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From the earliest years of the American republic, Paris has provoked an extraordinary American literary response. An almost inevitable destination for writers and thinkers, Paris has been many things to many Americans: a tradition-bound bastion of the old world of Europe; a hotbed of revolutionary ideologies in politics and art; and a space in which to cultivate an opennes From the earliest years of the American republic, Paris has provoked an extraordinary American literary response. An almost inevitable destination for writers and thinkers, Paris has been many things to many Americans: a tradition-bound bastion of the old world of Europe; a hotbed of revolutionary ideologies in politics and art; and a space in which to cultivate an openness to life and love thought impossible at home. Including stories, letters, memoirs, and journalism, "Americans in Paris" distills three centuries of vigorous, glittering, and powerfully emotional writing about the place that Henry James called ?the most brilliant city in the world.? American writers came to Paris as statesmen, soldiers, students, tourists, and sometimes they stayed as expatriates. This anthology ranges from the crucial early impressions of Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin to the latter-day reflections of writers as varied as James Baldwin, Isadora Duncan, and Jack Kerouac. Along the way we encounter the energetic travelers of the nineteenth century?Emerson, Mark Twain, Henry James?and the pilgrims of the twentieth: Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, E. E. Cummings, Cole Porter, Henry Miller. Come along as Thomas Paine takes a direct and dangerous part in the French Revolution; Harriet Beecher Stowe tours the Louvre; Theodore Dreiser samples the sensual enticements of Parisian night life; Edith Wharton movingly describes Paris in the early days of World War I; John Dos Passos charts the gathering political storms of the 1930s; Paul Zweig recalls the intertwined pleasures of language and sex; and A. J. Liebling savors the memory of his culinary education in delicious detail. "Americans in Paris" is a diverse and constantly engaging mosaic, full of revealing cultural gulfs and misunderstandings, personal and literary experimentation, and profound moments of self-discovery. Contents: Letter to Mary Stevenson by Benjamin Franklin Letters from Auteuil by Abigail Adams Two letters by Thomas Jefferson from A diary of the French Revolution by Gouverneur Morris Shall Louis XVI. have respite? by Thomas Paine from The diary of James Gallatin by James Gallatin from Life, letters, and journals by George Ticknor Letter to Stephen Longfellow, Jr. by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow from Journal, 1833 by Ralph Waldo Emerson from Pencillings by the way by Nathaniel Parker Willis from Gleanings in Europe by James Fenimore Cooper from Struggles and triumphs; or, Forty years' recollections by P.T. Barnum from Catlin's Notes of eight years' travels and residence in Europe by George Catlin from Things and thoughts in Europe by Margaret Fuller from Sunny memories of foreign lands by Harriet Beecher Stowe from The French notebooks by Nathaniel Hawthorne from The innocents abroad by Mark Twain The proclamation of the republic by Elihu Washburne Occasional Paris ; "The velvet glove" by Henry James Letter from Paris by Frederick Douglass Letter to John Hay by Henry Adams from The show-places of Paris by Richard Harding Davis. from My life by Isadora Duncan from A life in photography by Edward Steichen from Along this way by James Weldon Johnson A traveler at forty by Theodore Dreiser The look of Paris ; from A backward glance by Edith Wharton Mon amie by Randolph Bourne Paris notebook, 1921 by Sherwood Anderson from Peter Whiffle by Carl Van Vechten Significant gesture by Malcolm Cowley from Life among the surrealists by Matthew Josephson from The big sea by Langston Hughes from Gentlemen prefer blondes by Anita Loos Four letters from Paris, 1925 by William Faulkner from Post impressions ; Vive la Folie! by E.E. Cummings from The spirit of St. Louis by Charles Lindbergh The flying fool by Waverly Root from A moveable feast by Ernest Hemingway Postcard to Samuel Loveman by Hart Crane Paris diaries by Harry Crosby You don't know Paree by Cole Porter Babylon revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald From an early diary by Lincoln Kirstein from The autobiography of Alice B. Toklas ; from Paris France by Gertrude Stein Walking up and down in China by Henry Miller A spring month in Paris by John Dos Passos from The flower and the nettle by Anne Morrow Lindberg. The last time I saw Paris by Oscar Hammerstein II from Shakespeare and Company by Sylvia Beach Letter from Paris by Janet Flanner Paris, 7 A.M. by Elizabeth Bishop No. 13 Rue St. Augustin by Ludwig Bemelmans Place Pigalle by Richard Wilbur Three letters by Dawn Powell from First days in Paris by Art Buchwald Equal in Paris by James Baldwin from Remembrance of things past by Irwin Shaw The saucier's apprentice by S.J. Perlman Good-bye to a world by May Sarton from Departures by Paul Zweig The first time I saw Paris by James Thurber Trouble in Paris by Sidney Bechet from Between meals : an appetite for Paris by A.J. Liebling 17 Quai Voltaire by Virgil Thomson from Satori in Paris by Jack Kerouac Gare de Lyon by M.F.K. Fisher from D.V. by Diana Vreeland from Birthday by Dorothea Tanning


