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Cinderella, Volume 1: From Fabletown with Love

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When supernatural artifacts from the Homelands begin surfacing in the modern world, it falls to Cinderella, Fabletown's best kept (and best dressed) secret agent to stop the illegal trafficking. But can Cindy foil the dark plot before Fabletown and its hidden, exiled inhabitants are exposed once and for all? And how does her long lost Fairy Godmother factor into the equati When supernatural artifacts from the Homelands begin surfacing in the modern world, it falls to Cinderella, Fabletown's best kept (and best dressed) secret agent to stop the illegal trafficking. But can Cindy foil the dark plot before Fabletown and its hidden, exiled inhabitants are exposed once and for all? And how does her long lost Fairy Godmother factor into the equation? Whether she's soaring through clouds, deep-sea diving, or cracking jaws, Cindy travels from Manhattan to Dubai and hooks up with a handsome, familiar accomplice who may be harboring secret motives of his own. Meanwhile, trouble brews back home in Fabletown when Cindy's overworked, underappreciated assistant decides to seize control of The Glass Slipper, Cindy's exclusive shoe boutique. Collecting: Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love 1-6


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When supernatural artifacts from the Homelands begin surfacing in the modern world, it falls to Cinderella, Fabletown's best kept (and best dressed) secret agent to stop the illegal trafficking. But can Cindy foil the dark plot before Fabletown and its hidden, exiled inhabitants are exposed once and for all? And how does her long lost Fairy Godmother factor into the equati When supernatural artifacts from the Homelands begin surfacing in the modern world, it falls to Cinderella, Fabletown's best kept (and best dressed) secret agent to stop the illegal trafficking. But can Cindy foil the dark plot before Fabletown and its hidden, exiled inhabitants are exposed once and for all? And how does her long lost Fairy Godmother factor into the equation? Whether she's soaring through clouds, deep-sea diving, or cracking jaws, Cindy travels from Manhattan to Dubai and hooks up with a handsome, familiar accomplice who may be harboring secret motives of his own. Meanwhile, trouble brews back home in Fabletown when Cindy's overworked, underappreciated assistant decides to seize control of The Glass Slipper, Cindy's exclusive shoe boutique. Collecting: Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love 1-6

30 review for Cinderella, Volume 1: From Fabletown with Love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    Cinderella is a Fable, an ex-wife of Prince Charming, and an internationally active spy. She's been a spy since shortly after she came over from the Land of the Fables, with Bigby Wolf as her spymaster. This is an incredibly fun graphic novel. Cinderella has plenty of energy and authority as a spy. She uses her benignly pretty debutante and shoe store owner facade as a weapon along with others in her arsenal. This Fable can take care of herself and get out of some of the tightest spots. She even Cinderella is a Fable, an ex-wife of Prince Charming, and an internationally active spy. She's been a spy since shortly after she came over from the Land of the Fables, with Bigby Wolf as her spymaster. This is an incredibly fun graphic novel. Cinderella has plenty of energy and authority as a spy. She uses her benignly pretty debutante and shoe store owner facade as a weapon along with others in her arsenal. This Fable can take care of herself and get out of some of the tightest spots. She even has 'assets' who help her along as she needs them. Assets being magical animal Fables with unique skill sets. On this mission, she teams up with another recognizable character from the world of fairy tales and fables, that you might know as Aladdin. They make a good team, and share humble origins. Cinderella even faces some shadows from her own Fable past. The story is strong and the artwork is gorgeous, especially the cover art by Chrissie Zullo. Her work is beautiful and luminous, showcasing a Fae delicacy to this lethal spy. Even with a different writer, the spirit of the Fables series remains strong, and its focus on strong women prevails with Cinderella showing how spying Fable-style is done right. I liked the fairy tale "Cinderella," as a die-hard, inveterate fairy tale aficionado, how could I not? But I definitely love the idea of Cinderella as an international spy even more. On to the next adventure.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I read the first few Fabletown books, and then let the series slide thinking I would come back to it later. I'm really wishing now that I had kept up with what was going on, because I have a feeling Cinderella's story would have been even better if I'd had a little more background info on the goings-on in that world. However, it was still fairly easy to piece together enough of the story to enjoy this book. Also, had this been my first introduction to Fable town, I still would have loved it, beca I read the first few Fabletown books, and then let the series slide thinking I would come back to it later. I'm really wishing now that I had kept up with what was going on, because I have a feeling Cinderella's story would have been even better if I'd had a little more background info on the goings-on in that world. However, it was still fairly easy to piece together enough of the story to enjoy this book. Also, had this been my first introduction to Fable town, I still would have loved it, because Roberson did a great job incorporating Cinderella's fairytale into the story. He managed to take the myth and turn it on it's ear in a way that anyone could understand. I would recommend this to anyone who's looking for something a little different than the usual fairytale.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I like Fables but I don't like Fables if you know what I mean. I got upset about the direction that Snow was being taken so I have paused in reading the series, but I picked this up because it is supposed good fun. And it is good fun. Cinderella kicks butt. Nice and enjoyable. Not too heavy, not too light. Just right. I like Fables but I don't like Fables if you know what I mean. I got upset about the direction that Snow was being taken so I have paused in reading the series, but I picked this up because it is supposed good fun. And it is good fun. Cinderella kicks butt. Nice and enjoyable. Not too heavy, not too light. Just right.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Northrup

