the text" (p. 7). I found the book very helpful, especially since I was not as familiar with the English context as I was with the Scottish context (Letham emphasizes the English aspect since the assembly was English and since it has often been neglected since the standards have been mostly used in Scotland and North America). The section of the theology of the standards was not comprehensive, though it was detailed in points. Letham also uses recent research that Chad Van Dixhoorn has done on the minutes of the Assembly.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Robert Letham has done a great service to us here. I read the first 130 pages a few years ago, but this time I read the whole thing, and it is so rich and full. The real value here is not that Letham expounds what the Confession teaches, which he does, but that he brings with his exposition, not his own idiosyncrasies or pet issues, but a thorough knowledge of the sources, the authors works, their own theology and the background to the discussions that led to the formulations of the Assembly. Par Robert Letham has done a great service to us here. I read the first 130 pages a few years ago, but this time I read the whole thing, and it is so rich and full. The real value here is not that Letham expounds what the Confession teaches, which he does, but that he brings with his exposition, not his own idiosyncrasies or pet issues, but a thorough knowledge of the sources, the authors works, their own theology and the background to the discussions that led to the formulations of the Assembly. Part 1 Historical Background Part 2 Theological Context Part 3 Theology of the Westminster Assembly My Highlights Page Comment 138 Sufficiency of Scripture. Clarifying the role of tradition and reason. 153 The Creeds 192 Creation 194 Providence: language of causality 206-223 Excursus on Imputation 226 Covenant of Works? 235 Covenant of Redemption and endangerment to the Trinity! 250 Excursus on Justification 290 Tuckney on 2 Peter 1:4 294 Law and NC 331 Baptismal Regeneration 333 Excursus on Baptism 348 Lord’s Supper

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    I rather regret having read this book now. This is a book for the academically inclined and contains information which will be of no practical use to me whatsoever. The time taken to read it would have been put to better use. In other words, this book was an incredibly huge waste of my time. The reason I decided to read this is…well, to be honest I don’t know why I decided to read this book in the first place. I can only recommend that you give this book a hard pass and look for something better I rather regret having read this book now. This is a book for the academically inclined and contains information which will be of no practical use to me whatsoever. The time taken to read it would have been put to better use. In other words, this book was an incredibly huge waste of my time. The reason I decided to read this is…well, to be honest I don’t know why I decided to read this book in the first place. I can only recommend that you give this book a hard pass and look for something better to read. Should you become temporarily insane so as to want to read this book be sure to keep a dictionary handy. There are a number of words that I’ve encountered reading this book that I haven’t encountered anywhere else and I very much doubt I’ll ever encounter them again! One thing though, at the beginning of the section on page 314 to page 317 the printer chose to use a smaller font size than that of the rest of the book. This was an egregious typo that should not have gone unnoticed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Will Turner

    Letham isn't a book you pick up to read for fun. Well, I guess that depends on how you define fun. I will say this: he is not enjoyable to read. But he is helpful to read. This work is more a go-to reference work than a sit down and read straight through work. The book is broken up into three sections: First, the historical context. This is short, but helpful. Second, the theological context. Again, short but helpful. And last, the bulk of the book is comprised of digging into the theology of th Letham isn't a book you pick up to read for fun. Well, I guess that depends on how you define fun. I will say this: he is not enjoyable to read. But he is helpful to read. This work is more a go-to reference work than a sit down and read straight through work. The book is broken up into three sections: First, the historical context. This is short, but helpful. Second, the theological context. Again, short but helpful. And last, the bulk of the book is comprised of digging into the theology of the Assembly. In my opinion the best chapters are 11, 12, and 13. His focus on union with Christ is excellent. I appreciate how Letham is not afraid to say where the assembly's theology was lacking. And this work is a good reminder of the various amounts of debates, disagreements, and diversity within the assembly itself. This should give pause and perhaps a bit more theological humility to those who hold to a strict subscriptionism.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Rizzo