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From the earliest years of the American republic, Paris has provoked an extraordinary American literary response. An almost inevitable destination for writers and thinkers, Paris has been many things to many Americans: a tradition-bound bastion of the old world of Europe; a hotbed of revolutionary ideologies in politics and art; and a space in which to cultivate an opennes From the earliest years of the American republic, Paris has provoked an extraordinary American literary response. An almost inevitable destination for writers and thinkers, Paris has been many things to many Americans: a tradition-bound bastion of the old world of Europe; a hotbed of revolutionary ideologies in politics and art; and a space in which to cultivate an openness to life and love thought impossible at home. Including stories, letters, memoirs, and journalism, "Americans in Paris" distills three centuries of vigorous, glittering, and powerfully emotional writing about the place that Henry James called ?the most brilliant city in the world.? American writers came to Paris as statesmen, soldiers, students, tourists, and sometimes they stayed as expatriates. This anthology ranges from the crucial early impressions of Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin to the latter-day reflections of writers as varied as James Baldwin, Isadora Duncan, and Jack Kerouac. Along the way we encounter the energetic travelers of the nineteenth century?Emerson, Mark Twain, Henry James?and the pilgrims of the twentieth: Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, E. E. Cummings, Cole Porter, Henry Miller. Come along as Thomas Paine takes a direct and dangerous part in the French Revolution; Harriet Beecher Stowe tours the Louvre; Theodore Dreiser samples the sensual enticements of Parisian night life; Edith Wharton movingly describes Paris in the early days of World War I; John Dos Passos charts the gathering political storms of the 1930s; Paul Zweig recalls the intertwined pleasures of language and sex; and A. J. Liebling savors the memory of his culinary education in delicious detail. "Americans in Paris" is a diverse and constantly engaging mosaic, full of revealing cultural gulfs and misunderstandings, personal and literary experimentation, and profound moments of self-discovery. Contents: Letter to Mary Stevenson by Benjamin Franklin Letters from Auteuil by Abigail Adams Two letters by Thomas Jefferson from A diary of the French Revolution by Gouverneur Morris Shall Louis XVI. have respite? by Thomas Paine from The diary of James Gallatin by James Gallatin from Life, letters, and journals by George Ticknor Letter to Stephen Longfellow, Jr. by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow from Journal, 1833 by Ralph Waldo Emerson from Pencillings by the way by Nathaniel Parker Willis from Gleanings in Europe by James Fenimore Cooper from Struggles and triumphs; or, Forty years' recollections by P.T. Barnum from Catlin's Notes of eight years' travels and residence in Europe by George Catlin from Things and thoughts in Europe by Margaret Fuller from Sunny memories of foreign lands by Harriet Beecher Stowe from The French notebooks by Nathaniel Hawthorne from The innocents abroad by Mark Twain The proclamation of the republic by Elihu Washburne Occasional Paris ; "The velvet glove" by Henry James Letter from Paris by Frederick Douglass Letter to John Hay by Henry Adams from The show-places of Paris by Richard Harding Davis. from My life by Isadora Duncan from A life in photography by Edward Steichen from Along this way by James Weldon Johnson A traveler at forty by Theodore Dreiser The look of Paris ; from A backward glance by Edith Wharton Mon amie by Randolph Bourne Paris notebook, 1921 by Sherwood Anderson from Peter Whiffle by Carl Van Vechten Significant gesture by Malcolm Cowley from Life among the surrealists by Matthew Josephson from The big sea by Langston Hughes from Gentlemen prefer blondes by Anita Loos Four letters from Paris, 1925 by William Faulkner from Post impressions ; Vive la Folie! by E.E. Cummings from The spirit of St. Louis by Charles Lindbergh The flying fool by Waverly Root from A moveable feast by Ernest Hemingway Postcard to Samuel Loveman by Hart Crane Paris diaries by Harry Crosby You don't know Paree by Cole Porter Babylon revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald From an early diary by Lincoln Kirstein from The autobiography of Alice B. Toklas ; from Paris France by Gertrude Stein Walking up and down in China by Henry Miller A spring month in Paris by John Dos Passos from The flower and the nettle by Anne Morrow Lindberg. The last time I saw Paris by Oscar Hammerstein II from Shakespeare and Company by Sylvia Beach Letter from Paris by Janet Flanner Paris, 7 A.M. by Elizabeth Bishop No. 13 Rue St. Augustin by Ludwig Bemelmans Place Pigalle by Richard Wilbur Three letters by Dawn Powell from First days in Paris by Art Buchwald Equal in Paris by James Baldwin from Remembrance of things past by Irwin Shaw The saucier's apprentice by S.J. Perlman Good-bye to a world by May Sarton from Departures by Paul Zweig The first time I saw Paris by James Thurber Trouble in Paris by Sidney Bechet from Between meals : an appetite for Paris by A.J. Liebling 17 Quai Voltaire by Virgil Thomson from Satori in Paris by Jack Kerouac Gare de Lyon by M.F.K. Fisher from D.V. by Diana Vreeland from Birthday by Dorothea Tanning