    I've been reading Fables all along and I do love the concept of Cinderella's character, but the story itself was disappointingly insubstantial. I've really enjoyed the Arabian Knights fables and Aladdin was a great choice as co-star, so there's that. The second half seemed rushed, which was a greater weakness than its predictability. The side plot back at the shoe store was just annoying, however classically-based. Not least because the staffer provoked zilch sympathy. The flashbacks to past cape I've been reading Fables all along and I do love the concept of Cinderella's character, but the story itself was disappointingly insubstantial. I've really enjoyed the Arabian Knights fables and Aladdin was a great choice as co-star, so there's that. The second half seemed rushed, which was a greater weakness than its predictability. The side plot back at the shoe store was just annoying, however classically-based. Not least because the staffer provoked zilch sympathy. The flashbacks to past capers at the beginning of each issue (more of a distraction when you're reading it in trade) were a better idea than execution and retconning her into the Frankenstein story was pointless. (That or my memory is worse than I thought.) Probably the biggest downfall was the art, though. I appreciated that so many characters were just average-looking, and that such a variety of appearances, but it was a problem that there was so much variety in the appearances of the two main characters. And he gives a little too much attention to noses.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    It's been quite some time since I read the last fables book and I thought it should be time to finish the series. Cinderella is like the Black Widow of the Fables world and here she meets an unlikely foe. This is a strong spinoff from the main series, much like Jack of Fables and it keeps the action moving throughout. The twist at the end was quite good and I never seen it coming. The series has kept a steady quality throughout and I'll aim to finish this before the end of year as it is a series It's been quite some time since I read the last fables book and I thought it should be time to finish the series. Cinderella is like the Black Widow of the Fables world and here she meets an unlikely foe. This is a strong spinoff from the main series, much like Jack of Fables and it keeps the action moving throughout. The twist at the end was quite good and I never seen it coming. The series has kept a steady quality throughout and I'll aim to finish this before the end of year as it is a series sitting quietly on my shelf.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arielle

    So, it's been established in the Fables series that Cinderella is seriously kick-ass. This just proves her awesomeness - really enjoyed this. So, it's been established in the Fables series that Cinderella is seriously kick-ass. This just proves her awesomeness - really enjoyed this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Originally reviewed here Spoilers!: This review contains some minor spoilers for the Fables series, as does the book itself. Chronologically, this story takes place after Fables: War and Pieces (#11). So go read those first! I know what you’re thinking people...This is all very From Russia With Love. And you’re right! Cinderella has come here to chew bubble gum and kick ass...and she’s all out of bubble gum. Cinderella is Fabletown’s #1 bad ass spy. She’s so skilled in skulduggery she makes Bond lo Originally reviewed here Spoilers!: This review contains some minor spoilers for the Fables series, as does the book itself. Chronologically, this story takes place after Fables: War and Pieces (#11). So go read those first! I know what you’re thinking people...This is all very From Russia With Love. And you’re right! Cinderella has come here to chew bubble gum and kick ass...and she’s all out of bubble gum. Cinderella is Fabletown’s #1 bad ass spy. She’s so skilled in skulduggery she makes Bond look like an amateur. Recruited by then sheriff, Bigby Wolf, shortly after escaping the Homelands with Prince Charming, Cinderella has had mundy (that is mundane--aka us boring humans) lifetime’s to perfect her skills. She operates under Bigby’s number one rule of combat: Being the unarmed opponent in a fight isn’t necessarily a disadvantage...and if you really need a weapon, the other guy’s got one you can have. To the average Fabletown citizen, Cinderella is the jet-setting owner of “The Glass Slipper”, the local shoe shop. She spends far too little time there working, and far too much gallivanting across the globe spending money she doesn’t seem to have. To a select few, she is Fabletown’s top off the books spy, called in when situations are too big or too delicate to be handled by the Tourists (the on the books spies). After hundreds of years, the good Fables residing in the mundy world have defeated the evil adversary and are no longer at war with the Homelands, but the resulting upheaval has brought up its own share of problems for Fabletown. Unregistered magical goods have been popping up around the globe, and are falling into mundy hands. Astoundingly dangerous, one magical cookpot used wrong, and the whole world could drown in oatmeal (um...yuck!). Cinderella is sent to investigate; she sets off with some magical goods of her own, and along the way teams up with another rags-to-riches Fable-turned-spy looking out for the interests of his own city (can you guess who?). Meanwhile, back at The Glass Slipper, there’s something very “Red Shoes” going on if you know what I mean. If you enjoyed Cindy’s previous Fables exploits in “Cinderella Libertine” (issue 22), “Big and Small” (issue 51) and “Skulduggery” (issue 71-72), then you’ll love Cinderella: From Fabletown With Love. I’m so happy to say this spin-off was a success! I’m always wary of spin-offs, and have avoided Jack of the Fables like the plague since Jack is by far my least favorite Fables character. Roberson manages to give Cindy (and others) a tone so similar to Willingham’s treatment, you hardly realize it’s a different author. McManus’s art is his own, but in a way that easily evokes the images off all the characters we know and love. Cinderella doesn’t have the depth of the original Fables, but for the full-on addict that I have become, it was just the thing! Wrapped up in a neat little package, Cinderella: From Fabletown With Love is an excellent read for Fables fans. Plus there’s hotness. Did I mention the hotness? "I don’t believe in Happily Ever After. Not anymore. But if the best I can do is Happily For the Moment, then it’ll have to do. Hey, it beats sitting in cinders and ashes, right?" I’ll say. Finally, every Fables fan I know has a total crush on the cover art of James Jean. Well hold onto your pants kids, because Cinderella comes complete with a new cover artist, Chrissie Zullo, ready to fight for a place in your heart. Considering Zullo lists Jean among her influences, I’m feeling a steamy love triangle coming on!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This the first mini-series featuring Cinderella from Bill Willingham's wonderful Fables series penned by Chris Robertson. When the Fabletown sheriff needs a spy for a spot of espionage he doesn't call Bond - I don't think he'd be too keen on tackling tooled up polar bears. He doesn't call Bourne either - he wouldn't last 5 minutes going undercover in the land of Ultima Thule where frowns are a capital offense. He calls somebody with a little more vintage in the game. He calls Cinderella. This is This the first mini-series featuring Cinderella from Bill Willingham's wonderful Fables series penned by Chris Robertson. When the Fabletown sheriff needs a spy for a spot of espionage he doesn't call Bond - I don't think he'd be too keen on tackling tooled up polar bears. He doesn't call Bourne either - he wouldn't last 5 minutes going undercover in the land of Ultima Thule where frowns are a capital offense. He calls somebody with a little more vintage in the game. He calls Cinderella. This is a pretty decent addition to the Fables books. A lot of fun is had by all, there's some suitably fable style art and clever use of the fables back story. Before I join the Smile Patrol or even the Happiness Patrol though, I have to point a pointy finger at the unfortunate and out of place political burblage half way through which probably came stage directed "assume patronising lecturing tone". This happens frequently in Fables titles especially when some of the Eastern Fables turn up. As soon as Aladdin gurns his way onto the pages I feared the worst. It's not that the author isn't well meaning - just too preachy.The book would have been better served by a few more panels of the highly amusing though incidental interludes back at The Glass Slipper and the misadventures of the guy left in charge of the store. Chrissie Zullo's original covers are almost worth an extra star btw. Now when is Jenny Wren getting her own book?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    This was so awesome!! Such a unique take on the Cinderella story and the whole fairytail universe. A must read for sure. Very comical and action-packed. A great book :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dani Shuping

