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In this follow-up to The Lion's Game, John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and special agent for the Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is back. And, unfortunately for Corey, so is Asad Khalil, the notorious Libyan terrorist otherwise known as "The Lion." Last we heard from him, Khali had claimed to be defecting to the US only to unleash the most horrific reign of terrorism In this follow-up to The Lion's Game, John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and special agent for the Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is back. And, unfortunately for Corey, so is Asad Khalil, the notorious Libyan terrorist otherwise known as "The Lion." Last we heard from him, Khali had claimed to be defecting to the US only to unleash the most horrific reign of terrorism ever to occur on American soil. While Corey and his partner, FBI agent Kate Mayfield, chased him across the country, Khalil methodically eliminated his victims one by one and then disappeared without a trace. Now, years later, Khalil has returned to America to make good on his threats and take care of unfinished business. "The Lion" is a killing machine once again loose in America with a mission of revenge, and John Corey will stop at nothing to achieve his own goal -- to find and kill Khahil.


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In this follow-up to The Lion's Game, John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and special agent for the Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is back. And, unfortunately for Corey, so is Asad Khalil, the notorious Libyan terrorist otherwise known as "The Lion." Last we heard from him, Khali had claimed to be defecting to the US only to unleash the most horrific reign of terrorism In this follow-up to The Lion's Game, John Corey, former NYPD Homicide detective and special agent for the Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is back. And, unfortunately for Corey, so is Asad Khalil, the notorious Libyan terrorist otherwise known as "The Lion." Last we heard from him, Khali had claimed to be defecting to the US only to unleash the most horrific reign of terrorism ever to occur on American soil. While Corey and his partner, FBI agent Kate Mayfield, chased him across the country, Khalil methodically eliminated his victims one by one and then disappeared without a trace. Now, years later, Khalil has returned to America to make good on his threats and take care of unfinished business. "The Lion" is a killing machine once again loose in America with a mission of revenge, and John Corey will stop at nothing to achieve his own goal -- to find and kill Khahil.