    This book was great. A very solid read, and detailed overview of the historical context, formation, and formulation of the Westminster Assembly. The work of this assembly has provided such rich confessional documents for the church. One of the interesting things to consider is that this assembly was convened at the behest of the government, or at a branch of a government in the middle of a civil war. Letham's work shows how the assembly drew heavily on previous reformation confessions / articles This book was great. A very solid read, and detailed overview of the historical context, formation, and formulation of the Westminster Assembly. The work of this assembly has provided such rich confessional documents for the church. One of the interesting things to consider is that this assembly was convened at the behest of the government, or at a branch of a government in the middle of a civil war. Letham's work shows how the assembly drew heavily on previous reformation confessions / articles and on the scriptures. The work of the assembly doesn't cover every area of doctrine, but it covers important ones. He makes use of the extensive work of Van Dixhorn and the minutes of the assembly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joshua D.

    This is an incredibly helpful book in understanding the historical context of the Westminster Assembly. Conservative Presbyterians are meticulous in examining context when it comes to reading and teaching the Scriptures. But we often act as if the Westminster Confession and Catechisms dropped from the sky, taking little care to understand the climate of their origination, and the debates that led to the particular language that was ultimately included in the Westminster Standards. Letham's book This is an incredibly helpful book in understanding the historical context of the Westminster Assembly. Conservative Presbyterians are meticulous in examining context when it comes to reading and teaching the Scriptures. But we often act as if the Westminster Confession and Catechisms dropped from the sky, taking little care to understand the climate of their origination, and the debates that led to the particular language that was ultimately included in the Westminster Standards. Letham's book will go a long way in addressing this weakness. In the first half of the volume, the reader will get a lengthy history of the time period as well as the main participants at the Assembly. The second half walks through the Confession (with topical interludes particularly to the Larger Catechism), with special emphasis on the floor debates. Meticulously researched, Letham's analysis of the Westminster minutes give the reader a much deeper understanding of the diversity of views at the Assembly, and the compromise language chosen. Based on research alone, I'd rate this 5 stars. I gave it 4, simply because it's not a page turner and something you'll likely get jazzed about reading cover to cover. It makes for an excellent reference work and ought to be on the shelves of every Reformed seminary student and pastor. A couple of quick and random observations: 1.) My biggest takeaway is the large diversity of views at the Assembly. This is not the impression you get from a lot of folks in the PCA. The debates were long and often heated, and at times the final language won by small margins. And yet, those on the "losing side" were not excluded from the Assembly. They were allowed to participate in crafting the rest of the document. Thus, the strict subscriptionism cannot be defended. It's historical anachronistic. 2.) I had no idea there were English hypothetical universalists at the Assembly (Calamy being the most outspoken, but Seaman, Marshall and Vines are mentioned as supporting this position). Note that hypothetical universalism is not the same as actual universalism. Hypothetical universalism wants to push back against particular (or limited) atonement, suggesting that Christ's death has affect for the whole world, and not just those whom he saves. Faith is the only thing missing for someone to procure the effects of the death of Christ. At any rate, it seems the Assembly included "4 pointers" and didn't tar and feather them. 3.) There was a HUGE debate on the imputation of the active obedience of Christ. 4.) Letham does not think highly of TF Torrance's work on the Assembly. Letham seems to think Torrance kind of mailed it in. 5.) The debates around the Sacraments were also interesting. Seems clear that while most Assembly members favored sprinkling, some preferred immersion and few wanted to exclude any of the three modes of baptism: pouring, sprinkling, or immersion. 6.) The regulative principle was meant to be a "freeing principle" rather than a restrictive one. Assembly members were objecting to Anglican policies of enforcing the Book of Common Prayer and other liturgical elements on ministers and their churches. The Assembly didn't reject these things wholesale, but they crafted their statements on worship to make Scripture the sole judge and prescriptor of "right worship.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    Letham is clearly a top-notch scholar, and he provides good survey and interpretation of the Westminster Assembly; but he misunderstands TF Torrance's own theological program, and then tries to castigate Torrance's reading of the period through this misunderstanding. If often seems that he is driven, too much, polemically almost, in answering Torrance perceived misinterpretation of this period; in other words he presses the union with Christ motif in the LC in order to say to Torrance: "see, you Letham is clearly a top-notch scholar, and he provides good survey and interpretation of the Westminster Assembly; but he misunderstands TF Torrance's own theological program, and then tries to castigate Torrance's reading of the period through this misunderstanding. If often seems that he is driven, too much, polemically almost, in answering Torrance perceived misinterpretation of this period; in other words he presses the union with Christ motif in the LC in order to say to Torrance: "see, you were wrong, the Westminster Standards do include union theology." And this is precisely where Letham, surprisingly misses Torrance's critique. Torrance sought to ground and personalise salvation in the 'person of Christ' --- i.e. there is nothing 'instrumental' about it, as is the case for the WCF and LC's accounting; Letham even says that the Holy Spirit instrumentally applies grace to the heart of the elect in order to 'enable' them to respond. Again this is the kind of dualism that Torrance is critiquing, and that holds true whether it be in the WCF (or not) or in the Larger Catechism. Since Letham lifted Torrance up, usually as his whipping boy, and sought to answer and pumble Torrance by placing the WCF in context; he really really failed in this regard, because he fails to actually engage or grasp what in fact Torrance was about all along. Not only that, but Letham never engages the Scottish theologians whom Torrance appeals to in his book: "Scottish Theology." If Letham wanted to undercut Torrance's critique, from history, then he needed to engage these characters, at least a little . . . he didn't, so again, another real weakness.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jared Mcnabb