    The Fables universe has long been one of my favorite continuing comic stories. The depth and breadth of the characters, the fantastic storylines, and the imagery is absolutely fantastic. And then I heard about this spin off of Cinderella into her own short little series and I was hesitant. It wasn’t Bill Willingham writing it…would it be good? Needless to say my fears were unfounded as Chris Roberson creates a fantastic story for Cinderella, Fabletown’s ultimate spy. The story is well written an The Fables universe has long been one of my favorite continuing comic stories. The depth and breadth of the characters, the fantastic storylines, and the imagery is absolutely fantastic. And then I heard about this spin off of Cinderella into her own short little series and I was hesitant. It wasn’t Bill Willingham writing it…would it be good? Needless to say my fears were unfounded as Chris Roberson creates a fantastic story for Cinderella, Fabletown’s ultimate spy. The story is well written and the art is fantastic. So hang on for an adventure with a spy. When artifacts from the Homelands start surfacing in the modern world only one fable can find out what’s going on. Cinderella, Fabletown’s top secret spy and their best dressed agent. But she may not be the only agent on the case. And there are rumors…dark rumors of a powerful magical force lurking about in surprise. So not only does Cindy have to go out and find out what’s going on before Fabletown is exposed, she also has to worry about Crispin and her shoe store! Seems that he thinks he should run things. What’s a girl to do? Kick butt, take no prisoners, and save the world of course. Just like the regular series I love that the characters are turned on their head a bit. While Bill created the character of Cindy as super spy, Chris’s story has really brought her to life. He gives her a backstory, letting readers see the amount of depth that the character really has. The story itself is well told super spy story, ala James Bondish…except I think Cindy is a much better spy than James Bond. I mean after all who would expect a simple shoe store owner to be able to kick that much butt? I’m sure Bill signed off on what Chris was planning (Bill does have to keep writing the Fables universe after all), but Chris adds some really nice twists and turns in this story making use of some classic Fables misconceptions. I also really like the addition of (minor spoiler) Aladdin as a foil for Cindy to play off of. The one downside to the story…the Crispin aspect. I’d have prefered to see that as a separate story almost than one mixed in with what Cindy is up to. It just interrupts the flow of the rest of the story a bit. The artwork is classic Fables capturing the characters in all of the style and elegance they deserve. Shawn draws a number of action sequences in this collection, with Cindy kicking butt seemingly every other page and the details that he gives to the characters are absolutely perfect. Hair flying in the breeze, skirts/dresses billowing out, and I can believe that the characters are really fighting. I also really enjoyed the depiction of Aladdin’s all powerful genie. Its only one panel, but its a fantastic image. The one weak point of the artwork, for me at least, are the depictions of the animal characters. They just appear too cartoony next to the human characters, the Marquis De Carabas in particular. It’s just a bit jarring. Luckily they don’t show up that much in the collection. I also want to make mention of Chrissie Zullo’s covers for the series. I love her art style that captures Cindy as almost vulnerable, but an edge of hardness. She really plays up the James Bond aspect of Cindy. I really enjoyed this collection and it’s a great addition to the Fables Universe and I can’t wait to see what the next volume is like. I recommend this collection to and fan of Fables and if you haven’t read Fables yet (why the heck not?) this is pretty good introduction to the series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I loved this. It's so good! It's a simple concept: Cinderella is a spy and is trying to find magical items that could be used as weapons if they got into the hands of mundane humans. If you're not familiar with the series Fables this is a sort of spin off, but you don't need to have read any of the series to enjoy this. Basically: Fairy Tale characters live in the real world and came from their world into our own because of a war against The Advesary an Evil Overlord that overran the Fairy Tale I loved this. It's so good! It's a simple concept: Cinderella is a spy and is trying to find magical items that could be used as weapons if they got into the hands of mundane humans. If you're not familiar with the series Fables this is a sort of spin off, but you don't need to have read any of the series to enjoy this. Basically: Fairy Tale characters live in the real world and came from their world into our own because of a war against The Advesary an Evil Overlord that overran the Fairy Tale Kingdoms with Orcs and other monsters. Now magical items of extreme power are coming into the Real World and it's up to Cindy to find them and find out who is getting them into this world. My favorite thing about the issues is that they open with flashbacks that show Cinderella being a spy through the years and all the types of things she's already done. I love that trick to give her background, it's an easy one but it's pulled off very well here, it's also done with a sort of wink to the audience which can be hard to pull off, but is really well done here. I look forward to the next Trade Paperback of this series and if my comic shop carried it in issues I'd buy them, but sadly they don't.