30 review for The Lion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    The following is a transcript of a phone intercept recorded June 8, 2003. The first subject is John Corey, former NYPD detective and current contract agent for the FBI & NYPD’s joint Anti-Terrorist Task Force. The second subject is Asad Khalil (a/k/a The Lion), currently wanted internationally for multiple acts of terrorism and murder. John Corey: Hello. Asad Khalil: John, it’s Asad Khalil. Do you remember me? JC: Asad! How could I forget? You killed more people than cancer when you got inside the The following is a transcript of a phone intercept recorded June 8, 2003. The first subject is John Corey, former NYPD detective and current contract agent for the FBI & NYPD’s joint Anti-Terrorist Task Force. The second subject is Asad Khalil (a/k/a The Lion), currently wanted internationally for multiple acts of terrorism and murder. John Corey: Hello. Asad Khalil: John, it’s Asad Khalil. Do you remember me? JC: Asad! How could I forget? You killed more people than cancer when you got inside the U.S. three years ago. AK: Ah, yes. It was a good run. Of course, you kept me from completing my ultimate objective. JC: Let’s call it a draw. How have you been? AK: Busy. Lots of work in Afghanistan and Iraq for terrorists these days. JC: Yeah, you guys have kept me hopping, too. AK: Hey, do you still work with that woman you were partnered with when you were chasing me? What was her name? JC: Kate. And we still work together. In fact, we got married. AK: Really? Congratulations. But working with your wife? That has to be awkward. JC: It can get complicated, but we’re a pretty good team. We’ve had a couple of big cases since you were here, and we managed to get the job done. Besides, what do you know about working with females? You’d rather kill a woman for not wearing a burqua than take her out for a drink. AK: True, true. But this isn’t a social call, John. We need to discuss some business. JC: OK. But you really should try dating a girl instead of stoning her to death at some point. It’d be good for you and a hell of a lot more fun for her. AK: You know I’ve got far too many religious and sexual hang-ups to do that, John. Anyhow, back to the reason I called. Do you remember that phone conversation we had right before I fled the country three years ago? JC: Yeah. You said something about coming back to get me, and I said I was looking forward to the re-match. AK. Yes, and then I promised that I’d kill you and that whore you were with if it took me the rest of my life. JC: Right. You better be careful. Kate’s still pissed you called her a whore, and she‘s armed. AK: Well, here is her chance to do something about it. Some of my boys in Al Queda need a job done in New York, and I told them I’d do it if they’d help me come over there and kill you and Kate and a few other people I’m still mad at. JC: Oh, we’re still on for that? I was starting to think you forgot. AK: Not a chance. It just took me a little while to put my business case together and get some financial backers lined up. International terrorism and revenge are very expensive enterprises, John. JC: I’m sure. So we’re really doing this? AK: Definitely. JC: Great. How about we threaten and insult each other to get in the mood? AK: Certainly. Go ahead whenever you’re ready. JC: *ahem* You fucking psychopath. I’m going to blow your goddamn brains out. AK: No, you infidel pig! I’m going to kill you. But first I’m going to peel the face of your skull and show it to you. JC: You’re a piece of shit, and I’m going to rip your evil heart out of your chest and eat it. AK: I’m going to cut your godless head off, and you’ll burn in hell for all eternity. JC: Your mother was a whore. AK: Your wife is a whore. (Subjects verbally assualt each other for the next forty-five minutes.) JC: Oh, yeah. This is working. I’m really psyched. How about you? AK: I can’t wait. JC: That stuff about cutting off my face is new. AK: It’s something I picked up in Afghanistan. I’ll demonstrate it on you. JC: I’ll be waiting. AK: See you soon, John. JC: Try not to kill too many people on the way here. End transcript. ***** Geez. This book is so filled with alpha male testosterone that I think I grew a second pair of testicles while reading it. DeMille has been tending towards overstuffing books lately, and this one is no exception. He probably could have cut this book in half by toning down the macho posturing, but he does manage to put a very primal vibe into the conflict between Corey and Khalil. The sense of loathing between the two of them is kept at a nice boil through the book, and pays off in a confrontation that’s savage and brutal. This isn’t the usual good guy and bad guy settling things with a quick-draw gunfight. This is two enemies going completely caveman on each other. My other headache with this one is that I think John Corey is wearing a little thin. Most of DeMille’s protagonists are very similar and Corey is the ultimate version. A cynical, sarcastic, politically incorrect, smart-ass with an anti-authority streak and a New York attitude was fun in the early books like Plum Island, but after five novels, I don’t think Corey is nearly as clever and amusing as DeMille thinks he is. Plus, DeMille’s editor needs to tell him that multiple repetitions of a line make it get tiresome and not funnier. Despite being too long and Corey’s act getting a little stale, this was still a pretty good page turner and a nice follow-up to The Lion’s Game. And it’s a lot better than other recent DeMille stinkers like Night Fall and The Gate House.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This book is awesome. If only all fiction flowed this fast then truly would I be in Heaven. Step into the world of John Corey, all time smartass NYC detective who has a quip for every moment and who seems to always manage to solve the most difficult of cases. We were first introduced to him in PLUM ISLAND in which he was recovering from three bullet wounds and on disability leave. Of course, Corey can't keep his nose out of things like any good detective and goes on to investigate a matter relat This book is awesome. If only all fiction flowed this fast then truly would I be in Heaven. Step into the world of John Corey, all time smartass NYC detective who has a quip for every moment and who seems to always manage to solve the most difficult of cases. We were first introduced to him in PLUM ISLAND in which he was recovering from three bullet wounds and on disability leave. Of course, Corey can't keep his nose out of things like any good detective and goes on to investigate a matter related to something mundane like biological warfare. Yeah, right. This tale brings back Corey's greatest antagonist, The Lion, a smooth and most capable terrorist who has returned to get revenge against Corey and others for foiling his plans three years ago (in a previous novel titled LION'S GAME) in which he tried to assassinate all of the pilots who bombed Libya in 1986. Stellar suspense. I finished this novel in less than two weeks. The opening scene is a sky dive with his wife which goes from an adrenaline rush to pure terror. MY GRADE: A minus to A.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I ordered this to listen to on a trip to visit my kids. I'm chagrined that I wasted the time to listen to this catastrophe of a book. The story is predictable, there is no character development, and no suspense. It is the literary equivalent of reality TV. This is a tiresome and dated book with the usual prototype smart-alec protagonist oozing with testosterone and whose mouth and sarcastic repartee got on my nerves as did his extreme vulgarity. I mean, I am all for realism, but people - at leas I ordered this to listen to on a trip to visit my kids. I'm chagrined that I wasted the time to listen to this catastrophe of a book. The story is predictable, there is no character development, and no suspense. It is the literary equivalent of reality TV. This is a tiresome and dated book with the usual prototype smart-alec protagonist oozing with testosterone and whose mouth and sarcastic repartee got on my nerves as did his extreme vulgarity. I mean, I am all for realism, but people - at least the cops who I know - simply do not talk that way ALL THE TIME. Corey is a vulgar Bruce Willis and I really think that the rule breaking macho guy has been so overplayed in U.S. crime and thriller fiction that I think it's time for a break. Add to this annoying character the incessant blather about 9/11 and simply too many words and I found myself so irritated with it that we skipped to the last disc after disc 6. It was utterly predictable and I suspect that we missed nothing by cutting out 1/3 of the narrative.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Nelson DeMille’s latest effort "The Lion", combines humor and violence with an examination of the clash between Middle Eastern and Western cultures to produce a novel that is both wildly entertaining and frighteningly realistic. The Lion is the sequel to DeMille’s The Lion’s Game, published in 2000, which pitted retired NYC Detective John Corey against Libyan terrorist Asad Khalil, also known as The Lion. In this second installment, Khalil is back in the US three years after his last confrontatio Nelson DeMille’s latest effort "The Lion", combines humor and violence with an examination of the clash between Middle Eastern and Western cultures to produce a novel that is both wildly entertaining and frighteningly realistic. The Lion is the sequel to DeMille’s The Lion’s Game, published in 2000, which pitted retired NYC Detective John Corey against Libyan terrorist Asad Khalil, also known as The Lion. In this second installment, Khalil is back in the US three years after his last confrontation with Corey, seemingly emboldened by the World Trade Center attacks of September 11. Corey worked closely with FBI Agent Kate Mayfield during the original conflict with Khalil, and something clicked: Corey and Mayfield are now happily married. DeMille uses this to ratchet up the tension further, as Khalil comes back to the U.S. to finish the job Corey and Mayfiled started and adds them to his hit list. The mood definitely changes when the author is following Asad Khalil. The descriptions of Khalil’s actions and methods are precise, brutal and devoid of humor, much like Asad Khalil himself. The Lion takes on larger themes than just a clash between terrorists and the government. One way DeMille uses this story is to look at the endless war on terrorism. His obvious research and attention to detail give the reader an authentic feel of what it is like every day for the men and women whose task it is to keep this country safe. A very enjoyable read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    AH

