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Sisters in Fantasy 2

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These 23 spectacular, original tales of fantasy and adventure reflect the special vision, power, and magic of women, and features a virtual "Who's Who" of bestselling, award-winning female authors. These 23 spectacular, original tales of fantasy and adventure reflect the special vision, power, and magic of women, and features a virtual "Who's Who" of bestselling, award-winning female authors.


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These 23 spectacular, original tales of fantasy and adventure reflect the special vision, power, and magic of women, and features a virtual "Who's Who" of bestselling, award-winning female authors. These 23 spectacular, original tales of fantasy and adventure reflect the special vision, power, and magic of women, and features a virtual "Who's Who" of bestselling, award-winning female authors.

58 review for Sisters in Fantasy 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    Oh dear. The first Sisters in Fantasy was a pretty solid collection. This is not: it has a few stand outs and a few truly awful stories, and then a load of completely forgettable tales. The truly weird thing about this collection is that there were a number with no fantastical elements: Nancy Springer's "The Way Your Life Is," Gael Baudino's "Bitterfoot" (a good piece about a woman fighter pilot dogfighting with the enemy), Martha Soukup's "Fuzz". There is a lot of physical, sexual, and emotiona Oh dear. The first Sisters in Fantasy was a pretty solid collection. This is not: it has a few stand outs and a few truly awful stories, and then a load of completely forgettable tales. The truly weird thing about this collection is that there were a number with no fantastical elements: Nancy Springer's "The Way Your Life Is," Gael Baudino's "Bitterfoot" (a good piece about a woman fighter pilot dogfighting with the enemy), Martha Soukup's "Fuzz". There is a lot of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse in these stories, and a lot of the time it felt totally gratuitous. My favorites: "This Fair Gift" by Pamela Dean. Told from a secretary's point of view, the tale of a law office and magical garments. I really liked the magic in this book, which sometimes felt fantastic & inexplicable, and in other cases seemed almost mundane. "Vashti and God" by Valerie Freireich. A cool retelling of Esther--the previous queen receives messages from God telling her how to gain equality for women, and in obeying God loses her place and enables Esther to become queen. I love the different facets to this tale. "Volsi" by Diana Paxson. While the king tries to spread Christianity, one family holds out and continues using fertility magic. This felt like a window into another time and place. "Stone Whorl, Flint Knife" by Rebecca Ore. In the strange area that is Bracken county, where magic works and logic doesn't, one woman seeks vengeance for her son's accidental death. The way people think about vengeance and consequences in this county fascinates me. "The Witches of Junket" by Patricia McKillip. A dark magic that was banished thousands of years ago has returned, and old Granny Heather is the first to know about it. McKillip is fantastic at working magic with mundane items like fishing hooks: at one point the witches literally knit (using knitting needles!) a protective shield out of trash. McKillip is also the best at creating creepy fantasy moments: "What she had caught turned to her. She felt it as she had felt it looking out of the moon's eye. She went small, deep inside her, a little animal scurrying to find a hiding place. But there was no place; there was no world, even, just her, standing in a motionless, soundless dark with a ghostly fishing pole in her hands, its puny hook swallowed by something vast as fog and night, with the line dangling out of it like a piece of spaghetti." My least favorites: "Angel of the City" by Susan Shwartz. Uriel is on patrol in NYC, and he and the other angels grouse about God and humans. Tries to be funny but fails, then ends on a schmaltzy note. "A Night at the J Street Bar" by Susan Casper. Three page story set in a rundown bar, where the denizens bemoan that it will shortly be shut down. At the end of the story, the bar owner shuts off the lights and then switches off the perpetual drunk who sits on the same stool every night. I have no idea what the point of this story was. "The Way Your Life Is" by Nancy Springer. Five page story told entirely in the second person, about a guy who gets a snake to look cool and then throws a wild party. No magic and deeply annoying. "Fuzz" by Martha Soukup. A young woman tries to be an actress, but then she gets drunk with her friends (the "amusing" drunk bit takes forever) and then a friend has sex with her against her will. No idea why this was a story, let alone included in this collection. The worst of the worst: "Wet Wings" by Mercedes Lackey. Sometimes a story is so self-indulgent that I actually feel embarrassed for the author. "Katherine" is one of the few true mages left in an age when Political Correctness destroys magic. My first clue that this would be terrible is when "Katherine" sadly says to her pet butterfly: "'We always knew that there would be repression and a burning time again,'" which is swiftly followed by such gems as "They had decreed that everyone must be equal, and no one must be offended ever. And then they had begun the burning and the banning...She had known that her own work was doomed when a book that had been lauded for its portrayal of a young gay hero was banned because the young gay hero was unhappy and suicidal. She had not even bothered to argue. She simply announced her retirement and went into seclusion, pouring all her energies into the magic of her butterflies." You hear that? If you don't like Vanyel then Mercedes Lackey will take her ball and go home, you book burners! Then the "Psi-cops" break down her door and "Katherine" thinks, "in a way, she had expected it. She had been a world-renowned fantasy writer; she had made no secret of her knowledge of real-world magics." So "Katherine" pours the last of her magic into her butterfly, and the story ends "And she turned, full of dignity and empty of all else, to face her enemies." Damn those Politically Correct cops, who will arrest you if you call your cat a "pet" instead of an "Animal Companion" and who forbid nice white ladies from wearing Native American jewelry! The whole thing is so horribly obviously wish-fulfillment and wallowing in self-pity that I could hardly bear to read it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ida Jagaric