  12. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Bill Willingham's Fables was a runaway success beyond anyone's dreams. It'll go down in comics history with Sandman and Preacher, no doubt, even though it ran its course 60 issues ago. Spin-offs were inevitable but I never expected one to be 'Cinderella'. It isn't awful. Not completely. But it is altogether too smirking and far too trite. As if it thought it would continue to sell itself based on the popularity of the Fables mythos. That could be the case, could have been the case, but not to me Bill Willingham's Fables was a runaway success beyond anyone's dreams. It'll go down in comics history with Sandman and Preacher, no doubt, even though it ran its course 60 issues ago. Spin-offs were inevitable but I never expected one to be 'Cinderella'. It isn't awful. Not completely. But it is altogether too smirking and far too trite. As if it thought it would continue to sell itself based on the popularity of the Fables mythos. That could be the case, could have been the case, but not to me. Not for me. The idea of Cinderella as a spy the likes of James Bond didn't float well, didn't really make a bit of sense, to be honest. Everything about the writing seemed so out of character and rushed that it was distracting. If it had been a brand new series and brand new characters, I could have handled it. I could have liked it. The covers are gorgeous, though. Grade: D

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lu (Sugar & Snark)

    In this spinoff Cinderella is not the typical Cinderella I have come to known through the years, as it takes place after the whole dealings with the lost glass slipper, marrying this prince etc. Cinderella is now a divorced spy that owns a shoe shop called The Glass Slipper! And get this... her handler is Beast from Beauty and the Beast! But let me not give everything away. Cinderella goes on one hell of an adventure with a swoon worthy hero (think flying carpets and Arabian nights) and some inte In this spinoff Cinderella is not the typical Cinderella I have come to known through the years, as it takes place after the whole dealings with the lost glass slipper, marrying this prince etc. Cinderella is now a divorced spy that owns a shoe shop called The Glass Slipper! And get this... her handler is Beast from Beauty and the Beast! But let me not give everything away. Cinderella goes on one hell of an adventure with a swoon worthy hero (think flying carpets and Arabian nights) and some interesting talking animal sidekicks! And on top of this she has to deal with a shoe sales assistant that thinks he can run her business anyway he wants. And although I didn't think the illustrations were as good as they could have been, the story more than made up for it. Loved it! Illustrations: 3.5 stars Story: 5++ stars Overall: 5 stars

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A fun, light read. I enjoyed this spin-off much more than Jack of Fables - mainly because I find Cinderella to be a much more likable character than Jack. The artwork was nothing short of beautiful, particularly the covers by James Jean - I've come to expect nothing less from the Fables series. Still, the story itself was a bit of a let-down and not much of a page-turner... Also, I found the characters "Puss in Boots" and the "Fairy Godmother" resembled their "Shrek" counterparts too closely for A fun, light read. I enjoyed this spin-off much more than Jack of Fables - mainly because I find Cinderella to be a much more likable character than Jack. The artwork was nothing short of beautiful, particularly the covers by James Jean - I've come to expect nothing less from the Fables series. Still, the story itself was a bit of a let-down and not much of a page-turner... Also, I found the characters "Puss in Boots" and the "Fairy Godmother" resembled their "Shrek" counterparts too closely for comfort.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Celise