    If you haven’t yet read The Lion's Game, you really should read it before you read this book. You don’t have to, but it will be a much more satisfying read if you do. The Lion continues the story of John Corey, a New York City homicide police officer who is now working on the Joint Terrorism Task force and his nemesis the uber-terrorist and all out psychotic scary guy, Asad Khalil. At the end of The Lion’s Game (sorry for the mild spoiler) John and Khalil have a standoff. They both vow to kill ea If you haven’t yet read The Lion's Game, you really should read it before you read this book. You don’t have to, but it will be a much more satisfying read if you do. The Lion continues the story of John Corey, a New York City homicide police officer who is now working on the Joint Terrorism Task force and his nemesis the uber-terrorist and all out psychotic scary guy, Asad Khalil. At the end of The Lion’s Game (sorry for the mild spoiler) John and Khalil have a standoff. They both vow to kill each other. Khalil is now back with a vengeance and he is out to kill anyone in his way. And the body count is high in this book. I even started to keep track of the carnage. I absolutely loved John Corey. He just seems like a regular kind of guy. He likes to drink, he’s a bit of an ass, he doesn’t really like authority. John has a great sense of humor – a little wry, a little ironic. He is cynical, sarcastic, and jaded. He’s exactly who you want protecting you from the crazies of the world. His internal dialogue is priceless at times and a real tension breaker. The author takes you inside the terrorist’s mind. Some sections of the book are told from the terrorist’s point of view. Nelson DeMille captures Khalil’s fanaticism and his disdain for the American way of life. Khalil feels repulsed when he sees a homosexual couple in the park. He is disgusted with women’s roles: working outside the home, driving, and immodest dress. Khalil cannot understand the conspicuous consumption of the American people. He compares America to the declining Roman Empire. Khalil is portrayed as the ultimate killing machine, with no remorse, motivated by hate and his own personal jihad. Khalil is, in fact, avenging the death of his family in 1986, systematically killing anyone that had anything to do with his family’s death. He is in the United States on a mission for Al Qaeda, but he has his own personal mission to accomplish first. I was impressed with the depiction of how the terrorist cells work, and how terrorists can travel under the radar. The amount of personnel on the ground arranging items such as weapons, cell phones, travel, and lodging was astounding. I was even more impressed with the way the way that the law enforcement agencies worked together to thwart the threat. The Lion is an exciting and entertaining read. I really could not put the book down. If you haven’t read anything by Nelson DeMille, I recommend that you start with The Lion’s Game.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Excellent audiobook narrated by Scott Brick. Scott also interviews the Author at the end of the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rex Fuller