    Excellent book. This book should be required reading for seminary students, or any who wishes to have a "confessional" christianity. This book will not only help one to understand the theology of the Westminster documents, but also helps the reader properly appreciate them for what they are. (The Westminster documents are consensus documents, and often the language is careful to allow various views. We would do well to continue to allow various views on theological topics to exist within the boun Excellent book. This book should be required reading for seminary students, or any who wishes to have a "confessional" christianity. This book will not only help one to understand the theology of the Westminster documents, but also helps the reader properly appreciate them for what they are. (The Westminster documents are consensus documents, and often the language is careful to allow various views. We would do well to continue to allow various views on theological topics to exist within the bounds of "Reformed theology" instead of declaring everyone who disagrees with us to either be out of accord with the confession, or even be "not reformed," as I sadly see happen very often. )

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Stout

    Excellent! Letham convincingly makes the case that the work of the Westminster Assembly must be understood explicitly as an attempt to revise the doctrinal basis of the Church of England and that its flourishing in Scottish and North American settings has obscured this fact. He brings out the particular brilliance of the work of the Divines, as well as points out their shortcomings. The Westminster documents are shown to be intentionally inclusive of a wide swath of Reformed positions on a varie Excellent! Letham convincingly makes the case that the work of the Westminster Assembly must be understood explicitly as an attempt to revise the doctrinal basis of the Church of England and that its flourishing in Scottish and North American settings has obscured this fact. He brings out the particular brilliance of the work of the Divines, as well as points out their shortcomings. The Westminster documents are shown to be intentionally inclusive of a wide swath of Reformed positions on a variety of subjects.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    A must-read for anyone interested in understanding the Westminster Assembly's theology. Incredibly illuminating both because of Letham's expertise in the English background (political, historical, religious, cultural) that framed the Assembly's work and his use of the newly published/translated minutes of the Assembly (by Chad Van Dixhorn). Letham's judgments (when they do appear) seem right on, except perhaps for his over eager and quick dismissal of every single criticism lodged by Torrance, B A must-read for anyone interested in understanding the Westminster Assembly's theology. Incredibly illuminating both because of Letham's expertise in the English background (political, historical, religious, cultural) that framed the Assembly's work and his use of the newly published/translated minutes of the Assembly (by Chad Van Dixhorn). Letham's judgments (when they do appear) seem right on, except perhaps for his over eager and quick dismissal of every single criticism lodged by Torrance, Barth and co. Still, this is a minor complaint; the book is a treasure.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shep