    Oops, I didn't realize this was a spinoff of Fables. I should probably have read that first. Honestly this didn't do a lot for me. I liked the ending and the twists on individual fairytales. My favourite part was definitely the shoe store though. When the sidestory is more entertaining than the main plot it's a little hard to review so I'll just end this here. Oops, I didn't realize this was a spinoff of Fables. I should probably have read that first. Honestly this didn't do a lot for me. I liked the ending and the twists on individual fairytales. My favourite part was definitely the shoe store though. When the sidestory is more entertaining than the main plot it's a little hard to review so I'll just end this here.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    Fun. Definitely a tongue in cheek, 007 spy inspired romp through Fabletown. It is the comic relief to the main opus. Still, worthwhile as a quick read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

    Cindy is so sassy! I love the Fables series and all its spin-offs. For those that love fractured fairytales, I highly recommend but be warned younger readers, there are adult themes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Cinderella, from the Fables comics, is a spin off from the main Fables comics. While it is not really necessary to have read the original series, I do think it would help. Cinderella is doing a covert operation for Fabletown. She is looking for magical items that may inadvertently end up in the hands of "mundies". This takes her to Dubai where she runs into Alladin, who is doing something similar for the Arabic Fables. The two of them find a trio of Fables are selling these goods and buying weapo Cinderella, from the Fables comics, is a spin off from the main Fables comics. While it is not really necessary to have read the original series, I do think it would help. Cinderella is doing a covert operation for Fabletown. She is looking for magical items that may inadvertently end up in the hands of "mundies". This takes her to Dubai where she runs into Alladin, who is doing something similar for the Arabic Fables. The two of them find a trio of Fables are selling these goods and buying weapons with them. This leads to Ultima Thule, where they stumble upon who is really behind all of this nonsense. But no spoilers as the villain was an interesting one, as was the reason for choosing Ultima Thule as the base of operations. While not to the quality of the normal Fables series, this was an entertaining read. I have always liked the character of Cinderella (the one from the Fables comics) and enjoyed reading about her adventures. Perhaps this falls short only in comparison to the main series, however most readers will enjoy this comic. If you have been a huge fan of the Fables comics then you will likely enjoy it even more.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Loren

