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Monster Manual

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This is the source to be used by referees and players for creating imaginative situations while playing the AD&D game. To compliment the original version, we've added new cover art! This manual is ideal for intermediate through advanced players,ages 10 and up. "This is the original source used by Dungeon Masters and players to create challenges and combat scenarios" Within t This is the source to be used by referees and players for creating imaginative situations while playing the AD&D game. To compliment the original version, we've added new cover art! This manual is ideal for intermediate through advanced players,ages 10 and up. "This is the original source used by Dungeon Masters and players to create challenges and combat scenarios" Within the covers of this book lurk the monsters that made the AD&D game famous. Elves, dwarves, dragons, orcs, ghosts, and werewolves come to life as you read their detailed descriptions. In fact,each individual listing has all the necessary information to perform special attacks, defenses and magical resistance.No adventurer can be without it.


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This is the source to be used by referees and players for creating imaginative situations while playing the AD&D game. To compliment the original version, we've added new cover art! This manual is ideal for intermediate through advanced players,ages 10 and up. "This is the original source used by Dungeon Masters and players to create challenges and combat scenarios" Within t This is the source to be used by referees and players for creating imaginative situations while playing the AD&D game. To compliment the original version, we've added new cover art! This manual is ideal for intermediate through advanced players,ages 10 and up. "This is the original source used by Dungeon Masters and players to create challenges and combat scenarios" Within the covers of this book lurk the monsters that made the AD&D game famous. Elves, dwarves, dragons, orcs, ghosts, and werewolves come to life as you read their detailed descriptions. In fact,each individual listing has all the necessary information to perform special attacks, defenses and magical resistance.No adventurer can be without it.

30 review for Monster Manual

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    My favorite and most perused Dungeons and Dragons book of all time! From the meager kobold... …to the mighty Tiamat... …the Monster Manual provided a bevy of sword fodder such as goblins and orcs, as well as easily dispatched undead like skeletons and zombies: (I can't even begin to imagine how many orcs I killed. Stupid noisy pigs...) Not to mention trickier specters in the shadowy form of ghosts, ghasts and, well, specters with their ability to drain the life right out of the player’s characters: My favorite and most perused Dungeons and Dragons book of all time! From the meager kobold... …to the mighty Tiamat... …the Monster Manual provided a bevy of sword fodder such as goblins and orcs, as well as easily dispatched undead like skeletons and zombies: (I can't even begin to imagine how many orcs I killed. Stupid noisy pigs...) Not to mention trickier specters in the shadowy form of ghosts, ghasts and, well, specters with their ability to drain the life right out of the player’s characters: The book drew heavily from traditional mythological prototypes like unicorns, mermaids, minotaurs, and sphinxes as well as common place and less than terrifying giant badgers and beavers, right down to utterly mundane animals like deer, jackals, jaguars, wolves and whales. ***BEWARE THE SAVAGE BROWNIE!