    A stellar, balanced historical account of the Westminster Assembly that sheds light on the process by which its theological conclusions were formulated. On occasion I actually wanted MORE of Letham's personal opinion, but I value his decision to exercise restraint and simply portray the facts as accurately as possible. Tough to get through the historically superloaded first few chapters, but overall an enjoyable, intriguing, and informative read. A stellar, balanced historical account of the Westminster Assembly that sheds light on the process by which its theological conclusions were formulated. On occasion I actually wanted MORE of Letham's personal opinion, but I value his decision to exercise restraint and simply portray the facts as accurately as possible. Tough to get through the historically superloaded first few chapters, but overall an enjoyable, intriguing, and informative read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    CJ Bowen

    Tremendous study of the Westminster Standards, and one that is much needed today. Letham courageously hammers modern reformed presbyterianism on its failure to appreciate the richness of WCF on the sacraments, its anachronistic application of the CoW as a litmus test, and its general line-drawing spirit in the face of the desire of the Divines to present a generic Calvinism that could embrace diversity of opinion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Justin Andrusk

    I thought this was a very objective view from a historical contextual viewpoint to the the creation of the Westminster standards. The book also gives a good defense for some of the baseless criticisms from Karl Barth and others who don't view all of the standards as a whole. For example there some points expounded by the Larger Catechisms that are not addressed in depth by the Confession of Faith. Very good read. I thought this was a very objective view from a historical contextual viewpoint to the the creation of the Westminster standards. The book also gives a good defense for some of the baseless criticisms from Karl Barth and others who don't view all of the standards as a whole. For example there some points expounded by the Larger Catechisms that are not addressed in depth by the Confession of Faith. Very good read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    Robert Letham’s work sets the table for further great study on the Assembly. His historical corrections and utilization of new primary source discoveries lay a solid trajectory for helpful scholarship. This is the new standard. It has given Reformed Christians insight into their rich heritage and should enrich our understanding of confessionalism.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Letham’s work is an excellent summary of the historical background within which the 39 Articles and then the Westminster Standards were forged. At times, the material becomes a bit technical and detailed in the minutia of session transcripts, theological debate, and such (which may be a feature rather a bug for some readers), but the main thrust of the book is excellent.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Outstanding analysis of the Assembly's theology, which turns out accommodated a broad swatch of reformed theology. Today's reformed Christians ought to be as catholic as the divines. Here is a good place to learn about what that means. Other than a mistaken conflation of the FV and New Perspective on Paul, this is top notch. Outstanding analysis of the Assembly's theology, which turns out accommodated a broad swatch of reformed theology. Today's reformed Christians ought to be as catholic as the divines. Here is a good place to learn about what that means. Other than a mistaken conflation of the FV and New Perspective on Paul, this is top notch.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nate Walker

    Very helpful overview of the confession especially with regard to its historical context, the diversity present in the assembly, and how the final document made allowances for differences at a number of points.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Very enlightening look at the Westminster Divines in their historical and theological context. The greatest thing Letham did throughout was to point out many of the points at which modern theologians try to read their own anachronistic theology back into the Westminster documents.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Comis

    This was an excellent historical study of the WCF. There is plenty of food for thought here, for both the strict confessionalist, as well as those trying to understand the Confession from a perspective outside the modern American Presbyterian box.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Letham's work gives invaluable insights into the discussions behind the Westminster Confession. Recommended! Letham's work gives invaluable insights into the discussions behind the Westminster Confession. Recommended!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mathew

    www.grace4sinners.blogspot.com/p/book... www.grace4sinners.blogspot.com/p/book...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    A must read

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonah

    Great book and deserves another read. Letham knows his stuff and does a wonderful job placing the Westminster Standards in its historic context.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

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