    Although I believe it's the first "Fables" book not to carry Bill Willingham's name on the cover, Cinderella: From Fabletown With Love works as a very natural extension of the Fables universe. In many ways, in fact, it reads more like a regular Fables story than most of "Jack of Fables." In brief, "Fables" is about the characters from fairy tales and folklore (e.g. Snow White, the Big Bad Wolf, Pinocchio, etc.) who fled a conquerer in their fictional homelands by escaping to the 'real' world, whe Although I believe it's the first "Fables" book not to carry Bill Willingham's name on the cover, Cinderella: From Fabletown With Love works as a very natural extension of the Fables universe. In many ways, in fact, it reads more like a regular Fables story than most of "Jack of Fables." In brief, "Fables" is about the characters from fairy tales and folklore (e.g. Snow White, the Big Bad Wolf, Pinocchio, etc.) who fled a conquerer in their fictional homelands by escaping to the 'real' world, where they settled in their own secret section of New York City, dubbed 'Fabletown.' Cinderella has had relatively little screentime in the ongoing book, but Willingham established her as Fabletown's international secret agent, dealing with issues of concern to the Fable community. This globe-trotting setup certainly lends itself to an adventurous solo tale, and Chris Roberson was given the job of spinning that tale. One shortcoming in Cinderella's 'secret agent' treatment is that it's not exactly a natural outgrowth of any aspect of her original story. Apart from giving her a bit of a shoe theme, the character might as well be an original creation, an author working from a blank slate. (Part of this is due to the Cinderella story simply not providing much character-based material for its own protagonist; she's poor, and then with some magical help, she meets a prince who falls in love with her. The End. This is also why Disney's "Cinderella II" was such an atrociously bad idea.) Roberson tackles this problem in two ways. One is a spoiler, but the other is simply to play up the shoe aspect, by devoting a couple of pages an issue to a subplot about her shoe store ("The Glass Slipper"), and a magic-related scheme by her store manager (Crispin Cordwainer, the eponymous shoemaker of "The Elves and the Shoemaker"). The combined effect of this is that Roberson succeeds in making this a singularly Cinderella story, rather than just an espionage story featuring someone called Cinderella. Roberson also partners Cindy with a character who's more of a natural fit in an adventure tale, in the form of Aladdin, and gives small but valuable roles to a few other Fable characters. He even has one plot point that spins out of the regular Fables book, from a setup of Willingham's that always did seem underdeveloped. Roberson introduces a couple of his own plot points that never quite pay off, too. One involving the deal made by Crispin the shoemaker, and another with some underexplained villainous henchmen (who at one point he establishes as poisonous, only to never make that detail relevant). I'm no more familiar with the art of Shawn McManus than I was with the writing of Chris Roberson, but his work here is very much in the Fables house style. I'm sure the colors of Lee Loughridge and the lettering of Todd Klein are a great assist in that level of consistency, and their work is excellent as always. Faces occasionally look off (particularly in one scene where Cindy and Al appear inexplicably angry with each other), but it's mostly solid. On the whole, I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and knocked out most of it in one sitting. It's a fine extension of Willingham's work, and could easily serve as an introduction to a new reader unfamiliar with the Fables universe.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: Part of the Fables series. Cindy is one of my favourite Fables characters. She's not a major character but she's had some story arcs thrown her way and I always enjoy when she pop ups as one of Prince Charming's ex-wives. I was thrilled when I saw Cindy was getting a book devoted entirely to her; she both deserved one and could pull off a great story. Magical items are being smuggled out of Fabletown and Cinderella, secret spy, has been assigned the mission to find out who is d Reason for Reading: Part of the Fables series. Cindy is one of my favourite Fables characters. She's not a major character but she's had some story arcs thrown her way and I always enjoy when she pop ups as one of Prince Charming's ex-wives. I was thrilled when I saw Cindy was getting a book devoted entirely to her; she both deserved one and could pull off a great story. Magical items are being smuggled out of Fabletown and Cinderella, secret spy, has been assigned the mission to find out who is doing this and to stop them. When she first sets out she quickly runs into Aladdin who has also been charged with the same mission by the Baghdad rulers. Begrudgingly, they partner up. Each chapter starts with a brief blast from Cindy's past showing her in action back the days of yore, giving us some background on the character we've never had before. Also running through the story is a secondary story arc of her assistant left behind to look after the shoe store she owns. He's sick of always being left in charge as Cinderella is off on all these business trips and he decides to take full charge of the store and run things his way, selling the latest fashions to the Mundys and selling magical shoes (in the backroom) to the Fables. Predictably enough this does not work out so well and is a hilarious side story flipped to every now and then throughout the volume. I really enjoyed this volume even though we don't meet many new fables. Though there are a couple of new faces who show up. The story is full of girl action which I particularly loved. Cindy can kick butt with the best of them. With Aladdin's involvement we expect and get the Baghdad connection which I've always enjoyed too. I think Chris Roberson did a fantastic job writing a story that perfectly suits the Cindy we know. McManus's art is also very well done; I love his portrayal of Cindy. The only thing I didn't like was his rendition of Beast in the first issue, he came out looking like a big dummy, however he caught Frau Kinder's essence very well. This book is not exactly chronological within the series and could be read at anytime near where it has been published. That is to say, do not read it when you are only in the early volumes of the series or else much information will be given to you that was revealed as surprises during the later volumes. A fun and worthwhile addition to the series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    In this spin-off of Bill Willingham's "Fables" series, Cinderella is a covert agent: her cover is a shoe store called The Glass Slipper. In her latest assignment, "Cindy" must work with handsome but infuriating Aladdin to find out who is sneaking weapons between Fableland and the outside world. Cindy underwent one of the most radical revisions of the major Fables characters, becoming a super-spy in the service of Fabletown, while operating under the cover of running a shoe store. We can blame Bi In this spin-off of Bill Willingham's "Fables" series, Cinderella is a covert agent: her cover is a shoe store called The Glass Slipper. In her latest assignment, "Cindy" must work with handsome but infuriating Aladdin to find out who is sneaking weapons between Fableland and the outside world. Cindy underwent one of the most radical revisions of the major Fables characters, becoming a super-spy in the service of Fabletown, while operating under the cover of running a shoe store. We can blame Bigby Wolf for seeing her talent. It's not especially connected to her past back story, which might make it seem a bit random, but Willingham in the past has been able to write a very plausible spy, and Roberson likewise proves up to the task. In this instance, Cindy is on the trail of a magical weapons shipment that has reportedly been sent into the Mundy world. In pursuit of her task, she travels to Dubai (the Las Vegas of the Middle East), and finds herself teamed up with none other than Aladdin, who is operating on behalf of the Arabian Fable world, the "real" Bahgdad. The two form your typical spy movie duo, and proceed on the case. The result includes some follow-up on the "Arabian Nights (and Days)" story arc in the "Fables" title, as well as a reappearance by a certain important figure in Cinderella's past. And while all this is going on in Dubai, Cindy's assistant Crispin is using her shop to turn himself into the newest fashion mogul in Manhattan. Unfortunately, the shoes have some... well, unpleasant side effects. Magic carpets, genies, parachutes, shoemaking elves, Puss-in-Boots, Jenny Wren and some very obscure figures from the Arabian Nights mythology. Most spy stories center on male figures (either in the Bourne or Bond mold), so it's fun to see a sexy, feminine woman getting to do the job, especially since we see Cindy's previous spy adventures through the centuries. The only drawback is that we don't get as deep a look into Cindy's head as I'd like & I do wish we'd seen a bit of her doing her training. Book Details: Title Cinderella: From Fabletown With Love Author Chris Roberson Reviewed By Purplycookie