30 review for Americans in Paris: a Literary Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I loved Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon so when I heard about his latest - a compilation of esssays - I was delighted. It's not a book I read cover to cover, just pick it up for a read now and then. I do enjoy it. I loved Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon so when I heard about his latest - a compilation of esssays - I was delighted. It's not a book I read cover to cover, just pick it up for a read now and then. I do enjoy it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Guider

    All the different ways in which Americans have experienced -- and thus shaped how we imagine-- PARIS. For anyone interested in how our perceptions and prejudices and predilections for things European, and indeed for things American, have changed since Benjamin Franklin set the template, dip into and out of this smartly selected anthology. Lotsa interesting people weighed in on Paris, from Franklin and Jefferson and Abigail Adams to P.T. Barnum. Gopnik's opening preface is perceptive as well. All the different ways in which Americans have experienced -- and thus shaped how we imagine-- PARIS. For anyone interested in how our perceptions and prejudices and predilections for things European, and indeed for things American, have changed since Benjamin Franklin set the template, dip into and out of this smartly selected anthology. Lotsa interesting people weighed in on Paris, from Franklin and Jefferson and Abigail Adams to P.T. Barnum. Gopnik's opening preface is perceptive as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Jensen

    This was such a great book. It's a compilation of stories, essays, diary entries, book excerpts and even a little poetry from famous and not so famous Americans who lived or traveled through one of the most beautiful cities in the world. I especially loved some of the accounts from Benjamin Franklin. And those excesses of the roaring twenties are seriously Sodom and Gomorrah. The World War II pieces were riviting! A wonderful way of seeing Paris through the eyes of many a different personality. This was such a great book. It's a compilation of stories, essays, diary entries, book excerpts and even a little poetry from famous and not so famous Americans who lived or traveled through one of the most beautiful cities in the world. I especially loved some of the accounts from Benjamin Franklin. And those excesses of the roaring twenties are seriously Sodom and Gomorrah. The World War II pieces were riviting! A wonderful way of seeing Paris through the eyes of many a different personality.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Krisette Spangler