*** However, it also introduced into the fray plenty of its own bizarre creations like bulettes, black puddings, and xorns. (I always felt like the Xorn was included just so they'd have something to put under the letter X.) Right before the unnecessarily large section on dinosaurs (probably due to an interest D&D’s creators felt was ripe at the time) was a fiendishly enticing section on devils and demons…oh boy the pants-dance that succubus made me do in my nethers! This was back in a time when naked boobies made it into illustrations made for adolescent eyes and no one – well hardly anyone – seemed terribly bothered. Even if maybe only half of them actually made it into the D&D games I played, all of these creatures populated the imaginative landscape of my youth during those rainy, pre-cable, pre-Nintendo days. Nightmares were packed with creatures right out of this book. The poor trees in the forest behind my house took on the appearance of ogres and giants in my mind and took a beating with my wooden sword (or a whiffle ball bat if my homemade Sting broke) as me and my buddy hacked off limbs while imagining ourselves as powerful knights or beefy barbaric warriors. Then my wife made me come in and do the dishes…I kid. Seriously though, my youth would not have been nearly as fun and exciting if it weren't for this game!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    My ticket to being a cool dad because I own these "ancient" texts. Mine is a 4th edition 1979 with illustrations by David C. Sutherland III. The sub-title is “An alphabetical compendium of all of the monsters found in Advanced Dungeons and Dragons, including attacks, damage, special abilities, and descriptions.” Almost 40 years later and it is still fun. A quick reference for all things arcane, occult and monstrous. How many hit dice does Orcus (Prince of the Undead) have? 120 hit points. What armor My ticket to being a cool dad because I own these "ancient" texts. Mine is a 4th edition 1979 with illustrations by David C. Sutherland III. The sub-title is “An alphabetical compendium of all of the monsters found in Advanced Dungeons and Dragons, including attacks, damage, special abilities, and descriptions.” Almost 40 years later and it is still fun. A quick reference for all things arcane, occult and monstrous. How many hit dice does Orcus (Prince of the Undead) have? 120 hit points. What armor class does a goblin have? 6 What is the length of a purple worm (as seen on the back cover)? 50 feet long.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    When I first found AD&D back in '78 I think that the Monster Manual may have been my favorite book to just sit down and read. In first edition i gave the books (Handbook and DM Guide) four stars, this one I give 5. It remains handy. You have to convert the monsters to use them in the other editions but that's not a big deal Do you write,...(be careful not to use copyrighted material), but thumbing through this book you'll come on classic creatures from mythologies around the world that you have c When I first found AD&D back in '78 I think that the Monster Manual may have been my favorite book to just sit down and read. In first edition i gave the books (Handbook and DM Guide) four stars, this one I give 5. It remains handy. You have to convert the monsters to use them in the other editions but that's not a big deal Do you write,...(be careful not to use copyrighted material), but thumbing through this book you'll come on classic creatures from mythologies around the world that you have completely forgotten about. Are you setting up a game world from scratch? Everything you need to populate a dangerous landscape and myriad dungeons is right here.Kudos on the research and writing, it's a flat fun book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Taddow