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kai Charles(Fiction State Of Mind)

    I've always been a fan of Fairy Tales. I was raised on them! I loved the nightly readings with my Mom and Dad: Cinderella, Snow White, Robin Hood, Peter Pan. Bill Willingham has taken the wonderful characters of our childhood fantasies and turned them into the adventurous, action packed ,and sometimes comedic series Fables. Now Chris Roberson has taken one of Fabletown's favorite residents on her own private adventure. A little backstory about the Fabels crew: All of our favorite characters are o I've always been a fan of Fairy Tales. I was raised on them! I loved the nightly readings with my Mom and Dad: Cinderella, Snow White, Robin Hood, Peter Pan. Bill Willingham has taken the wonderful characters of our childhood fantasies and turned them into the adventurous, action packed ,and sometimes comedic series Fables. Now Chris Roberson has taken one of Fabletown's favorite residents on her own private adventure. A little backstory about the Fabels crew: All of our favorite characters are on the run from the evil advesary. They make it to our world and set up shop, or shops :) in modern day New York. The magical creatures of Myth, those that can't easily blend in with society live outside of New York ,on The Farm. These Fables are ageless, sustained magically by their stories and popularity among the mortals or Mundies. In the intervening years since the Fables escape to our world, Cinderella has recovered from her disasterous marriage to Prince Charming and runs a successful shop : Glass Slipper Shoes a shop that caters to Fables and humans alike. Her persona as a dedicated socialite and Fashionista is a deliberate ruse to hide her true profession: Spy! Cinderella has been working undercover ops for the Sheriff of Fabletown. This mission finds her trying to stop the flow of illegal magical items from the Homelands into the human world. This story is action packed, and lots of fun! Cinderella travels from Dubai to a reclusive Fables kingdom tracking down the smuggler. She also encounters the handsome Aladdin who is on a mission of his own. I'm a huge fan of Chris from his book I Zombie, so I was loking forward to seeing his take on the Fables World. He really captures the essence of Willingham's character. I loved the fun dialogue and the flashback scenes relating to Cinderella's past. Shawn McManus art is beautiful.It has a textured feel to it similiar to fairy tale illustrations. This is a great starter for those interested in the fables universe, and lovers of action and adventure :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    In Fabletown, no one is who they traditionally are. The Big Bad Wolf was the sheriff but Beast (from Beauty and the... fame) now has the job. Cinderella is doubly covert. She owns a shoe store (The Glass Slipper) and spends a lot of time flying around acting like a rich, spoiled heiress. Her real vocation is doing espionage work for Fabletown, with only the sheriff in the know. Her latest assignment is to discover who is selling magical items to the "mundies," the everyday people like you and me In Fabletown, no one is who they traditionally are. The Big Bad Wolf was the sheriff but Beast (from Beauty and the... fame) now has the job. Cinderella is doubly covert. She owns a shoe store (The Glass Slipper) and spends a lot of time flying around acting like a rich, spoiled heiress. Her real vocation is doing espionage work for Fabletown, with only the sheriff in the know. Her latest assignment is to discover who is selling magical items to the "mundies," the everyday people like you and me. What could possibly be more valuable than magical items? Her travels take her to Dubai where she meets up with Aladdin, who is investigating the same mystery. They do some glamorous traveling and have lots of fights, with bad guys and with each other, like a proper spy story. This story kept me captivated. The fable world is well blended with the mundane world. Cinderella is a fun character. She has a great sense of adventure, keeping the story from getting too heavy or serious. Also, this book doesn't get as dark or sleazy as its sequel. This one is definitely worth reading.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Artemisa

    I was far enough along the Fables books that I didn't get any spoilers from Cindy's story. If any thing this story is a bit in my Fables "past". This book reminds me a lot of the first Fables books. This time the book is a straith forward spy story with all the mandatory villain that are only middle men and the final suprising big bad boss (it was actually a surprise for me, I was expecting other character) Lets just say that I really loved this book, it felt right even if it isnt the same writer. I was far enough along the Fables books that I didn't get any spoilers from Cindy's story. If any thing this story is a bit in my Fables "past". This book reminds me a lot of the first Fables books. This time the book is a straith forward spy story with all the mandatory villain that are only middle men and the final suprising big bad boss (it was actually a surprise for me, I was expecting other character) Lets just say that I really loved this book, it felt right even if it isnt the same writer. It also felt like a return to the narrative style that first atracted me in Fables, that using all the genre cliches to retell a character's story. And I'll end my review because I really don't want to tell any spoilers on this book, after all it's a spy book and the thing I enjoy most in spy books is the final reveal, as the hero saves the world...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    She's learning the spy-trade for centuries, no spy ever has had so much experience and training, yet I feel none of the Cinderella Fables' writers truly capture that. I'd expect some off-key bad-ass shit from someone with that much experience, thus always felt underwhelmed by how the series portrayed this character. In her first solo volume Cinders teams up with Aladdin and a few other Fabletown 'assets' to look into smuggling magical items from the Homelands. Some nice sub arc around the The Gl She's learning the spy-trade for centuries, no spy ever has had so much experience and training, yet I feel none of the Cinderella Fables' writers truly capture that. I'd expect some off-key bad-ass shit from someone with that much experience, thus always felt underwhelmed by how the series portrayed this character. In her first solo volume Cinders teams up with Aladdin and a few other Fabletown 'assets' to look into smuggling magical items from the Homelands. Some nice sub arc around the The Glass Slipper shoe shop she owns and some tidy mystery setting around Totenkinder, but the main story was pretty linear, although entertaining. 7 out of 12.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris - Quarter Press Editor