    John Corey, the main character in DeMille’s primary series, jumped out at me from among the collection of short mysteries published in 2017 entitled Matchup. His wisecracking, anti-PC attitude, lightning quick mind, and basic humanity, struck chords with me. So much so, that I read the first book of the series, Plum Island, and then steamed straight through all of the rest of them. The Lion (Corey book 5). Asad (the “lion”) Khalil returns to fulfill his dual psychotic revenge upon the pilots who John Corey, the main character in DeMille’s primary series, jumped out at me from among the collection of short mysteries published in 2017 entitled Matchup. His wisecracking, anti-PC attitude, lightning quick mind, and basic humanity, struck chords with me. So much so, that I read the first book of the series, Plum Island, and then steamed straight through all of the rest of them. The Lion (Corey book 5). Asad (the “lion”) Khalil returns to fulfill his dual psychotic revenge upon the pilots who bombed Libya and jihad upon America, as well as to kill Corey and his wife for preventing him from fulfilling his hatred the first time around. The middle half of this moves a tad slowly but the opening and ending quarters are fast and inventive. Not to worry anyway, because Corey is at his smart-mouth best pretty much throughout.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Another fabulous book by DeMille. I wish he published a book every week. I just can't get enough. Another fabulous book by DeMille. I wish he published a book every week. I just can't get enough.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Giovanni Gelati

    Right from the start I just want to say that this novel ROCKED for me. John Carey is a fun character and I am glad to have discovered him finally. I know, where have I been and why haven’t I read his work before? Chalk it up to one of life’s little mysteries. I have seen the movie The General’s Daughter and enjoyed it; I have the novel on my- to read- list now. The beauty of the whole thing is that this is what I enjoy about the different websites we are a part of, finding new stuff to read, the Right from the start I just want to say that this novel ROCKED for me. John Carey is a fun character and I am glad to have discovered him finally. I know, where have I been and why haven’t I read his work before? Chalk it up to one of life’s little mysteries. I have seen the movie The General’s Daughter and enjoyed it; I have the novel on my- to read- list now. The beauty of the whole thing is that this is what I enjoy about the different websites we are a part of, finding new stuff to read, the discovery process. The Lion captured me right from the get go. The banter, the edge, the machismo of John Carey blew me away. The guy is a gamer. Nelson DeMille gets major points from me for his style, prose and gift of continual action and suspense. I like the different vantage points the novel creates for us as he bounces back and forth from Carey to no one’s favorite terrorist, The Lion. The inclusion of the NYPD, FBI, CIA, and the NY State Police was great and the way he had the forces interact was interesting and for the most part, respectful of all parties. I like that. The interagency infighting was minimal; the matter at hand & the capture of the terrorist was foremost on everybody’s mind. Nelson Demille creates a great tale of suspense, intrigue, and action in The Lion. The bad guy, Asad Khalil, is a great bad guy. Instantly able to be disliked, psychotic, zealot, totally flawed and damaged, he is the total bad guy package. Khalil makes it easy to root for John Carey and Company. This is an excellent novel for this time of year, for all the right reasons. The Lion is great read at the beach, poolside, anywhere. Humor, compassion, honesty, patriotism, this novel just has it all. It would be remiss of me not to ask you to put this in your Goodreads –to read- list. I was a bit bent ; the Goodread meter said that this novel had 600 pages. Mine only had 433, and DeMille used every single one of them, to the last word. What are you reading today? Check us out and become our friend on Facebook. Go to Goodreads and become our friend there and suggest books for us to read and post on. You can also follow us on Twitter, Book Blogs, and also look for our posts on Amazon. Did you know you can shop directly on Amazon by clicking the Gelati’s Store Tab on our blog? Thanks for stopping by today; we will see you tomorrow. Have a great day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jay Connor

