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Music in the Nineteenth Century

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The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shap The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a significant period in the history of Western music. In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Richard Taruskin offers a panoramic tour of this magnificent century in the history music. Major themes addressed in this book include the romantic transformation of opera, Franz Schubert and the German lied, the rise of virtuosos such as Paganini and Liszt, the twin giants of nineteenth-century opera, Richard Wagner and Giuseppe Verdi, the lyric dramas of Bizet and Puccini, and the revival of the symphony by Brahms. Laced with brilliant observations, memorable musical analysis, and a panoramic sense of the interactions between history, culture, politics, art, literature, religion, and music, this book will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand this rich and diverse period.


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The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shap The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a significant period in the history of Western music. In Music in the Nineteenth Century, Richard Taruskin offers a panoramic tour of this magnificent century in the history music. Major themes addressed in this book include the romantic transformation of opera, Franz Schubert and the German lied, the rise of virtuosos such as Paganini and Liszt, the twin giants of nineteenth-century opera, Richard Wagner and Giuseppe Verdi, the lyric dramas of Bizet and Puccini, and the revival of the symphony by Brahms. Laced with brilliant observations, memorable musical analysis, and a panoramic sense of the interactions between history, culture, politics, art, literature, religion, and music, this book will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand this rich and diverse period.

30 review for Music in the Nineteenth Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bryn Hammond

    Consulted rather than read. A true history, that follows the changes of music in its social, political, ideological context. Masterly.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The 19th century is, for most fans of "Classical" music, the heart of the repertoire, so it's not surprising that Taruskin gives this period its own volume. It points up, too, both the strengths and quirks of Taruskin as the author of this massive history project. How Taruskin chooses to divide up the discussion is, at time, confounding, and seems clearly designed to demonstrate his own erudition rather than clearly examine the works of certain composers. While he repeatedly offers an "apology" The 19th century is, for most fans of "Classical" music, the heart of the repertoire, so it's not surprising that Taruskin gives this period its own volume. It points up, too, both the strengths and quirks of Taruskin as the author of this massive history project. How Taruskin chooses to divide up the discussion is, at time, confounding, and seems clearly designed to demonstrate his own erudition rather than clearly examine the works of certain composers. While he repeatedly offers an "apology" about there being so few women discussed, I can't help but notice that he gives short shrift to Fanny Mendelssohn, does not address Clara Schumann as anything but wife and pianist, and fails to mention the very successful French composer Cecile Chaminade even as a footnote. I'm sure Taruskin would note that he leaves a number of male composers in the dust as well, but saying that there is "no history" of women composers (his usual defense) seems a weak argument in this time period. And anyone who wants to know about American music during this time period will need to look elsewhere. Those quibbles aside, there's some good stuff here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    LOVE

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Graser

    In this third volume of Taruskin's incredible examination of Western Music we are treated to in-depth examinations of the post-Beethoven symphonic era, competing factions of French Grand Opera, Italian Opera, Wagnerian Music-Drama, as well as the eventual internationalization of the symphony beyond the Germanic tradition (Dvorak, Nielsen, Sibelius, Franck). As with any far-reaching history like this there will be elements, pieces, and composers that we all feel are underrepresented. While Tarusk In this third volume of Taruskin's incredible examination of Western Music we are treated to in-depth examinations of the post-Beethoven symphonic era, competing factions of French Grand Opera, Italian Opera, Wagnerian Music-Drama, as well as the eventual internationalization of the symphony beyond the Germanic tradition (Dvorak, Nielsen, Sibelius, Franck). As with any far-reaching history like this there will be elements, pieces, and composers that we all feel are underrepresented. While Taruskin's examinations are on point as always, his dismissal and lack of discussion on Schumann's wonderful four symphonies (coupled with a hugely drawn-out examination of Schubert's 8th) seems like a gaping hole in the middle of what is otherwise an excellent and engaging narrative. However, as previously stated, I'm certain we all will have similar thoughts when going through this massive tome about our own favorites. Wonderful and awe-inspiring research as always from Taruskin.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donald Lafleur

  6. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rob Proost

  8. 5 out of 5

    Provichance

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brett Banducci

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aya Hayashi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Chay

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Chaplikov

  14. 4 out of 5

    Suzzanne Bloom

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Ruth

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bryce

  17. 4 out of 5

    Manolo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kalliope

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emanuele

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  25. 5 out of 5

    Manuel J.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nolan Vallier

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jared Brubaker

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris Duval

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kirk McElhearn

  30. 4 out of 5

    H Raley

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