    For me this was the book that started my obsession with role-playing games (RPGs). I still remember the day in elementary school when my best friend (who I still play D&D with) brought the book to school to show me. He didn’t play D&D (yet) but his older brother (who also did not play D&D) had bought it for him as a birthday present. My friend had seen the book at the local comic/gaming store and liked it because some of the artwork was “intriguing” to a boy that was starting to go through puber For me this was the book that started my obsession with role-playing games (RPGs). I still remember the day in elementary school when my best friend (who I still play D&D with) brought the book to school to show me. He didn’t play D&D (yet) but his older brother (who also did not play D&D) had bought it for him as a birthday present. My friend had seen the book at the local comic/gaming store and liked it because some of the artwork was “intriguing” to a boy that was starting to go through puberty. I didn’t know what D&D or RPGs were at the time, but I liked reading about historical and fictional knights and castles, wizards and dragons, and tales of King Arthur and the works of Tolkien. When I saw this book, I was immediately interested in it (for different reasons than my friend). It was an encyclopedia of monsters from myth and more. The art was amazing. It was the coolest thing I had seen, and then I learned this book was a supplement to a game you could play where you could take on the role of a knight, or a wizard, and battle these creatures. My head started spinning from the possibilities. The quests that could be done using your imagination. I wanted more of this. So began my journey. One that would take me through different worlds and genres of various RPG systems. One that would also get me into miniature war gaming. One that got me great friends and great memories. And the journey is still going...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This was most likely the first book of the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons (1st Ed.) rules that I owned or read, and it was an excellent place to start. A listing of more than 350 monsters, most of them illustrated, was a perfect book for a young person of my predilections. I didn't necessarily understand half of the data fields for each entry at first - being accustomed only to "Basic" D&D, but I understood the opportunity to people my fantasy worlds with a tremendous array of beasts. It may have This was most likely the first book of the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons (1st Ed.) rules that I owned or read, and it was an excellent place to start. A listing of more than 350 monsters, most of them illustrated, was a perfect book for a young person of my predilections. I didn't necessarily understand half of the data fields for each entry at first - being accustomed only to "Basic" D&D, but I understood the opportunity to people my fantasy worlds with a tremendous array of beasts. It may have both fired and limited my imagination in certain ways (to this day, if you say "troll" or "succubus," the first thing that comes to my mind is the illustration from the Monster Manuel). This was always the best listing of monsters, for it included so many that are well-known to fantasy myth, while later books included mostly made-up monsters. Even the original monsters here are wonderful, however, including the Rust Monster, the Lurker Above, and the Mind Flayer. Since the monsters are listed in alphabetical order, though, I could never understand the purpose of the Index in the back, which lists them in alphabetical order with the page # for their entry. How does this make it easier to locate anything?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This will always be my favorite edition, full of awesome monsters and wonderful art.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The original collection of monstrous fiends 13 January 2013 Well, I can't say I actually read this book from cover to cover, though I do believe that I did own a copy of it at one time (though it probably disappeared sometime over the years). This is the third of the three main books for the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons game and while not necessary for running a game (the Dungeons Master's Guide contained a list of creatures in the back) it is still quite helpful since it contained pictures and The original collection of monstrous fiends 13 January 2013 Well, I can't say I actually read this book from cover to cover, though I do believe that I did own a copy of it at one time (though it probably disappeared sometime over the years). This is the third of the three main books for the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons game and while not necessary for running a game (the Dungeons Master's Guide contained a list of creatures in the back) it is still quite helpful since it contained pictures and descriptions of the multitude of monsters that one might encounter during the course of an adventure. Also it is really helpful when you discover a creature (such as an Otyugh) in one of the adventures, but no description of what that creature actually is or does - an Otyugh is a creature that lives in raw sewage, and it looks something like this: One of the annoying aspects of this particular edition though was the way they handled demons. Basically you would have a list of demons from type 1 to type 7 (or 8), and I can just imagine a group of adventurers wondering through a dungeon and stumbling on a demon (oh, I think it is a type 3 demon) and then flicking through the monster manual to try and work out what type it is. Mind you, ideally, the DM shouldn't actually be giving the name of the monster away because the adventurers, particularly when they have not encountered the monster before, would not actually know what that monster was (hmm, I have never seen nor heard of an Otyugh before, but I know it's name, strengths and weaknesses, how many children it can have, and what it likes to eat for dinner – though the dinner question is pretty obvious because the answer is usually adventurers). Mind you, it is all just a game anyway, and this book is helpful for creating adventures and sending the players up against the many different foes. Mind you, and this was one of the things I loved about roleplaying games, is that you need not limit yourself to what is laid out in the books (the creators didn't). These books are really only starting points for hours and upon hours of fantastic adventures, and the foes that would be encountered could be infinite in number. In fact, it was unusual for an adventure to be released without one or two new monsters, and then once there were enough monsters for a new book, they would release a new book of monsters. This book contains all of the traditional monsters, and the newer ones simply got weirder and weirder (which is not necessarily a bad thing, especially if you like weirdness). However, I still sometimes wonder who came up with the idea that a gorgon was some bull that breathed steam that would turn you to stone when in Greek Mythology they were basically what the game refers to as a Medusa (Medusa was the name of one of the Gorgons, not a race in and of herself). Oh, and there was also the succubus (and as tempting as it is, I won't be posting a picture here).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    You still can't beat this book and, to a lesser extent, the Monster Manual II for stimulating the imagination. I loved this book as a kid and I still look at it from time to time just for the nostalgia. This tome seems to capture an element of the fantastic that cannot be replicated by the overt visual (and superficial) stimulation of video games and movies. You still can't beat this book and, to a lesser extent, the Monster Manual II for stimulating the imagination. I loved this book as a kid and I still look at it from time to time just for the nostalgia. This tome seems to capture an element of the fantastic that cannot be replicated by the overt visual (and superficial) stimulation of video games and movies.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Bye

