web site hit counter Growing Up Sad: Childhood Depression and Its Treatment - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Growing Up Sad: Childhood Depression and Its Treatment

Availability: Ready to download

The pioneering work of Drs. Cytryn and McKnew has resulted in the widespread recognition that childhood depression is an all too common psychological reaction to environmental stress and genetic heritage. Here they explain the current understanding of this devastating disorder and offer guidance for parents, teachers, and counselors on distinguishing depression from ordina The pioneering work of Drs. Cytryn and McKnew has resulted in the widespread recognition that childhood depression is an all too common psychological reaction to environmental stress and genetic heritage. Here they explain the current understanding of this devastating disorder and offer guidance for parents, teachers, and counselors on distinguishing depression from ordinary sadness and seeking appropriate treatment. They cover recent advances influencing treatment of the depressed child, including the availability of new antidepressants and the awareness that childhood depression is more serious than previously believed and may be a forerunner of later major depression or bipolar disorder. Prevention and early treatment are emphasized. While giving specific advice on recognizing and handling the depressed or suicidal child, the authors show how mood disorders reduce the quality of life at any age and how to relieve the hardships felt by these children and their families.


Compare

The pioneering work of Drs. Cytryn and McKnew has resulted in the widespread recognition that childhood depression is an all too common psychological reaction to environmental stress and genetic heritage. Here they explain the current understanding of this devastating disorder and offer guidance for parents, teachers, and counselors on distinguishing depression from ordina The pioneering work of Drs. Cytryn and McKnew has resulted in the widespread recognition that childhood depression is an all too common psychological reaction to environmental stress and genetic heritage. Here they explain the current understanding of this devastating disorder and offer guidance for parents, teachers, and counselors on distinguishing depression from ordinary sadness and seeking appropriate treatment. They cover recent advances influencing treatment of the depressed child, including the availability of new antidepressants and the awareness that childhood depression is more serious than previously believed and may be a forerunner of later major depression or bipolar disorder. Prevention and early treatment are emphasized. While giving specific advice on recognizing and handling the depressed or suicidal child, the authors show how mood disorders reduce the quality of life at any age and how to relieve the hardships felt by these children and their families.

33 review for Growing Up Sad: Childhood Depression and Its Treatment

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joan Downs

    This book is an updated version of the authors' 1983 work, Why Johnny Isn't Crying. New York : Norton, 1983. As one might tell from the original title, depression in childhood does not necessarily have all the same obvious markers as adult depression. Specifically, children may hold their feelings in rather than express them. The characteristics of childhood depression are listed several times throughout the book, beginning in Chapter Two, "What is Childhood Depression?" They include: changes in This book is an updated version of the authors' 1983 work, Why Johnny Isn't Crying. New York : Norton, 1983. As one might tell from the original title, depression in childhood does not necessarily have all the same obvious markers as adult depression. Specifically, children may hold their feelings in rather than express them. The characteristics of childhood depression are listed several times throughout the book, beginning in Chapter Two, "What is Childhood Depression?" They include: changes in school work; sleep disturbances; eating difficulties; feelings such as despair, hopelessness, and helplessness; slowed down movement; and the occasional presence of suicidal thoughts or attempts. The authors also share what should be done if these characteristics are present in a child and also describe the different kinds of treatments available. This book enlightened me in recognizing that I had had depression as a child. While this was not a great surprise as I knew something had been wrong, it was refreshing to have a name for what had troubled me so much. This book should be required reading for those who are professionally involved in treating children. Others who care for children should also read it. Finally, those who think they may have had depression as children may be surprised and comforted by Cytryn's and McKnew's insights. Review by Joan Downs

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robert Strupp

    Sporting a cover that looks like Back to the Future's Lea Thompson posed for it, Growing Up Sad: Childhood Depression and Its Treatment is a work every parent should read. In year 2000 on Monday, April 10, after I purchased Growing Up Sad and began reading it, I was literally thrown back into my own childhood and quickly found myself bawling like Wesley Snipes at an IRS tax audit. Then for 7 years and 7 months Growing Up Sad grew dust while it waited on my library shelves. Published in 1996, Gro Sporting a cover that looks like Back to the Future's Lea Thompson posed for it, Growing Up Sad: Childhood Depression and Its Treatment is a work every parent should read. In year 2000 on Monday, April 10, after I purchased Growing Up Sad and began reading it, I was literally thrown back into my own childhood and quickly found myself bawling like Wesley Snipes at an IRS tax audit. Then for 7 years and 7 months Growing Up Sad grew dust while it waited on my library shelves. Published in 1996, Growing Up Sad is a tiny bit dated but remains an excellent book on understanding childhood depression, coping with it, or better yet, preventing it entirely. Biblical scholars tell us that JOB is the most ancient of all the books in the Bible. And knowing that Job himself suffered from depression we can see that the blues have been with us a very long time. It was so odd to read that at one time, medical science did not believe children could suffer from depression! This is one of half a dozen books I have read about how the brain functions, but yet it is the first to clearly explain to me exactly how neuronal signals flow and how SSRI's work. The book displays my old bugaboo, and that is superscripted footnotes throughout the text, however the vast majority of the nineteen pages in the back are reference notes only, so turning to them is rarely necessary. Almost as if it was written for health care professionals, the pages are densely packed with medical and scientific terms. With highliter in hand and Webster's close by Growing Up Sad, is a book to be purposefully read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    This is the book that I picked up when I was teenager, trying to figure out what was wrong with me. I soon found out and it changed my life (for the better). As a counseling student and somebody who has suffered from Dysthymia since I was 11, this is a very important book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hiloi6

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberlie Trueblood

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cen

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angelic

  9. 5 out of 5

    Monica Linge

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marla

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marieke

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roxi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  17. 5 out of 5

    T.K.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katiergove

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara Kilany

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chennel Cameron

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fathmath

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shanice

  26. 4 out of 5

    Derya Ozbek

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marc Horan-spatz

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Seajohn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Davenport

  31. 4 out of 5

    Mallie

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jim Mudd

  33. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.