    In a summer of great, long awaited sequels (at least 10 years from original) -- see my reviews of Linda Greenlaw's "Seaworthy" and Scott Turow's "Innocent" -- Nelson DeMille's sequel to the 2000 "The Lion's Game" (reviewed earlier this summer), is a brutal disappointment. In fact, "The Lion" only got its second star because of a wonderfully written, over the top, original skydiving scene. Much of what served DeMille so well in the first installment failed or was dropped in this go 'round. The 200 In a summer of great, long awaited sequels (at least 10 years from original) -- see my reviews of Linda Greenlaw's "Seaworthy" and Scott Turow's "Innocent" -- Nelson DeMille's sequel to the 2000 "The Lion's Game" (reviewed earlier this summer), is a brutal disappointment. In fact, "The Lion" only got its second star because of a wonderfully written, over the top, original skydiving scene. Much of what served DeMille so well in the first installment failed or was dropped in this go 'round. The 2000 original, set contemporaneously i.e., pre-9-11 was powerfully prescient; the sequel is set in 2003, thus it had reference to 9-11 but is adrift from current political realities and fears. To deal with this, DeMille moved from global political / war on terror motivations to a brutal revenge scenario whereby both his protagonist (John Corey) and antagonist (Asad Khalil) are diminished in the process. Even more off-putting is the author's maintaining the vehicle of flipping back and forth from 1st person narrative (Corey) to 3rd person (Khalil). While, it was fresh in the original, here we have way too much time with the inner monologue of a self-centered, brute (and that's our hero - Corey). It's like spending eternity inside the brain of Sylvester Stallone! Where "The Lion's Game" was a chess game of strategy between two strongly committed foes, "The Lion" is a blood feud of two homicidal maniacs. I lost count when the body count exceeded 12! Stay away.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was so excited to have this book finally arrive! I love the John Corey books, and this did not disappoint. I don't think it's as good as Lion's Game, but come on, that bar is pretty high. I am stingy with my stars and this isn't quite a five,but I happily give it four. Weak spots: In this book I felt Khalil didn't have any measure of humanity. In the first book, when we learn his story, he still has a spark of some kind of humanity and it made the book more interesting. The brief attraction he I was so excited to have this book finally arrive! I love the John Corey books, and this did not disappoint. I don't think it's as good as Lion's Game, but come on, that bar is pretty high. I am stingy with my stars and this isn't quite a five,but I happily give it four. Weak spots: In this book I felt Khalil didn't have any measure of humanity. In the first book, when we learn his story, he still has a spark of some kind of humanity and it made the book more interesting. The brief attraction he had with the lady pilot for example. . .but in this one, he is just bad to the bone. The final section, with Boris, John, and, well, let's say the truck, seemed a tiny bit pro forma. The scene with Boris was well done, but then the scene with John was a bit anticlimactic. And to have John's boss show up at the end the way he does I guess seemed a bit of a cheat--the last book took such delicious time building up to the killings. That one just kind of happened, but it was probably the only way to do it to get the phone bit to work for the reader. Then, to have John basically save the world from his hospital bed. . . well. . . that was the weakest. I can see that Al Qaida needed Khalil to pay them back for their info and help, but how did he effect that plan? The three guys he killed did it all--they didn't need him at all. They likely would have been successful if it weren't for his involvement! He needed to have found something to try with the Statue of Liberty as he dreamed earlier on, and do more of it himself. On the good side, the sky diving scene in the beginning was ROCKIN'! This book is really screaming to be made into a movie. I can't get enough of Corey's snarkiness. I love this guy. I loved the dig DeMille took when Corey, two years after 9/11, makes the comment that the political infighting affecting ground zero was likely to delay construction for another COUPLE YEARS. Hmmm, yeah, just a couple years! Another favorite scene was the one at 26 FP, when John realizes the after action report that was filed after their first encounter with Khalil was probably not true, and the images held from what information was revealed was also likely not true. I realized that these guys deal in such secrets, and even they don't know what cards are being or have been played. I have to admit, I didn't get the nuance at first; it took me a while, and when I got it, I was furious and how unfair it all was. Seriously, except for the few things I mentioned, I really liked this book, and recommend it highly. It's packed with action and intrigue, and a long simmering vengeance is finally closed. I can sleep at night and know my country is safe. :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dorsi

    This is my favorite in this series! I absolutely LOVED this one. As I have stated in my reviews from other books in this series, I have read these completely out of order. That is not the norm for me. I have one more to read in this series. I hope that DeMille writes more of these because I cannot get enough of John Corey. He is one of my favorite characters of all time. Great plot, great characters (good guys & the scariest, most psycho villian), & excellent style. Fantastic delivery by Scott B This is my favorite in this series! I absolutely LOVED this one. As I have stated in my reviews from other books in this series, I have read these completely out of order. That is not the norm for me. I have one more to read in this series. I hope that DeMille writes more of these because I cannot get enough of John Corey. He is one of my favorite characters of all time. Great plot, great characters (good guys & the scariest, most psycho villian), & excellent style. Fantastic delivery by Scott Brick! He just adds so much to the character of Mr. John Corey. This is an excellent series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim Chamberlain