    I have a 1st edition of this book. When constructing an 8 level dungeon with around a hundred rooms per floor, this book became an essential companion. My kids took over where I left off, so it's still being used today. I have a 1st edition of this book. When constructing an 8 level dungeon with around a hundred rooms per floor, this book became an essential companion. My kids took over where I left off, so it's still being used today.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Marlowe (Out of this World Reviews)

    I still have this book and many of the original Dungeons & Dragons books in a box upstairs. It's been years and years since I've played, but looking through some of the Gygax titles sure brings back some memories. I still have this book and many of the original Dungeons & Dragons books in a box upstairs. It's been years and years since I've played, but looking through some of the Gygax titles sure brings back some memories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andy Howell

    In memoriam. --Naked Succubus on page 18.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Corbett Sparks

    I constantly refer to this book for answers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan Ray

    ok, this is my favorite book of all time. I was in the 4th grade and found this at my school book fair for 75 cents. No idea what D&D was, no clue how the game was played, I just loved monsters and here was a book full of them. Also numbers and statistics, from which I derived the entire game and setting over the next several years by making up games for my brother and our friends. This book changed my life more than any other. I still have it, and I'm using it to make up bed-time stories based on t ok, this is my favorite book of all time. I was in the 4th grade and found this at my school book fair for 75 cents. No idea what D&D was, no clue how the game was played, I just loved monsters and here was a book full of them. Also numbers and statistics, from which I derived the entire game and setting over the next several years by making up games for my brother and our friends. This book changed my life more than any other. I still have it, and I'm using it to make up bed-time stories based on the pictures to my 3 year old son. Best book ever.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carolee

    This manual ( & Monster Manual II) was one of my son's favourite books to sprawl out behind on the floor ... at the age of 5 / 6 this is what he really enjoyed reading ... pictures and gory details about all manner of beasties. My husband is a first generation D & D er ... I only came to the wonderful world of RPG in the late 90's ... Diablo for PC was the little game that 'bit me' and Baldur's Gate reeled me in! I know, I know, I'm not a true-blood ... but these manuals helped me and my band wa This manual ( & Monster Manual II) was one of my son's favourite books to sprawl out behind on the floor ... at the age of 5 / 6 this is what he really enjoyed reading ... pictures and gory details about all manner of beasties. My husband is a first generation D & D er ... I only came to the wonderful world of RPG in the late 90's ... Diablo for PC was the little game that 'bit me' and Baldur's Gate reeled me in! I know, I know, I'm not a true-blood ... but these manuals helped me and my band ward off many a fierce foe, and avoid certain death with its insightful tidbits.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Winston

    One of the most used D&D books I own!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    109 Pages cover to cover. This book is a reference manual for the tabletop AD&D Role Playing Game, but when I was 6, it was a textbook for everything you need to know in life. I have two copies of this book, and I love them both like children; more than children. This book taught me how to kill vampires, why you don't speak the names of demons and that there are better things to be afraid of than home-invaders- like mind flayers. This was one of the most important books of my childhood. Buy one 109 Pages cover to cover. This book is a reference manual for the tabletop AD&D Role Playing Game, but when I was 6, it was a textbook for everything you need to know in life. I have two copies of this book, and I love them both like children; more than children. This book taught me how to kill vampires, why you don't speak the names of demons and that there are better things to be afraid of than home-invaders- like mind flayers. This was one of the most important books of my childhood. Buy one for your kid too, unless you want him to end up like this guy: http://www.klas-tv.com/Global/story.a...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    What do ya use to keep all those heroes and adventures busy and out of trouble back in town? MONSTERS! that right you need something for them to fight. This is a great book of foes both great and small to pit your players against. Excellent reference book. Very recommended to gamers

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Full disclosure: Never really played AD&D except for a few ill-fated attempts in 5th grade. It's amazing how personalities can clash, especially with an incompetent DM. But it is just fun to read about all kinds of cool monsters and imagine pitting your toughest character against them. Full disclosure: Never really played AD&D except for a few ill-fated attempts in 5th grade. It's amazing how personalities can clash, especially with an incompetent DM. But it is just fun to read about all kinds of cool monsters and imagine pitting your toughest character against them.