    I've been curious about these for awhile now, seeing as how much I've enjoyed the Fables series as a whole, and it's only recently that I could track this book down. I loved it. While Roberson isn't quite as deft a writer as Willingham, he totally captures the tone of the stories, and does a great job keeping consistent with who the characters are and how they act. It's more than a bit interesting, too, how he's managed to keep it tied in with the rest of the universe and story. In all honesty, thi I've been curious about these for awhile now, seeing as how much I've enjoyed the Fables series as a whole, and it's only recently that I could track this book down. I loved it. While Roberson isn't quite as deft a writer as Willingham, he totally captures the tone of the stories, and does a great job keeping consistent with who the characters are and how they act. It's more than a bit interesting, too, how he's managed to keep it tied in with the rest of the universe and story. In all honesty, this one simply boils down to fun and entertainment. It might not expand your worldview, but it will keep you engaged, giggling, and set you up for the next one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    CJ - It's only a Paper Moon

    If you love Fables, you will love this. Simple as that. This story follows Cindy as she looks for magical artifacts that are being smuggled into the mundy world in exchange for mundy goods. We meet Ala-al-din - I think you know who I mean - an operative from the Homelands Baghad. We get to know Crispin, Cindy's shop assistant and his ambitions and we get some pretty cool flashbacks. Yep, it was a spy comic with the classic Fables twist. While the art in the actual books was 'meh' the covers are a If you love Fables, you will love this. Simple as that. This story follows Cindy as she looks for magical artifacts that are being smuggled into the mundy world in exchange for mundy goods. We meet Ala-al-din - I think you know who I mean - an operative from the Homelands Baghad. We get to know Crispin, Cindy's shop assistant and his ambitions and we get some pretty cool flashbacks. Yep, it was a spy comic with the classic Fables twist. While the art in the actual books was 'meh' the covers are amazing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    A spinoff from Billi Willingham's well done and popular Fables series that is a light enjoyable spy tale that hearkens back to the Sean Connery Bond or Flint movies. Cinderella is an off the books operative for Fabletown, and she is tasked with finding out who is selling magical objects to the Mundys (us-the non fables). she ends up teamed with Al_a_din, and the two make a formidable and engaging team. The villain was telegraphed, but I missed it because I was enjoying the escapist tone of the t A spinoff from Billi Willingham's well done and popular Fables series that is a light enjoyable spy tale that hearkens back to the Sean Connery Bond or Flint movies. Cinderella is an off the books operative for Fabletown, and she is tasked with finding out who is selling magical objects to the Mundys (us-the non fables). she ends up teamed with Al_a_din, and the two make a formidable and engaging team. The villain was telegraphed, but I missed it because I was enjoying the escapist tone of the tome.

  29. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Well, this book started off with a promising start, and a lot of fun cameos. Overall, I enjoyed the storyline, and was ready to give it 5 stars when I started it. Cinderella makes a good spy - after all, she's had several lifetimes to hone her role. The mission she is sent on is interesting and enjoyable, but the ending was rather unsatisfying and lackluster. The rivalry between Frau Totenkinder and Cinderella's Fairy Godmother is never really explained, so I wish that could have been explored mo Well, this book started off with a promising start, and a lot of fun cameos. Overall, I enjoyed the storyline, and was ready to give it 5 stars when I started it. Cinderella makes a good spy - after all, she's had several lifetimes to hone her role. The mission she is sent on is interesting and enjoyable, but the ending was rather unsatisfying and lackluster. The rivalry between Frau Totenkinder and Cinderella's Fairy Godmother is never really explained, so I wish that could have been explored more to make this story more cohesive.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rosa

    Cinderella has gotten her series. It covers her time working as an undercover spy for fable town. The reader also gets a glimpse at the inner workings of Cinderella's shoe store. Cinderella as a spy is definitely interesting. I love the peak into the Arabian Nights fairy tale and Aladdin is definitely kind of awesome in his way. I also thought that the story of the shoemaker working for Cinderella was a great comedic relief. Cinderella has gotten her series. It covers her time working as an undercover spy for fable town. The reader also gets a glimpse at the inner workings of Cinderella's shoe store. Cinderella as a spy is definitely interesting. I love the peak into the Arabian Nights fairy tale and Aladdin is definitely kind of awesome in his way. I also thought that the story of the shoemaker working for Cinderella was a great comedic relief.

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