    There were some wonderful essays in this compilation. I loved the ones that took me back to the sights, sounds, and especially, the tastes of Paris. This essays cover a lot of the history of Paris as well. It's worth reading if you love Paris. There were some wonderful essays in this compilation. I loved the ones that took me back to the sights, sounds, and especially, the tastes of Paris. This essays cover a lot of the history of Paris as well. It's worth reading if you love Paris.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This was a great book - best writing is from Edith Wharton.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    As a rule, I dislike anthologies. They remind me of reading only tiny chunks of great works for survey classes--as if you could fancy yourself well-read by reading only one act of every Shakespeare play. The emphasis on breadth instead of depth--vexing. However--they are good for introducing a broad range of writers, and this one pushed me off my normal reading path. I was convinced to buy it because I knew that Gopnik is an engaged reader and that he would select good pieces. And so he has. As a As a rule, I dislike anthologies. They remind me of reading only tiny chunks of great works for survey classes--as if you could fancy yourself well-read by reading only one act of every Shakespeare play. The emphasis on breadth instead of depth--vexing. However--they are good for introducing a broad range of writers, and this one pushed me off my normal reading path. I was convinced to buy it because I knew that Gopnik is an engaged reader and that he would select good pieces. And so he has. As a reference for myself, since it's too heavy to carry home and I must abandon it here, I particularly liked the pieces by: James Gallatin Nathaniel Parker Willis George Catlin (and his tally of women walking with one small dog, two small dogs, three small dogs, or one large dog no string) Harriet Beecher Stowe Mark Twain, that rogue The grumpy Henry Adams Sherwood Anderson Anita Loos William Faulkner Janet Flanner, astute, intelligent, clear Elizabeth Bishop Dawn Powell ("I cannot get anyone to admit that rue Jacob is a continuation of rue de l'Universite or Boulevard des Italiens is a continuation of Boulevard des Capucines. No. These streets have nothing to do with each other. No, Madame, it is not the same street under a different name, it is an entirely different street...") James Baldwin SJ Perelman May Sarton Paul Zweig

  7. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Excellent selection of literature written by Americans in Paris, for either a short while, or most of their lives, starting with Benjamin Franklin, and going by way of those such as Paine, Longfellow, Emerson, Beecher Stowe, Hawthorne, Twain, Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Miller, Thurber, Kerouac and numerous other lesser-known writer, as well and those not known for their writing, like P.T. Barnum. A rich variety of styles and perspectives. Well worth the read, even for those who have never Excellent selection of literature written by Americans in Paris, for either a short while, or most of their lives, starting with Benjamin Franklin, and going by way of those such as Paine, Longfellow, Emerson, Beecher Stowe, Hawthorne, Twain, Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Miller, Thurber, Kerouac and numerous other lesser-known writer, as well and those not known for their writing, like P.T. Barnum. A rich variety of styles and perspectives. Well worth the read, even for those who have never visited or lived in Paris, but probably much more interesting and enlightening for those of us who’ve had the chance to live here.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Avis Black

    The selections are rather uneven in quality, but overall this a solid piece of reading. The most interesting entries are from the 1700 and 1800s.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Suzie

    just reread this one! still love it and just as fun I remember. I always love an anthology. so insightful and full of important reflection.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deedee

    Dewey 810.8032 A

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    I love Gopnik's introduction and enjoyed the bulk of these excerpts. This is a book to own, however, not to check out from the library as I did, so you can flip through it over time. Read one after the other, it felt a bit repetitive. I love Gopnik's introduction and enjoyed the bulk of these excerpts. This is a book to own, however, not to check out from the library as I did, so you can flip through it over time. Read one after the other, it felt a bit repetitive.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Fouquet

    This absorbing compilation of essays spans three centuries of Americans visiting La Ville Lumière. I found the varied perspectives fascinating, but one constant was obvious- Paris transforms her guests.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    My one problem with this book is that there were rarely translations of the French phrases used. I looked some of them up, but most of the time I guessed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Doppelganger

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Weber

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christi Winkelman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Engle

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Heyman

  19. 5 out of 5

    Constantino

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kealan Casey

  22. 5 out of 5

    Drrichter

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  26. 4 out of 5

    Travis

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 4 out of 5

    N.T.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Gardner

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

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