  19. 4 out of 5

    (Bret)

    Awesome pictures that still haunt me to this day.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    And people wonder where I get my imagination from...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Becerra

    This book emanates magic. It's the inspiration and innocence of beginnings incarnated. A true treasure. This book emanates magic. It's the inspiration and innocence of beginnings incarnated. A true treasure.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wiener

    My friends and I played the hell out of this when we were younger.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Capitalismissexy

    never let the system slow u down! This system was chaotic and detailed but gave the nerd gods somethign to chew on and make characters unique i would add in all kinda modifications as a dm esp the addition of dex being liek 3x as powerful to nullify strength only pwoergmaers I also think charisma shoulda been the battery for psionics which could made it a non dump stat anyway after ad&D 1st edition D&D got too fast food for me the palladium rpg and other stuff liek stormbringer rpg use as modules the never let the system slow u down! This system was chaotic and detailed but gave the nerd gods somethign to chew on and make characters unique i would add in all kinda modifications as a dm esp the addition of dex being liek 3x as powerful to nullify strength only pwoergmaers I also think charisma shoulda been the battery for psionics which could made it a non dump stat anyway after ad&D 1st edition D&D got too fast food for me the palladium rpg and other stuff liek stormbringer rpg use as modules the world building is so awesome make u rown map populate with some baddies and let yourself go!

  24. 4 out of 5

    J.R. Handley

    I've read this several times through as I play a campaign with James M Ward over on the SciFi Writers Playing Old School D&D. It's the roadmap to one heck of a good time! https://www.twitch.tv/oldschooldnd I've read this several times through as I play a campaign with James M Ward over on the SciFi Writers Playing Old School D&D. It's the roadmap to one heck of a good time! https://www.twitch.tv/oldschooldnd

  25. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This was unfortunately the least fun of the three AD&D core books to read. The problem is that it's mostly a detailing of combat abilities and stats, and largely lacks information on what these monsters are. Some are of course fairly obvious, such as the PC races and major villains like orcs, goblins, zombies, and vampires. But there are other monsters where I'm left with absolutely no idea of how I'd use them. One good example of this is the Titan. I know that they're fairly powerful and come f This was unfortunately the least fun of the three AD&D core books to read. The problem is that it's mostly a detailing of combat abilities and stats, and largely lacks information on what these monsters are. Some are of course fairly obvious, such as the PC races and major villains like orcs, goblins, zombies, and vampires. But there are other monsters where I'm left with absolutely no idea of how I'd use them. One good example of this is the Titan. I know that they're fairly powerful and come from another plane of existence, but I don't know who they are or what they do. They can't be the Titans of Greek Mythology, because these Titans are chaotic good and friends with the also good storm giants. There are various other monsters like this, which are frustrating. I know it gets better in second edition and beyond, but I'd kinda like to know how these monsters were thought of in 1st edition. There are also a number of monsters that exist just to screw with the players, including floors and ceilings that try to eat you. Finally, some of the iconic D&D monsters aren't present - though this point I can forgive, since many things hadn't been invented yet and make their appearance in the other 1st edition monster books. On the plus side, the illustrations are generally pretty fun, especially the cartoon for the giant lynx. And there is some good fluff in here - the page and a bit on sahaugin (fish men, basically) made me go from wondering why they needed so much space to wanting to run a campaign about fighting their evil kingdom. The selection here is fair, and includes a nice spread of things for the various levels - as well as perhaps a few too many giant animals. All in all, while this isn't as fun to read as the other two core books were, it does seem like it would be relatively functional in play, and I can understand why it was a pretty cool book when it first came out.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Speck

    I have the original first edition of this book as well as the one above. The monsters, art and the descriptions burned themselves into my brain from being a young boy. I still read it now when I come across it. Thanks for everything in here!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Keith Brough

    Oh yes. The old one. Still in a box under my bed. I think I have Joe's old copy. Ah,... the good ol' days. Oh yes. The old one. Still in a box under my bed. I think I have Joe's old copy. Ah,... the good ol' days.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abraham Ray

    nice rpg monster book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Vosper

    Classic D&D information for gamers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abraham Ray

    nice rpg monster book

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