    Written for the KAZI Book Review (http://kazibookreview.wordpress.com/): Nelson DeMille’s latest effort combines humor and violence (not necessarily in that order) with an examination of the clash between Middle Eastern and Western cultures to produce a novel that is both wildly entertaining and frighteningly realistic. The Lion is the sequel to DeMille’s The Lion’s Game, published in 2000, which pitted retired NYC Detective John Corey against Libyan terrorist Asad Khalil, also known as The Lion. Written for the KAZI Book Review (http://kazibookreview.wordpress.com/): Nelson DeMille’s latest effort combines humor and violence (not necessarily in that order) with an examination of the clash between Middle Eastern and Western cultures to produce a novel that is both wildly entertaining and frighteningly realistic. The Lion is the sequel to DeMille’s The Lion’s Game, published in 2000, which pitted retired NYC Detective John Corey against Libyan terrorist Asad Khalil, also known as The Lion. In this second installment, Khalil is back in the US three years after his last confrontation with Corey, seemingly emboldened by the World Trade Center attacks of September 11. Corey worked closely with FBI Agent Kate Mayfield during the original conflict with Khalil, and something clicked: Corey and Mayfield are now happily married. DeMille uses this to ratchet up the tension further, as Khalil comes back to the U.S. to finish the job Corey and Mayfiled thwarted and adds them to his hit list. Khalil’s astonishing attack on Mayfield not only drives Corey’s actions through the rest of the novel, but it also show’s off DeMille’s skill in writing complex and breathtaking action sequences. To heighten the contrast between the main characters’ respective cultures, DeMille moves between using the first person perspective in the Corey sections and the third person in the Khalil sections. By allowing John Corey to narrate his own sections, DeMille is easily able to show off the dry wit and internal dialogue of his mildly unreliable narrator. This unreliability usually introduces humor to the novel, in stark contrast to the graphic violence that tends to follow Khalil around. The mood definitely changes when the author is following Asad Khalil. The third person narration allows DeMille to examine and describe Khalil clinically, giving these parts a much chillier feel than when we are listening to the detective. The descriptions of Khalil’s actions and methods are precise, brutal and devoid of humor, much like Asad Khalil himself. The Lion takes on larger themes than just a clash between terrorists and the government. One way DeMille uses this story is to look at the endless war on terrorism. His obvious research and attention to detail give the reader an authentic feel of what it is like every day for the men and women whose task it is to keep this country safe. He is able to look at the relationship between Middle Eastern and Western cultures and how this is about more than terrorism—it is about a struggle between two value systems that have difficulty finding a middle ground. By successfully taking on this topic alone, DeMille has established himself as a master of timely, modern fiction.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Damn, this book was intense! The Lion is the follow-up to The Lion's Game, and takes place 3 years later and The Lion (AKA Asad Khalil) is a ruthless Arabian Terrorist who has returned to America to kill John Corey out of revenge for ruining his plans 3 years ago. When I found out that this was a follow-up to The Lion's Game I just wanted to skip Nightfall and Wild Fire and go right to this book to find out what happens next, but I chose to read them in order so I wouldn't be lost. One thing I'll Damn, this book was intense! The Lion is the follow-up to The Lion's Game, and takes place 3 years later and The Lion (AKA Asad Khalil) is a ruthless Arabian Terrorist who has returned to America to kill John Corey out of revenge for ruining his plans 3 years ago. When I found out that this was a follow-up to The Lion's Game I just wanted to skip Nightfall and Wild Fire and go right to this book to find out what happens next, but I chose to read them in order so I wouldn't be lost. One thing I'll say about Asad Khalil was he was one sick bastard, LOL! And once again John Corey still has his sarcastic humor and personality and the story was very riveting! Those who like the John Corey series I recommend reading The Lion's Game before this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Humbert

    There is much to like about DeMille's skills and story telling - but he has a couple of fatal flaws that reduce him to entertaining - but frustrating 1. He takes twice as long as he should to get through his stories. The balance between detail and boring is not an easy one for him to deal with. 2. The "oh no - don't go into the basement" problem crops up in each of his books - the failure to see what is obvious to readers/listners ruins a pretty good tale. The plus side is he is a very good story t There is much to like about DeMille's skills and story telling - but he has a couple of fatal flaws that reduce him to entertaining - but frustrating 1. He takes twice as long as he should to get through his stories. The balance between detail and boring is not an easy one for him to deal with. 2. The "oh no - don't go into the basement" problem crops up in each of his books - the failure to see what is obvious to readers/listners ruins a pretty good tale. The plus side is he is a very good story teller and creates great characters - both heroes and villains - although at times his villains are a bit over the top

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Part of the strength of The Lion's Game was that the terrorist enemy had a backstory that constituted a comprehensible explanation for his actions. But in this book, the exact same character comes back and now is just another two-dimensional crazed killer. Disappointing. Part of the strength of The Lion's Game was that the terrorist enemy had a backstory that constituted a comprehensible explanation for his actions. But in this book, the exact same character comes back and now is just another two-dimensional crazed killer. Disappointing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Nelson DeMille can write. He gives just the right amount of technical information and back story to make his books satisfying reads. John Corey is back. He and Kate Mayfield (his wife) may finally get their chance to find The Lion who they think is back in the States and ready for more revenge. Read these books in order so you can enjoy watching John Corey grow as a character. When recurring characters are done well, it's easy to get wrapped up in their stories. Corey joins my list that includes Nelson DeMille can write. He gives just the right amount of technical information and back story to make his books satisfying reads. John Corey is back. He and Kate Mayfield (his wife) may finally get their chance to find The Lion who they think is back in the States and ready for more revenge. Read these books in order so you can enjoy watching John Corey grow as a character. When recurring characters are done well, it's easy to get wrapped up in their stories. Corey joins my list that includes Dave Robicheaux, Alex Cross, Harry Bosch, Mickey Haller and, of course, Jack Reacher. Don't miss this series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    I don't know how I missed this novel when it first came out. I read The Lion's Game and loved it. I wondered if the bad guy getting away at the end meant a sequel was in the works. Then I forgot about it as other books featuring DeMille's politically incorrect protagonist John Corey came out: first Nightfall, then Wild Fire, then, as far as I was aware, The Panther. But before The Panther was the sequel I'd wondered about: The Lion. Thank you, Audible, for making me aware of it. What a treat, so I don't know how I missed this novel when it first came out. I read The Lion's Game and loved it. I wondered if the bad guy getting away at the end meant a sequel was in the works. Then I forgot about it as other books featuring DeMille's politically incorrect protagonist John Corey came out: first Nightfall, then Wild Fire, then, as far as I was aware, The Panther. But before The Panther was the sequel I'd wondered about: The Lion. Thank you, Audible, for making me aware of it. What a treat, so many years later, to finally read about the fate of Asad Khalil.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ...