    Well I'm finished but had to start skipping stories, just couldn't handle reading so many poor ones. :( Most of them were set in modern times with little to no magic or fantasy aspects. :( And I realized the common thing that made the good stories enjoyable vs. the crappier ones was connection between characters, instead of just a series of events. Well I'm finished but had to start skipping stories, just couldn't handle reading so many poor ones. :( Most of them were set in modern times with little to no magic or fantasy aspects. :( And I realized the common thing that made the good stories enjoyable vs. the crappier ones was connection between characters, instead of just a series of events.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I remembered the image of Sigyn refusing to hold the bowl over Loki's face until he swore to her he didn't know their sons would be killed for his treachery, but somehow I thought that was Gaiman's Sandman. Sorry, Lois Tilton! I remembered the image of Sigyn refusing to hold the bowl over Loki's face until he swore to her he didn't know their sons would be killed for his treachery, but somehow I thought that was Gaiman's Sandman. Sorry, Lois Tilton!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I bought this for Pamela Dean's short story, "This Fair Gift", which I liked a lot, though I'm clearly going to have to read it again in order to figure out all of the characters' Arthurian analogues. I skipped freely, not reading any story which didn't grab me within the first couple of paragraphs, but there were several other stories I liked a lot: Lois Tilton's "Kneeling at His Side"; Janni Lee Simner's "Why Is This Night Different"; Esther Friesner's "Moonlight in Vermont"; Ru Emerson's "Cal I bought this for Pamela Dean's short story, "This Fair Gift", which I liked a lot, though I'm clearly going to have to read it again in order to figure out all of the characters' Arthurian analogues. I skipped freely, not reading any story which didn't grab me within the first couple of paragraphs, but there were several other stories I liked a lot: Lois Tilton's "Kneeling at His Side"; Janni Lee Simner's "Why Is This Night Different"; Esther Friesner's "Moonlight in Vermont"; Ru Emerson's "Call Him by Name"; Sherwood Smith's "Daria's Window"; and Lee Barwood's "Pyre".

  5. 5 out of 5

    Malaika

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew F.

  8. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Kramer

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Schwartzberg

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan Buskirk

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bronwen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Louise BDGG

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  15. 4 out of 5

    alicia croy

  16. 5 out of 5

    KU2

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrea McLean

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter Shirts

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie Brady

  21. 4 out of 5

    Violethedge

  22. 4 out of 5

    Teruko

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roy Murphy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Liobhan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marybeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carol Tuft

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Fure

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

  32. 4 out of 5

    Llama Castillo

  33. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre

  34. 5 out of 5

    katayoun Masoodi

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tribefan

  36. 4 out of 5

    Meril

  37. 4 out of 5

    Cher

  38. 4 out of 5

    Cyn Armistead

  39. 4 out of 5

    Deb

  40. 5 out of 5

    Ria

  41. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jan (the Gryphon)

  43. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

  44. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

  45. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  46. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  47. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

  48. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

  49. 4 out of 5

    Lis

  50. 5 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

  51. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Hollyberry

  52. 5 out of 5

    Bea

  53. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  54. 5 out of 5

    Maurynne Maxwell

  55. 4 out of 5

    Maya

  56. 5 out of 5

    Joseph-Daniel Peter Paul Abondius

  57. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  58. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

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