    The Lion is a sequel to the first book I read by DeMille, The Lion's Game. In this one we reencounter the same antagonist. John Corey's life was threatened in the earlier book -- by one of the world's most wanted terrorists. In this one John gets his man. The story is strong, just like the previous three. DeMille is really good at building tension, and does so while showing lots of humor. It is a great combination. The Lion is a sequel to the first book I read by DeMille, The Lion's Game. In this one we reencounter the same antagonist. John Corey's life was threatened in the earlier book -- by one of the world's most wanted terrorists. In this one John gets his man. The story is strong, just like the previous three. DeMille is really good at building tension, and does so while showing lots of humor. It is a great combination.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Very good.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lorna Beecroft

    I will be looking for the rest of the books in this series. The subject matter is quite dark but it is so well written, and I really love the humorous side of John Corey, the protagonist. The only down side, and ergo the 4 star rating is that he has more of his religious beliefs coming into the book now, which, frankly, I could do without. The whole "pray for him/her/them/me" thing and god's will sentiment is just not something I need in a book. I will be looking for the rest of the books in this series. The subject matter is quite dark but it is so well written, and I really love the humorous side of John Corey, the protagonist. The only down side, and ergo the 4 star rating is that he has more of his religious beliefs coming into the book now, which, frankly, I could do without. The whole "pray for him/her/them/me" thing and god's will sentiment is just not something I need in a book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    This was a good story and I would have enjoyed it immensely, but for the constant foul language. I won’t be reading any more books from this author. Intelligent people can write a good story without adding thousands of foul words.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pete Lacrosse

    Really good, slowed down a bit in the later middle. John Corey is a great character!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Satterfield

    Book five in the John Corey series and this was my least favorite of them. Especially following up on what was a fantastic book four. In this book Corey and Asad Khalil finally face off against each other again, but unfortunately the remainder of the book leading up to the climax is pretty bland. It also doesn't help that Khalil is a vicious killer, but very boring enemy character. Still worthwhile read with great humor as usual, but not near the magic of the first four. Book five in the John Corey series and this was my least favorite of them. Especially following up on what was a fantastic book four. In this book Corey and Asad Khalil finally face off against each other again, but unfortunately the remainder of the book leading up to the climax is pretty bland. It also doesn't help that Khalil is a vicious killer, but very boring enemy character. Still worthwhile read with great humor as usual, but not near the magic of the first four.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mike Wood

    Entertaining enough, basically a beach book for dudes

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom Lawson

    I could skip the middle..:

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    Disappointing sequel to The Lion’s Game. The only value is to satisfy your curiosity if you read The Lion’s Game. Do not read this as a stand alone. There were three action scenes in the beginning of the book with Asad killing people. Then the huge middle section of the book felt like filler. Too wordy with political ponderings. Too much internal thinking and monologuing. Too much repetitive thinking about past events. Finally we get some action toward the end. This book would have been better if w Disappointing sequel to The Lion’s Game. The only value is to satisfy your curiosity if you read The Lion’s Game. Do not read this as a stand alone. There were three action scenes in the beginning of the book with Asad killing people. Then the huge middle section of the book felt like filler. Too wordy with political ponderings. Too much internal thinking and monologuing. Too much repetitive thinking about past events. Finally we get some action toward the end. This book would have been better if we could have seen how Asad got his information, how his sources got information, and how Asad and those sources communicated. I did not understand why the authorities did not put Asad’s picture in the newspapers and on TV. Asad is running around the country interacting with people. One scene was kind of unbelievable. Two guys want to kill each other but they throw down their guns in order to fight hand to hand with knives. Scott Brick did a good job as John Corey because Scott does cocky arrogance well. John Corey’s arrogance was written in an entertaining way so it worked. But I’ve given Scott Brick 1 and 2 stars for his narration of other books where he was too arrogant, and it detracted from the book. DATA: Narrative mode: 1st person John Corey, 3rd person other characters and scenes. Unabridged audiobook length: 15 hours and 45 mins. Swearing language: strong including religious swear words, but not often used. Sexual content: none. Setting: 2003 mostly New York City, NY. Book copyright: 2010. Genre: suspense thriller.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    Under normal circumstances I'd say that 'The Lion' pretty good thriller. The thing is though that its predecessor - 'The Lion's Game' - is one of the best thrillers I've ever read. My expectations on this book were therefore very high and I'm sorry to say that this time around Mr. DeMille failed to deliver. There are two main reasons why I feel let down by this book. My disappointment is mostly caused by the fact that there was a clear-cut path for a follow-up to 'Lion's Game' and the author took Under normal circumstances I'd say that 'The Lion' pretty good thriller. The thing is though that its predecessor - 'The Lion's Game' - is one of the best thrillers I've ever read. My expectations on this book were therefore very high and I'm sorry to say that this time around Mr. DeMille failed to deliver. There are two main reasons why I feel let down by this book. My disappointment is mostly caused by the fact that there was a clear-cut path for a follow-up to 'Lion's Game' and the author took it. You pretty much know after reading the first sentence how the plot will develop. And while the path chosen by Mr. DeMille is undeniably great snack for my reptile brain (I'm a sucker for paybacks and revenge stories), the fact that I knew exactly what would happen made me also feel cheated. Then there is the execution of the idea itself. DeMille's books (especially the early ones) are usually constant over the top action roller-coasters. 'The Lion' has a good dose of this ingridient, but it is also dragging its feet on quite a few occasions. Also, I must admit that the exchanges between the 'good' guys and the bad guy started after a while to sound a bit infatile to me. 'I'll kill you... no, I'll kill you!'-dialogues kind of loose their drama after third or fifth time they're used in same book. People often say that the sequel is never as good as the first installment. 'The Lion' fails to disprove this theory; it's a decent thriller, but it's nowhere near 'The Lion's Game'.

  29. 5 out of 5

    _yay_

    John Corey is back and has unfinished business with terrorist Asad Khalil. Fans will know him from DeMilles The Lion's Game. One has to get used to all the testosterone, but will quickly enjoy Corey mouthing off on everyone and everything. I was constantly laughing out loud or the very least shaking my had in amusement. Witty dialogue! Please keep the soap away from Corey's mouth a while longer because I enjoyed this book a lot. 5 stars for this entertaining read! Now, I've read some of the other John Corey is back and has unfinished business with terrorist Asad Khalil. Fans will know him from DeMilles The Lion's Game. One has to get used to all the testosterone, but will quickly enjoy Corey mouthing off on everyone and everything. I was constantly laughing out loud or the very least shaking my had in amusement. Witty dialogue! Please keep the soap away from Corey's mouth a while longer because I enjoyed this book a lot. 5 stars for this entertaining read! Now, I've read some of the other reviews. People are complaining about Corey being annoying and the lack of character development. I respectfully disagree. His sarcasm is what makes him such a fun character. Corey keeps the readers on their toes. Of course he can be a pain in the behind. That's exactly what I'm looking for in a book. I need to feel the need to comment on the protagonists behaviour, otherwise it would be a great bore. Spoiler! Detective Ramos confided in me, “If something happens to you on my watch my ass is O-U-T.” “How do you think I’d feel? D-E-A-D.” --- Kate had never been married, so she had no way of knowing if I was a normal husband. This has been good for our marriage.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Asad Khalil (aka "The Lion"), the ruthless Libyan terrorist who menaced ex-NYPD cop John Corey in The Lion's Game (2000), returns to the U.S. 18 months after 9/11, bent on finishing old business in DeMille's fast-paced fifth John Corey thriller (after Wild Fire). In Los Angeles, Khalil dispatches the last of the eight American pilots who dropped the bombs that killed Khalil's family in the historic 1986 raid on Tripoli. In New York City, a daring encounter with Corey, a member of the federal Ant Asad Khalil (aka "The Lion"), the ruthless Libyan terrorist who menaced ex-NYPD cop John Corey in The Lion's Game (2000), returns to the U.S. 18 months after 9/11, bent on finishing old business in DeMille's fast-paced fifth John Corey thriller (after Wild Fire). In Los Angeles, Khalil dispatches the last of the eight American pilots who dropped the bombs that killed Khalil's family in the historic 1986 raid on Tripoli. In New York City, a daring encounter with Corey, a member of the federal Anti-Terrorist Task Force, and Corey's FBI agent wife, Kate Mayfield, who's also a member of the ATTF, sets the stage for the mano a mano struggle both Corey and Khalil crave. DeMille splices gripping action scenes with accounts of Khalil's horrifically inventive attacks and the ATTF's futile countermeasures. While Corey isn't much more appealing than his foe, those who enjoy starkly black-and-white battles between good and evil will be satisfied. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Another good story from DeMille.

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